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  Messages 1-33 from 33 matching the search criteria.
Does magnesium hold the key to vitamin D benefits? Darrell Miller 2/12/19
Hormone therapy could help improve bone health in menopausal women Darrell Miller 12/4/16
Calcium Supplements and the Heart: Clearing Up the Confusion Darrell Miller 11/26/16
Impacts of pantethine Darrell Miller 1/9/14
Can DMAE Help Memory And Mood? Darrell Miller 12/19/13
Can Vitamin D-3 Do More For Bone Health Than Calcium? Darrell Miller 1/10/13
Bitter Orange Extract Darrell Miller 11/22/12
Celiac disease Darrell Miller 4/8/08
Active Coenzyme Q10 Darrell Miller 7/7/07
Neurological Health and CoQ10 Darrell Miller 2/25/07
For Better Heart Health ... Darrell Miller 2/6/07
Benefits - Supports joint function and tissue health* Darrell Miller 12/11/06
All Natural Hair Care Products - Salon Quality! Darrell Miller 9/1/06
L-Citrulline 500mg capsules of powder Darrell Miller 9/1/06
Benefits of Best Alpha Lipoic 35! Darrell Miller 2/12/06
Omega-3 Fish Oils “Super Supplement of the Sea” Darrell Miller 1/3/06
JOINT HEALTH Darrell Miller 12/22/05
Research on SAMe.... Darrell Miller 10/26/05
Nutrition Insurance .... Darrell Miller 10/21/05
Benefits of Alpha Lipoic Acid Darrell Miller 10/13/05
Curcumin - Turmeric Extract Darrell Miller 8/19/05
GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine) Versatile Life Support Nutrient .... Darrell Miller 6/21/05
America's Most Wanted Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Bone Power - Natures Plus Darrell Miller 6/11/05
PHOSPHATIDYL SERINE (PS) - Maintain healthy cells ... Darrell Miller 6/4/05
Liquid Calcium 1200 with Magnesium Darrell Miller 6/2/05
Life Minerals - Why are Minerals So Important? Darrell Miller 6/2/05
Higher Mind - Smart Nutrients for the Performance of a Lifetime... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
KudZu, Treatment of alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse Darrell Miller 5/19/05
Acute administration of red yeast rice depletes tissue CoQ10 Darrell Miller 5/13/05
Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control. Darrell Miller 5/12/05
Re: Read more on how to Lower Cholesterol safe and naturally! Darrell Miller 5/9/05



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Does magnesium hold the key to vitamin D benefits?
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Date: February 12, 2019 10:20 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Does magnesium hold the key to vitamin D benefits?





Dr. Qi Dai teaches medical courses at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and he has recently conducted a study surrounding the link between magnesium and vitamin D production. The study determined that when someone has a deficiency of magnesium, it ends up blocking both the pathway and the metabolic process that is necessary for vitamin D to properly enter our systems. Having sufficient levels of vitamin D is an essential component in ensuring that we can correctly metabolize magnesium.

Key Takeaways:

  • A recent study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shone the spotlight on the important link between Magnesium and vitamin D.
  • The study was undertaken by a team from Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville Tennessee.
  • Dr. Qi Dai, of Vanderbilt University, collated and analyzed data culled from input taken from 1200 individuals who took the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

"New evidence shifts the focus onto magnesium, implicating it in playing a central role in determining how much vitamin D our bodies can make."

Read more: http://medicalnews.fabiola.uk/cancer/does-magnesium-hold-the-key-to-vitamin-d-benefits/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6019)


Hormone therapy could help improve bone health in menopausal women
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Date: December 04, 2016 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hormone therapy could help improve bone health in menopausal women





Loss in bone density and bone mass can be common for women after going through menopause. Recent studies, with a test group of over 1200 women, suggest that through menopausal hormone therapy (MHP), post-menopausal women may in fact be able to slow down the effects of osteoporosis and improve bone density.

Key Takeaways:

  • Menopausal women can improve their bone mass and bone structure by undergoing hormone therapy.
  • When used in the right context, specifically in postmenopausal women younger than 60 years old for whom the benefits outweigh risks, menopausal hormonal therapy is effective for both the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
  • Osteoporosis is a progressive condition in which bones become weaker and are more likely to fracture or break.

"Taken for menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, previous research has already revealed the benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) on bone mineral density."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.ctvnews.ca/health/hormone-therapy-could-help-improve-bone-health-in-menopausal-women-1.3166551&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEyGQHyvsEEnUUtz6VIiGD9GCOyAw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3568)


Calcium Supplements and the Heart: Clearing Up the Confusion
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Date: November 26, 2016 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Calcium Supplements and the Heart: Clearing Up the Confusion





The Institute of Medicine has recommended 1000-1200 mg of calcium daily for most adults, and the tolerable upper intake level has been set at 2000-2500 mg of calcium daily. Even a recent observational study from the MESA cohort suggested an association between calcium supplements and coronary artery calcium, but it is important to note that in observational studies, the association does not prove causation. In the large-scale Women's Health Initiative calcium and vitamin D trial, we found no association between calcium and vitamin D supplementation and coronary artery calcium measured at the end of the 7-year trial.

Key Takeaways:

  • We know that both calcium and vitamin D are essential for bone health, but concerns have been raised from selected reports in recent years about heart risk.
  • There are other reasons that there could be an association, such as overlapping risk factors for osteoporosis and heart disease, including smoking and lack of exercise.
  • There are many dietary sources of calcium, including dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese), fatty fish with bones (such as sardines), fortified beverages, and leafy greens.

"We know that both calcium and vitamin D are essential for bone health, but concerns have been raised from selected reports in recent years about heart risk."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.medscape.com/viewarticle/871466&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFQpRn2FPTRhKr-ZYi7jkxzioJqrQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3513)


Impacts of pantethine
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Date: January 09, 2014 04:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Impacts of pantethine

What is Pantethine

vitamin b5Pantethine (bis-pantethine or co-chemical pantethine) is a dimeric type of pantothenic harsh corrosive (vitamin B5). It is made out of two particles of pantothenic harsh corrosive connected by cysteamine crossing over aggregations. The monomer of this compound is regarded as pantetheine and is a halfway in the generation of Coenzyme A by the form. Pantethine is acknowledged the all the more naturally animated type of vitamin B5, yet it is less stable, disintegrating over the long haul in the event that it is not kept refrigerated most vitamins B5 supplements are subsequently as calcium pantothenate, a salt of pantothenic harsh corrosive.

Dietary supplementation

Pantethine is accessible as a dietary supplement due to proof of its health profits. In different clinical trials of patients with hoisted cholesterol and triglycerides, absolute and LDL cholesterol were diminished by 12%, triglycerides diminished by 18%, and HDL cholesterol was expanded by 9%. These clinical trials were directed with day by day admissions running from 600 to 1200 mg/day. Inside this measurement go there is no proof of a measurements impact relationship, i.e. changes in lipid focuses covered over the reach of measurements. Immediate measurements reaction proof is not accessible in light of the fact that no trial tried more than one measurement. A couple of trials tried 300 mg/day with additional unobtrusive yet factually noteworthy effects.

Further deliberately regulated trials of 600 and 900 mg/d dosages have indicated factually huge bringing down of LDL cholesterol in people with extraordinarily or reasonably raised levels of blood lipids.

