SearchBox:

Search Term: " chips "

  Messages 1-8 from 8 matching the search criteria.
Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death VitaNet, LLC Staff 8/17/18
How Much Salt Should You Really Be Eating? Darrell Miller 4/3/17
This Cancer-Causing Chemical May Be in Potatoes, Cereal and Your Morning Coffee, Too Darrell Miller 3/15/17
Pea Protein Powder And Your Health Darrell Miller 1/19/10
Fiber Darrell Miller 7/28/08
THE FDA AND STEVIA Darrell Miller 7/15/05
FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Snack Attack - we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a min Darrell Miller 6/12/05



GOOD HEALTH NATURAL FOODS APPLE CHIPS CINNAMON 2.5oz 12
   1 $45.38 23% OFF $ 34.94
GOOD HEALTH NATURAL FOODS APPLE CHIPS NATURAL 2.5oz 12 C
   1 $45.38 23% OFF $ 34.94
Now Foods Red Dragon Fruit Chips
   2 oz $5.99 6% OFF $ 5.63
FunFresh Foods Taste Waves Omega-3 Tortilla Chips
   4oz Chip x 6 bags $17.94 23% OFF $ 13.81

Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 17, 2018 09:53 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death





Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death

Nature News puts out an article on a possible link between routinely eating deep fried foods and premature deaths. One of the possible causes of an early death is acrylamide, which is present in some foods, one of which is deep fried potatoes. To cut down on risks, Nature News recommends cutting back on eating deep fried foods more than once a week(preferably even less often) and finding healthier substitutes. Substitutes could include vegetables or oven baked sweet potato fries.

Key Takeaways:

  • Fried food is full of a carcinogen known as acrylamide.
  • Black olives, cocoa, dark-crusted breads, and peanut butter are also high in acrylamide.
  • Kale chips, sweet potato fries, and crispy green beans are some healthier alternatives to French fries.

"To stay healthy and lower your risk of premature death, limit your intake of fried foods like French fries and potato chips."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-08-16-eating-fried-food-just-twice-per-week-increases-your-chance-of-early-death.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5710)


How Much Salt Should You Really Be Eating?
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 03, 2017 08:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Much Salt Should You Really Be Eating?





Many people use salt to season their foods, but often use far too much to be healthy for them. It is time to learn the right amount of salt for you to consume without causing risk to your health. There are so many other ways to season your foods than with salt, and with so many dangers, you shouldn't consume more than you should. Learn the truth about the right amount of salt to consume.

Key Takeaways:

  • A low-salt diet is actually more likely to cause fatal heart conditions than is a high-salt diet
  • Weight gain can be caused when stress hormones are triggered, and restricting one's salt intake can actually trigger those stress hormones
  • Natural sources of salt include meat, dairy products and vegetables, thus it's almost impossible to completely avoid salt if one enjoys a well-rounded diet

"Despite being a crucial ingredient in some of our fave guilty pleasure foods (hot chips, anything salted caramel) salt has copped a bit of a bad rap lately."

Read more: http://sporteluxe.com/how-much-salt-should-you-really-be-eating/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4342)


This Cancer-Causing Chemical May Be in Potatoes, Cereal and Your Morning Coffee, Too
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 15, 2017 11:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: This Cancer-Causing Chemical May Be in Potatoes, Cereal and Your Morning Coffee, Too





Acrylamide, a chemical created when carbohydrate rich foods are cooked at high temperatures can be found in potato chips, French fries, cereal, toast and coffee among other foods. The chemical has been shown to cause cancer in animals with mixed studies in humans. It can be avoided by shortening cooking times or boiling instead of frying or baking/broiling and don't overcook your food. Soak your potatoes before cooking and avoid potato chips. Keep in mind it firms from plant-based foods so be aware when you cook these types of foods

Key Takeaways:

  • In 2002, researchers discovered a cancer-causing and potentially neurotoxic chemical called acrylamide is created when carbohydrate-rich foods are cooked at high temperatures
  • Acrylamide is the byproduct of a chemical reaction between sugars and the amino acid asparagine, which occurs at high temperatures.
  • To cut acrylamide from your diet, the agency recommends avoiding fried foods, and toasting or cooking items such as bread and potatoes to a light golden color rather than dark brown or blackened.

