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  Messages 1-22 from 22 matching the search criteria.
Activated Charcoal for Intestinal Detox, Food Poisoning, and Hangovers Darrell Miller 7/23/17
7 disease-fighting foods to incorporate into your eating habits Darrell Miller 6/1/17
Adaptogens: Why you need these super herbs in your diet Darrell Miller 3/18/17
How Much Should You Push Yourself with Depression? Darrell Miller 11/23/16
Annatto Seeds, Leaves and Root. Darrell Miller 9/6/16
Interesting Facts About Activated Charcoal Darrell Miller 11/3/13
Korean Ginseng Root Extract Darrell Miller 12/14/12
Can N-Acetyl Cysteine Boost Liver Health And Function? Darrell Miller 2/10/11
Horehound Herb Darrell Miller 9/21/09
Milk Thistle And Silymarin Darrell Miller 8/12/09
Activated Charcoal - Highly absorbent material to combat poisoning Darrell Miller 4/24/08
Diet And Nutrition Can Boost The Body’s Energy Efficiency Darrell Miller 4/10/08
Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/7/05
Endnotes Darrell Miller 7/25/05
HERBS FOR A HEALTHY LIVER Darrell Miller 7/14/05
FUNCTIONS Darrell Miller 7/12/05
TRADITIONAL USES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH GARLIC Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GARLIC AS AN ANTIOXIDANT Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Health Movements - Joining mind and body with healthy movement generates harmony Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Energy Cycles - Stress and lack of energy don't just frazzle your nerves Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Pycnogenol Complex - The Next Generation of Antioxidant Protection Darrell Miller 6/4/05



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Activated Charcoal for Intestinal Detox, Food Poisoning, and Hangovers
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Date: July 23, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Activated Charcoal for Intestinal Detox, Food Poisoning, and Hangovers





A blog about alternative health treatments has published an article about the benefits of activated charcoal. This material adsorbs chemicals and has a great surface area. Thus, activated charcoal is good for treating poisoning. The article mentions how a professor drank poison and survived because he mixed charcoal into the drink. The article states this product can be used to treat digestive disorders. It can be applied to insect bites. It can even whiten teeth. A photo of activated charcoal is included.

Key Takeaways:

  • Can resist up to 60% of the absorption of drugs, chemicals and other toxins.
  • Activated charcoal is made in an oxygen absent chamber, burnt at extremely high temps, until it's charred.
  • Very porous, two teaspoons full, have the surface areas of one entire football field.

"This makes the fine black powder incredibly valuable as an antidote for poisons, which readily adhere to the large surface area of the pores like paper clips to a magnet."

Read more: http://criticalhealthnews.com/health-news/25-ben-fuchs-articles/310-activated-charcoal-for-intestinal-detox-food-poisoning-and-hangovers

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5021)


7 disease-fighting foods to incorporate into your eating habits
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Date: June 01, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 7 disease-fighting foods to incorporate into your eating habits





Garlic and onions are one of the main vegetables that can fight diseases. Together they lower the risk of prostate cancer while beans offer the healthy benefit of vegetables while keeping the heart healthy. Ginger is a cheap and simple antidote that can cure diarrhea, the Chinese have been using Ginger to cure diarrhea for over 2000 years. Mint has many uses like it can be used to cure asthma anxiety and can make the face pimple free when used as a mask.

Key Takeaways:

  • These 7 foods aid in disease prevention and healing; garlic and onion, ginger, cinnamon, turmeric, beans, mint and citrus fruits.
  • Each of these foods contain nutrients and properties that assist with symptoms ranging from diarrhea, high blood sugar, high cholesterol and inflammation.
  • Eating these power foods will assist with preventing obesity, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and many other diseases.

"Disease prevention can be as simple as being more mindful of the food you eat."

Read more: http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-05-25-7-disease-fighting-foods-eating-habits.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4748)


Adaptogens: Why you need these super herbs in your diet
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Date: March 18, 2017 01:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Adaptogens: Why you need these super herbs in your diet





Herbs are healthy for different reasons. Many have vitamins and minerals in them which are essential to human health. Herbs have helped people treat illness for millennia. This talks about a certain type of herb called an adaptogen. These aren't mentioned often. Many people have never even heard of them.

Key Takeaways:

  • Now more than ever we're living in a constant state of fight or flight mode with the latest APS Stress and Wellbeing survey revealing Australian's anxiety levels are the highest they've been in five years.
  • And where once an English Breakfast may have been a source of comfort, an anchor to hold to stay grounded, now no longer has the force we need to cultivate an effective mood change.
  • Or could it? What if tweaking your herbal blend could be the difference between stressed out and blissed out?

"Adaptogens are Eastern medicine's answer to alleviating stress and boosting wellbeing and could just be the soul soothing, simple antidote we all need."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.goodfood.com.au/recipes/news/adaptogens-why-you-need-these-super-herbs-in-your-diet-20170306-gus6g2&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjhmNDExODA5M2I0NWE3Y2I6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNE6duBmCl_JUWiri3LqKl-4PpThXw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4206)


How Much Should You Push Yourself with Depression?
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Date: November 23, 2016 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Much Should You Push Yourself with Depression?





Depression is a reality that affects all too many. One of the toughest decisions is knowing when to push and when to cut yourself some slack. The key to making this decision above all is to know yourself. Find out what it is about yourself that can help you identify your triggers for stress and learn to combat them with the perspective and experience of Therese J. Borchard.

Key Takeaways:

  • How do you know what your limits should be?” The woman in my depression community wanted to know whether she should scale back to part-time work or continue to slog through her full-time job.
  • Positive psychologists claim that using your signature strengths and contributing to society are antidotes to depression: The sense of accomplishment you get from going to work or volunteering or doing anything productive will ultimately propel you to better mental health.
  • But a few months ago, I realized that the only way I am going to heal from all of my chronic illnesses is if I allow myself to err on the other side — to push myself less and saying no to everything I didn’t absolutely HAVE to do: radio shows, interviews, speeches, business lunches and phone calls.

"Do you typically push yourself too much or do you need to be pushed? That will help you know what to do when you get depressed. If you constantly beat yourself up for not doing everything perfectly in recovery, or in life, maybe you should throttle back to part-time (if you can afford it) and try to allow yourself to heal. If you typically need other people to inspire you to change, then maybe pushing yourself is the right thing to do."



Reference:

//psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2016/11/05/how-much-should-you-push-yourself-with-depression/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3495)


Annatto Seeds, Leaves and Root.
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Date: September 06, 2016 02:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Annatto Seeds, Leaves and Root.

Benefits of Annatto Seeds, Leaves and Root.

Coming from achiote shrub seeds, annatto is not just a food coloring. The red plant extract is also used to give colours to textiles and body care products.

The red colour of the seeds comes from the carotenoid content.  Carotenoids are best known for their work in the eyes.  They work as antioxidants to help fight off the damages caused by sunlight.  Since carotenoids are strong antioxidants, annatto can be used to treat the skin by reducing wrinkle signs, blemishes and helps tightening up the skin to make it look younger, all through free radical scavenging antioxidant properties.

Annatto leaves supports healthy digestion and healthy cholesterol levels.

The roots of Annatto can be extracted to be made an antidote to cure cassava poisoning.

Scientists are finding that antioxidant rich diets can help slow the aging process, slow the buildup of cholesterol, and slow mental decline.  By adding annatto to your diet, you to can reap the benefits of a rich antioxidant diet.


URL References

  1. //naturallysavvy.com/eat/what-is-annatto-a-natural-food-coloring-exposed
  2. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/seed-and-nut/annatto.html
  3. //www.medicalhealthguide.com/herb/annatto.htm

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3269)


Interesting Facts About Activated Charcoal
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Date: November 03, 2013 12:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Interesting Facts About Activated Charcoal

 How Activated Charcoal is Made

charcoalActivated charcoal is very similar to normal charcoal which is made from coconut shell, wood, petroleum, peat or coal. To make activated charcoal, the common charcoal is heated in the presence of some gases like argon, oxygen or nitrogen in a variety of processes, namely; physical or chemical activation. These processes open up millions of tiny pores between the present carbon atoms. These pores help the charcoal to easily trap select chemicals in a process known as adsorption. It is known by a myriad of names from Animal charcoal, Gas black to lamp black etc.

Uses of Activated Charcoal

The earliest documented usage of activated charcoal was reported in the early 19th century in England where it was sold as charcoal biscuits. It was generally administered as an antidote to a wide variety of stomach problems and flatulence. It has since gained mainstream usage for a wide variety of ailments and can either be sold as an over the counter drug in certain countries as tablets or capsules or be prescribed by doctors in hospitals. It can also be used for pre-hospital purposes in emergency treatments.

One of the main uses of activated charcoal has been in treating instances of overdoses and poisonings in the human body. It does this by adsorption (attaching to the poison by chemical attraction) thereby preventing its absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. It is also known to interrupt the enteroenteric circulation of some toxins and drugs thereby preventing poisoning. The correct dosage is usually 1 gram per kilogram of body mass and is usually given once to the patient even though in very acute instances it can be given to the patient more than once. Apart from the adsorption process, activated charcoal can also be used to filter out any harmful drugs from affected person’s blood stream. It is worth noting though that for long term accumulation of toxins in the body through a variety of methods such as toxic herbicide infection, that the use of activated charcoal to reverse the effects will not be successful.