Physiological impacts

Two instruments of activity are proposed for pantethine. In the in the first place, pantethine serves as the forerunner for amalgamation of coenzyme A. In the second, pantethine is changed over to two pantetheine particles which are thusly metabolized to structure two pantethenic harsh corrosive and two cysteamine atoms. Cysteamine is conjectured to tie to and therefore inactivate sulfur-holding amino acids in liver catalysts included in the generation of cholesterol and triglycerides.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2956)


Can DMAE Help Memory And Mood?
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Date: December 19, 2013 07:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can DMAE Help Memory And Mood?

moodDMAE

Do you ever feel like you are experiencing lapses in memory or you have a low general mood? There is evidence that DMAE might be able to help with both memory and mood. DMAE occurs naturally in the human brain. When we take supplemental amounts of the compound, brain function effects can be seen.

DMAE as a Supplement

It is thought that the supplement works by increasing the speed of the brain's turnover and synthesis of a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. This neurotransmitter plays a strong role in maintaining general mental ability. It also works at supporting a stable, healthy memory in older adults. It is also believed that DMAE might work by stopping choline metabolism. This allows the free choline to gather in the blood, go into the brain, and stimulate the cholinergic receptors.

A French double-blind study was performed to measure how much of an impact the supplement DMAE has on both mood and vigilance. Four of the subjects were categorized as having anxiety, and four other subjects were the controls. They were each given 1200mg of DMAE over the course of 5 days. These subjects were measured daily for their EEG and convergence of the inter hemispheres of the brain. In the case of the four subjects that were given the supplement, progressive sync of the two brain hemispheres was found. This is correlated with increased neuromotor control, increased verbal memory, improvement in behavioral tasks, as well as better control of anxiety.

Another use for DMAE worth mentioning is its affects on learning deficiencies like ADD or hyperkinesia. Many doctors prescribe amphetamines for conditions like this, but DMAE has also proven useful. According to studies, hyperactivity and irritability decrease, and scholastic ability improves from supplementing with DMAE.

In addition to improving these conditions there is evidence that DMAE can improve life span, IQ, and motor mechanisms. It is very important to take the correct dosage of DMAE. I would start with taking 200-400mg first, and work your way up from there.

Sources:

  1. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimethylethanolamine
  2. //www.life-enhancement.com/magazine/article/105-presence-of-mind-dmae-the-mood-elevating-smart-nutrient

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2929)


Can Vitamin D-3 Do More For Bone Health Than Calcium?
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Date: January 10, 2013 01:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Vitamin D-3 Do More For Bone Health Than Calcium?

Loss of density and mass in bones has become very common these days because of the increase in the number of people suffering from osteoporosis. It is shocking to note that the number of osteoporosis related fractures in US is more than 1.3 million. Bone health can be improved by taking the right nutrients and minerals. It is generally assumed that calcium is the only mineral needed to prevent and treat osteoporosis. Calcium supplement have been used by many people to improve their bone strength. is it correct?

Do calcium supplements treat osteoporosis completely?  The answer is NO.

A recent study conducted in Iceland concludes that maintaining right levels of vitamin D-3 provides greater protection to bones than taking calcium supplements every day.

What are the results of this study?

Maintaining ideal levels of PTH or parathyroid hormone is essential for bone health. It has been proved by researchers that sufficient vitamin D-3 levels ensure the ideal level of PTH and not calcium. PTH is not in the ideal level in an individual who takes more than 1200 mg calcium a day if he has vitamin D deficiency. On the other hand PTH level is ideal in a person who has sufficient vitamin D even if he takes less than 800 mg of calcium a day.

Vitamin D-3 has calcium sparing effect and if the status of vitamin D in the body is assured, there is no need to take calcium of more than 800 mg a day. The results of this study clearly indicate the importance of vitamin D-3 for bone health. It is clear that sufficient levels of vitamin D-3 are more important than sufficient levels of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. In another study, women who were hospitalized for osteoporosis related fractures were studied. It was found that more than 50% of them had vitamin D-3 deficiency.

The duration of the study was two years and it proved that vitamin D-3 supplementation improved the bone strength and reduced the risk of fractures in these women. It is an unarguable fact that calcium is an important mineral to build bones and to keep bones healthy and strong, but how does the human body absorb calcium? It is the presence of vitamin D-3 that helps in absorption of calcium. Without adequate vitamin D-3, intake of calcium supplements is meaningless.

To absorb calcium sufficient amount of vitamin D-3 must be present in the body. Vitamin D-3 is also needed for the efficient utilization of calcium by the body. The mass and density of the bones are increased only when calcium is absorbed by the body. Absorption of calcium is not possible without vitamin D. Vitamin D-3 plays an important role to build bones in children and to keep bones strong and healthy in adults. It also improves immunity, prevents muscle weakness, regularizes the functioning of thyroid glands and helps in blood clotting.

Deficiency in vitamin D-3 may increase the risks of Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Vitamin D-3 is the natural form of vitamin D. It is produced when skin is exposed to the ultraviolet rays in the sun. Those who live in latitudes, who have dark skin, who spend most of the day indoors and who wear sunscreen lotion whenever they step outdoors lack sufficient levels of vitamin D-3. They should take vitamin-D supplements to avoid a lot of health risks and to improve their bone health.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2809)


Bitter Orange Extract
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Date: November 22, 2012 10:46 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bitter Orange Extract

History

Indigenous to the Meditteranean region today, but brought to their shores by Arab tradesmen in 1200 , bitter orange or citrus aurantium was highly popular among herbalists all over the southern parts of Europe is mainly France, Greece, Spain and Italy. A botanical species commonly termed as seville orange and bigarade orange, this bitter citrus fruit is known for its oil extract, flavoring and use in the perfume industry.

However , the ancient Chinese used it for treating dyspepsia , abdominal distention and diarrhea. These uses also drew from its roots in ancient Greek experiments in aromatherapy, phyto-therapy and cosmetology. Its arrival in America can be credited to the Spaniards and the Portuguese who for very long had been using the fruit for its medical component. Bitter orange trees grew in abundance in the states of Florida, Louisiana and California way back in the middle of the nineteenth century.There have been numerous pharmacological indicators in the study of C aurantium actions and it has been termed as an anti spasmodic, anti fungal , anti bacterial, anti-inflammatory, sedative, tranquilizer and also a vascular stimulant.

Studies, Benefits

Recent studies about its effect on cancer cells is underway. A Closer Look At Its Health Benefits Bitter orange peel, flower and seed are known to have varying effects on the human body and its studies date back centuries. Quite simply it has the ability to squeeze blood vessels, affect the heart rate and also change the level of metabolism. A closer look at its components would help focus on their particular impact on health.

  • * A Source Of Flavonoids: Useful in indications such as inflammations and bacterial or fungal infections.
  • * Intense source of Vitamin C which is an immunity booster. Drinking its juice, which is rather bitter, does help in aiding digestive health, ridding the body of waste and in cases of gastrointestinal constrictions.
  • * Regulation of fat cells in the blood and lowering of sugar levels in diabetics.
  • *Blood purification by aiding the function of liver, kidney, bladder and the gall bladder; its use as a detoxifying agent has been proved beyond doubt.
  • *Bitter orange peel powder is known to improve appetite by toning the intestines while on the other hand it is known to act as an appetite suppressant.
  • * Treating of shock and Insomnia-the tincture made with its peel is useful in thee symptoms as well as to cure chronic headache and bodyache.
  • *Presence of synephrine which is an active compound in bitter orange is a stimulant in body activities.