"In November 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a consumer update advising people to reduce consumption of foods in which acrylamide is plentiful, noting this toxic byproduct is found in 40 percent of calories consumed by the average American."



Reference:

//www.healthnutnews.com/cancer-causing-chemical-may-potatoes-cereal-morning-coffee/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4160)


Pea Protein Powder And Your Health
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 19, 2010 03:42 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pea Protein Powder And Your Health

PEA Protein PowderCombining proteins from plant sources can be difficult, especially for people who are stressed for time and for those who avoid not only meats but dairy products, soy and eggs. Vegans and vegetarians often struggle to consume optimum levels of protein. And many other people search for ways to include the right amounts and types of protein in their diets.

Source Naturals Pea Protein Powder is a natural vegetable protein powder made from yellow peas (Pisum sativum), the peas used in split pea soup. This highly digestible, highly bioavailable protein source is a great way to supplement a vegetarian diet for those who have problems eating beans and soy. Suitable for children and adults, it increases carbohydrate metabolism for heart health, weight management and healthy glucose levels.

Pea Protein Powder is a non-GMO, hypo-allergic protein source that is 100% gluten and cholesterol free. The concentrated powder is 84% protein, and compliments that content of other protein sources. Its protein profile includes a high content of lysine, and essential amino acid that is often limited in other vegetable proteins.

Pea Protein Powder is easily incorporated into drinks, smoothies, shakes, crackers, chips, snacks, soups, and other dishes. It can be added to soups or stews or sprinkled on past dishes instead of parmesan cheese. It has a neutral taste and good solubility. Source Naturals Pea Protein Powder is a great way for your to boost the protein in your diet. Available in both 16 oz and 32 oz powder cans.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2121)


Fiber
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 28, 2008 03:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fiber

As a society we are undoubtedly suffering from a lack of dietary fiber. Although it is true that we are constantly warned that diets low in fiber can actually kill us, most of us continue eating the way we always have. Our diets are full of empty calories, refined foods, sugar, and very little when it comes to whole foods. As far as fiber is considered, many of us believe that a daily bowl of cereal is more than enough fiber. Sadly, the food in many of our houses consist of white flour products, cooked and canned vegetables, cookies, chips, all of which are fiber-less and artificially altered from their original state, making them less and less like actual food. The typical American eating habits have led to issues of chronic constipation, intestinal gas, bowel disorders, and a variety of infections all leading to colon cancer.

If we want to increase our fiber intake, we must first recognize what exactly fiber is, where it is found, and how it works. A lot of us would not even recognize certain foods in their whole, natural state. For the most part, whole foods from plants offer us a great amount of dietary fiber. Although food producers add natural and synthetic fiber to foods, they cannot improve on the natural fiber that is found in plants. Since ancient times, whole grains have been considered staples of the diet were consumed by the lower-class societies who could not afford the fatty, sweet, high protein diets of the upper class.

It is no coincidence that as our intake of fiber decreased, certain bowel diseases including colon cancer and diverticulitis increased. Physicians of the 19th and early 20th centuries prescribed the worse possible treatment for these bowel disorders, which was eating a bland, highly refined diet. Now today, there are over 85,000 cases of colon cancer that have diagnosed in our country each year, with the number growing.

The science of fiber began in the early 20th century, when studies were initiated on the laxative action of bran, as well as other subjects. Researchers in the sixties noticed that certain diseases, which were devastating our societies, were relatively rare in third world communities. It was concluded that all the diseases of our civilization were caused by our over-consumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Thankfully, the medical establishment has become more aware nowadays.

Today we know that the condition of the colon is related to all body systems and can influence numerous chronic diseases, which include cancer. A bacterial flora imbalance may be the cause of many diseases, with this condition being referred to as autointoxication. Autointoxication is caused by the array of poisons that an unhealthy colon can harbor and is based on the belief that what you eat determines the kind of bacteria which will inhabit your bowel.