References:

  1. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-269-ACTIVATED CHARCOAL.aspx?activeIngredientId
  2. //science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/question209.htm
  3. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Activated_carbon

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2872)


Korean Ginseng Root Extract
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Date: December 14, 2012 12:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Korean Ginseng Root Extract

Korean ginseng is a perennial herb that has been long renowned for its medicinal properties in curing various health disorders. Extracts of the root of this plant are made by dilution of one part of ginseng root with one part of water and alcohol.

The Korean ginseng root has been a staple ingredient in traditional Chinese medicines for more than 2000 years. This herb was considered a miracle drug by them, and the theory of its beneficial properties has been passed down through the ages. People still recognize the miraculous powers of this root, and use it as a natural antidote for various ailments. The ginseng root is generally, powdered only after six years of its growth and is made available in the form of extracts at stores all over the world. The Korean root is believed to comprise of various phytochemicals which are the main cause of all beneficial properties.

  • Ginsenosides, possessing steroid-like properties, increase the brain activity and act as a stress-buster.
  • Panaxans, have the similar structure as anabolic steroids, and can strengthen and build body muscles.
  • Polysaccharides, with a carbohydrate structure can boost mood, maintain blood sugar levels and promote cardiovascular health.

Benefits of Korean ginseng root extract

General health tonic

Ginseng is classified as an adaptogen, which acts as a complete health tonic. This extract can help the body rebound from fatigue, arising from various kinds of stress. It also aids in improving energy and physical endurance, thereby, contributing to the overall well-being of an individual.

Improves cardiovascular function

- This root extract can prevent organ and tissue prolapse, and improve blood circulation for improved cardiovascular function. It lowers the bad cholesterol levels and increases HDL cholesterol in the human body.

Improves functioning of the nervous system

The plant nutrients found in the herb extract can enhance the cognitive abilities and act as memory boosters. They can cure problems related to poor concentration, memory, insomnia and anxiety.

Diabetes control

The ginseng extract holds great promises for people with type-2 diabetes as it can result in greater glucose and insulin resistance.

Prevents cancer

Ginseng extract has also been proved to act as a preventive remedy for several kinds of cancer.

Immunity support

The extracts of this herb act as a stimulant for boosting the immunity and effectively prevent all kinds of flu and cold.

Korean ginseng root extract has worked miracles on improving the general well-being of a person. The numerous benefits of ginseng extract might seem compelling but it is advisable to exercise caution, as with other herbal supplements. Consult your physician before consuming ginseng to explore probable side-effects with existing medication.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2750)


Can N-Acetyl Cysteine Boost Liver Health And Function?
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Date: February 10, 2011 12:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can N-Acetyl Cysteine Boost Liver Health And Function?

N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) And The Liver

N-Acetyl Cysteine or NAC is an antidote for poisonous effects of paracetamol overdose. It targets the cells in the liver, raising their capacity to deal with harmful metabolites. There are a number of researches well underway that scrutinizes a variety of medical conditions for which this compound could be of use. It is a known precursor of antioxidants and in itself a scavenger of peroxides and free radicals.

Hepatocytes are the cells that take on most of the functions of the liver and account for more than 70 per cent of the liver’s total mass. These cells are responsible for the presystematic metabolism of drugs, also known as the first-pass effect, rendering most drugs innocuous before they are released into the bloodstream. The total amounts of bioactive substances that are distributed to the rest of the body are also largely regulated by hepatocytes, notably carbohydrates. In addition, they are involved in the biosynthesis of protein, cholesterol, phospholipids, and bile salts as well as the functional reserves for protein.

Hepatocytes and Toxins

Certain drugs produce toxins when broken down by hepatocytes. A classic example is the metabolism of ethanol into acetaldehyde, which is a toxic compound, a probable carcinogen, and an air pollutant emitted by combustion of cars and tobacco smoking. While hepatocytes are known for their detoxifying responses to toxic substances entering the body, the metabolism of toxins actually takes up a great deal of time, resulting in certain toxins getting released into the bloodstream prior to first-pass effect.

That being said, continued exposure to toxins wears down hepatocytes, and high concentrations of what we refer to as poisons is certain to bring damage to the liver. This is what happens during overdose of paracetamol, or acetaminophen. In an effort to metabolized excessive amounts of the drug, the liver cells produce by-products that are essentially poisons, which under normal circumstances can be contained well.

NAC and Glutathione Production

The major antioxidant synthesized by the human body called glutathione comes to the liver’s defense when toxic by-products are produced. Hepatocytes in particular are so dependent on glutathione in the quenching of toxins that it has been observed that any challenge to the manufacture of this endogenous antioxidant will ultimately result in liver failure.

Glutathione is released by hepatocytes in large amounts especially during the metabolism of alcohol and drugs, but during overdose the ravaging activities of ethanol or drug metabolites overwhelm the detoxifying effects of antioxidant reserves in the body. Simply put, the defense mechanisms in the employ of the body have limits. NAC resolves this problem.

The presence of NAC in the body augments the liver’s ability to produce the needed amounts of glutathione to effectively counter the harmful properties of invasive substances. In fact, the liver completely recuperates in a matter of weeks even after life-threatening conditions given that NAC is introduced in the human body in time to avoid subsequent damages to other vital organs. Indeed its application has proven to save lives in fatal cases of paracetamol poisoning.

N-Acetyl Cysteine is available at your local or internet vitamin store in capsule or tablet forms. Always choose name brands like Source Naturals to ensure quality and purity of the product you buy for better liver health.

Have you had your NAC today?

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2235)


Horehound Herb
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Date: September 21, 2009 11:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horehound Herb

Horehound has been around for thousands of years. The Romans used this herb in a combination as an antidote for poison. The horehound plant is a bushy plant that produces numerous annual branching stems. The plant is a foot or more in height and has whitish flowers. The leaves are much wrinkled, opposite, petiolate, and about an inch long. They are covered with white, felted hairs that give them a wooly appearance. The leaves have a strange, musky smell that can be diminished by drying the plant. Horehound is known to flower between June and September.

An ancient Greek physician by the name of Galen first recommended horehound for use in treating respiratory conditions. Early European physicians also used horehound to treat respiratory ailments. Early settlers in North America brought horehound with them to treat coughs, colds, and tuberculosis. The herb was also used to treat hepatitis, malaria, and intestinal worms. Horehound was also used to promote menstruation and sweating. Most commonly, the herb is used to treat colds and coughs, to soothe the throat and loosen mucus in the chest. Horehound is a well-known lung and throat remedy.

Warm infusions of horehound are able to relieve congestion and hyperemic conditions of the lungs. They do this by promoting an outward flow of blood. In large doses, horehound will work as a mild laxative. Applying the dried herb topically is a great way to treat herpes simplex, eruptions, eczema, and shingles.

The Romans praised horehound because of its medicinal purposes. Its Latin name Marrubium is derived from the word Maria urbs, which is an ancient town of Italy. The plant was called the ‘Seed of Horus” or the ‘Bull’s Blood,’ and the ‘Eye of the Star’ by the Egyptian Priests. Horehound was a main ingredient in Caesar’s antidote for vegetable poisons. It was recommended, in addition to its uses in coughs and colds, for those that had drunk poison or had been bitten by serpents. Horehound was once thought of as an anti-magical herb. Additionally, horehound is a serviceable remedy against cankerworm in trees. Some believed that if it is put into new milk and set in a place where there are a lot of flies, it will quickly kill all of them.

The marrubiin content of horehound is believed to be the responsible component, giving it its ability to stimulate bronchial mucosa secretions. This information was obtained by German research done in 1959. Horehound can be used as a safe and effective expectorant.

The entire horehound plant should be used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antitussive, aromatic, bitter, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, mild purgative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are iron, potassium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and F. Primarily, horehound is extremely helpful in dealing with asthma, colds, coughs, croup, lung ailments, excessive mucus, phlegm, and respiratory problems.

Additionally, this herb is beneficial in treating bronchitis, infectious diseases, earaches, external eczema, fevers, glandular problems, jaundice, absent menstruation, and external shingles. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horehound, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2084)


Milk Thistle And Silymarin
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Date: August 12, 2009 12:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Milk Thistle And Silymarin

In Europe, milk thistle was used as a well-known remedy for liver problems and also as a digestive aid. Pliny the Elder, the early Roman writer, explained how the juice of milk thistle mixed with honey was used for carrying off bile. Gerard, an herbalist, said in 1597 that milk thistle was one of the best remedies for liver-related diseases. Milk thistle was also given to nursing mothers to improve milk production.

The liver is an extremely important organ that is found in the body. It is responsible for filtering toxic material from the body, which prevents accumulation that can lead to disease and death. Often, the vital functions of the liver are overlooked. Nevertheless, they are extremely important. It is essential to keep the liver working properly. Milk thistle has been proven to be very beneficial for liver function. Milk thistle extract has been shown in observations to help reverse both acute and chronic liver problems, including cirrhosis and viral hepatitis. The antioxidant properties may be due to the bioflavonoid content. Milk thistle has also been found to help heal the liver from damage that occurs from alcohol toxicity. It has been used to treat many different liver ailments. Among these are fatty liver disorders, chronic hepatitis, inflammation of the bile duct, hardening of the liver, and cirrhosis. Milk thistle is also thought to actually help liver regeneration when part of the liver is removed.