It results in faster metabolism, increase in heart rate by affecting the adrenaline system, and in turn aid in weight loss. What needs to be seen is whether this metabolism booster is in any way a retardant with any other medication that you may be taking.

Many have reverted to bitter orange extracts to tackle their weight problem after the ban on ephedra by the US drug administration . what is needed is prudence as most consider bitter orange as a health supplement forgetting its rather potent effect on the body .

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2731)


Celiac disease
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Date: April 08, 2008 11:58 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Celiac disease

Celiac disease also known as sprue, is an autoimmune disorder that often goes un-detection. It mimics the symptoms of other conditions including: irritable bowel syndrome, gastric ulcers, Crohn’s Disease, diverticulitis, parasitic infections, skin disorders, iron-deficiency anemia caused by menstrual blood loss, and various nervous system conditions. All of which are very uncomfortable for anyone to experience.

To complicate matters, between fifty to sixty percent of celiac patients have no obvious symptoms, which makes this disease particularly difficult to diagnose. This has led to the assumption that the disease was uncommon in the United States. However, recent estimates suggest that one in one hundred and thirty three people have the disease. Do you know if you have it?

In the Year 2000, a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that the incidence of Celiac disease among 1200 children and adolescents tested for the disorder ranged from one in fifty seven to one in thirty three. Symptoms in children differ somewhat from those of adults in that fatigue, irritability and behavior changes are more common in children with Celiac disease. Infants with Celiac disease may lose weight and "fail to thrive."

Older children may have delayed growth or unexplained anemia due to malabsorption. Like adults, Celiac disease children have abdominal gas, pain and foul smelling stools. Liquid Supplements are recommended for individuals with Celiac's Disease.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1744)


Active Coenzyme Q10
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Date: July 07, 2007 01:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Active Coenzyme Q10

Active CoQ10

 

The benefits of Coenzyme Q10 have become increasingly well-known. This important nutrient has been shown in clinical trials to improve heart function, reduce the side effects of certain drugs used to treat cancer, and slow the progression of serious brain diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. Now research has opened a new chapter in the CoQ10 story, highlighting the benefits of ubiquinol, the active form of CoQ10, to increase energy and stamina, and reduce some of he physical signs of aging.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor we will review the benefits of Coenzyme Q10, and discuss the differences between CoQ10 and its active form –ubiquinol.

 

Q. What is CoQ10?

A. CoQ10 is a natural, fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all cells. CoQ10 also is known as ubiquinone. That’s because CoQ10 is ubiquitious and exists everywhere there is life. CoQ10 is vital to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. ATP is the energy-rich compound used for all processes requiring energy in the body. Although CoQ10 is produced by the body and exists in some limited dietary sources, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirements. CoQ10 levels diminish with age and as a result of dietary inadequacies and various disease states. Also, some drugs, especially a group of cholesterol lowering prescription drugs known as “statins,” (Pravachol, Zocor, Lipitor, etc.) significantly reduce CoQ10 levels in the body.

 

Q. What is ubiquinol? Is it the same or different from CoQ10?

A. Ubiquinol and CoQ10 are very closely related. Ubiquinone, or CoQ10, is the oxidized form of the molecule. This means it has to be converted to a non-oxidized form before it can perform its work. Ubiquinol is the active form of this nutrient. Our bodies convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol – which is the form needed to produce cellular energy. Until recently, it was not possible to use ubiquinol as a supplement because it is very unstable outside the human body. But research has now found a way to keep this molecule stable so it can be successfully taken in supplement form.

 

Q. If CoQ10 gets converted to ubiquinol anyway, can’t I just take CoQ10?

A. While it is true that our bodies can convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol, it isn’t true that we all do this equally well. In fact, as we age, our ability to convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol declines. And some people even have a gene that makes them less effective at this conversion than the majority of the population. IN fact, several common health issues have been associated with less than optimal ratios of CoQ10 to QH. For healthy people the ideal ratio is approximately 97% Ubiquinol to 3% CoQ10. But in people with diabetes, for example, the ratios have been found to range from 43% ubiquinol to 47% CoQ10 in mild diabetes, to only 24% ubiquinol to 76% CoQ10 in severe diabetes. These numbers are for men; the numbers for women vary by 2 to 5 percentage points.

So for older folks, the 30-50% of people who have the gene that impairs CoQ10 conversion, or for people who have serious health concerns, supplementing with ubiquinol instead of CoQ10 might be the smart choice.

 

Q. What are the health benefits of CoQ10 and Ubiquinol?

A. There have been many studies showing that CoQ10 is beneficial in treating and preventing heart disease and conditions such as high blood pressure atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), angina, and congestive heart failure (CHF). It’s been shown that heart attacks tend to occur when CoQ10 levels are low in the body. Exciting new research has found that CoQ10 in a unique delivery system supplementation may slow the progression of symptoms associated with neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, ALS, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition, CoQ10 is beneficial for diabetes, immune dysfunction, cancer, periodontal disease, prostate cancer, and neurological disease. While the research on ubiquinol is still very new, it is reasonable to expect that its benefits will be equal to or perhaps even better than CoQ10, because it is the more active form.

 

Q. Why is CoQ10 especially important for preventing and treating heart disease, and for neurological diseases like Parkinson’s disease?

A. The heart and brain are some of the most metabolically active tissues in the body. Both require large amounts of uninterrupted energy, which means these tissues also need increased amounts of ubiquinol. Research has shown that many people with heart of brain diseases have serum CoQ10 levels that are lower than those of healthy people. Correcting such deficiencies often can produce significant results. However, these diseases become more common as we age – right at the time our ability to convert CoQ10 to its active form, ubiquinol, declines.

 

Q. How might ubiquinol be important for the heart?

A. Heart Health: A study on patients admitted to the hospital with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) found that CoQ10 can provide rapid protective effects in patients with a heart attack if administered within three days of the onset of symptoms. Seventy-three patients received CoQ10 (120 mg/d). The study’s control group consisted of 71 similarly matched patients with acute AMI. After treatment, angina pectoris (severe chest pain signifying interrupted blood flow to the heart), total arrhythmias (dangerously irregular heartbeats), and poor function in the left ventricle (the essential chamber of the heart) were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden cardiac failure and nonfatal heart attacks also were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared with the placebo group.

In another study, CoQ10 was studied in 109 patients with high blood pressure (hypertension). The patients were given varying doses of supplemental CoQ10 with the goal of attaining a certain blood level (greater than 2.0 mcg/l). Most patients were on medications to treat hypertension. Half the patients were able to stop taking some or all of their prescription drugs at an average of 4.4 months after starting CoQ10. The 9.4% of patients who had echocardiograms, performed both before and during treatment, experienced a highly significant improvement in heart wall thickness and function. This improvement was directly attributed to CoQ10 supplementation.

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating disease that affects 5 million people in the U.S. It causes edema, difficult breathing, and impaired circulation. In another study, CoQ10 restored healthy heart function in CHF patients. Patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the investigators introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of patients’ hearts to determine the degree of CHF damage to the heart muscle. The patients’ heart muscles at rest and work improved significantly. The researchers concluded CHF patients would greatly benefit from adjunctive CoQ10 treatment. Since ubiquinol is the active form of CoQ10, it may be able to overcome the hurdles to providing maximum impact, most importantly, age and genetic related inefficiencies in converting CoQ10 to active CoQ10 (Ubiquinol).