It has been found that we rarely replenish the good flora by eating good sources of acidophilus and routinely kill the friendly bacteria by using antibiotics and other drugs and alcohol. This creates the perfect habitat for pathogenic bacteria to flourish and leaving our colons as a toxic waste dump. Intestinal microflora can be altered by increasing your intake of dietary fiber in as little as two weeks. Since fiber affects several vital metabolic processes, eating enough of it is extremely important in maintaining good health and preventing disease.

--
Buy Discount Fiber At Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1845)


THE FDA AND STEVIA
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 15, 2005 12:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: THE FDA AND STEVIA

THE FDA AND STEVIA

While stevia in no way qualifies as an “artificial sweetener,” it has been subject to rigorous inquiry and unprecedented restraints. In 1986, FDA officials began to investigate herb companies selling stevia and suddenly banned its sale, calling it “an unapproved food additive.” Then in 1991, the FDA unexpectedly announced that all importation of stevia leaves and products must cease, with the exception of certain liquid extracts which are designed for skin care only. They also issued formal warnings to companies and claimed that the herb was illegal. The FDA was unusually aggressive in its goal to eliminate stevia from American markets, utilizing search and seizure tactics, embargoes and import bans. Speculation as to why the FDA intervened in stevia commerce points to the politics of influential sugar marketers and the artificial-sweetener industry.

During the same year, the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) began their defense of the herb with the goal of convincing the FDA that stevia is completely safe. They gathered documented literature and research on both stevia and other non-caloric sweeteners. The overwhelming consensus was that stevia is indeed safe, and the AHPA petitioned the FDA to exempt stevia from food additive regulations.

Food Additive vs. Dietary Supplement

FDA regulations of stevia were based on its designation as a food additive. The claim was that scientific study on stevia as a food additive was inadequate. Ironically, extensive Japanese testing of stevia was disregarde—regardless of the fact that this body of documented evidence more than sufficiently supported its safe use. Many experts who have studied stevia and its FDA requirements have commented that the FDA wants far more proof that stevia is safe than they would demand from chemical additives like aspartame.

Stevia advocates point out that stevia not a food additive, but rather, a food. Apparently, foods that have traditionally been consumed do not require laborious and expensive testing for safety under FDA regulations. The fact that so many toxicology studies have been conducted in Japan, coupled with the herb’s long history of safe consumption, makes a strong case for stevia being accepted by the FDA as a safe dietary substance. Still, it was denied the official GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status and designated a food additive by the FDA.

The FDA Reverses Its Position

As a result of the Health Freedom Act passed in September of 1995, stevia leaves, stevia extract, and stevioside can be imported to the United States. However, ingredient labels of products that contain stevia must qualify as dietary supplements.

Stevia had been redesignated as a dietary supplement by the FDA and consequently can be legally sold in the United States solely as a supplement. Its addition to teas or other packaged foods is still banned. Moreover, stevia cannot, under any circumstances, be marketed as a sweetener or flavor enhancer.

SUGAR, SUGAR EVERYWHERE

Ralph Nader once said, “If God meant us to eat sugar, he wouldn’t have invented dentists.” The average American eats over 125 pounds of white sugar every year. It has been estimated that sugar makes up 25 percent of our daily caloric intake, with soda pop supplying the majority of our sugar ingestion. Desserts and sugar-laden snacks continually tempt us, resulting in an escalated taste for sweets.

The amount of sugar we consume has a profound effect on both our physical and mental well-being. Sugar is a powerful substance which can have drug-like effects and is considered addictive by some nutritional experts. William Duffy, the author of Sugar Blues, states,“The difference between sugar addiction and narcotic addition is largely one of degree.” In excess, sugar can be toxic. Sufficient amounts of B-vitamins are actually required to metabolize and detoxify sugar in our bodies. When the body experiences a sugar overload, the assimilation of nutrients from other foods can be inhibited. In other words, our bodies were not designed to cope with the enormous quantity of sugar we routinely ingest. Eating too much sugar can generate a type of nutrient malnutrition, not to mention its contribution to obesity, diabetes, hyperactivity, and other disorders. Sugar can also predispose the body to yeast infections, aggravate some types of arthritis and asthma, cause tooth decay, and may even elevate our blood lipid levels. Eating excess sugar can also contribute to amino acid depletion, which has been linked with depression and other mood disorders. To make matters worse, eating too much sugar can actually compromise our immune systems by lowering white blood cells counts. This makes us more susceptible to colds and other infections. Sugar consumption has also been linked to PMS, osteoporosis and coronary heart disease.