Milk thistle possesses a variety of compounds which are known as Silymarin. This includes silybin, silydianin, and silychristin. All of these substances are known to protect the liver against some toxins, which helps to increase the function of this important organ. Silybin is used as an antidote to the deathcape mushroom, which is known to destroy liver cells. The deathcap species is one of the most toxic of liver poisons and has a death rate of up to fifty percent. A study with sixty patients suffering from deathcap poisoning treated with silybin produced incredible results. None of the participants died. Silymarin is an effective remedy if it is administered within forty-eight hours of ingestion. This compound seems to occupy the receptor sites to protect the cell membranes. Not only does it work to treat serious liver conditions, but it also prevents damage from occurring. Silymarin contains amines which are known to help stimulate the production and flow of bile. This compound has been found in studies to work exclusively on the kidneys and liver. Milk thistle has also been shown to stimulate the synthesis of protein.

The seeds of the milk thistle plant are used to provide alterative, antioxidant, galactagogue, hepatic, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are bioflavonoids. Primarily, milk thistle is extremely beneficial in treating cirrhosis, hepatitis, jaundice, kidney problems, and liver disorders. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with alcoholism, appetite loss, high blood pressure, boils, chemotherapy, depression, epilepsy, fatty deposits, gas, heartburn, heart problems, hemorrhages, hypoglycemia, indigestion, absent lactation, menstrual symptoms, effects of radiation, skin diseases, varicose veins, and the effects of toxins.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2052)


Activated Charcoal - Highly absorbent material to combat poisoning
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Date: April 24, 2008 02:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Activated Charcoal - Highly absorbent material to combat poisoning

Activated charcoal has been treated by heat to open up millions of small spaces between the carbon atoms and turn it literally into an atomic sponge that adsorbs both organic and organic impurities.

This heat treatment is carried out in the absence of oxygen, so the charcoal cannot burn. Instead, what oxygen it did contain is driven off leaving behind all of these interstitial gaps that multiply the effective surface area by factors of ten. Since it is the surface area of the charcoal that determines its potency, then the greater this is the better.

Activated charcoal has a massive surface area, and just ten grams has the same surface area as nine American football pitches or 77 tennis courts. Ten grams is just marginally more than a third of an ounce. The term adsorb has a different meaning to absorb, and while a real sponge absorbs water by mopping it up through capillary action and suction, activation carbon adsorbs substances through a form of chemical attraction. You get rid of water from the sponge by squeezing it, but that doesn’t work with activated charcoal, since the substances are bound to it, not just physically constrained.

This huge surface area provides activated charcoal with innumerable bonding sites, and when chemicals that are attracted to carbon pass by they are attached to the surface. They cannot get free again, as water in a sponge can, but are bound to the surface of the carbon. Because the digestive system has no effect on charcoal then whatever is bound to it passes naturally through the body.

It is most effective at binding other carbon-based materials, and other substances with the right electronic arrangement, but others will just pass straight through. Because it is a chemical process, once all of the empty bonding sites have been taken up, the charcoal loses its effectiveness and has to be replaced. It is possible to regenerate it, but hardly worthwhile for you to do so because of the small quantities you use.

Because of the way it works, activated charcoal can help people to recover from some forms of food poisoning. It can adsorb gases in the intestine and help to relieve the pain of excessive gas in the gut. It has many additional uses that will be touched on later, but for now we will look at its effect on poisons because that is where activated charcoal is of greatest benefit to us.

It does not adsorb and neutralize all poisons, but is very effective with those that it can be sued for. Professor Touery proved a point when he drank a lethal dose of strychnine in front of colleagues at the French Academy of Medicine in 1831 and came through unscathed. He had mixed the strychnine with activated charcoal, and the fact that he lived after drinking a dose that would certainly have led to a very painful death within minutes testifies to the powerful effect of activated charcoal as an potential antidote for poisoning.

Ever medicine cabinet should have an emergency supply of activated carbon, especially those with young children in the household. However, this is not good news for the pharmaceutical companies who have reacted by refuting some of the claims made in its favor: they have claimed that it is not effective against arsenic. If that is so, then how did Michel Bertrand survive after swallowing 5 grams of arsenic trioxide – 150 times what is regarded as the lethal dose? He did this is 1813 after mixing it with activated charcoal, just as Professor Touery was to do 18 years later with ten times the lethal dose of strychnine.

It is true, however, that it does not have this degree of activity with all poisons, and it has no effect on cyanide, alcohols, antifreeze (glycols) and lithium. It also has no effect on corrosive poisons such as the strong alkalis used in oven clearers, or hydrocarbons such as kerosene. The way it works is adsorb the poison and prevent it being released into the body. For that to happen, the poison must have an affinity for carbon, and its adsorption site, and not all substances possess that property. Those that do however are permanently bound and therefore safe.

For charcoal to be effective in neutralizing a poison, it must be swallowed within an hour of taking the poison, or the poison will be too far advanced ion the digestive process for the charcoal to do any good. Keep in mind, though, that it is not selective, and activated charcoal can adsorb nutrients and other beneficial constituents of your body’s chemistry. It is important therefore that you take in only when necessary: you might need several doses if the poison was severe, but once it has done its job it is not meant to be used as a maintenance material to take ‘just in case’. Used like that, it can do harm.

If charcoal can adsorb poisons then it makes sense to believe that it can also adsorb some of the harmful agents that cause food poisoning. Not all food poisoning of course, but certainly those organisms that emit toxins that are attracted to carbon. And this is, in fact, the case. Food poisoning is caused by bacteria rather than viruses, and is not the presence of the bacteria that make you vomit and feel very ill.

As bacteria grow in your body they release toxins, or poisons, into your digestive system. These poisons are what make you ill. They can seriously affect the complete gastro-intestinal tract, causing vomiting, diarrhea, and inflammation and swelling of the small and large intestine. The latter can cause abdominal cramps and severe colic, and the severity of the symptoms depends very much upon the type of bacteria and the number of them in your body.

Many of these toxins are attracted to carbon since they are frequently organic based, and activated charcoal can be used to adsorb them. Once adsorbed they lose their potency, and since carbon is not digested by the body, they are passed harmlessly through the colon and eliminated in the faeces. It can also be used to eliminate many other foreign bodies from your gut, including viruses and fungi and might possibly reduce the concentration of uric acid, which can bring relief to gout sufferers.

Activated charcoal has many uses, and is normally available in capsule form. It can be dangerous to take too much, particularly if you suffer from intestinal problems that cause constipation, because the charcoal itself can have that effect. However, there is no better emergency treatment for accidental poisoning in the home, although, since it is not suitable for all poisons, you must still regard poisoning as an emergency and contact the emergency services.

Activated charcoal, or activated carbon as it is sometimes called, is also a good emergency treatment for vomiting and the other unpleasant effects of food poisoning. It deals with bacterial toxins in the same way as any other, though once again you must refer to your physician before or after using it – preferably the former.

--
Vitanet ®, LLC

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Diet And Nutrition Can Boost The Body’s Energy Efficiency
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Date: April 10, 2008 10:28 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Diet And Nutrition Can Boost The Body’s Energy Efficiency

Today, when we look around, we can’t help but notice that the environment is suffering. Natural resources are depleted, water and soil are contaminated, and air, in some cities, is gray with particulates. If the human body is a microcosm of the planet, and the planet is showing signs of stress, then one can only imagine what is going on with our bodies. Scientific advances allow us to fight fatal disease, but obesity and diabetes rates are higher than ever. People who are living unhealthy lifestyles are facing a “personal environment” crisis similar to the one that Earth is fighting.

Just as fossil fuels are guilty of polluting the environment, junk foods are to blame for polluting our bodies, making both our bodies and the planet pay the price. The answer lies in our energy choices. Fresh foods are the antidote to microwave dinners and meals from the drive-thru. The healthiest and most efficient sources of energy all have one thing in common; they are derived directly from the sun. Sunlight creates vitamin D in our bodies and allows plants to grow. Despite our fears of melanoma and premature aging, the sun does so much for us.

About 85% of our country’s power today comes from carbon-based fossil fuels. Even though these energy sources originated from the sun, it took the earth millions of years to create these fuels that we rely upon today. After over 100 years of use, we’re quickly running out of these fuels, which may be good considering the harmful effects fossil fuels cause. The good news it that there are clean, renewable, natural alternatives to these energy sources, such as solar energy.

Although solar energy currently accounts for only about 0.1% of US energy usage, its momentum is increasing steadily, as demand has grown from 20% to 25% over the past twenty years. We can harness the sun’s energy by passive solar heating, which can reduce heating bills as much as 50%; solar hot water heating, which uses a roof-mounted solar collector in order to produce hot water; and PV panels, which achieve between 10% to 20% efficiency in converting sunlight into energy. Solar energy doesn’t pollute, is infinitely available, and is steadily increasing in efficiency levels.