 

And Neurological Health?: A study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health showed that supplementing with CoQ10 in a unique delivery system was associated with a slowing of the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Participants were divided into 4 groups and their physical skills (coordination, walking, etc) and mental skills were evaluated. Each group then received 300 mg, 600 mg, or 1200 mg of a special form of chewable CoQ10, or a placebo. The researchers evaluated the participants after 1, 4,8, 12, and 16 months of treatment. Each participant was again scored on motor, mental, and activities of daily living skills.

The results of the study showed that the people who took the highest dosage of CoQ10-1200 mg-experienced the least decline in their physical abilities. The results were so encouraging that the researchers will be continuing with new studies, suing higher dosages to see if the results can get even better.

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating and degenerative inherited disease that is always fatal. In fact, no other medication, drug, or nutritional supplement has ever been shown to cause a decline in the progression of this terrible disease. A study compared CoQ10 against remacemide (an investigational HD drug made by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals), in 347 HD patients who were in the early stages of the disease. Remacemide blocks glutamate, the neurotransmitter scientists think may cause the death of brain cells that occurs in Huntington’s disease. While remacemide had no effect on the progression of HD, CoQ10 showed a trend toward slowing the disease by an average of 15%. This meant the HD group taking CoQ10 was able to handle every day activities of life a little longer than the patients taking remacemide or a placebo. They also were able to focus their attention better, were less depressed, and less irritable.

The 15% slowing of decline can result in about one more year of independence of HD patients. Needless to say, the gift of an additional year of health in the lives of HD patients is incredibly significant.

Because of these impressive results, researchers are hopeful that supplemental CoQ10 will have beneficial effects for people with other neurological diseases such as ALS and Alzheimer’s disease, too. Studies are under way to confirm these effects.

Using the active form of CoQ10 helps to assure that, regardless of age or illness, the CoQ10 can have the greatest impact.

 

Q. What have been the results of research studies with Ubiquinol?

A. One of the most interesting effects of Ubiquinol that has been reported so far is its ability to slow the physical signs of aging. In laboratory studies, administration of stable ubiquinol to mice forestalled the changes associated with aging – rounded spine, patchy fur and irritated eyes. While the mice who received ubiquinol did not necessarily live longer than the mice that didn’t, they lived better. But it is important to note that these mice were bred to die at a young age. Human studies are needed to determined true impact on longevity.

Additionally, supplemental, stable ubiquinol has been shown to increase physical energy and stamina. In an animal study, the length of time rats were able to run on a treadmill before getting tired was measured. The same rats were then given ubiquinol and the treadmill test was repeated. The length of time the rats were able to run before tiring increased 150 times.

 

Q. How can one supplement have applications for neurological diseases, heart health, and even the immune system?

A. Supplements often have more than one function, especially when it’s a substance like CoQ10, which is present in all parts of the body. All nucleated cells (most cells other than red blood cells) have mitochondria and all cells require energy to function. CoQ10 is vital to ATP production. Thus, CoQ10 has applications not only in neurological (neurons or nervous system cells) and cardiac health (myocardium or heart tissue), but also for the immune system.

 

Q. Should I take CoQ10 or ubiquinol? How much should I take?

A. While everyone can benefit from CoQ10 or ubiquinol supplementation, it appears that ubiquinol should be the first choice for older adults, people with known genetic inefficiencies in converting CoQ10 to ubiquinol, and for people with serious heart disease or neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, who are otherwise supplementing with high levels of CoQ10. For people in overall good health, a high quality CoQ10 supplement with proven absorption is a good choice.

Take 200 to 300 mg of CoQ10 or 100 mg ubiquinol daily, depending on your health history. The safety of both forms has been tested, and no significant side effects reported. Occasional mild stomach upset may occur. Taking your CoQ10 or ubiquinol with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

 

Conclusion
CoQ10 is not the only answer to the complex issues of heart disease, neurological diseases, or immune dysfunction; however, research indicates that it’s a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagines. The more we study this naturally occurring compound, the more benefits we find. And with this new ability to provide CoQ10 in its active form, ubiquinol, for the first time, even greater benefits may be derived.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1583)


Neurological Health and CoQ10
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Date: February 25, 2007 12:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Neurological Health and CoQ10

Between 1946 and 1965, 78 million Americans were born, creating the largest number of children in U.S. history. This Baby Boom generation has greatly influenced the makeup of American society and undoubtedly w ill continue to do so. Thanks to good nutrition and health care, Baby Boomers are aging well and have an excellent life expectancy. For the first time in history, we have more people turning 60 every day, and record numbers of adults reaching their seventh decade. As a result, neurological diseases associated with aging, such as Parkinson’s disease, are becoming major health care concerns. The good news is CoQ10 has applications for neurological diseases, in addition to its better known use for cardiovascular diseases.

Q. What is CoQ10?

A. CoQ10 is a natural, fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all cells. CoQ10 also is known as ubiquinone (existing everywhere there is human life). CoQ10 is vital to the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is the energy-rich compound used for all energy-requiring processes in the body.

Q. Isn’t CoQ10 a supplement for heart health?

A. Yes, it is. Because the heart requires lots of ATP to meet its high energy needs, CoQ10’s function in heart health is well understood. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that when individuals with heart disease take CoQ10, their symptoms improve, sometimes quite dramatically. Supplemental CoQ10 improves the heart’s pumping ability, improves blood circulation, increases tolerance to exercise, and improves the heart’s muscle tone. CoQ10 also is a powerful antioxidant and protects heart tissue from free-radical damage.

Q. How does CoQ10 affect brain health?

A. CoQ10 works in the brain the same way it works elsewhere in the body: it’s essential to ATP production. Nearly all human cells contain tiny structures called mitochondria. Mitochondria are referred to as cell powerhouses because they produce cellular energy. Depending on what each cell’s job is. There can be several thousand mitochondria in one cell. If a cell needs a lot of energy, it will have more mitochondria. This explains why heart cells contain so many mitochondria; the continual pumping of blood requires continual ATP production.

The brain also requires huge amounts of uninterrupted energy to regulate, integrate, and coordinate ongoing nervous system transmissions. To meet this need, ATP production within the mitochondria of brain cells is vital. Since CoQ10 exerts such a powerful influence on heart cells in ATP production, it was a natural progression for scientists to wonder how it affects brain cells. Brain and nervous system research led to the conclusion that the same intracellular principles apply. CoQ10 is produced in the body to assist in ATP production. Without it, ATP cannot be produced.

The most important discovery regarding CoQ10 and the brain is that CoQ10, when formulated with certain ingredients, can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain’s mitochondria. If large amounts of CoQ10 can get into the brain cell’s mitochondria, its ability to make ATP is greatly enhanced.

Q. What is the blood-brain barrier and why is it important?

A. The blood-brain barrier is a unique anatomical structure. The cells that make up the blood vessels that provide blood to the brain are extremely close together. This greatly restricts what can leave the bloodstream and enter the brain. While the blood-brain barrier protects the brain and spinal cord from potentially toxic substances, it also can be a significant obstacle to therapy of central nervous system disorders. Only substances with certain solubilities or those that have a transport system can cross the blood-brain barrier to a significant degree.