Why Do We Crave Sweets?

Considering the sobering effects of a high sugar diet, why do we eat so much of it? One reason is that sugar gives us a quick infusion of energy. It can also help to raise the level of certain brain neurotransmitters which may temporarily elevate our mood. Sugar cravings stem from a complex mix of physiological and psychological components. Even the most brilliant scientists fail to totally comprehend this intriguing chemical dependence which, for the most part, hurts our overall health.

What we do know is that when sugary foods are consumed, the pancreas must secrete insulin, a hormone which serves to bring blood glucose levels down. This allows sugar to enter our cells where it is either burned off or stored. The constant ups and downs of blood sugar levels can become exaggerated in some individuals and cause all kinds of health problems. Have you ever been around someone who is prone to sudden mood swings characterized by violent verbal attacks or irritability? This type of volatile behavior is typical of people who crave sugar, eat it and then experience sugar highs and lows. Erratic mood swings can be linked to dramatic drops in blood sugar levels.

Hypoglycemia: Sign of Hard Times?

It is rather disturbing to learn that statisticians estimate that almost 20 million Americans suffer from some type of faulty glucose tolerance. Hypoglycemia and diabetes are the two major forms of blood sugar disorders and can deservedly be called modern day plagues. Hypoglycemia is an actual disorder that can cause of number of seemingly unrelated symptoms. More and more studies are pointing to physiological as well as psychological disorders linked to disturbed glucose utilization in brain cells. One study, in particular, showed that depressed people have overall lower glucose metabolism (Slagle, 22). Hypoglycemia occurs when too much insulin is secreted in order to compensate for high blood sugar levels resulting from eating sugary or high carbohydrate foods. To deal with the excess insulin, glucagon, cortisol and adrenalin pour into the system to help raise the blood sugar back to acceptable levels. This can inadvertently result in the secretion of more insulin and the vicious cycle repeats itself.

A hypoglycemic reaction can cause mood swings, fatigue, drowsiness, tremors, headaches, dizziness, panic attacks, indigestion, cold sweats, and fainting. When blood sugar drops too low, an overwhelming craving for carbohydrates results. To satisfy the craving and compensate for feelings of weakness and abnormal hunger, sugary foods are once again consumed in excess.

Unfortunately, great numbers of people suffer from hypoglycemic symptoms. Ironically, a simple switch from a high sugar diet to one that emphasizes protein can help. In addition, because sugar cravings are so hard to control, a product like stevia can be of enormous value in preventing roller coaster blood sugar levels. One Colorado internist states: People who are chronically stressed and are on a roller coaster of blood sugar going up and down are especially prone to dips in energy at certain times of day. Their adrenals are not functioning optimally, and when they hit a real low point, they want sugar. It usually happens in mid-afternoon when the adrenal glands are at their lowest level of functioning. (Janiger, 71) Our craving for sweets in not intrinsically a bad thing; however, what we reach for to satisfy that craving can dramatically determine how we feel. Stevia can help to satisfy the urge to eat something sweet without changing blood sugar levels in a perfectly natural way and without any of the risks associated with other non-nutritive sweeteners.

Diabetes: Pancreas Overload?

Diabetes is a disease typical of western cultures and is evidence of the influence that diet has on the human body. Perhaps more than any other disease, diabetes shuts down the mechanisms which permit proper carbohydrate/sugar metabolism. When the pancreas no longer secretes adequate amounts of insulin to metabolize sugar, that sugar continues to circulate in the bloodstream causing all kinds of health problems. The type of diabetes that comes in later years is almost always related to obesity and involves the inability of sugar to enter cells, even when insulin is present. Diabetes can cause blindness, atherosclerosis, kidney disease, the loss of nerve function, recurring infections, and the inability to heal. Heredity plays a profound role in the incidence of diabetes, but a diet high in white sugar and empty carbohydrates unquestionably contributes to the onset of the disease. It is estimated that over five million Americans are currently undergoing medical treatment for diabetes and studies suggest that there are at least four million Americans with undetected forms of adult onset diabetes. Diabetes is the third cause of death in this country and reflects the devastating results of a diet low in fiber and high in simple carbohydrates. Most of us start our children on diets filled with candy, pop, chips, cookies, doughnuts, sugary juice, etc. Studies have found that diabetes is a disease which usually plagues societies that eat highly refined foods. Because we live in a culture that worships sweets, the availability of a safe sweetener like stevia, which does not cause stress on the pancreas is extremely valuable. If sugar consumption was cut in half by using stevia to

