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Eating Raw Onion Can Cure Your Thyroid Problem Completely Darrell Miller 8/3/17
30 surprising food swaps that will immediately improve the health of every organ in your body Darrell Miller 7/27/17
Home REMEDIES for PILES that Actually works? | Health tips 2017 Darrell Miller 7/6/17
Yes, you can stop yourself from mindlessly eating. Here's how. Darrell Miller 2/5/17
Top 10 Anti-Aging Superfoods Darrell Miller 11/3/16
Sesame sticks - a choice full of health Darrell Miller 12/18/13
Why Are Fresh Sprouts Like Alfalfa, Barley, and Wheat So Good for Your Health? Darrell Miller 5/24/11
Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Best Bread ... Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Home on the Range Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Snack Attack - we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a min Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Lose the Gluten - everyone who suffers from food allergies Darrell Miller 6/10/05
COENZYME Q10 - Transforming food into energy Darrell Miller 6/1/05
Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control. Darrell Miller 5/12/05



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Eating Raw Onion Can Cure Your Thyroid Problem Completely
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Date: August 03, 2017 05:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating Raw Onion Can Cure Your Thyroid Problem Completely





Thyroid problems are no fun. They can cause weight gain and more. There is a way to help it, though. Apparently you can eat raw onion. This doesn't have to be as unpleasant as it sounds at first. You can eat them in a salad. Many also eat them with vinegar and seasonings on them or on Sandwiches. There are many ways. Onions are very good for you so should be part of your diet anyway.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLO1e8zor-Q&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • onions juice can be rubbed on your thyroid area and can help with thyroid problems
  • The thyroid gland and the pituitary gland work together to regulate hormones
  • Onion slices can be put on the bottom of your feet for health benefits

"It is known that onions clean the skin, kill bacteria, and the phosphoric acid enters the bloodstream and miraculously helps to purify the blood."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5078)


30 surprising food swaps that will immediately improve the health of every organ in your body
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Date: July 27, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 30 surprising food swaps that will immediately improve the health of every organ in your body





All of us have favorite foods, dishes, go-to condiments, that appear invariably on our plate. Whether it’s the easy-to-make no-fuss nature of the choice, the it’s ‘what my store carries appeal,’ or it just boils down to how our taste buds feel about it, we can get in nutrition rut.

Fortunately, it’s not that hard to start swapping items we use daily for other easy-to-use items that taste good, even often having a similar taste and texture to those items we already use. The plus is that the swapped in items are better for us. Better, because they’re higher, in things that matter, like protein, amino acids, fiber, vitamins and minerals, besides being lower in things we should want to avoid, like empty calories, trans fat, excess carbs, and more.

By swapping some things daily, such as trying cinnamon, or organic honey, over sugar, substituting plain, organic coffee for that latte, a veggie wrap, for that bread and meat sandwich, could have big overall benefits in reduced pounds, renewed energy and a better overall nutritional profile, making for a healthier you.

Key Takeaways:

  • Swapping out healthier ingredients in your recipes can improve your overall health
  • Sugary and starchy foods can be replaced by natural and healthy alternative
  • Guidelines,swaps and healthy recipes can be found in the provided article.

"Coffee often gets a bad rap when in fact, quality coffee consumed in moderation can have some great benefits."

Read more: https://www.healthnutnews.com/30-surprising-food-swaps-that-will-immediately-improve-the-health-of-every-organ-in-your-body/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5043)


Home REMEDIES for PILES that Actually works? | Health tips 2017
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Date: July 06, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Home REMEDIES for PILES that Actually works? | Health tips 2017





Your body can throw you for a loop at any time. You wake up with a sore throat the day you're set to make a major presentation, a seafood-salad Sandwich leaves you with grumbling indigestion, or you overdo it at the gym and arrive home with a stiff neck. Wouldn't it be great to have a live-in doctor/therapist/trainer to tend to your everyday aches and pains? Here's the next best thing: all-natural, expert-recommended ways to treat ailments quickly, safely, and effectively at home. So clear some space in your bathroom cabinet, refrigerator, and kitchen cupboard for these surprisingly effective (and inexpensive) remedies.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpm2uL9P-V0&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Applying apple cider vinegar (with a cotton ball) to the inflamed area will help shrink swollen blood vessels and provide relief to those suffering from both internal and external hemorrhoids.
  • Juice from a freshly squeezed lemon can either be applied externally (with a cotton ball) or ingested by mixing with milk and drinking. Should be repeated 3 times each day for best results.
  • The easiest remedy for treating hemorrhoids is simply to increase your daily intake of water to 8 to 10 glasses.

"As many as 75% of people in the United States will be affected by hemorrhoids also known as piles."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4934)


Yes, you can stop yourself from mindlessly eating. Here's how.
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Date: February 05, 2017 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Yes, you can stop yourself from mindlessly eating. Here's how.





DO YOU OFTEN find that, while making a peanut butter Sandwich, you just end up lazily spoon-feeding yourself a bunch of PB on the couch? Or maybe you've found yourself sitting in the Taco Bell drive-thru, wondering how you got there, with only a hazy recollection of ordering 10 Cheesy Gordita Crunches just minutes earlier?

Key Takeaways:

  • Sound cues or something else could help us break bad eating haits.
  • Junk food is addictive.
  • It is hard but not impossible to break bad eating habits.

"Nothing ruins a diet plan like catching yourself mindlessly eating all the time—but it's an all-too-familiar situation for people struggling with their weight."



Reference:

//www.mensfitness.com/weight-loss/burn-fat-fast/yes-you-can-stop-yourself-mindlessly-eating-heres-how

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3888)


Top 10 Anti-Aging Superfoods
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Date: November 03, 2016 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Top 10 Anti-Aging Superfoods

Most of these foods (garlic excepted) are something that you can integrate into your daily diet without even noticing it. I grab a handful of grapes as a snack. Use spinach as an alternate to lettuce in your salads. Eat an avocado by itself or use it as a mayo substitute in that lunch Sandwich. Most important, eat what you like off this list. Those little changes will pay in dividends in the future.

Key Takeaways:

  • Many people wish if they could stop the process of aging and live younger for whole life but still we haven’t found any method or medicine which could stop the process of aging.
  • Blueberries contain large amounts of antioxidants such as flavonols, anthocyanins and vitamin C, which promote cell health and can protect against disease.
  • Avocados are full of anti-aging components.

"Many people wish if they could stop the process of aging and live younger for whole life but still we haven’t found any method or medicine which could stop the process of aging."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//amazingplanetnews.com/top-10-anti-aging-superfoods/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjFlMTFjYzBlYzAwOTU4NjY6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFJg6xb-KTFTUna-vLeF7t5tcy2gA


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3379)


Sesame sticks - a choice full of health
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Date: December 18, 2013 04:03 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sesame sticks - a choice full of health

What is Sesame

sesameSesame (Sesamum indicum) is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world. The story of its amazing benefits, begins 3600 years ago in the ancient Egyptian times. Since those antique times, women used the sesame seeds to keep their beauty and their youth and the Roman soldiers ate them for energy and strength. In recent years, an abundance of scientific information was exposed to demonstrate that the sesame seeds and their components have over 36 therapeutic properties.