Obtaining optimal absorption of CoQ10 is difficult. The CoQ10 molecule is large and inflexible. The easiest and least expensive way to increase absorption levels is with the use of harsh solvents such as propylene glycol. However, at higher doses, these types of chemicals are considered dangerous (neurotoxic) to the person with a serious neurodegenerative disease. It is more difficult, as well as more expensive (considering raw materials, research, and proper manufacturing methods) to promote absorption with less harmful alternatives. However, reputable companies ensure that their products are safe for all their customers. Look for CoQ10 products formulated with vitamin E and other safe ingredients such as Micosolle.

Nearly all CoQ10 supplements enter the bloodstream. But, only CoQ10 supplements with special formulations have been scientifically shown to enter the mitochondria and cross the blood-brain barrier.

Q. If CoQ10 is made in the body, why take supplements?

A. While CoQ10 is synthesized in the body, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirements. Researchers have discovered CoQ10 levels diminish with age and as a result of dietary inadequacies and various disease states. They also have determined some medications significantly reduce CoQ10 levels in the body.

Although CoQ10 exists in some dietary sources, it may not be realistic to obtain CoQ10 through food alone. For example, it would take approximately 3 pounds of sardines, 7 pounds of beef, or 8 pounds of peanuts to equal 100 mg of supplemental CoQ10.

Q. How does CoQ10 help people with Parkinson’s disease?

A. CoQ10 seems to have several beneficial actions in the illness. Researchers have looked at mitochondria in brain cells and determined people with Parkinson’s disease have reduced activity of Complex I in the electron transport chain. Recent research has proposed the reduced activity of Complex I interferes with the brain-signaling chemical dopamine. Stored and newly synthesized dopamine is depleted. The dopamine depletion causes nerve cell degeneration.

A recent clinical study involved 80 patients with Parkinson’s disease (both men and women). The researchers first evaluated all the participants to establish scores for basic motor skills (measuring the ability to control physical movements such as walking), mental status (whether the person was depressed or experiencing memory loss) and the activities of daily living (whether the person was experiencing difficulty with handwriting, dressing themselves, using utensils such as knives and forks, and so on). This scale is known as the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). This process is known as establishing “baseline values,” that is, the condition of the patient before receiving any treatment.

Participants were divided into 4 groups. Each group received either 300 mg, 600 mg, or 1200 mg of the special form of CoQ10, or a placebo. The researchers observed the participants for 16 months.

The results of the study showed that all the participants who received CoQ10 had smaller declines in function compared to the placebo group, but the smallest decline was experienced by the group taking the highest amount of the special form of CoQ10.

The most significant results were noted specifically in the activities of daily living scores by the people taking 1200 mg of CoQ10 daily. These people retained better ability to feed and dress themselves, speak, walk, and bathe or shower by themselves. They maintained greater independence for a longer time. Parkinson’s disease, as with other neurodegenerative diseases, robs the sufferer of their ability to control the movements of their own body and care for themselves. Supplementation with CoQ10, while not a cure, is the first intervention that showed a slowing in the progressive deterioration of the function associated with this disease.

Q. What were the results of clinical research on Huntington’s Disease?

A. A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study respected type of study, was conducted at the University of Rochester. All of the 347 Huntington’s disease (HD) patients were experiencing some HD symptoms, but were still in the early stages of the disease. The patients (who did not know which drug they were receiving) were randomly assigned to four different treatment groups: 25 percent received Remacemide, 25 percent received CoQ10, 25 percent received both, and 25 percent received a placebo, or sugar pill. The researchers, who also did not know which patients got which drug, watched and recorded their progress for two and one-half years. Remacemide is a new drug made by Astra Seneca that blocks the neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain, that has long been suspected of contributing to the death of brain cells in Huntington’s disease.

Unfortunately, in the CARE-HD study, Remacemide had no effect on the progression of the disease in patients in the early stages. However, the individuals who received 600 mg of CoQ10 per day experienced some slowing of the disease progression. They were able to manage daily activities, such as meal preparation, housekeeping tasks, and personal care longer than those not on CoQ10. They were also able to focus their attention better and were less depressed and irritable. The portion of the studied patients receiving 600 mg of CoQ10 per day experienced a 15 percent decline in the progression of HD. According to the researchers conducting the study, a 15 percent decline in the progression of HD would roughly translate into approximately one more year of independence for patients. This is the very first study from more than a dozen Huntington’s disease patient trails that showed any modification of the course of the illness.

Of note, the effects of the CoQ10 had not abated at the end of the research study. That is, the benefit of using CoQ10, 600 mg per day, was still increasing; this suggests that the longer a patient supplements with CoQ10, the greater the decline in the progression of HD. The next phase of the CARE-HD research will test a higher dose of CoQ10 (1200 mg or more per day), with more patients (over 1000), for a longer period of time (approximately 5 years). This study should improve our understanding of the optimal dose and the total achievable decline in the progression of HD. The CoQ10 product used in the CARE-HD study was designated an Orphan Drug by the FDA. The product utilizes a proprietary, patent-pending delivery mechanism, which is proven to be safe and tolerable at high doses for people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, substantially improving brain tissue levels of CoQ10.

Q. What other diseases could benefit from CoQ10 supplementation?

A. Studies show CoQ10 levels are greatly reduced in Alzheimer’s patients. Mitochondrial abnormalities also are noted; however, research has yet to determine how or why this occurs. Some scientists believe damage to mitochondria is an early feature of the disease. Free-radical damage also is a feature of Alzheimer’s.

In a study of 27 Alzheimer’s patients, subjects were given 60 mg of CoQ10, 150 mg of iron, and 180 mg of vitamin B6 daily. Each patient’s mitochondria activity was effectively activated. All patients continued to experience gradual decline. However, researchers believed that with this combination, the progression was much slower and allowed the patients to experience 1 to 2 years of extended good health.

ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) is a progressive, fatal, neurological disease. It occurs when the nerve cells in the brain that control voluntary movement gradually degenerate. Investigation of CoQ10 in individuals with ALS is just beginning. Researchers at the Eleanor and Lou Gehrig ALS Center at Columbia University recently conducted a small clinical pilot trial of CoQ10 in ALS. The study was an open label study, which meant that everyone enrolled received CoQ10, 400 mg three times per day. Of the 16 patients originally enrolled, nine patients completed the study. Six of these nine patients experienced some benefits. The patients declined from 0 – 25 percent in functional scores, 6 percent in strength, and 10 percent in breathing ability. These scores reflect a positive trend compared to the 50 percent decline that is seen in the natural history of ALS over the same period of time (5 to 9 months). Citing the need to conduct more studies of the effectiveness of CoQ10 for people with ALS is rapidly and efficiently as possible to get answers to patients and clinicians, another clinical trial is currently underway at the Gehrig ALS Center. This is a pilot study to determine if CoQ10 has short-term effects on motor nerves in the brain using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The researchers are going to try to “see” if CoQ10 can change the chemical sin the brain’s upper motor nerves of people with ALS, an important next step of the investigation.

Q. Can taking CoQ10 prevent neurodegenerative disease?

A. To date, there have been no studies or research examining whether CoQ10 can prevent these diseases.

Alzheimer’s disease prevention is being clinically investigated. Researchers have determined that people who take certain anti-inflammatory medications seem less likely to develop the illness. A large, multi-centered trial is studying this connection.