  • “stretch”
  • sweetening power, our risk for developing blood sugar disorders like diabetes and hypoglycemia could dramatically decrease.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=642)


    FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 07:34 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview

    FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview

    A wealth of scientific evidence now exists which should have turned each and everyone of us into a fat “phobic.”1a-e In other words, virtually every health expert agrees that a high fat diet is directly linked to cardiovascular disease, various types of cancer and premature death. It’s no secret that excess dietary fat poses a tremendous health risk. The United States National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization and many other scientific institutes have confirmed the frightening hazards of fat. Health proponents generally concur that excess fat can significantly shorten one’s lifespan. More than 10,000 medical papers are published every year dealing with obesity and cardiovascular disease, two of the most insidious killers of Americans. Western eating habits, which promote fatty, salty, sugary foods, have created massive widespread disease and tremendous suffering. Studies have shown that fat is the macronutrient associated with overeating -

    ------------------------------------

  • • BACON CHEESEBURGER/HARDEE’S 39
  • • BURRITO SUPREME/TACO BELL 22
  • • HAMBURGER DELUXE/WENDY’S 21
  • • QUARTER POUNDER WITH CHEESE/MCDONALD’S 28
  • • SAUSAGE BISCUIT WITH EGG/MCDONALD’S 33
  • • POPCORN CHICKEN/KFC 45
  • • WHOPPER/BURGER KING 36

    TABLE 1. Total fat grams in single servings.4

    and obesity.2 In spite of this finding we are eating more fat and becoming fatter. The average absolute fat intake has increased from 81 to 83 grams per day over the last ten years.3 Our obsession with fatty foods has exacted an enormous toll in the form of rampant obesity, clogged arteries, hypertension, heart attack, stroke, breast cancer, etc. Many of us remain oblivious to the fat gram count of foods we routinely pop into our mouths, unaware that one fast food entree may contain more fat grams than one should consume in one given day. Take a good look at the following list of foods which have been assessed for fat content. Fast food has become a 20th-century sensation which continues to boom and expand throughout our society. Many of us literally exist on fast food, which is frequently also “fat” food. It’s no wonder so many of us “battle the bulge”, and have skyrocketing cholesterol counts. Our love affair with greasy, fried, rich, creamy foods has burdened our bodies with the dilemma of excess fat “baggage,” resulting in phenomenal amounts of money being spent on weight loss programs. Worse still, thousands of Americans are dying before their time or living extremely compromised lives only because they ingest too much fat. Why is this? The bottom line is that fats taste good!5 Many of us were raised on seemingly innocuous foods that are loaded with fat. Some of these include:

    macaroni and cheese battered fish sticks hot dogs cheese-filled casseroles pepperoni pizza burritos pancakes, waffles doughnuts pies and pastries ice cream candy bars ramen soup

    Fat is also a major ingredient in most of the snack food we constantly nibble on, including chips, crackers, cookies, and nuts. Check ingredient labels to find the fat gram content of most snack foods. You’ll be surprised to find out just how fatty these foods are. Even a healthy sounding food like a “bran muffin” can contain 36 grams of fat! No wonder they stay so “moist”. In addition to the above foods, fat can add wonderful flavor to breads, vegetables and the like, and is usually used liberally in the form of butter, sour cream, whipping cream, melted cheese, cream cheese spreads, dips, cream sauces, and gravies. Fruits can also be high in fats. Did you know that one avocado has 30 grams of fat? One half cup of peanuts contains 35 grams of fat and only one glazed doughnut has 13 grams of fat. The majority of research points to fat as a much more dangerous culprit than anyone might have imagined. Saturated fats such as lard, palm, coconut oil, and beef tallow are particularly menacing. Research scientists have found over and over again that fats can contribute to the growth of tumors in animal studies.6 The National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences reported that even a relatively small amount of extra body fat increases the risk of certain diseases for women and may compromise their longevity.7 Even being mildly overweight may be much more risky than anyone previously assumed.8