Sesame Seed

Sesame seeds are number one when it comes to the richness and complexity of nutrients. Sesame seeds are rich in calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc and these can be added in salads, Sandwiches or over cereal in the morning.Another excellent choice are the sesame sticks. These are the real sources of health and in addition there are some excellent snacks.

Sesame Sticks

Sesame sticks consumption helps to detoxify the liver and kidneys, being highly recommended for cirrhotic patients. In addition, these snacks prevent arthritis and osteoporosis, asthma, migraines and headaches; have antirheumatic and anti-cancer effects; strengthen the immune system and decrease the level of cholesterol.All these properties put together, give your body energy and a great power to work.

Health Benefits of Sesame

So, as you can see, the sesame seeds have many health benefits and additionally, these keep your silhouette. Therefore, when you sit and watch your favorite show on TV, you can choose a healthy snack consisting of sesame sticks, instead of chips that will fill you with cholesterol and that will add you a few extra pounds.You can also consume sesame sticks during breaks or when you feel the need for a snack.Vitamins and minerals contained by sesame seeds will provide you the necessary energy and will create you a feeling of satiety.

References:

  1.  //www.ele.ro/sanatate/tratamente-naturiste/semintele-de-susan-scad-colesterolul-si-previn-multe-boli-complicate-24261 and ... a delicious bar with sesame and honey.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2928)


Why Are Fresh Sprouts Like Alfalfa, Barley, and Wheat So Good for Your Health?
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Date: May 24, 2011 11:22 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Why Are Fresh Sprouts Like Alfalfa, Barley, and Wheat So Good for Your Health?

Sprouts For A Healthier Body!

Fresh sprouts are among the healthiest of all foods. They are alfalfa, barley, wheat sproutsrich in enzymes that are not found in the human body. These enzymes help facilitate better absorption of vitamins and minerals. Alfalfa, barley, and wheat are examples of plants that are capable of sprouting when soaked in water. They are best consumed fresh when they still contain all of their nutrients. They make excellent ingredients to salads and Sandwiches that can complement any meal. They can be processed in juicing machines, too.

You might have heard of the nutritional value of grasses and legumes. Wheatgrass is becoming increasingly popular nowadays as they have been receiving a lot of good press lately. Wheatgrass and barley grass has in fact earned the moniker superfoods. Alfalfa, on the other hand, is a legume recently rediscovered for its phytochemical content. It has been a forage crop for centuries, but human consumptions have steadily increased in the past few years. Apart from the fact that wheat, barley, alfalfa can be consumed as fresh sprouts, they also bring similar benefits to human health.

Restore Normal pH Levels

Proponents of the alkaline diet believe that the body is in a constant cycle of alkalinity and acidity, which is partially dependent on the foods that we eat. The body raises alkalinity with every acidic by-products of digestion to maintain pH balance. That being said, a significant fraction of the human diet is acid-forming, tipping the balance in the process. Fresh sprouts are often linked to the alkaline diet, which aims to restore pH balance of the body.

Have High Nutrient Content

Alfalfa, barley grass, and wheatgrass are very good sources of vitamins and minerals. They are particularly rich in dietary minerals that help the body function at its best. Plus, they contain amino acids, essential fatty acids, dietary fiber, and carbohydrates in amounts adequate to complement any other foods that make up a healthy diet. One of the very noticeable improvements after months of consuming fresh sprouts is the increase in red blood cell count.

Cleanse the Body of Toxins

Aside from the fact that fresh sprouts are effective free radical scavengers, they also improve the natural antioxidant defense of the human body. Wheat, barley, and alfalfa are reliable sources of potassium, magnesium, manganese, and selenium, all of which are involved in chemical reactions that lead to effective removal of toxic by-products of metabolism. Fresh sprouts are capable of neutralizing reactive oxygen species such as free radicals. Furthermore, they facilitate the excretion of toxins.

Promote Heart Health

NOW - SPROUTING JARS 1/2 GAL 6/CASEFresh sprouts are particularly good for the cardiovascular system. They maintain the health of red blood cells. They limit the releases of low-density lipoproteins into the blood, thus lowering bad cholesterol and free fatty acids. They help control high blood pressure and promote normal blood flow. They maintain healthy levels of blood sugar by improving glucose metabolism. And, of course, their antioxidant profile enables them to protect the heart and arterial walls from lipid peroxidation.

Have you had your sprouts today?

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2304)


Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly
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Date: June 14, 2005 11:18 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly by Thomas Sherman Energy Times, October 15, 2004

We need fat to absorb vitamins, to keep our brains sharp, to survive. But not all fats are our friends. Find out which ones are the heroes and the villains in your diet.

In a lot of cases health fads don't live up to their hype. But the case for consuming more good fats-the omega-3 fatty acids found primarily in fish, flax and hemp oils-is strong and growing stronger. As a nation we eat too little of these good fats, and our health would improve greatly if we relied a little less on the bad saturated fat in burgers, skipped the ugly trans fats in fries and indulged in more salmon and other seafoods.

Fish and the Heart

Need proof? A wealth of research supports fish oil's desirable effects, especially on heart health. While many people believe that heart disease is primarily a problem for men, women who have passed through menopause are just as susceptible to heart problems.

" [Our] findings suggest that all women, and most likely men, would benefit from regular fish intake," says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston. "A tuna fish Sandwich counts, as does almost any other type of fish that is baked, broiled, grilled, or poached." But she points out that fried fish, which is often cooked in hydrogenated oils, is not helpful.

In research on more than 200 women, performed at the Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts, scientists found that the arterial blockages among women who dined on fish were less (and impeded blood flow less) than in women who hardly ever ate seafood. Fish was especially helpful for women who had diabetes, a disease that makes you more prone to heart and circulation problems (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 9/04).

These effects are important: Heart disease is the number one cause of death for women, and older women who suffer from diabetes are particularly susceptible. The number of people with diabetes has been increasing of late, mainly due to the fact that Americans are overweight. Right now about 18 million people have diabetes and another 20 million are expected to suffer this condition in the next four decades.

" This study shows that following the current guidelines of eating at least two servings of any type of fish per week slows down the progression of heart disease in women with coronary artery disease (CAD), especially those who were also diabetic," says Dr. Lichtenstein, coauthor of the study. "We further found that eating one or more servings per week of fish that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as tuna or other dark-fleshed fish, is equally effective."

Dangerous disruptions in heartbeat, known as arrhythmias, may also be affected by fish oil. "[E]xperiments show that fatty acids from omega-3 fish oils are stored in the cell membranes of heart cells and can prevent sudden cardiac death or fatal arrhythmias," notes Alexander Leaf, MD, medical researcher and professor at Harvard University.