Q. How much CoQ10 should I take?

A. Depending on your family history of neurological disease and your disease experience, studies show benefits at doses of 100 to 200 mg of CoQ10 daily. Some studies used doses of up to 1,200 mg per day.

CoQ10’s safety has been evaluated. To date, no toxicities have been reported. Mild stomach upset may occur. Taking CoQ10 with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

Q. What should I look for in a CoQ10 supplement?

A. Use products which have a strong clinical research track record, supported by product-specific research from reputable institutions, and have been proven to be safe, tolerable and effective in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The CoQ10 product you choose should be proven to: be absorbed, enter the blood stream, cross the blood brain barrier and increase mitochondrial levels of CoQ10. If the product you are considering does not have evidence to support these points, keep looking. Once you have found a candidate, examine the product’s safety and efficacy record for neurodegenerative diseases- if the product has not been proven to be safe and effective, keep looking. Good products exist; however, caveat emptor.

Conclusion

CoQ10 supplementation for people with neurodegenerative diseases is supported by contemporary clinical research. CoQ10 is certainly not the only answer to the complex issues of management and treatment of these types of diseases. However, research indicates that it is a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagined. As we continue to study this naturally occurring compound, we are finding more and more benefits to the body.

All CoQ10 is not created equal. For safety and overall effectiveness, use a CoQ10 product that is supported by product-specific research from reputable institution, which is proven to be safe, tolerable and effective at high doses; deviating from this set of criteria may do more harm than good for people with these serious illnesses. Choose clinically tested products from a well-respected company and increase the potential to achieve and maintain brain and neurological health.



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Buy Coenzyme Q10 (COQ10) at Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1459)


For Better Heart Health ...
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Date: February 06, 2007 12:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: For Better Heart Health ...

Nutrients Every Heart Needs

 

High blood pressure. High cholesterol levels. Ever increasing stress. All are factors related to the development of heart disease – the leading cause of death for both men and women. In fact, 1 in 2 women in the United States die of heart disease or stroke, while 1 in 30 dies of breast cancer. If current trends remain unchanged, not only will heart disease remain the primary killer in our country, the number of people it claims will steadily and dramatically increase in the next 20 years.

 

Fortunately, heart disease is a problem you can do something about. Proven ways to prevent or mitigate the effects of heart disease include taking targeted nutritional supplements, making changes in the foods we eat, exercising most days of the week, drinking in moderation, eliminating tobacco use and adapting a positive attitude. Research shows that those of us who are often angry and depressed have more heart disease than people that live their lives with a more positive outlook.

 

In this Ask the Doctor, we’ll talk about specific nutritional supplements that are heart healthy, whether your goal is to prevent heart disease or reduce the effects of heart disease if you currently have it.

 

Q. I am trying hard to live a healthier life. But it all seems so overwhelming. How do I start?

A. It may help to know that you’re not alone in feeling overwhelmed. Lots of people feel this way. This is why the Centers for Disease Control and the American Heart Association are both urging people to prevent heart disease by identifying their individual health risk factors.

 

A risk factor is an indicator of whether or not you may develop a certain health condition. In heart disease prevention, there are two kinds of risk factors. There are risk factor you can control – such as diet, exercise, and the supplements you take. There are also risk factors you can’t change or control –your age, race, and gender, as well as your family’s history of heart disease.

 

Examples can be really helpful. Let’s follow three adults – Fred, Jane, and Earl – and determine their risk factors.

 

Low Risk

Fred is 32, single, has a job he loves, has an optimistic attitude about his life, and works out 5 days a week. Most days Fred’s diet is fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low fat. Occasionally Fred will eat a cheeseburger and fries when he watches the game with his buddies. Fred’s risk factors are his male gender and the occasional high fat content in his diet.

 

Moderate Risk

Jane is 55, a lawyer, married, and has a very stressful job. Jane eats lots of salads, fruits, and whole grains. However, her job requires her to work long hours which leaves little time to exercise. Jane is for the most part happy with her life, but her work stress had led to times of negativity. Her father had a heart attack when he was 56. Jane’s risk factors include her age (greater than 50), negativity from job stress, lack of regular exercise, and a family history of heart disease.

 

High Risk

Earl is 65, married, and has just retired from a job he hated. He spends most of his day watching TV and eating potato chips and other high fat, salty snacks. Earl has told his friends and family since he worked so hard for so long, he is sure to drop dead soon after retiring. He has high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Earl’s father had a heart attack and died when he was 73. Earl’s risk is his male gender, age (greater than 50), sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, negative outlook on life, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and a family history of heart disease.

 

Q. OK, it’s pretty easy to see that Fred needs to watch his diet, Jane needs to exercise more, and Earl needs lots of help. But, which supplements should they take?

A. The Whole Heart Nutrition chart is an easy way to determine the supplements each risk level needs. As you can see, everyone wanting to prevent heart disease – Fred, Jane, Earl, you, and I – need to take quality heart formula multivitamin, garlic, and a fish oil supplement providing Omega-3 fatty acids. CoQ10 is also a smart choice for complete heart heath support.

 

Q. Why do we all need to take a “heart multivitamin”? Why can’t we take a regular multivitamin to prevent heart disease?

A. Since the human heart simply cannot function without adequate amounts of certain vitamins and minerals, it seems logical that a multivitamin would be the foundation of good nutrition for your heart. Heart-health formulated multivitamins provide the exact nutrients needed to prevent heart disease.

 

That’s why we need to take a specially formulated heart-focused multi-vitamin. The cells and the tissues that make up the heart must have vitamins C, A, and E, as well as B1, B6, and B12 to function. Folic acid, the little B vitamin that is so crucial in preventing spina bifida (a birth defect), breast cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease is also needed to keep heart muscles strong. The B vitamins and folic acid are very important to heart health because they help lower homocysteine levels. Homocysteine is a potential and emerging cardiac risk factor,

 

Magnesium is a mighty mineral and healthy hearts need it every day. Aloha lipoic acid, a fatty acid, provides protection against heart cholesterol and high blood pressure. Lutein and lycopene are all-natural nutrients and keep our arteries free from the buildup of plaque, a condition linked to heart attacks and strokes.

 

Multivitamins formulated with these exact vitamins, minerals, and nutrients will work with medications often prescribed to treat heart disease and provide the nutrition our hearts need.

 

Q. Don’t all multivitamins work with medications prescribed to treat heart disease?

A. Many multivitamin formulas contain herbs and other nutrients that can interfere with prescription medications, especially mediations prescribed to treat heart disease. One multivitamin does not fit all.

The more risk factors you have, the greater your chance of developing heart disease.

Factors you CAN’T change

 

Increasing age

About four out of five people who die of coronary heart disease are 65 or older.

Male gender

Men have more heart attacks than women. Even after menopause, when women’s death rate from heart disease increases, men continue to have more heart attacks until both groups reach their 80s.

Heredity (including Race)

While heart disease has often been noted to occur in families, recent research has shown this link may be the result of environment more than heredity. In other words, your dad’s high blood pressure and your high blood pressure may be related more to your mutual love of salty foods than your genetics. African Americans tend to have very high blood pressure and a higher risk of heart attacks than other races.

Factors you CAN change

 

Tobacco smoke

Smokers have twice the risk of heart attack than nonsmokers.

High blood cholesterol

As blood cholesterol rises, so does the risk of heart disease.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure increases the heart’s workload, causing the heart to thicken and become stiffer.