The sun also supplies the cleanest, most efficient fuel for our bodies: vegetables, fruits, grains, and anything else that comes from the earth. All living things depend on sunlight for food. Therefore, food in its natural state, nourished by the sun, comes readily made with all the nutrients that we need in order to achieve optimal health. The processed junk foods are many steps removed from the sun’s energy and have little nutritious effects to offer us and all they do is pollute our system. Those calories that are nutrient-based are the best bet for our body’s efficiency.

Nutrient-dense foods allow us to eat less and yet feel more satisfied because we’re getting the needed nourishment. If the body’s cells are thought of as microscopic power plants, it can be seen that they need the right kind of fuel in order to make the machine (the body) do what it’s suppose to do. Without carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water, the body can not function. These substances allow the body to perform daily activities such as heart, lung, and organ function, as well as repairing tissue.

Those foods containing phytochemicals are disease fighting, adding increased benefits to our diet. Whole foods that are fresh from the earth are the best options to keep your body in peak performance. For those who can not eat good all day long, multiple vitamins are available to help supplement what is missing from the over processed foods in out diets.

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Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet
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Date: December 07, 2005 12:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet

Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 02/10/05

LIKELY USERS: People with exposure to toxins that stimulate liver activity; People with exposure to infections that may have damaged liver tissue

KEY INGREDIENT (S): Milk Thistle extract (Silymarin), Glutathione, NAC, Bupleurum extract, Grape Seed Extract, Dandelion Root extract, Artichoke Leaf, Schisandra and about a dozen additional herbs, along with synergistic ingredients

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: This formula was developed by a physician based on his clinical experience.

Artichoke leaf has antioxidant properties and restores healthy growth to liver cells.

Bupleurum may promote normal cell growth, immune function and is a staple of Chinese liver formulas. Dandelion Root may serve as a natural down-regulator of inflammatory chemicals in the body. NAC supports liver Glutathionestores (antioxidant, detoxifier, heavy metal chelator). Schisandra protects liver cells from toxins and may help to regenerate damaged cells. Milk thistle’s antioxidant Silymarin improves liver function tests and protects liver cells against oxidative damage. It also protects liver cells by blocking and removing toxins from the liver. Silymarin aids in regenerating injured liver cells and blocks fibrosis.

OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES: Samuel Verghese, M.D. (AM), Ph.D., BCIA-EEG, DAAPM, holds a degree in Alternative Medicine and specializes in Nutritional, Ayurvedic and other Alternative Health Solutions. He is certified as a BCIA-EEG Associate Fellow.

AMOUNT TO USE: Three or more capsules a day, preferably with meals.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Antioxidants (supports liver detoxification), Alpha Lipoic Acid, EGCg Green Tea Extract, Astragalus, medicinal mushrooms (shiitake, reishi), SAM-e (may improve bile flow and promotes methylation to detoxify chemicals), TMG, lecithin, thymus glandular extract, Cordyceps.

AVOID: acetaminophen, alcohol, iron supplements (also red meat, fortified flour)

CAUTIONS: This formula should not be used by pregnant women, nursing mothers children or those with liver problems unless recommended under the supervision of a healthcare professional. Please notify your physician about your supplement use if you are using any drugs! Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

1. Salmi HA, Sarna S. Effect of silymarin on chemical, functional and morphological alterations of the liver. A double-blind controlled study. Scand J Gastroenterol 1982;17:517–21.
2. Feher J, Deak G, Muzes G, et al. Liver-protective action of silymarin therapy in chronic alcoholic liver diseases. Orv Hetil 1989;130:2723–7 [in Hungarian].
3. Muzes G, Deak G, Lang I, et al. Effect of silymarin (Legalon) therapy on the antioxidant defense mechanism and lipid peroxidation in alcoholic liver disease (double blind protocol.) Orv Hetil 1990:131:863–6 [in Hungarian].
4. Velussi M, Cernigoi AM, De Monte A, et al. Long-term (12 months) treatment with an anti-oxidant drug (silymarin) is effective on hyperinsulinemia, exogenous insulin need and malondialdehyde levels in cirrhotic diabetic patients. J Hepatol 1997;26:871–9.
5. Lieber CS. Nutrition in liver disorders. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M, Ross AC (eds). Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 9th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins, 1999, 1179–80.
6. Rodriguez-Moreno F, Gonzalez-Reimers E, Santolaria-Fernandez F, et al. Zinc, copper, manganese, and iron in chronic alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol 1997;14:39–44.
7. Gibbs K, Walshe JM. Studies with radioactive copper (64 Cu and 67 Cu); the incorporation of radioactive copper into caeruloplasmin in Wilson’s disease and in primary biliary cirrhosis. Clin Sci 1971;41:189–202.
8. Lieber CS. Nutrition in liver disorders. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M, Ross AC (eds). Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 9th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins, 1999:1179–80.
9. Halsted CH. Alcohol: medical and nutritional effects. In Ziegler EE, Filer LJ (eds). Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 7th ed. ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 1996, 553.
10. Blum AL, Doelle W, Kortum K, et al. Treatment of acute viral hepatitis with (+)-cyanidanol-3. Lancet 1977;2:1153–5.
11. Suzuki H, Yamamoto S, Hirayama C, et al. Cianidanol therapy for HBs-antigen-positive chronic hepatitis: a multicentre, double-blind study. Liver 1986;6:35–44.
12. Tang W, Eisenbrand G. Chinese Drugs of Plant Origin. Berlin: Springer Verlag, 1992. (Astragalus)
13. Hobbs, C. Medicinal Mushrooms. Santa Cruz, CA: Botanica Press, 1995, 96–107.
14. Harada T, Kanetaka T, Suzuki H, Suzuki K. Therapeutic effect of LEM (extract of cultured Lentinus edodes mycelia) against HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B. Gastroenterol Int 1988;1(suppl 1):abstract 719. 15. Kelly GS. Clinical applications of N-acetylcysteine. Altern Med Rev. Apr1998;3(2):114-27.
16. Montanini S, et al. Use of acetylcysteine as the life-saving antidote in Amanita phalloides (death cap) poisoning. Case report on 11 patients. Arzneimittelforschung. Dec1999;49(12):1044-7.
17. Buckley NA, et al. Oral or intravenous N-acetylcysteine: which is the treatment of choice for acetaminophen (paracetamol) poisoning? J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1999;37(6):759-67. 18. Girardi G, Elias MM. Effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine in protecting against mercuric chloride-induced nephrotoxicity. Toxicology. Apr1991;67(2):155-64.
19. Berkson MB. Alpha-Lipoic Acid (Thioctic Acid): My Experience With This Outstanding Therapeutic Agent. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine. 1998;13(1):44-48.
20. Breithaupt-Grogler K, et al. Dose-proportionality of oral thioctic acid--coincidence of assessments via pooled plasma and individual data. Eur J Pharm Sci. Apr1999;8(1):57-65.
21. Gebhardt R. Antioxidative and Protective Properties of Extracts from Leaves of the Artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) Against Hydroperoxide-induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. Jun1997;144(2):279-86.
22. Adzet T, et al. Hepatoprotective Activity of Polyphenolic Compounds From Cynara scolymus Against CCl4 Toxicity in Isolated Rat Hepatocytes. J Nat Prod. Jul1987;50(4):612-17.
23. Gebhardt R. Antioxidative and protective properties of extracts from leaves of the artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) against hydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress in cultured rat hepatocytes. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. Jun1997;144(2):279-86.
24. Khadzhai I, et al. Effect of Artichoke Extracts on the Liver. Farmakol Toksikol. Nov1971;34(6):685-87.
25. Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicine: A Guide for Health-Care Professionals. Cambridge: Pharmaceutical Press; 1996:36-37.
27. Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press;1996:96-97.
28. Bradley PR, ed. British Herbal Compendium. Vol.1. Bournemouth: British Herbal Medicine Association;1992:73-74.
29. Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press;1996:96-97.