Fat for Your Brain

The right kind of fat is also crucial for the function of your nerves and brain tissue, which is 60% to 70% fat. Incorporating omega-3 fatty acids into those cells can help keep your brain firing on all synapses. It may lower your risk of Alzheimer's disease, an irreversible form of mental deterioration that kills 100,000 Americans a year. About a thousand people a day in the US are found to have Alzheimer's, and experts believe that over the next 40 years 14 million of us will be doomed to being enveloped by the mental fog this condition produces.

Research indicates that our brains probably need omega-3 fats for protection against the kind of damage that causes our mental capacities to slip. Once Alzheimer's starts, deterioration accelerates because brain cells start losing these fats.

In experiments performed at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA (Neuron 9/2/04), scientists looked at how a lack of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, one of the omega-3 fats found in fish), affected the cellular processes that lead to Alzheimer's. They found that the part of brain cells that receive signals from other brain cells, the receptors, are vulnerable to damage from chemical reactions that take place inside the cells. However, DHA offers antioxidant protection against this destruction.

When brain cells were denied DHA, the cells' receptors suffered extra harm. But when fish oil was present, brain cells were protected. In addition, animals that received extra omega-3s were better able to learn and find their way through mazes.

Greg Cole, PhD, senior researcher on this study and a professor of neurology at Geffen, says, "We saw that a diet rich in DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, dramatically reduces the impact of the Alzheimer's gene [which made the animals more susceptible to Alzheimer's]. Consuming more DHA is something the average person can easily control. Anyone can buy DHA in its purified form, fish-oil capsules, high-fat fish or DHA-supplemented eggs." Fishes rich in omega-3s include salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines and herring.

Protecting Kids from Asthma

A surprising benefit of omega-3s has been found in pregnant women and their newborns: Pregnant women with asthma who eat fish rich in omega-3s during their pregnancy lower their children's risk of asthma.

Not just any fish will do. The study (American Thoracic Society International Conference 5/25/04) discovered that mothers who ate fish sticks during pregnancy doubled the asthma risk in their kids. " Fish sticks are deep-fried, and they contain omega-6 fatty acids, which encourage inflammation of the airways," says study co-author Frank Gilliland, MD, PhD, professor at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Oily fish [like salmon and trout] contain omega-3 fatty acids, which appear to be anti-inflammatory, and lead to the reduced potential for developing asthma and allergies."

The USC investigation showed that when women with asthma ate oil-bearing fish during pregnancy, the risk of asthma for their children dropped more than 70%. The more fish that mom consumed, the less likely her baby was to develop asthma. Unfortunately, the study did not find the same benefit in women without asthma.

" A family history of asthma is a very strong risk factor for a child developing asthma," Dr. Gilliland says. "It appears that oily fish interacts with the genes involved in the predisposition to develop asthma, and somehow reduces the risk."

Although most of us try to avoid accumulating unsightly fat around our hips, the right kind of fat plays an integral part in the functioning of our bodies and may even keep us alive. Fats don't get much better than that.



--
Vitanet ®

Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=344)


Best Bread ...
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Date: June 13, 2005 07:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Best Bread ...

Best Breads by Jane Lane Energy Times, December 9, 1999

Few of us can resist the seductions of freshly baked bread, warm and fragrant, poised on the edge of a steaming bowl of soup or painted with an aromatic swath of rosemary scented oil. Even those of us from the most culinary challenged households can recall the pleasures of the simple plump white dinner roll or flaky biscuit piled in a basket on the dinner table.

Bread has blossomed from sideshow status beside the dinner plate to a full-scale mealtime headliner, a scrumptious star enriched by nutritious grains, herbs, fruits and vegetables.

Contemporary cooks build meals around crunchy cornbread or chewy focaccia, presenting soups or salads as satisfying counterpoints. Want to jump into the bread baking basket or hone your skills? Two top vegetarian chefs shared with Energy Times their passion for bread and their expertise in baking. See if you don't find that ardor contagious.

Nancy Lazarus is a chef at the famed Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, New York, established in 1973 to serve up natural fare with a homecooked, vegetarian emphasis. The bill of fare changes daily at Moosewood, but there's one constant: a cup or bowl of soup, a salad and a thick slice of bread. Some loyal customers have ordered the daily special for 20 years.

That's why bread occupies a cherished spot at Moosewood. Nancy Lazarus tells why and offers some of Moosewood's favorite bread recipes: "Cooking is like art; baking is like science; bread is like magic. No matter how much science you apply, you'll never have complete control: It'll do its own thing on some level, which is part of its charm, if you're charmed by that sort of thing. Breads come out differently depending on heat and humidity, the heat of the oven; yeast is a variable that can be slower or faster acting.

"There are bread machines, of course, and they work. But they're not as satisfying as the real thing, the kneading, which can be almost therapeutic, and the control over the ingredients to your own specifications.

"Bread is not that difficult. Know your own oven, to begin: Good insulation is important and how the heat travels around inside. Convection ovens are a wonderful thing.

"There are difficult breads we recommend you buy at a good bakery: baguettes, Italian, French and Cuban that are crusty outside and soft inside.

"But focaccia is easy. It's a yeasted bread that's better to make at home than buy because it's so fresh and you can control the toppings. It only requires one slow and one quick rising but you have to be there for a while.

"Then there are quick breads that use baking soda or powder, like cornbread. If you want a good meal at home and can make only one thing, make a quick bread. They're satisfying and delicious warm from the oven; and the aroma of bread fills the house. A corn bread with tomato soup for supper is a nurturing meal good for vegans.

"Popovers are fast and simple, a middle American 50s treat, but you do need a hot oven and 45 minutes. Also easy to make: sweet breads- carrot, banana, zucchini-and biscuits.

"To reduce the fat in denser quickbreads and cakes, use applesauce. It gives body and moistness.

"The number of wheat-sensitive people is rising dramatically. A theory I think makes sense is that in the last 30 years the varieties of wheat grown has been reduced to 1 or 2 that are more easily cultivated and harvested with the machinery available. People are overloaded with one type of wheat.

"Gluten is the offending substance in wheat and some oats; try rice, tapioca and potato flours, which are denser and more fine and don't produce a good crust. Improve the crust by baking in a preheated cast iron skillet.

"Also investigate chickpea flour. You don't make a loaf of bread with it- use it for flatbreads like papadam, which is in Indian cookbooks. And it's good for batter for vegetables.

"Spelt is the closest to wheat flour in consistency but some people can be sensitive to it.

"Visit a natural food store to check out the flours. The mills sometimes print handouts with recipes and a lot of those are real good, especially for what works with their flour. Or you may run into a baker who will whet your appetite with ideas and recipes.

"Bread is the supreme comfort food. It can speak to us, and reassure us. The magic of bread and how it varies: There's something appealing in that. In today's world, food is predictable, and that's reassuring to some people. At Moosewood, things are always different, and that's good."