Physical inactivity

Exercise most days of the week helps prevent heart disease. The more vigorous the activity, the greater your benefits.

Obesity and overweight

People who have excess body fat are more likely to develop heart disease and stroke even if they have no other risk factors.

Individual coping styles

Research has shown there is al ink between heart disease risk and stress, happiness, negativity, and socioeconomic status.

Alcohol consumption

Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure. However, the risk of heart disease in people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol (an average of one drink for women or two drinks for men per day) is lower than in nondrinkers.

 

Q. What can garlic supplements do for Fred, Jane and Earl or other people with low to high risk factors?

A. Garlic supplements have a very long and very successful history of preventing premature death from heart attacks. Lately, however, there have been some conflicting news stories about supplemental garlic’s ability to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure – the causes of heart disease and death. That’s because many different garlic supplements have been used in these studies – garlic oil, garlic powder, aged garlic extract, and supplements made from fresh garlic. They have all been studied clinically for their effects in heart disease.

 

The best garlic supplements (and the ones that showed the best effects in garlic studies) contain alliin, which is then converted to allicin. Allicin is the compound that lowers harmfully high cholesterol levels and dangerous blood pressure readings. Allicin is also responsible for garlic’s characteristic odor. Because alliin is very stable when dry, properly prepared and enteric coated fresh garlic preparations preserve the allicin-producing action until the garlic mixes with the fluids of the intestinal tract. Fresh garlic extract’s enteric coating also prevents garlic breath. In contrast, aged garlic contains absolutely no allicin or allicin potential. This fact is probably responsible for the poor results noted in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure from aged garlic preparations.

 

The most effective garlic supplements are made from fresh garlic, enteric coated, and provide a daily dose of at least 10 milligrams (mg) alliin or a total allicin potential of 4,000 micrograms (mcg). Taking a once-daily garlic supplement that delivers 4,000 mcg of allicin will lower Jane’s and Earl’s high blood pressure and Earl’s high cholesterol, naturally and effectively.

 

Whole Heart Nutrition

Supplement

Low Risk

Moderate Risk

High Risk

Heart multivitamin

Every day

Every day

Every day

Garlic supplement 4,000 mcg allicin

1 tablet each day

1 tablet each day

1 tablet each day

Fish oil supplement with omega-3 fatty acids

600 mg each day

1200 mg each day

1800 mg each day

CoQ10

60 mg

100-200 mg each day

200-400 mg each day

Each additional risk factor requires additional supplements or increased doses for protection from heart disease.

 

Q. What about fish oil supplements? I know they can prevent heart disease but I’ve also heard they contain harmful substances, too.

A. You’re right on both counts. But, there are excellent fish oil supplements naturally loaded with Omega-3 fatty acids, powerful nutrients that prevent heart disease, that are also certified free of harmful contaminants.

 

In the 1980s, researchers first began noticing the native Inuit (Eskimo) populations of Greenland and Alaska had hardly and heart disease despite a very high-fat diet. The deep-water fish that these peoples eat (and continue to eat to this day) are indeed quite fatty. But, this kind of fat, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids actually protects the heart instead of harming it.

 

Research has shown that the Omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil supplements can:

-Reduce the risk of arrhythmias, lethal heartbeat rhythms that cause sudden death.

-Lower the levels of triglycerides, fats in the blood that can increase a person’s

risk of dying from a heart attack, even if a person’s cholesterol levels are normal.

-Slow atherosclerosis – the growth of harmful plaque on artery walls.

Atherosclerosis develops over many years. If the plaque growth is slow and

stable, chances are low that a heart attack will result. However, rapidly growing

or unstable plaques can rupture. The body responds with inflammation, which

causes blood clots to form. These blood clots block the artery and cause a heart

attack.

-Keep blood pressure levels low. Many people have high blood pressure for years

without knowing it. That’s because it has no symptoms. Uncontrolled high

blood pressure can lead to stroke, heart attack, heart failure, and kidney failure.

While 25% of Americans have high blood pressure, nearly one-third of these

people don’t know they have it. This is why high blood pressure is often called

the “silent killer.”

 

You can get all of this heart disease preventive protection from just 600-1800 mg of fish oil. It’s pretty simple to see why Fred, Jane, Earl, and you and I need to take fish oil supplements every day.

 

However, it is absolutely critical that the fish oil supplement you take is free of contaminants and guaranteed fresh! Make sure that the manufacturer of the fish oil supplement you buy is able to provide documentation of purity in their product. Supplements should contain no detectable dioxin (a widely used toxic preservative), DDT (a toxic insecticide), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) or heavy metals such as mercury and lead.

 

Before you buy any fish oil supplement, ask the clerk if you can open the bottle or jar and smell the contents. A fishy smelling fish oil supplementation means it is rancid. Rancid fish oil is not going to help your heart at all and may actually hurt it.

 

Q. That leaves CoQ10. Why is it important for Jane and Earl?

A. CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone, is the premier heart supplement! CoQ10 is part of our energy producing system. It works directly in the mitochondria of each cell. Mitochondria are highly specialized structures within each cell and are often referred to as powerhouses. These tiny energy producers generate 95% of the energy the body requires. The number of mitochondria in a cell depends on its function and energy needs. The heart has very important functions and requires a vast amount of energy. Thus, the heart has a lot of mitochondria or little powerhouses.

 

CoQ10 is incredibly crucial to the health of our hearts. Especially to hearts that are pumping blood with too much cholesterol. But, in a dangerous paradox, CoQ10 levels can become dangerously depleted when physicians treat high cholesterol in their patients with certain medications. The so-called “statin” drugs (Mevacor/lovastatin and Crestor/rosubastatin are two examples) are powerful and medications prescribed to lower harmful cholesterol levels. However, one very harmful side effect they share is that they deprive cells of CoQ10. While some physicians are aware of this serious side effect and tell their patients to take at least 400 mg of CoQ10 each day, most are not. The result? Any good the statin drugs may be doing is actually negated by their depletion of CoQ10.

 

Q. How does CoQ10 actually work? Has it been studied in heart disease?

A. Yes, it has! CoQ10 has been extensively studied in heart disease. This natural nutrient is present in every nucleated cell in our body (the only cells that don’t contain CoQ10 are red blood cells). Heart cells, however, are absolutely loaded with CoQ10. Its job is fairly simply – CoQ10 is vital to the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the compound our body uses for 95% of its energy needs.

 

In 1998, 144 patients who had been admitted to the hospital after a heart attack, participated in a CoQ10 study. Half of the patients received 120 mg of CoQ10 a day in addition to the usual treatments given to heart attack patients. The other half, the control group, received the usual treatments and a placebo, but no CoQ10.

 

The results showed that the group taking CoQ10 had less irregular heartbeat, experienced less angina (a type of heart pain), and had much better function in the left ventricle (the most essential chamber of the heart), compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden heart failure or another heart attack were also reduced in the CoQ10 group.

 

Q. What if I have already been diagnosed with Congestive Heart Failure? Will CoQ10 still help me?

A. CoQ10 has been proven in study after study to help slow down the destruction that occurs in congestive heart failure (CHF), a serious heart disease, and heal the heart muscles damaged by heart attacks. In fact, heart attacks often occur when the body’s CoQ10 levels are low.

 

In a CHF study, patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the researchers introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of the patients’ hearts to determine the degree of muscle damage CHF had caused. In the group who took CoQ10, the pumping ability of the heart improved significantly. The placebo group’s hearts did not. The researchers conducting the study recommended that people with CHF add CoQ10 to the other medications they need to take to stay alive and well.