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Endnotes
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Endnotes

Endnotes


1 John R. Lee, M.D., NATURAL PROGESTERONE: THE MULTIPLE ROLES OF A REMARKABLE HORMONE, Revised. (BLL Publishing, Sebastopol, California: 1993), 4. See also U.S. Barzel, “Estrogens in the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a review.” AM J MED, (1988), 85: 847-850 and D.R. Felson, Y. Zhang, M.T. Hannan, et al., “The effect of postmenopausal estrogen therapy on bone density in elderly women.” THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE. (1993), 329: 1141-1146.
2 Darrell W. Brann, “Progesterone: The Forgotten Hormone?” PERSPECTIVES IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE. Summer, (1993), 34:4, 642. See also A.I. Csapo and B.A. Resch, “Induction of preterm labor in the rat by the antiprogesterone.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. (1979), 134:823-27.
3 Penelope Ody, THE COMPLETE MEDICINAL HERBAL. (Dorling Kindersley, New York: 1993), 52.
4 Daniel B. Mowrey, THE SCIENTIFIC VALIDATION OF HERBAL MEDICINE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1986), 112.
5 Lee, 16.
6 Ibid., 52.
7 C. Norman Shealy, M.D., DHEA THE YOUTH AND HEALTH HORMONE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1996), 34.
8 Lee, 4.
9 Ibid., 101.
10 Ibid., 50.
11 Ibid., 51.
12 Ibid., 101.
13 Ibid., 52.
14 Ibid., See also “Progesterone: Safe antidote for PMS.” MCCALL’S MAGAZINE. October, (1990), 152-56 and Linda Carol Graham, “Do You Have a Hormone Shortage?” REDBOOK. February, (1989), 16.
15 Ibid.
16 Rita Elkins, M.A., DEPRESSION AND NATURAL MEDICINE. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 129.
17 Lee, 84.
18 Ibid., 87.
19 Ibid.
20 Alan R. Gaby, M.D., PREVENTING AND REVERSING OSTEOPOROSIS. (Prima Publishing, Rocklin, California: 1994), 150. See also John, R. Lee, M.D. “Osteoporosis reversal: the role of progesterone.” INT CLIN NUTR REV. (1990) 10:3, 384-91 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Osteoporosis reversal with transdermal progesterone.” LANCET. (1991), 336, 1327 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Is natural progesterone the missing link in osteoporosis prevention and treatment?” MED HYPOTHESES. 35, 316-18.
21 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 4.
22 Ibid., 102.
23 Ibid.
24 Shealy, 34.
25 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 71. See also R.A.Hiatt, R. Bawol, G.D. Friedman and R. Hoover, “Exogenous estrogen and breast cancer after bilateral oophorectomy.” CANCER. (1984), 54, 139-44.
26 Lee, 4. See alsoR.B. Gambrell, “The Menopause: Benefits and Risks of Estrogen-Progesterone Replacement Therapy,” FERTIL STERIL, 1983, (37, 457-74).
27 Ibid., 75
28 Ibid., 72. See also, L.D. Cowan, L.Gordis, J. A. Tonascia, and G.S. Jones. “Breast Cancer Incidence in Women with a History of Progesterone Deficiency. JOURNAL OF EPIDIMIOLOGY, 1981, (114) 209.17.
29 Schealy, 35.
30 Ibid..
31 Lee, 74.
32 Schealy, 35.
33 Lee, 102.

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HERBS FOR A HEALTHY LIVER
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Date: July 14, 2005 03:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HERBS FOR A HEALTHY LIVER

HERBS FOR A HEALTHY LIVER

The liver is extremely important in ridding the body of toxins. It is the key channel of elimination. Good health is impossible without adequate liver function. It is one of the most important organs in the body and often is not considered when it comes to health. The liver cannot function if digestion is poor or the colon is congested. Everything the enters the liver must be detoxified.

Everything we breathe, eat and absorb through the skin is refined in the liver; it becomes overburdened when too much is required. The liver is required to detoxify at a much higher rate than ever before. The exposure to toxins has increased rapidly over the years. The liver works by using enzymes to break down toxic material. The liver then converts the material from a fat soluble form to a water soluble form to be eliminated through the kidneys.

Milk Thistle

Milk thistle has a complex of compounds known as silymarin. These substances are actually known to protect the liver against some toxins and help increase the function of this important organ. Silybin found in this herb is used as an antidote to the deadly deathcap mushroom which is known to destroy liver cells. It also contains amines (thyramine and histamine) which are known to help stimulate the production and flow of bile. Milk thistle has been proven to be very beneficial on liver function.

Studies done recently indicate that milk thistle is beneficial for severe liver disorders such as hepatitis and cirrhosis, as well as general liver restoration, protection and strengthening. The properties of milk thistle have been confirmed in animal studies to be a protection in liver disorders.

Turmeric

Turmeric has been found to contain liver protective properties similar to the glycyrrhizin found in licorice. This ability may be due to its powerful antioxidant activity. It also has been found to increase enzymes in the liver to pre vent inflammation. Turmeric has also been found to increase bile acid output. Turmeric has the ability to breakdown carcinogens and toxins allowing them to be excreted from the body without doing damage. It seems to protect the liver from toxic damage.

Licorice

Licorice contains glycyrrhizin and glycyrrhetinic acid which help stimulate interferon in the body which is essential for protecting the immune system. It also contains liver protective properties preventing damage due to toxic exposure. Glycyrrhizin found in licorice is thought to inhibit cell injury. Glycyrrhizin has been found in studies to be beneficial in treating cases of chronic hepatitis B. It seems to improve liver function as well as reduce liver enzymes that are known to determine liver damage.

Schizandra

Scientific studies have found that schizandra protects the liver against toxins. Problems with the liver and lead to immune disorders because of the build up of toxins. Schizandra has also been found to protect against the effects of alcohol in mice. Other studies have found this herb to have a mild regenerative effect on the liver . It is used in China to treat infectious hepatitis. It helps to protect the liver from damage and encourage liver regeneration after injury or illness.

Other herbs:

  • Dandelion
  • Burdock
  • Barberry

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    FUNCTIONS
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    Date: July 12, 2005 09:54 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: FUNCTIONS

    FUNCTIONS

    The active ingredients in Milk Thistle consist of a complex of compounds which are referred to as silymarin. These substances can actually protect the liver against certain toxins, while simultaneously boosting the function of the liver. Milk Thistle contains some of the most potent liverp rotecting substances known. For this reason, it is an invaluable herb for the treatment of hepatitis, cirrhosis, jaundice and fatty degeneration of the liver.

    In addition, silybin, one of the compounds found in Milk Thistle, has been used as an antidote to the lethal deathcap mushroom whose toxin targets liver cells. Because of this action, in Germany, Milk Thistle has been used to block the action of amanita mushroom poisoning. In the case of mushroom poisoning, the herb is administered intravenously.

    Studies have indicated that Milk Thistle has valuable therapeutic merit for severe liver disorders and acts as liver restorative as well.1 Not only does it promote new cell growth in the liver, it also prevents the formation of damaging leukotrienes.

    Because the liver plays a vital role in maintaining a healthy immune system, Milk Thistle can contribute to increased disease resistance. This link may explain why it also has value for anyone suffering from psoriasis or chronic fatigue syndrome.

    In addition, Milk Thistle can legitimately be called an antioxidant. It helps protect the cells from free radicals by scavenging them before they can cause cellular damage. Flavonoids have tremendous value as antioxidants and Milk Thistle is rich in them. The flavonoid-like compounds of this herb help to promote cell membrane integrity and to reduce its permeability.

    Milk Thistle also acts to protect the kidneys, brain and other vital organs from toxin damage, treats allergic reactions, reduces inflammation and promotes healing. It also helps to emulsify fats and enhance bile flow, making it a good remedy for indigestion.

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    TRADITIONAL USES
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:08 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: TRADITIONAL USES

    TRADITIONAL USES

    Folk tales and myths surround the ginseng plant in all its varieties. It was thought to be the ultimate herb for strength, vigor and a long life. The Asian ginseng used throughout China was thought of as the ultimate cure-all. It has been highly esteemed and used for thousands of years.

    Ginseng is stimulating on the entire body to help overcome stress, increase longevity, fatigue, weakness, mental fatigue, improve brain cell function, and benefit the heart and circulation. It is also used to normalize blood pressure, reduce cholesterol levels, and to prevent artherioslcerosis. It is used to help protect the body against radiation and as an antidote to drugs and toxic chemicals. Ginseng is often given alone or in combination with other herbs to restore balance in the body.

    Folk medicine recommends ginseng for many ailments such as amnesia, cancer, atherosclerosis, asthma, diabetes, coughs, heart, fear, fever, epilepsy, hypertension, malaria, impotence, insomnia, longevity, swelling, sores and vertigo. It is probably safe to say that ginseng is one of the most popular and most prescribed natural remedies for just about anything.

    Ginseng has been used to rejuvenate the body and maintain health. It is used to promote regeneration at times of stress on the body. It also helps when the body has undergone illness or surgery. It is also thought to help increase longevity and keep the body looking young with less signs of aging. It is not only promoted for physical longevity but also for mental function.

    Ginseng is often used to help strengthen the male reproductive systems. It is thought to be especially healing on the prostate gland. It is also used as an aphrodisiac. Ginseng is also thought to produce some testosterone in women, and for this reason, is not recommended for long periods of time. Panax ginseng is thought to increase male hormone production.