Claire Criscuolo puts an intensely personal spin on the eclectically ethnic style of cooking at her esteemed vegetarian restaurant, Claire's Corner Copia. That 25-year-old institution in New Haven, Connecticut, reflects her zest for the freshest ingredients, robust flavors and inspired combinations. Claire, a teacher and advocate for healthful cuisine, pours her passion into her breadmaking as well:

"Healthy bread is like anything else-it has healthy ingredients. We use the best organic unbleached flour and yeast, pure vanilla, whole eggs (not dried and powdered), whole milk and organic sour cream. You want to use good, fresh ingredients. It's the essence of healthy cooking. "I tell my staff, 'Don't use your soup pot as a garbage pail. Bread is the same. If the ingredients aren't at their freshest for serving, then they aren't right for other uses in the kitchen.

"Our bread is very important at Claire's. We make a country white and a honey wheat in a pinwheel loaf-400 a day-and challah for the morning French toast with sauteed bananas or as buns for veggie burgers. "It's not practical to bake bread every day. We let our bread rise several times, punching it down again and again. For the home cook, it's time consuming. Even I'm happy to buy a good loaf of bread. "But anybody can bake bread. Combine flour, water and yeast and watch it grow! It's delights all your senses. And it a gratifies and satisfies. I was kneading it all by hand until we got up to 12 loaves a day.

"I love a good oatmeal molasses bread; a whole wheat bread with walnuts, rosemary and finely chopped sweet onion sauteed in olive oil for a roasted vegetable Sandwich; or an anadama bread with split pea soup.

"Bread is part of a meal. It requires time and effort, but I can't think of many things worthwhile that don't."



--
Vitanet ®

Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=333)


Home on the Range
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Date: June 13, 2005 03:52 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Home on the Range

Home on the Range

by Janis Jibrin, RD Energy Times, September 5, 1999

Got chicken? Americans can't seem to get enough of this bird. Last year each of us ate, on average, just about 80 pounds of chicken, a whopping increase over the 49 pounds we each devoured in 1980 and an eight-pound increase from 1995. Part of this food's popularity comes from its lean image as a healthier, less fatty alternative to red meat (don't forget to take the fatty skin off). Chicken's also a cheap protein source: At many popular supermarkets you'll find weekly specials at about a dollar a pound.

But at health food markets, chicken can cost upwards of $1.69 a pound. These birds may be touted as raised in an organic, stress-free environment and on a vegetarian diet, free of antibiotics. For many people, this poultry is a better buy.

The Alternative Chicken

Most of the supermarket chicken you pick up in grocery refrigerated cases are broilers, birds bred to mature in about eight weeks. In comparison, in the '60s, chickens needed 14 weeks to become adult poultry. Conventionally-raised broilers eat grain mixed with whatever's cheapest on the market, such as recycled cooking oil that's been used to fry fast foods and animal parts.

These birds reside in chicken coops the size of football fields and don't see the light of day until transported to the slaughterhouse. On the other roost, alternatively raised chickens are brought up in a variety of ways (see box), but usually enjoy a more relaxed life and diet.

Chickens on the farm receive antibiotics for two reasons: To fight off the diseases that can run rampant through a crowded chicken coop and to encourage faster growth.

Antibiotics Stimulate Growth

Mark Cook, PhD, professor of animal science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, explains, "Gut bacteria trigger an immune system assault, which makes chickens a little feverish, suppresses appetite and slows growth. Antibiotics stimulate growth indirectly, by keeping bacteria levels down, and preventing the immune reaction." When birds get sick, they often get dosed with even more antibiotics.

This widespread antibiotic use has come home to roost and may contribute to the growth of bacteria that, frequently exposed to chemicals, have evolved ways to keep from being killed by pharmaceuticals.

This development threatens human health. Bacterial infections that people contract, once easily cured by penicillin or other drugs, are now tougher to eradicate. For instance, campylobactor, a common bacteria found in chicken, and responsible for some food poisonings, now demonstrates signs of resistance to drugs like floroquinolones. A powerful class of antibiotics, floroquinolones used to dependably conquer this infection.

"Floroquinolones are an extremely important class of antibiotics, used to treat many types of infections such as urinary tract infection, a wide variety of gastrointestinal illnesses, pneumonia, almost everything," says Kirt Smith, DVM, PhD, epidemiologist, acute disease epidemiology section, Minnesota Department of Health.

A study by Dr. Smith, published in the New England Journal of Medicine (340, 1999: 1525-32), showed that the percent of floroquinolone-resistant campylobactor appearing in infected people in his state-Minnesota-climbed from a little over 1% in infected people during 1992 to 10.2% in 1998. He and other scientists strongly suspect that the rise is a direct consequence of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) decision to allow floroquinolones in poultry feed beginning in 1995.

Although it was nearly impossible for Dr. Smith to trace the precise origin of campylobactor poisoning, he believes chicken was usually the source-and not just U.S. chicken. Many of the infected people had returned from Mexico and other countries.

"Sales of floroquinolones for poultry use in Mexico has increased dramatically," notes Dr. Smith.

Many alternative chicken producers do not use any antibiotic-laced feed at all. Other farmers adjust the feed to lower gut pH, making it more acidic and lowering chances of bacteria. At the U. of Wisconsin, Dr. Cook is developing antibodies to suppress the immune response to bacteria so chickens won't need antibiotics to spur growth. Buying and dining on chicken raised with little or no antibiotics could beneficially lower your risk of contracting a hardy bacterial infection. Better to catch campylobactor from an antibiotic-free chicken than a conventional chicken, speculates Dr. Cook. "There's less likelihood the bug will be resistant, and a better chance your problem can be cured with antibiotics," he explains.

And, looking beyond your own immediate health risk, buying antibiotic-free chicken makes a small contribution to stopping the spread of antibiotic resistant bugs. A Matter of Taste Conventionally raised chickens get little exercise and live only eight weeks, so they're tender but bland.

"There's not much taste in a modern chicken. Free range or organically grown, older birds usually have more taste," notes Dr. Cook.

The days of barnyard chickens happily clucking and strutting around in picturesque nature have disappeared with the family farm. Today, chickens lead a meager existence. After hatching, baby chicks are tossed into a gigantic hen house that is home to up to 30,000 birds. Their short lives are lived within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) mandated 3/4 square foot per chicken. In that squeeze, birds can catch "chicken influenza," especially in winter when it's too cold to let in much fresh air.

Laying hens don't experience much more of a peaceful existence. These birds live their years with about five other hens, so crowded they can't flap their wings. Cages, suspended in the air, let eggs roll into a holding area. So they don't peck each other, hens are often debeaked, a painful process that can cause infection.

Hens go through natural laying and "dry" cycles. Growers manipulate this cycle by "forced molting," depriving hens of food for four to 14 days to keep them constantly laying. By the end of two years, hens are worn out. Their inactivity weakens their bones enough that electrical stunning, the usual method for knocking chickens out before slaughter, shatters their bones. So some wind up being plucked and boiled alive, according to Mary Finelli, program director for farm animals and public health at the Humane Society of the United States. The meat from these hens, tougher than other birds, was probably in your deli lunch Sandwich. It's also used in the school lunch program or may end up in dog food.