    The Relat ionship between Breast Cancer, Fat s, Fiber And Indoles

    Dr. Leonard Cohen, of the Dana Institute of the American Health Foundation at Naylor, believes that pre-cancerous lesions found in breast tissue will develop into cancer only if they are stimulated by certain agents such as fat.9 Women increase their risk of developing breast cancer when they consume a diet high in fat and animal protein and low in fiber, vegetables and fruits. When women put on weight, they have a tendency to create more estrogen since adipose tissue produces estrogen. Certain forms of estrogen, the so-called “bad estrogens” can act as carcinogens and are anything but desirable.10 High or unbalanced estrogen levels stimulate concerous tissue in the breast. Obesity is also associated with increased breast cancer mortality.11 The three most important ways to inhibit “bad” estrogen from inducing breast cancer are:
    1. Maintain an ideal body weight.
    2. Eat a diet high in fiber and low in fat (fiber helps to sweep excess estrogen from the bowel so it does not “recycle”).
    3. Consume enough cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, radishes, watercress etc.) so that adequate amounts of dietary indole-3-carbinol enter the system.12 Indoles are phytonutrients which help us balance our estrogen levels and reduce the levels of “bad estrogen” present. When combined with a low-fat, high-fiber diet, indoles can provide the body with significant metabolic protection against breast cancer.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=490)


    Snack Attack - we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a min
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 12, 2005 02:33 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Snack Attack - we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a min

    Snack Attack by Chrystle Fiedler Energy Times, August 5, 2003

    Americans are snackers. For instance, during the Superbowl, we munch on about 125,000 pounds of pretzels, chips, popcorn and nuts a minute; 30 million pounds by the end of the game. At work about half of us snack two or three times a day. By the end of today, as a group, we'll have eaten $22 million worth of candy-almost a million dollars an hour for every hour of every day.

    If you snack unwisely, these munchies can expand your waistline and sabotage your health. But if you snack wisely, you can keep your taste buds fulfilled, your brain working at top capacity and your body satisfied.

    When searching for snack satisfaction, think protein. Protein bars and protein shakes keep you feeling fuller longer on fewer calories than sweets.

    Second to protein, think fiber, as in fresh fruit, dried fruit, or whole grain breads and crackers.

    Unlike carbohydrates that break down into sugars and may be quickly stored as body fat, protein-rich snacks release sugar into your bloodstream at a slow, steady and healthy pace. That keeps you satisfied longer on fewer calories.

    "Protein is an important building block (for the body)," says Alicia Gonzalez, ND, a teaching fellow at Bastyr University in Kenmore, Washington. "It breaks down into amino acids as precursors to things like neurotransmitters, hormones and muscle."

    Besides eating protein-rich snacks, eat protein with every meal and eat it first. "It will help your body absorb sugar at a slower rate."

    "Protein and fiber are the best at helping the body absorb sugar at an optimal rate," says Jon Gordon, author of Become an Energy Addict (Longstreet Press).

    "Protein bars release sugar at a slower rate, resulting in more balanced blood sugar levels and greater overall energy," Gordon says. "You'll crave sugar less and will have a more sustained source of energy all day long."

    Protein Bars' Power

    "The biggest advantage of protein bars, besides their convenience, is the fact that they do have considerably more protein, say 10 grams, than candy bars, which can contain as little as 2 grams," says Dr. Gonzalez. Total fat tends to be much less in a protein bar, too.

    When choosing a protein bar, Dr. Gonzalez says, "Look for total protein content, say, between 10 and 12 grams and total fat, no more than 5 grams, and be careful with high sodium content."

    "Choose a protein bar closest to nature," says Gordon. "Like one with almonds and cashews. Nuts are full of nutrients and minerals. Nuts are also a source of fiber."