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    SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH GARLIC
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    Date: June 25, 2005 10:34 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH GARLIC

    SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH GARLIC

  • • Antioxidant: Protects cells against damage by free radicals found in environmental pollutants including heavy metals. Garlic contains the highest level of the antioxidant selenium, which affords excellent cellular protection.
  • • Anti-toxic: Can be considered a radiation antidote in that it stimulates cellular detoxification.
  • • Anti-cancer: Blocks the ability of carcinogens to mutate healthy cells into malignant ones. In some cases, Garlic can even inhibit the early proliferation of cancerous cells.
  • • Decongestant: Helps to rid the respiratory tract of mucus.
  • • Artery Cleanser: Significantly lowers blood levels of triglycerides which have been associated with an increased risk of heart attack.
  • • Anti-artherosclerotic: Promotes the regression of fatty deposits in blood vessels, a major cause of atherosclerosis, and can even help reverse arterial blockages caused by the collection of plaque.
  • • Antibiotic: Works as an immune system stimulant which helps the body fight bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Enhancing immune defenses may also help the body rid itself of cancerous invaders.
  • • Anticoagulant: Reduces the tendency of the blood to clot and helps to dissolve existing clots. Both of these actions are very significant in reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • • Tonic: Garlic has a positive effect on the heart, stomach, lungs and spleen.
  • • Anti-infection: Externally, garlic can be used as a drawing poultice.
  • • Antiparasitic: Garlic has traditionally been used in enemas to rid the colon of intestinal parasites.
  • • Blood Purifier: Helps to stimulate the lymphatic system to more efficiently get rid of waste material.
  • • Glucose Control: Garlic has been found to be useful in controlling glucose tolerance and is beneficial for both hypo and hyperglycemia. Anyone with diabetes can benefit from garlic as well.
  • • Swelling: Garlic suppositories have been used to shrink hemorrhoids.
  • • Anti-inflammatory: The anti-inflammatory action of garlic makes it a valuable treatment for arthritis. Garlic reduces joint swelling and inflammation
  • • Antihypertensive: Garlic has been recognized by the Japanese Food and Drug Administration as an official treatment for high blood pressure.
  • • Garlic is a “wonder” food that is considered to be one of the most effective natural healing substances in the world.

    COMBINATIONS THAT ENHANCE GARLIC

  • • garlic, capsicum and vitamin C
  • • garlic, coenzyme Q10, carnitine, selenium and hawthorne berries
  • • garlic, ginseng, echinacea, and white willow
  • • garlic, horehound, echinacea, chickweed, mullein and licorice
  • • garlic, onion, raspberry leaves and licorice

    Garlic: Primary Applications

  • • asthma
  • • artherosclerosis
  • • arthritis
  • • blood clots
  • • blood pressure
  • • bronchitis
  • • Candida Albicans
  • • cardiovascular disease
  • • cancer prevention
  • • circulation
  • • colds
  • • colitis
  • • contagious diseases
  • • coughs
  • • ear infections
  • • digestion
  • • fever
  • • flu
  • • fungus
  • • gas
  • • heart disease
  • • hypertension
  • • infections (viral, bacterial and fungal)
  • • liver disorders
  • • parasites
  • • prostate gland
  • • respiratory diseases
  • • staph and strep infections
  • • yeast infections

    Garlic: Secondary Applications

  • • acne
  • • allergies
  • • arthritis
  • • diabetes
  • • diarrhea
  • • emphysema
  • • gallbladder
  • • hypoglycemia
  • • insomnia
  • • kidneys
  • • pneumonia
  • • rheumatism
  • • sinus
  • • ulcers
  • • warts
  • • worms

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    GARLIC AS AN ANTIOXIDANT
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    Date: June 25, 2005 10:20 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GARLIC AS AN ANTIOXIDANT

    GARLIC AS AN ANTIOXIDANT

    The term “antioxidant” has become a buzz word over the last decade. Defending ourselves against a wide array of chemicals, heavy metals, pollutants, radiation and poor nutrition has become a vital area of scientific focus and research. Oxidizing agents or free radicals attack our bodies constantly and have the potential to damage our cells, which compresses human tissue.

    Substances which have been found to help protect us from the cellular damage caused by free radicals include vitamin C, bioflavonoids, vitamin E, vitamin A, beta carotene and selenium to name a few. Garlic is not usually found on standard antioxidant lists and probably should be.

    Garlic has an abundance of sulfhydryl which is an excellent antioxidant. It’s important to know that raw garlic did not demonstrate this ability. In fact, raw garlic actually has some oxidant action, which is not desireable. Garlic can also help to lessen free radical damage because it has the ability to protect against radiation. In this regard, it may significantly decrease our risk of developing certain degenerative diseases such as cancer and premature aging. In addition, anyone undergoing radiation or chemotherapy should supplement their diet with garlic. “Based on a number of studies conducted by research teams from throughout the world, scientists have concluded that part of the preventive effect of garlic against cancer is due to protection against free radical damage. But that protection extended beyond the mere ability to protect against disease. The ability of garlic to protect against free radical damage may have yet another important benefit to cancer victims: it can, according to several published articles, protect against the damage that results from radiation treatment and chemotherapy commonly given to many cancer patients.” 44 Garlic also contains a number of amino acids which are required for the formation of an enzymatic antidote to free radical pathology which is created by cigarette smoke and other pollutants. Cysteine, glutamine, isoleucine and methionine found in garlic help to protect the cells from free radical damage.

    Garlic works as an antioxidant the same way that onions, and green chilies do. In his book The Miracle of Garlic, Paavo Airola states:

    “An Indian study showed that garlic exhibited a high antiox idant property as determined by the peroxide values of the products by the swift stability test. Garlic restrained the development of all characteristic indexes of rancidity (acids, peroxides, iodine no. etc.). Garlic retained its antioxidant property for a half year after harvesting.”45

    Because our food, air, water and environments are heavily contaminated with pollutants of all kind including food additives, preservatives, artificial colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, chemical fertilizers, etc., garlic should become a permanent addition to our nutritional array of supplements.

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    Health Movements - Joining mind and body with healthy movement generates harmony
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    Date: June 12, 2005 05:49 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Health Movements - Joining mind and body with healthy movement generates harmony

    Health Movements by Sylvia Whitefeather Energy Times, December 6, 2003

    Mind/body exercises like yoga (especially the super-popular Bikram variety), tai chi and Pilates aren't just trendy, they're custom made to soothe the rough edges of modern life. So often does today's fast-paced world emphasize the mental and competitive aspects of existence that its inhabitants frequently neglect the necessity of gentle movement for the body. But these exercises are an antidote to the tendency to view the mind and body as separate entities.

    Modern science is validating what traditional teachers have always known: The mind dwells in every cell. Joining mind and body with healthy movement generates harmony, lowers your chance of chronic illness and promotes emotional stability.

    Yoga

    No one knows when yoga first appeared. Historians and archaeologists figure the practice was initiated in India somewhere between 3,000 and 1,500 BCE. But the father of the modern forms of yoga is considered to be a man named Patanjali, who wrote the Yoga Sutra around 200 CE.

    The literal translation of the word yoga is "union." As Jennifer Schwamm Willis notes in her book The Joy of Yoga (Marlowe), this practice represents "the union of body, mind and spirit." The purpose of learning the fundamental movements of yoga is to connect with your body, release knots of tension and improve strength and flexibility. In that way, the physical balance during a yoga session translates into inner balance during times of crisis or distress. Schwamm points out that ancient yoga practitioners believed "the aim of yoga is to quiet the fluctuations of the mind, to create stillness in order to hear one's inner voice..."

    Yoga is used by many for stress relief. But it has other important uses: In a study presented by Oregon Health & Science University at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in April 2003, yoga was shown to benefit folks with multiple sclerosis. The researchers found that participants who regularly attended yoga class for six months suffered less fatigue and improved their quality of life.

    A yoga class generally begins with warm-up postures, moves on to a core group of basic postures, and ends with poses meant to cool you down. An important aspect of yoga is breath work and control. Movement in and out of poses involves carefully orchestrated breath work. Inhalation and exhalation in timed sync with movement lies at the heart of yoga's benefits. Yoga beginners often feel stiff and inflexible. But with gentle, patient, regular practice, greater flexibility, strength and balance can be had. Experts say that a yoga session does not demand struggle; it asks for surrender. If one pose causes discomfort, try another.

    Bikram Yoga

    One particular form of yoga, Bikram, is hot in terms of both popularity and room temperature: Not only is it one of the biggest trends in the fitness world, this demanding, aerobic take on yoga is conducted in heated rooms designed to maximize muscle relaxation and minimize injury risk. The heat also helps facilitate cleansing and detoxification. It was created by Bikram Choudhury, a four-time Indian yoga champ who founded the Yoga College of India in Beverly Hills, California.

    As in other types of yoga, Bikram uses asanas, or poses, handed down through generations of yoga teachers. In this case, though, 26 asanas are done in a prescribed order over a 90-minute period. Everyone, from novice to expert, works out together, the idea being that each individual is working to stretch his or her own limits by becoming stronger, more flexible and less prone to illness.

    Bikram yoga stresses the tourniquet effect, in which blood floods through vessels after they've momentarily been squeezed shut. This pressurizing effect is supposed to flush out debris, quickening circulation and releasing stress. The tourniquet effect also helps cleanse the lymphatic system. Proponents say Bikram improves balance, concentration and posture; increases energy; and eases sleep.

    Like any other exercise program, Bikram yoga requires diligence: one center says a minimum of 10 classes over 30 days is needed for maximum benefits. And while hydration is important during all fitness routines, consuming adequate water is crucial when you're exercising in a hot room.

    Tai Chi

    Tai chi (also known as taiji or tai chi ch'uan) consists of a series of fluid movements that build endurance, increase flexibility and balance, and foster alertness of mind and spirit. Tai chi developed around the 13th century as a form of martial arts in China based on the power of flow and grace, rooting and yielding, flexibility and endurance. To the onlooker, a person practicing the movements of tai chi has the quality of someone swimming in air.