"Generally, organically-grown broilers and hens have it better because room to move is part of the organic certification process," says Finelli. Finelli suggests visiting chicken suppliers to find out how chickens are treated. Or, she advocates a Humane Society book listing reliable firms. For a local producer call the society: 202-452-1100. According to a Consumer Report report, some growers force chickens out the last week of their lives to brand them "free range." So free range isn't a prime standard for choosing a decently raised chicken. However, turkeys thrive outdoors, so choosing free-range turkey is often a good idea for better tasting poultry.

In any case, organic is your best bet for chicken without pesticides. Make it your main choice for your 80 pound yearly consumption!

To fight cruel treatment of poultry:

• Forced Molting Ban. Forced molting is shocking hens for more eggs. To support petitions banning forced molting write: Docket Manage-ment Branch, FDA, Dept. Health & Human Serv-ices, 12420 Parklawn Drive, Room 1-23, Rock-ville, MD 20857. Include docket # 98P-0203/CP

• Downed Animal Protection Bill (House Bill 443, Senate Bill S515) spares some animals from the tortuous journey from chicken house to slaughterhouse. Mandates humane euthanization.



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Snack Attack - we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a min
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Date: June 12, 2005 02:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Snack Attack - we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a min

Snack Attack by Chrystle Fiedler Energy Times, August 5, 2003

Americans are snackers. For instance, during the Superbowl, we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a minute; 30 million pounds by the end of the game. At work about half of us snack two or three times a day. By the end of today, as a group, we'll have eaten $22 million worth of candy-almost a million dollars an hour for every hour of every day.

If you snack unwisely, these munchies can expand your waistline and sabotage your health. But if you snack wisely, you can keep your taste buds fulfilled, your brain working at top capacity and your body satisfied.

When searching for snack satisfaction, think protein. Protein bars and protein shakes keep you feeling fuller longer on fewer calories than sweets.

Second to protein, think fiber, as in fresh fruit, dried fruit, or whole grain breads and crackers.

Unlike carbohydrates that break down into sugars and may be quickly stored as body fat, protein-rich snacks release sugar into your bloodstream at a slow, steady and healthy pace. That keeps you satisfied longer on fewer calories.

"Protein is an important building block (for the body)," says Alicia Gonzalez, ND, a teaching fellow at Bastyr University in Kenmore, Washington. "It breaks down into amino acids as precursors to things like neurotransmitters, hormones and muscle."

Besides eating protein-rich snacks, eat protein with every meal and eat it first. "It will help your body absorb sugar at a slower rate."

"Protein and fiber are the best at helping the body absorb sugar at an optimal rate," says Jon Gordon, author of Become an Energy Addict (Longstreet Press).

"Protein bars release sugar at a slower rate, resulting in more balanced blood sugar levels and greater overall energy," Gordon says. "You'll crave sugar less and will have a more sustained source of energy all day long."

Protein Bars' Power

"The biggest advantage of protein bars, besides their convenience, is the fact that they do have considerably more protein, say 10 grams, than candy bars, which can contain as little as 2 grams," says Dr. Gonzalez. Total fat tends to be much less in a protein bar, too.

When choosing a protein bar, Dr. Gonzalez says, "Look for total protein content, say, between 10 and 12 grams and total fat, no more than 5 grams, and be careful with high sodium content."

"Choose a protein bar closest to nature," says Gordon. "Like one with almonds and cashews. Nuts are full of nutrients and minerals. Nuts are also a source of fiber."

If you exercise, protein bars with whey or soy protein make for quick replacement of necessary nutrients. "Eating a protein bar an hour before exercising helps to maintain that energy boost you need and replenishes minerals you lose when working out," says Dr. Gonzalez.

Some protein bars, though, do a bait n' switch with saturated fats and trans fatty acids, says Dawn Weatherwax, RD, author of The Official Snack Guide for Beleaguered Sports Parents (WellCentered Books). "If the label says hydrolyzed or hydrogenated palm oil, that's as bad as saturated fat. People think they're doing the healthy thing by eating a protein bar but they end up getting the wrong type of fat."

Besides protein bars, other healthy and healthful snacks include whole grain bread with peanut butter and cheese on whole grain, high-fiber crackers. "Mixing fiber and protein will help you sustain your energy," says Gordon. "Yogurt is also very good."

Smooth Sailing

"Smoothies are also wonderful (snacks)," says Weatherwax. "Add protein powder, silken tofu and fruit to them and you can have them as a meal replacement."

"Nuts like cashews, almonds, seeds and dried berries are some of the best snacks that you can eat because you're not getting all that sugar," says Dr. Gonzalez. "Nuts have a good balance of good fat versus bad fat, including essential fatty acids, which are really important for cellular health and overall well-being. A combination of nuts, seeds and dried berries provides you with a good mix of all the vitamins and minerals along with the good fats that you need to be healthy."

When snacking, think about variety. "Mix it up, have a protein bar one day, a protein shake the next," says Gordon. "Combine protein with a healthy carbohydrate and you'll have much more sustained energy throughout the day."

Fuel for Your Fire

"We're like a train, we need to keep the furnace stoked," says Weatherwax, a consulting dietitian for the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. "The goal is to eat every three or four hours. You have breakfast and lunch and you need an afternoon snack. That's the hardest one to get. Most people don't want to eat another Sandwich; they want snack food. So a protein bar with a carb like a piece of fruit, an apple, orange or banana...is a great combination." "Studies show if you have moderate-size meals plus small between-meal snacks you increase your levels of energy and alertness," says Gordon. "It also optimizes your memory and performance and gives you a steady flow of energy rather than the rises and falls. Without healthy snacks your blood sugar falls and you experience fatigue and tension. Just as we need to constantly feed a fire with moderate-sized pieces of wood, we also need to continually supply our internal furnace with food that can be turned into fuel. This keeps our metabolism going strong and steady."

"You want to stay between one-third and two-thirds full," adds Weatherwax.

"Eating less in an effort to lose weight is actually deleterious in the long run," says Dr. Gonzalez. "When we don't eat our body gets mixed signals; it isn't sure when it's going to get its next meal. This makes the body want to store fat and sugar to save it just in case. On the other hand, if your body becomes accustomed to eating more often, the cells will be more inclined to use the fat up, knowing there is more food on the way."

To program your body this way, don't skip meals. Have protein-filled breakfast like a protein smoothie and eggs. Follow up with healthy snacks like a protein bar or shake and regular meals.

"Ideally, it's best to combine the macronutrients, the protein, carbs and healthy fats," says Weatherwax. "By mixing all three you actually burn more energy. One study shows that you burn an extra 35 calories."

Nibbling on refined sweets can give you the snack blues. So let smart-snack strategies. Shift your mental outlook into high gear and use snacks wisely.

Snacking and Exercising

When you incorporate snacks into a consistent exercise program, you boost your chances of maintaining a healthy weight.

To make a big difference in your day, Gordon says, get up a half an hour early to exercise. Next, eat a breakfast that includes protein and fiber, have a mid-morning snack, a healthy lunch, an afternoon snack and good dinner. Take a walk within 30 minutes of eating dinner and you'll give your body a double dose of get-up-and-go.