    If you exercise, protein bars with whey or soy protein make for quick replacement of necessary nutrients. "Eating a protein bar an hour before exercising helps to maintain that energy boost you need and replenishes minerals you lose when working out," says Dr. Gonzalez.

    Some protein bars, though, do a bait n' switch with saturated fats and trans fatty acids, says Dawn Weatherwax, RD, author of The Official Snack Guide for Beleaguered Sports Parents (WellCentered Books). "If the label says hydrolyzed or hydrogenated palm oil, that's as bad as saturated fat. People think they're doing the healthy thing by eating a protein bar but they end up getting the wrong type of fat."

    Besides protein bars, other healthy and healthful snacks include whole grain bread with peanut butter and cheese on whole grain, high-fiber crackers. "Mixing fiber and protein will help you sustain your energy," says Gordon. "Yogurt is also very good."

    Smooth Sailing

    "Smoothies are also wonderful (snacks)," says Weatherwax. "Add protein powder, silken tofu and fruit to them and you can have them as a meal replacement."

    "Nuts like cashews, almonds, seeds and dried berries are some of the best snacks that you can eat because you're not getting all that sugar," says Dr. Gonzalez. "Nuts have a good balance of good fat versus bad fat, including essential fatty acids, which are really important for cellular health and overall well-being. A combination of nuts, seeds and dried berries provides you with a good mix of all the vitamins and minerals along with the good fats that you need to be healthy."

    When snacking, think about variety. "Mix it up, have a protein bar one day, a protein shake the next," says Gordon. "Combine protein with a healthy carbohydrate and you'll have much more sustained energy throughout the day."

    Fuel for Your Fire

    "We're like a train, we need to keep the furnace stoked," says Weatherwax, a consulting dietitian for the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. "The goal is to eat every three or four hours. You have breakfast and lunch and you need an afternoon snack. That's the hardest one to get. Most people don't want to eat another sandwich; they want snack food. So a protein bar with a carb like a piece of fruit, an apple, orange or banana...is a great combination." "Studies show if you have moderate-size meals plus small between-meal snacks you increase your levels of energy and alertness," says Gordon. "It also optimizes your memory and performance and gives you a steady flow of energy rather than the rises and falls. Without healthy snacks your blood sugar falls and you experience fatigue and tension. Just as we need to constantly feed a fire with moderate-sized pieces of wood, we also need to continually supply our internal furnace with food that can be turned into fuel. This keeps our metabolism going strong and steady."

    "You want to stay between one-third and two-thirds full," adds Weatherwax.

    "Eating less in an effort to lose weight is actually deleterious in the long run," says Dr. Gonzalez. "When we don't eat our body gets mixed signals; it isn't sure when it's going to get its next meal. This makes the body want to store fat and sugar to save it just in case. On the other hand, if your body becomes accustomed to eating more often, the cells will be more inclined to use the fat up, knowing there is more food on the way."

    To program your body this way, don't skip meals. Have protein-filled breakfast like a protein smoothie and eggs. Follow up with healthy snacks like a protein bar or shake and regular meals.

    "Ideally, it's best to combine the macronutrients, the protein, carbs and healthy fats," says Weatherwax. "By mixing all three you actually burn more energy. One study shows that you burn an extra 35 calories."

    Nibbling on refined sweets can give you the snack blues. So let smart-snack strategies. Shift your mental outlook into high gear and use snacks wisely.

    Snacking and Exercising

    When you incorporate snacks into a consistent exercise program, you boost your chances of maintaining a healthy weight.

    To make a big difference in your day, Gordon says, get up a half an hour early to exercise. Next, eat a breakfast that includes protein and fiber, have a mid-morning snack, a healthy lunch, an afternoon snack and good dinner. Take a walk within 30 minutes of eating dinner and you'll give your body a double dose of get-up-and-go.

    "It exponentially increases your energy production and fat burning," says Gordon. Do all these things and watch your energy soar. "You'll fuel your life with real sustained power sources rather than the quick fix like coffee that's going to give you the rise in energy and then fall."

    You don't need to be told to keep on snacking. Just keep to the protein and fiber side of the snack street.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=308)



  • VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.