    This gentle form of movement can be practiced by people of almost all ages and physical conditions. Tai chi does not require special equipment, props or a floor mat. As a non-impact form of exercise, tai chi delivers minimal stress to the joints. Tai chi emphasizes proper body alignment and uses the large muscles in the legs to relieve stress from the hips, back and shoulders. It strengthens joints, increases range of motion and improves circulation of all body fluids. Like many other forms of mind/body exercise, tai chi relieves stress.

    Tricia Yu, author of Tai Chi: Mind and Body (DK), has been practicing tai chi for over 30 years. She believes that tai chi not only has benefits as a health exercise, but that it "can have a beneficial effect on your mental and emotional states, as well as help you to feel connected with your surroundings." Yu adds, "Like yoga, tai chi originated in a culture that views the mind and body not as separate but rather as different expressions or states of qi-vital energy or life force."

    Current research has validated the health benefits of tai chi. One study found that the knee strength of elderly people practicing tai chi improves significantly (J Gerontol A Biol Med Sci 2003 August; 58:M763-6). Participants in this study, whose average age was 72 years, benefited significantly after five months of tai chi. For the elderly, this extra strength and control translates into fewer falls and injuries.

    Tai chi may help immunity. In a study published in the September 2003 issue of Psychosomatic Medicine, researchers reported that elderly folks who participated in a tai chi class for a period of 15 weeks "saw an improvement in factors that suppress shingles [a painful viral condition] increase by 50%." They also showed an increased ability to move throughout the day and a significant improvement in their general health.

    Pilates

    Joseph Pilates (1880-1968) was a sickly child afflicted with asthma, rickets and rheumatic fever. Determined to recover his health, Pilates studied both Eastern and Western forms of exercise, incorporating moves from gymnastics, yoga and wrestling, along with controlled breathing. With his wife, Clara, Joseph Pilates developed the form of exercise known today as simply Pilates. In the 1920s, Joseph left his native Germany and came to New York City and began teaching his exercise style in dance studios.

    Today, Pilates has gained acceptance both as an exercise style for fitness and as a system for physical rehabilitation. Because of its benefits, Pilates is practiced in hospitals, wellness centers, gyms and specialized Pilates studios. It is used by athletes, dancers and anyone looking to increase endurance and improve flexibility, balance and muscle tone.

    The basic principle of Pilates focuses on increasing what is called core strength. Core muscle groups include the abdominal, pelvic floor and back muscles. If these muscle groups are strong, then the body is balanced and strong. The Pilates method also encourages flexibility by building long, strong muscles without bulk.

    The Stott method is one of the most popular forms of Pilates. This technique combines traditional Pilates exercises with movements updated to conform with modern knowledge about the biomechanics of the human body. By stabilizing muscles in the pelvis and shoulders, and keeping the spine and pelvis in safe, neutral positions, knowledgeable Pilates instructors minimize the chance of injury during these exercises.

    Pilates exercises have been shown to help reduce back pain. Researchers report that "Pilates method can be useful for patients with chronic low back pain and deconditioning" (J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2002 May; 25/4:E3).

    According to Ken Endelman, the founder of Balanced Body, maker of Pilates equipment, "Pilates is a full-body exercise. It focuses on flexibility and control, not adding bulk; bulk defeats flexibility. This flexibility is particularly important as we age. Staying flexible is key, and Pilates is good at those types of things."

    A Pilates routine can be structured to fit your specific physical needs or goals. Instructors use specially designed equipment along with mat work to improve fitness. The human body was designed to move. Again and again, research shows that exercise maintains health, vitality, longevity, weight and quality of life. If you match your exercise with your physical needs and goals, and your personality, you are more likely to stay with that program whether it is aerobics, walking, Pilates or yoga. For real benefits, physical fitness has to be a lifetime endeavor.



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    Energy Cycles - Stress and lack of energy don't just frazzle your nerves
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    Date: June 12, 2005 02:09 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Energy Cycles - Stress and lack of energy don't just frazzle your nerves

    Energy Cycles by Sylvia Whitefeather Energy Times, August 2, 2003

    Feeling stressed out and exhausted from an overburdened schedule? Regenerating your personal energy necessitates defusing stress. Stress and lack of energy don't just frazzle your nerves; they can leave you depressed, anxious and vulnerable to a long list of health problems.

    According to J. Douglas Bremner, MD, a psychiatrist at Emory University, Atlanta, when your brain overcharges on prolonged stress, your body pays a heavy, tiring price.

    "If stress has effects on the brain and neurological function, then stress has effects on all parts of the body, including the heart, blood vessels, immune system and digestive system," says Dr. Bremner, author of Does Stress Damage the Brain? (Norton). "The long list of damaging effects can include heart disease, memory impairment, depression and even increased susceptibility to stroke and cancer."

    A Good Night's Sleep

    Although getting a good night's sleep is a basic part of lowering stress and boosting energy, many of us seem to be tossing and turning through an epidemic of insomnia. The fact that so many people appear to suffer from disturbed and unsatisfying sleep may signal not only a personal energy lack, but also a deeper health crisis developing on the horizon. Lack of sleep, along with stress, not only contributes to those lackluster afternoons of the blahs, but it can also derail your basic body rhythms, weaken your immune system and make you age quicker.

    Researchers at the University of Chicago report that lack of sleep may deplete your get-up-and-go by upsetting basic metabolic functions and interfering with hormones. Pretty serious stuff: When people in this experiment cut back their sleep time to about four hours each night, their bodies behaved as if they were twenty years older and they started showing signs of developing diabetes. These effects happened in only a week of missing sleep (The Lancet, October 23, 1999).

    The drastically reduced sleep schedule slowed the thyroid gland, reducing the production and action of thyroid hormones. As a result, metabolism slowed and the non-sleepers developed that awful sluggish feeling too many of us know and hate.

    Stress from lack of sleep also coaxed the adrenal glands into releasing extra amounts of cortisol, a stress hormone whose purpose is to force the body into providing short-lived energy boosts. But after a while the body flames out, its ability to cope with daily demands drained even further.

    "We found that the metabolic and endocrine changes resulting from a significant sleep debt mimic many of the hallmarks of aging," says Eve Van Couter, PhD, professor of medicine at the University of Chicago and director of the study. "We suspect that chronic sleep loss may not only hasten the onset but could also increase the severity of age-related ailments such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity and memory loss."

    And when are you are constantly short-changed of sleep, it builds up an accumulative effect. Particularly susceptible are busy parents, shift workers, menopausal women and college students.

    One way to take back your energy from this metabolic madness is to get twelve hours of sleep a night for a week. But aside from hitting the snooze button a few hundred times, a possible antidote to this cortisol nightmare may be vitamin C.

    Fight and Flight

    The human body, which evolved before the advent of split-level houses and SUVs, was built to survive life-threatening, physical danger. When it encounters modern-day stress, such as traffic jams and credit card bills, it releases extra cortisol, heightening the body's immediate ability to run or fight. As a result of cortisol release, senses go on high alert, heart rate speeds up, blood flow to muscles increases, and the immune system mobilizes to deal with what it thinks is an imminent crisis.

    However, unlike physical danger that rapidly resolves (either you get away from what's trying to harm you or it does you in), today's stress drags on and on (at least till the next exit on the expressway), and the cortisol in the body continues to circulate.

    The long-range result of persistent cortisol is a drop in energy, rampant fatigue and lowered immunity. You feel constantly tired and you get sick more often. You may also gain weight.

    But researchers at the University of Alabama at Huntsville have found that large doses of vitamin C "reduce...the levels of stress hormones in the blood and also reduce...other typical indicators of physical and emotional stress, such as loss in body weight, enlargement of the adrenal glands, and reduction in the size of the thymus gland and the spleen," according to P. Samuel Campbell, PhD (American Chemical Society, 1999). Dr. Campbell believes that our prehistoric ancestors probably consumed large amounts of vitamin C in a tropical diet rich in fruits. "If so, the physiological constitution we have inherited may require doses far larger than the present RDA (the amount the government recommends) to keep us healthy under varying environmental conditions, including stress."

    Iron Out the Fatigue

    If you are a premenopausal woman, a lack of iron may also be draining your body of energy. According to experts, as many as one of every five women who menstruate may suffer anemia caused by a lack of iron. This type of problem is also frequent in teenagers and during pregnancy. (But before you take iron supplements, talk to your health practitioner to make sure this is the source of your fatigue.)

    "Women with heavy menstrual flow have the greatest risk (of anemia)," points out Susan Lark, MD, in Healing with Vitamins (Rodale). Dr. Lark recommends eating more iron-rich foods (like organic red meat) even if you are not anemic, since a mild iron deficiency can drag you down into the doldrums.

    Vegetarians necessarily eat fewer iron-rich foods than do meat eaters. But if you take a vitamin C supplement when you consume such iron-rich vegetables as lima beans, pinto beans and spinach, your body can absorb more of the iron in these foods.

    The Krebs Cycle: Keep the Wheel Turning

    All of your cells make the energy that keeps you going. This process, a complicated chemical reaction called the Krebs cycle, transforms fatty acids and carbohydrates into ATP (adenosine triphosphate) for cellular energy. Mitochondria, small structures in each cell, are the centers of this energy production.