"It exponentially increases your energy production and fat burning," says Gordon. Do all these things and watch your energy soar. "You'll fuel your life with real sustained power sources rather than the quick fix like coffee that's going to give you the rise in energy and then fall."

You don't need to be told to keep on snacking. Just keep to the protein and fiber side of the snack street.



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Lose the Gluten - everyone who suffers from food allergies
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Date: June 10, 2005 10:20 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Lose the Gluten - everyone who suffers from food allergies

Lose the Gluten by Phyllis D. Light, RH Energy Times, October 14, 2004

Are you a glutton for gluten, the sticky protein found in bagels and many other breads? Unfortunately, not everyone can enjoy the taste of fresh-baked bread because it contains this natural substance that can cause allergic reaction or intolerance in susceptible folks.

And while not everyone who suffers from food allergies or intolerances has a problem with gluten, other foods that can cause distress include items like watermelon, fish or even the benign-seeming peanut butter and jelly Sandwich.

Still, with a little guidance, even if you have an allergy or two, you can enjoy meals and reduce food-related difficulties when you make food choices wisely.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, more than one in 50 adults and one in 12 children in the US suffer food allergies. But the problem may be even larger. Researchers believe even more of us have food allergies and don't know it: many food allergies and intolerances may be mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome or conditions like chronic fatigue syndrome.

Unhappy Digestion

The involvement of the immune system in an allergy represents the dividing line between intolerance and allergy. A food allergy strikes when the immune system attacks food ingredients as though they were threatening substances. Usually, proteins trigger these physiological alarms. The most common food allergens include wheat, soy, peanuts, shellfish, eggs, fish, tree nuts, milk and watermelon. Fortunately, many children who suffer allergies outgrow them as their bodies mature.

Signs of a food allergy may include a rash, hives, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, itchy skin, shortness of breath, chest pain, swelling of the airways and a condition called anaphylactic shock, a serious occurrence that can cut off breathing and requires immediate medical help.

If you believe you have a food allergy, see your health practitioner. If you have reasons to suspect an allergy to a particular food, avoid it altogether.

Intolerance Versus Allergy

Food intolerances are more common than allergies. They happen when food irritates the digestive system or offers substances that the digestive tract cannot break down. A food intolerance, however, does not provoke the immune system into an attack. The most common foods that cause intolerance are wheat, rye and barley; they all contain gluten.

Figuring out an intolerance generally requires adding and eliminating foods to gauge your response. Signs can include nausea, stomach pain, gas, cramps, bloating, vomiting, heartburn, diarrhea, headaches and irritability or nervousness. If you suspect you have a food intolerance, keep a food diary-recording what you eat and how you feel afterwards.

In addition, an elimination diet, wherein you avoid certain foods and track your responses, can help determine food intolerances. After you have dropped certain foods from your diet, reintroduce them, one at a time, until you eat a food that causes a return of your problems. These foods should then be permanently avoided.

Inflamed Intestines

Celiac sprue is a particularly severe inflammatory response to wheat or other grains containing gluten. According to the National Science Foundation, one in every 200 Americans suffers from this often misdiagnosed condition. That's more than a million of us!

If left untreated, celiac sprue can cause anemia, contribute to osteoporosis by limiting calcium absorption and increase the risk for intestinal cancer. Signs include headaches, weight loss, nutritional deficiencies, fatigue and neurological symptoms. The only treatment is to avoid all grains that contain gluten.

According to researchers in England, celiac sprue is often mistaken for chronic fatigue syndrome, type 1 diabetes or irritable bowel syndrome and can result in infertility (Med J Austral 2004 May 17; 180(10):524-6). Because sprue can confuse health practitioners, many people spend years trying to find an answer to their discomforts before finding that a gluten-free diet relieves their pain.

According to the Celiac Sprue Association, if you have gluten intolerance you should avoid durum wheat, semolina wheat, rye, kamut, spelt, barley, triticale and often oats. Some people find they can tolerate spelt, a distant cousin to wheat that's high in fiber and contains more protein (talk to your practitioner). Oats are generally well-tolerated by most people with gluten intolerance, but because oats are often processed on the same machinery as wheat, they may have traces of gluten. If you are gluten intolerant, you can still eat rice, corn, soy, potatoes, beans, sorghum, quinoa, millet, buckwheat, arrowroot and amaranth.

Problem Foods

Other food ingredients can trouble digestion. They include:

  • • Lactose: Up to 20% of Americans are lactose intolerant (Har Health Lett 2003 Dec; 29:6-7), reacting badly to milk products because they lack the enzyme necessary for digesting lactose (milk sugar). For these people, milk, ice cream and cheese cause gas, bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhea.
  • • MSG (monosodium glutamate): A flavor enhancer, MSG can cause allergic responses in susceptible individuals.
  • • Sulfites: Food preservatives-often found in baked goods, wines, snack foods and condiments-have been found to cause hives, nausea, shortness of breath, diarrhea and, in some cases, anaphylactic shock.
  • • Food colorings: These items may cause allergic-type responses in some people.

    Fermented Foods

    If you have what seem to be allergies and intolerances, fermented foods that contain beneficial bacteria (probiotics) can aid the functioning of your digestive tract. Yogurt, kefir, buttermilk and sauerkraut supply active bacterial cultures and are generally easy to tolerate because they are predigested. According to researchers at Tufts University, yogurt can improve your digestive health and soothe difficulties linked to allergies and intolerances (AJCN 2004 Aug; 80(2):245-56).

    In addition, yogurt and other probiotic foods have been found to reduce the recurrence of irritable bowel flare-ups and may help reduce the risk of colon cancer. Yogurt improves gut microflora, increases bowel transit time and enhances immune response. Probiotics are also available as supplements.

    Helpful Hints

    If you have problems with certain foods or additives, becoming an amateur food detective can make meals more pleasant. Before eating a packaged food, always read the label; if you are unsure of the ingredients, contact the food manufacturer. But, in any uncertain situation, if you are in doubt of a food's ingredients, do without. Better to avoid food problems than realize too late that you've eaten a food that has upset your digestion.

    Some people find their food intolerance comes and goes, often depending upon the amount eaten and how often a food is consumed. For example, some people with lactose intolerance find they can have a little milk in their coffee or on their breakfast cereal one day a week, but have problems if they drink milk on two consecutive days.

    While deciphering which foods in your diet cause you problems can be time consuming, the reward for eliminating these nutrients, better digestion, is great. Don't give up! Persevere and, eventually your digestion will thank you.



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    COENZYME Q10 - Transforming food into energy
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    Date: June 01, 2005 11:06 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: COENZYME Q10 - Transforming food into energy

    Coenzyme Q10

    It’s 3:30 p.m. and you feel irritable; you can’t seem to concentrate. You were so busy you skipped lunch. At last you bite into the Sandwich that you were ready for 3 hours ago. By the time you have eaten half of it, energy is starting to flow through you. What happened? The answer to that question is both extremely complex and very simple. In essence, your body transformed the food into useable energy. CoQ10 is a crucial component of the primary energy generating cycle that takes place in each of the trillions of cells in our bodies. CoQ10 is essential for human life.

    To transform that lunchtime Sandwich into useable energy your body essentially has to burn it - just the way a car burns gasoline to drive its engine. This energy generating process takes place in structures called mitochondria - tiny power plants which are within every cell. Inside these energy generating stations, fats, sugars, and amino acids are transformed into ATP, an energy-rich molecule sometimes called the “energy currency” of the body.

    Energy Generation Requires Nutrients

    The body requires many nutrients in order to perform the complex biochemical processes that convert food into ATP “energy currency.” Some of these nutrients such as the B-vitamins are familiar to us. However, there are many other substances which are essential to this process. Coenzyme Q10 is one of these.

    Functions of CoQ10

    Several complex metabolic pathways are required in order for the body to transform that lunchtime Sandwich into energy that you can feel and use. First glycolysis and the Krebs’ cycle break down large molecules of protein, carbohydrate and fat into smaller components. CoQ10 is a key enzyme in the Electron Transport Chain - the final stage in this extraordinary design. This pathway generates 90% of the ATP needed by the body from the food we eat. ATP provides the “energy currency” for the following crucial metabolic functions: 1) synthesis of cellular components including cholesterol and proteins (formed primarily by the liver), 2) nerve conduction (in the brain and peripheral nerves), and 3) energy for muscular contraction (of the heart and skeletal muscles). The Heart: The heart muscle (myocardium) consumes a tremendous amount of energy. Your heart beats over 100,000 times and pumps 1,000 gallons of blood each day! CoQ10 is necessary for the generation of the energy required by the heart. Numerous scientific studies have demonstrated that supplementation with this nutrient may support normal heart function. Its presence is necessary for cardiac performance during exercise as exemplified by criteria including: blood flow, oxygen utilization, contractility and exercise tolerance. In addition, CoQ10 may play a role in the regulation of blood pressure. The Gums: Since the 1970’s scientists have been researching the effects of CoQ10 on the health of the oral tissues. Although the mechanism of action is not known, research has established that CoQ10 has a profound ability to preserve and maintain the health of the gums. Antioxidant Properties: CoQ10 plays an additional vital role in our metabolism as a protector of lipids in cell membranes. Laboratory studies have also shown that CoQ10 is more efficient than vitamin E, beta carotene or lycopene in safeguarding LDL cholesterol from oxidation by peroxides. This process is important for maintaining the health of our blood vessels.

    Energy Insurance

    CoQ10 is needed in body tissues where energy production is critical, such as the liver, brain and muscles. Therefore we include CoQ10 in significant potencies in many of our premium formulas, such as Life Force Multiple™, Élan Vitàl™, Heart Science™, Liver Guard™, MenoBalance™, Higher Mind™, MegaMind™ and Wellness Multiple™. We also offer a combination of CoQ10 and Lipoic Acid (30 mg each), CoQ10 Sublingual (30 mg and 60 mg), 30 mg CoQ10 Softgels with Bioperine® and 30 mg CoQ10 NutraSpray™. Our single CoQ10 products are CoQ10 in 15 mg, 30 mg, 75 mg, 100 mg, and Ultra Potency 125 mg caps.

    References
    1) Folkers et al., BCACQ, Elsevier, 1977
    2) Judy et al., BCACQ, Elsevier, 1984.
    3) Kamikawa, T. et al., American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 56, August 1, 1985, p. 247-250.
    4) Nohara et al., Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Elsevier, 1984.
    5) Packer, L., Oxidative Stress and Aging, Birkhauser Verlad, 1995.
    6) Stocker, et al., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 88, pp 1646-1650, March 1991.
    7) Tortora, G. Principles of Human Anatomy, 4th Ed., Harper & Row, New York, 1986, p. 301.
    8) Wilkinson and Arnold, Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Elsevier, 1977.
    9) Yamagami et al., Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Elsevier, 1977.



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    Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control.
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    Date: May 12, 2005 10:00 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control.

    Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Solutions for Cholesterol and Triglyceride Control

    by Richard Conant, L.Ac., C.N.

    Fat and human existence are inseparable. Setting aside the fear and loathing over fat in the body that pervades our culture, we understand that fat is our friend. We cannot live without fat.

    The human body contains many different kinds of fats and fat-like molecules. Collectively known as "lipids" these fatty substances include fatty acids, lipoproteins, phospholipids, glycolipids, triglycerides, steroid hormones and the infamous, dreaded cholesterol.

    Lipids (fats) are found everywhere in the body, performing a variety of vital functions. The brain is a fat-rich organ. Brain neurons and all other nerve cells are protected by a myelin sheath, made largely out of fatty material. Cell membranes consist almost entirely of phospholipids (lipids that contain phosphorus) arranged in a Sandwich-like double layer embedded with proteins. Sex hormones are lipids, belonging to the group of complex lipid molecules known as "steroids." Vitamin D is a lipid.

    The body stores and transports fatty acids in the form of triglycerides. A triglyceride contains three fatty acid molecules, which have a chain-like structure, linked to glycerol. (There are also mono- and di-glycerides, which have one and two fatty acid chains, respectively, attached to glycerol.)

    Like many other things necessary to life, fat is a two-edged sword. Fat insulates us from the cold, cushions and protects our vital organs and serves as a storehouse for energy. Yet, when present in excess to the point of obesity, fat threatens health, happiness, self-esteem, social standing and longevity. The same is true of other lipids, most notably triglycerides and cholesterol. Transported throughout the body in the bloodstream, these essential lipids become a health liability when the blood contains too much of them.

    Keeping fat in it its proper place, not eliminating or drastically reducing it, is the goal we should seek. In the blood, lipids must be maintained at healthy levels and ratios. When they are, an important foundation of good health is established.

    How do we keep the blood lipids we need——triglycerides and the various forms of cholesterol——balanced at healthy levels? Diet and exercise are indispensable, these basics must come first. Along with the recommended dietary practices, a number of nutritional approaches offer help for maintaining healthy blood lipids. We will now give several of these a closer look.

    Gugulipid

    In 1990, an herb used for centuries in the Far East was introduced to U.S. consumers. This herb, called "gum guggul," is proving to be one of the most effective natural cholesterol-lowering agents ever discovered. It also brings triglycerides down and raises HDL, the "good" cholesterol. The changes are substantial; gum guggul single-handedly normalizes the entire blood lipid profile, even in people with high starting levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

    Gum guggul, also called simply "guggul," is a gummy resin tapped from the Commiphora tree. A cousin of myrrh gum, guggul has been used by Ayurvedic herbalists of India for at least 3,000 years; texts dating from around 1,000 B.C. mention the herb. Guggul was traditionally given for rheumatism and poor health caused by excess consumption of fatty foods. One ancient Sanskrit text describes in detail what happens in the body when blood fats are out of balance, due to sedentary lifestyle and overeating. The name of this condition has been translated as "coating and obstruction of channels."

    Intrigued by the obvious similarity between "coating and obstruction of channels" and arteries clogged by fatty plaque, Indian researchers initiated a series of experimental and clinical studies in the 1960's to see if gum guggul would lower excess blood lipids.1 Both human and animal studies consistently showed cholesterol and triglyceride reductions.