    Energy production requires oxygen. The more oxygen available to the cells, the more energy is produced. Deep breathing and moderate exercise are simple, quick ways to oxygenate the body and boost energy. That is why walking, jogging and other physical activity wakes up your brain and restores pep.

    If you've been looking for ways to feel more energetic, take a deep breath and go for a long walk before you sit down to your rejuvenating lima beans and vitamin C. And another thing...take a pass on those late-night TV shows. Sleep is more important.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Pycnogenol Complex - The Next Generation of Antioxidant Protection
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    Date: June 04, 2005 02:14 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Pycnogenol Complex - The Next Generation of Antioxidant Protection

    Pycnogenol Complex

    If there’s one factor that has the greatest negative impact on our health, it is the damage done to our cells by free radicals. These highly unstable molecules disrupt the biochemical processes that regulate life. Although a natural product of oxygen metabolism in the body, free radicals are also produced in vast quantities by modern technology. Our bodies’ natural defenses simply have not been able to keep up with the onslaught of these dangerous products of civilization. On the other hand, technology has offered help by identifying some of nature’s most powerful weapons against free radical attack. Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX is an unprecedented combination of these extremely potent plantbased antioxidants, or Plantioxidants™. Consider them your antidote to the industrial revolution.

    How free radicals are formed and their effect on the body

    Oxygen both makes life, and takes life. The energy that animates us comes from the biochemical reactions that burn oxygen within our cells. And though carefully regulated by the body, this biological combustion, over time, inevitably leads to cellular damage. If oxidation is not carefully controlled, tissues are damaged faster than the body can repair them. This is caused by an excess of over-reactive, electron hungry molecules called oxidants or “free radicals,” which tend to disrupt normal cellular activity. Free radicals attack a cell’s membrane and can even damage its hereditary blueprint (DNA). Since free radicals are a natural result of certain metabolic reactions, the body synthesizes several types of antioxidant enzymes to neutralize them. In addition, we get essential antioxidants from the foods we eat. Vitamins C, E and beta carotene are the ones found most often in our diet. During this century, our environment has become a perpetual source of free radical contamination, primarily from radiation and the chemical pollution in our air, water and food. Today, we are literally overwhelmed with more free radicals than our bodies are accustomed to handling. Fortunately, science has found that certain plants contain special antioxidants that are far more powerful than the vitamins we typically get in our diet. With this knowledge, Source Naturals formulated PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX, the most advanced combination of Plantioxidants available today in one product. Pycnogenol® is the proprietary name of a natural plant product made from the bark of the European coastal pine, Pinus maritima.

    Natural protection against free radicals

    Pycnogenol® Complex – A Cornucopia of Health Our knowledge of pine bark goes back nearly 500 years, to when the French explorer, Jacques Cartier, reported that a tea made from pine tree bark by Native Americans saved the lives of his crew who were dying of scurvy. Nutrition scientists have since isolated the extraordinary antioxidant compounds of pine bark. They have also discovered many other unique antioxidants throughout the plant kingdom. Plants have evolved bioflavonoids to protect themselves from free radical damage. One of the most abundant compounds in the plant kingdom, bioflavonoids are found in the pigments of bark, rinds, seeds, leaves and flowers.

    Natural antioxidants in Pycnogenol® Complex

    The active ingredients of Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX are derived from a diverse range of nature’s plenty: pine bark, green tea, turmeric spice, rosemary, grape seeds, milk thistle seeds, bilberries, hawthorn berries and ginkgo leaves. Each of these Plantioxidants is an exceptional free radical scavenger, and each has a tendency to concentrate in a different organ of the body, thus providing targeted protection. And since their primary function is to capture free radicals, these Plantioxidants free up vitamin C, so it can perform its many other vital functions.

    Defense Plants The two headliners of Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX are the pine bark extract, Pycnogenol®, and an extract from grape seeds, Proanthodyn™. Their unsurpassed antioxidant activity – up to 20 times that of Vitamin C and up to 50 times that of Vitamin E – comes from a high concentration of proanthocyanidins.

    Why Pycnogenol® Complex is formulated with extracts of pine bark and grape seed

    These highly bioavailable flavonoids are able to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier, and can stay in the bloodstream for up to 72 hours. Few other nutritional antioxidants cross this barrier, and none do it as well. Proanthocyanidins therefore offer the brain and central nervous system unparalleled antioxidant protection. In particular, proanthocyanidins may help reduce the formation of lipofuscin, a brown waste material made of free radical-damaged proteins and fats. Over time, lipofuscin deposits form in the brain, heart, and skin. The “age” or “liver” spots that develop on the backs of some elderly peoples’ hands are made of lipofuscin. Because they’re rich in unsaturated fatty acids, cell membranes are the primary site of free radical attack. Proanthocyanidins are able to protect against both water- and fat-soluble free radicals. Also, their chemical structure is incorporated within cell membranes, making proanthocyanidins very effective in preventing damage to the cell’s interior. This is vital, because if a cell’s DNA is disrupted, it could lead to the abnormal reproduction of that cell. For many years now, Europeans have used pine bark and grape seed extracts to maintain vein and capillary health. Proanthocyanidins support the circulatory system by helping to keep collagen and elastin, the essential constituents of vessel walls, from breaking down during times of imbalance. And most importantly, proanthocyanidins can help prevent the oxidation of LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream. Scientists now recognize that it’s not cholesterol itself, but the oxidation of cholesterol that can be problematic.

    How Plantioxidants benefit different organs in the body

    The Power of Diversity

    In addition to the broad protection offered by Pycnogenol® and Proanthodyn, Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX offers an outstanding array of other Plantioxidants. Each has unique abilities to protect the body from oxidants. For several thousand years, Green Tea has been enjoyed in the Orient, not only for its taste, but also as a health tonic. Upon analysis, it contains several strong antioxidants, called Polyphenols, with exceptional free radical scavenging abilities. Polyphenols have been shown to be over 200 times more effective than vitamin E in preventing oxidative damage to brain cells. Source Naturals uses a potent extract of green tea that concentrates 2,000 pounds of fresh green tea leaves into one pound of finished product. This extract has been awarded 30 patents for its protective effects. The ancient Ginkgo Biloba tree has long been prized for its beneficial qualities. Like proanthocyanidins, ginkgo’s compounds are able to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier, and support cell membrane and capillary integrity. Its particular antioxidant constituents have been associated with superior oxygen transport to the brain. This is important because the brain uses 20% of all inhaled oxygen. Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX uses a superior 50 to 1 extract, providing 24% Ginkgoflavoneglycosides and 6% Terpenoids. Bilberries were first studied for their capacity to heighten visual acuity in normal subjects under poor light conditions. In fact, to increase their night vision, RAF pilots ate bilberry jam during WW II. Its antioxidant compounds, Anthocyanosides, have an affinity for delicate eye tissues, where it quenches free radicals and supports capillary strength. Source Naturals utilizes a standardized bilberry extract with 25% anthocyanosides, 80 times more potent than regular bilberry.

    The wide range of natural antioxidants in Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX

    Milk Thistle Seed Extract has been researched and used for over 20 years in Europe. Its antioxidant compound, called Silymarin, has a special preference for the liver. It’s one of the few nutrients that can support the liver’s natural regenerative processes. By enhancing DNA activity, liver cells can regenerate up to five times faster. Turmeric Extract contains 95% Curcumin, the active ingredient of this traditional East Indian spice. Curcumin promotes the body’s own production of antioxidant enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase, an important protector of the liver. Curcumin also increases the production and secretion of bile, which is used to remove cholesterol from the body. Quercetin has been well-researched for its free radical scavenging activity. Because of its ability to stabilize cell membranes, quercetin helps prevent damage and discomfort from reactionary (histamine- and leukotriene-related) processes in the body. Source Naturals quercetin has been isolated from plant sources. Rosemary and Hawthorn Berries both contain bioflavonoid antioxidants that have the unique ability to neutralize the hydroxyl radical, a particularly dangerous type of free radical. Hydroxyls are produced by exposure to excessive radiation and pollution from burned fossil fuels. The body has no innate defense system against it. Vitamin C is one of the most active and abundant antioxidants in the body, so it must be frequently replenished. Since it works in conjunction with bioflavonoids, each tablet of Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX contains 500 mg of vitamin C, bound to Magnesium for increased bioavailability.

    A World of Help

    As we better understand how free radicals affect our health and well being, it’s important that we take advantage of the wonderful protective qualities found in certain plants. These Plantioxidants provide the appropriate means to counteract the destructive effects of excessive free radicals, which have become part and parcel of modern life. Source Naturals PYCNOGENOL® COMPLEX brings the diverse and concentrated power of the plant world into your world of wellness.

    References
    • Masquelier, J. Natural Products as Medicinal Agents . Stutgart, Germany: Hippokrates Verlag, 1981. • Middleton, E. Jrnl. of Immunology 127 (1981): 546-50. • Muzes, G., et al. Acta-Physiologica-Hungary, 78.1 (1991): 3-9. • Oguni, I., et al. Orig. Res., Univ. of Shizuoka, Japan, 1990. PYCNOGENOL® is a registered trademark of Horphag Research, Ltd. Protected by U.S. Patent No. 4,698,360.



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