    Detailed pharmacological studies showed that guggul's lipid-lowering effects are produced by compounds in the resin called "guggulsterones."2 An Indian pharmaceutical firm then patented a standardized extract of gum guggul under the trade name "Gugulipid." The product contains a uniform 2.5 percent guggulsterones, which is higher than guggul resin in its natural state.

    Because Gugulipid guarantees the necessary intake of guggulsterones needed for blood fat reduction, it has become the product used in clinical research. Phase I efficacy safety trials and Phase II efficacy trials have yielded more positive data.3,4,5 Most of the studies on gum guggul have used relatively small numbers of subjects; this tends to make mainstream medical scientists reluctant about natural remedies. A large, well-publicized double-blind Gugulipid trial on 400 to 500 people would go a long way toward giving this herb the credibility it deserves.

    Pantethine

    Another effective natural solution for blood fat control that should be better known is a relative of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5). Pantethine is the active form of pantothenic acid in the body. Pantethine forms CoA, an essential co-enzyme for utilization of fat. CoA transports "active acetate," an important byproduct of fat metabolism that provides fuel for generating cellular energy. By promoting the burning of fats for energy, pantethine helps keep triglyceride levels down.6 Pantethine also helps regulate cholesterol production, by facilitating the conversion of fat into other lipid-based molecules needed in the body.6

    Japanese researchers began studying the effect of pantethine on blood fats nearly twenty years ago. They reported their promising results at the Seventh International Symposium on Drugs Affecting Lipid Metabolism, held in Milan, Italy in 1980.7 Few in the medical or scientific communities took notice. Italian researchers followed up with several small clinical trials that confirmed the preliminary reports.6,8,9 An excellent cholesterol and triglyceride lowering agent that is safe and free of side-effects, pantethine remains, for the most part, ignored by mainstream science, although its usage is growing in alternative medicine circles. Pantethine it will no doubt prove to be one of the most important supplements for maintaining healthy blood fat levels.

    Niacin

    When taken in high enough doses, niacin (vitamin B3) substantially lowers cholesterol. This has been known to medical science for many years.10 studies on niacin as a cholesterol-lowering agent go back to the 1950's. There was a fair amount of initial enthusiasm for niacin because it improves, unlike most lipid-lowering drugs, all parameters of the blood lipid profile. Niacin reduces total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. It also raises HDL cholesterol quite well. Interest in niacin has faded, in part because the necessary dose, 1200 milligrams a day or more, can cause flushing and gastrointestinal disturbances. Very high doses may be harmful to the liver if taken for too long.

    There is a solution to the side-effect problem with niacin which, again, has failed to gain widespread attention. Inositol hexanicotinate is a flush-free form of niacin composed of six niacin molecules bonded to one molecule of inositol, another B-complex nutrient. Absorbed as an intact structure, inositol hexanicotinate is metabolized slowly, releasing free niacin into the bloodstream over a period of hours following ingestion.11 Inositol hexanicotinate has all the benefits of niacin for controlling blood fats. The flushing effect of ordinary niacin, which metabolizes much more rapidly, does not occur. Taking as much as four grams per day has not been reported to raise liver enzymes or cause other side-effects, but prudence dictates that people with liver problems should avoid very high doses of inositol hexanicotinate, or any form of niacin.12

    Tocotrienols

    We often think of vitamin E as synonymous with d-alpha tocopherol. Vitamin E is actually a whole family of compounds that includes various tocopherols and a group of lesser known but highly beneficial substances called "tocotrienols." All have vitamin E activity. Tocotrienols are similar in chemical structure to tocopherols, but they have important differences which give them unique and highly beneficial properties for human health.

    Vitamin E is one of the most recognized antioxidants, nutrients that deactivate potentially toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism known as free radicals. Vitamin E neutralizes peroxides, which result from the free radical oxidation of lipids, making it a key antioxidant in cell membranes. While d-alpha tocopherol has generally been regarded as the form of vitamin E with the strongest antioxidant activity, tocotrienols are even stronger.

    The tocotrienol story is another example of a natural product slow to gain recognition. A Univeristy of California research team discovered that d-alpha tocotrienol is over six times more effective than d-alpha tocopherol at protecting cell membranes against free radical damage.13 In the presence of vitamin C, which recycles vitamin E-like compounds, its antioxidant activity is 40 to 60 times higher than d-alpha tocopherol. This study was published in 1991. Its safe to say few cardiac physicians know about tocotrienols, and we have yet to see 60 Minutes do a piece on "the powerful new form of vitamin E."

    It would be a tremendous service to public health if they did, because the benefits of tocotrienols go far beyond their stellar antioxidant ability. Tocotrienols also lower total cholesterol and LDL, by impressive percentages. In one double-blind controlled study, tocotrienols reduced total cholesterol by 16 percent and LDL by 21 percent after twelve weeks. Another study recorded drops of 15 to 22 percent in total cholesterol along with 10 to 20 percent decreases in LDL levels.14 Now appearing on health food store shelves, tocotrienols are a health-protecting nutrients whose long overdue time has come. Derived from food oils such as palm oil and rice bran oil, tocotrienols have the same lack of toxicity as ordinary vitamin E.

    References

    1. Satyavati, G. Gugulipid: a promising hypolipidaemic agent from gum guggul (Commiphora wightii). Economic and Medicinal Plant Research 1991;5:47-82.

    2. Dev, S. A modern look at an age-old Ayurvedic drug—guggulu. Science Age July 1987:13-18.

    3. Nityanand, S., Srivastava, J.S., Asthana, O.P. Clinical trials with gugulipid. J. Ass. Physicians of India 1989;37(5):323-28.

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    10. Crouse, J.R. New developments in the use of niacin for treatment of hyperlipidemia: new considerations in the use of an old drug. Coronary Artery Disease 1996;7(4):321-26.

    11. Welsh, A.L. Ede, M. Inositol hexanicotinate for improved nicotinic acid therapy. International Record of Food Medicine 1961;174(1):9-15.

    12. "Inositol hexaniacinate" (Monograph). Alternative Medicine Review 1998;3(3):222-3.

    13. Serbinova, E., et. al. Free radical recycling and intramembrane mobility in the antioxidant properties of alpha-tocopherol and alpha tocotrienol. Free Radical Biology and Medicine 1991;10:263-275.

    14. Qureshi, N. Qureshi, A.A. Tocotrienols: Novel Hypercholesterolemic Agents with Antioxidant Properties. in 'Vitamin E in Health and Disease' Lester Packer and Jürgen Fuchs, Editors. 1993; New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.

    Control Cholesterol with the following Supplements

  • Policosanol -- Reduces Production of Cholesterol by the Liver
  • Red Yeast Rice -- Reduces production of cholesterol like pharmaceutical Statins on the market today
  • Sytrinol -- Lowers Cholesterol by reducing production of cholesterol in the body like Statins on the market today
  • Fiber -- Helps elimate waste and reduce cholesterol


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