 

Q. Are some types of CoQ10 better than others?

A. Indeed they are. CoQ10 products are not created equally. The key to this natural medicine is the quality of the manufacturing. Take a CoQ10 supplement that’s been used in research conducted by prestigious universities (it will tell you this right on the label). Researchers want the best CoQ10 for their studies. You want the best CoQ10 for yourself and your loved ones.

 

The best CoQ10 has to meet the following criteria:

1. Must be easily absorbed during the digestion process so that it can get into the

bloodstream.

2. Must reach the mitochondria in the cell.

3. Must be proven effective in studies.

4. Must be safe and free of impurities.

 

Q. It sounds as if CoQ10 is only for people with moderate or high risk factors. Can others benefit from this supplement?

A. Many people, including those like Fred with low risk factors or no risk of heart disease take CoQ10 every day. CoQ10 supplements may reduce your risk of cancer, prevent gum disease, and help certain nerve cells work more effectively.

 

Conclusion

Understanding your personal risk factors, making it better lifestyle choices, taking a multivitamin formulated for your heart, an enteric-coated fresh garlic supplement, fish oil supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids, and CoQ10 – the heart’s super-nutrient – can help keep your heart healthy and strong.

 

Helen Keller, the famous lecturer and author, who was both blind and deaf wrote, “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot e seen or even touched. They must be felt with the human heart.”

 

Healthy hearts have the most opportunities to “feel” the best and are the most beautiful thing our world has to offer.

 



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Benefits - Supports joint function and tissue health*
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Date: December 11, 2006 03:46 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits - Supports joint function and tissue health*

To understand glucosamine's role, it is important to understand joint structure and function. Cartilage in the joints acts as a shock absorber to cushion the blows of daily wear and tear. Joint cartilage is made of a unique connective tissue that consists of collagen and proteoglycans. Collagen is a strong, fibrous, insoluble protein. Proteoglycans are large, carbohydrate-rich protein chains made up of 95 percent polysaccharides and 5 percent protein called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). GAGs are composed of repeating two-sugar units (disaccharides) that contain glucosamine sulfate and other amino sugars. Surrounding the joint cartilage is synovial fluid, which contains many substances including its chief component, hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronic acid forms the backbone of other proteoglycans and is responsible for the thickness of synovial fluid as well as its lubricating and shock-absorbing properties. Synovial fluid also provides nutrients for the joint cartilage.

Glucosamine sulfate is a normal constituent of glycosaminoglycans in cartilage and synovial fluid. In essence, glucosamine sulfate provides important building blocks for cartilage production. Laboratory studies suggest that glucosamine may also function to stimulate production of cartilage-building proteins. It is also thought that the sulfate portion of the molecule contributes to the efficacy of glucosamine sulfate in the synovial fluid by providing the elemental sulfur needed for strengthening cartilage and aiding glycosaminoglycan synthesis. 1,2,3

Glucosamine sulfate has been the subject of research for over twenty years. Clinical trials as well as experimental studies have repeatedly supported the efficacy of oral glucosamine sulfate in supporting joint function. In one large open trial, over 1200 people took oral glucosamine sulfate for periods ranging from 36 to 64 days. In this multi-center trial, ninety-five percent of the subjects experienced greater joint comfort and increased mobility. The physicians reported "good" results in 59%, and "sufficient" results in 36%. Furthermore, the improvements in joint health lasted for up to three months after the glucosamine sulfate was discontinued. 3

Promotes optimal joint comfort, function and flexibility*

Boswellia serrata (Indian frankincense) has been used for centuries in the Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine to maintain healthy joints. Even today, this is one of the primary uses for this plant in Ayurvedic medicine. Boswellic acids have been shown to support healthy joint tissue, maintain circulation to joints, enhance joint mobility, and promote joint comfort in animal models without known side effects. 4

Boswellin® is an extract rich in boswellic acids. Boswellic acids are potent modulators of enzymes involved in leukotriene synthesis in vitro, promoting a healthy balanced production of these components of the immune system.5 Healthy leukotriene balance can lead to enhanced joint function. A human clinical study was conducted to assess the effects of supplementation with a formula containing Boswellia, Curcumin and other nutrients on joint function. In this double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial, participants were randomly assigned to receive the herbal formulation or a placebo for 3 months. Following this 3-month period, the treatments were reversed for an additional 3 months. The results showed that while each group was receiving the herbal formulation, they had superior joint function and a greater sense of joint comfort when compared to the placebo groups.6 Other trials lend further support to Boswellia’s ability to promote healthy joint function.4,6,7

Curcumin is a potent antioxidant that has known free radical scavenging activity. This activity of Curcumin is thought to play a major part in its role as a joint protective nutrient. In fact, the numerous beneficial effects attributed of whole turmeric are thought to stem in large measure from the antioxidant properties of curcuminoids. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals, which are highly unstable molecules that can damage cellular structures through abnormal oxidative reactions. Curcumin is not toxic to cells, even at high concentrations. Pure Curcumin was shown to be less protective than a mixture of curcuminoids, indicating a possible synergism among the curcuminoids.8

Curcumin demonstrates several other in vitro effects linked to free radical scavenging. Curcumin scavenges nitric oxide, a compound associated with the body’s inflammatory response.9 Curcumin also demonstrates in vitro inhibition of certain enzymes involved in promoting inflammatory reactions in the body. Together these results strongly suggest that Curcumin is a potent bioprotectant with a potentially wide range of therapeutic applications.9,10,11

Preliminary human trials have assessed the therapeutic potential of Curcumin, with results that verify the traditional use of turmeric as an herb to enhance joint health. In a short-term double-blind, cross-over, comparative study, eighteen people were randomized to receive Curcumin (1200 mg daily) or an alternative therapy for two-week periods. The participants in the Curcumin groups were shown to produce measurable enhancements in joint flexibility and walking time.12 Research suggests that Curcumin and Boswellia work extremely well in combination to benefit joint health and mobility, as trials combining both nutrients have yielded highly positive results.

Bioperine-Nature’s Absorption Enhancer Boosts Nutrient Absorption*

Traditional Ayurvedic herbal formulas often include black pepper or long pepper as synergistic herbs. The active ingredient in both black pepper and long pepper is the alkaloid, piperine. Experiments carried out to evaluate the scientific basis for the use of peppers have shown that piperine significantly enhances bioavailability when consumed with other substances.13 Several double-blind clinical studies have confirmed that Bioperine® increases absorption of nutrients.14

Curcumin is known to be poorly absorbed in the intestinal tract when used on its own, thereby limiting its therapeutic effectiveness. Oral doses are largely excreted in feces, and only trace amounts appear in the bloodstream. However, a study has shown that concomitant administration of 20 mg of piperine with 2 grams of Curcumin was able to enhance Curcumin bioavailability by an astounding 2000%. 15 These results speak to the wisdom of including a small amount of Bioperine® in the formulation to ensure nutrient bioavailability.

Sustained Release – For lasting joint comfort and convenient dosing

To ensure that the body can utilize all of the joint health-enhancing nutrients effectively, Best Joint Support featuring ArthriBlend-SR™ has been designed to have a sustained release delivery system. The nutrients are released over a longer period of time, maximizing absorption and providing the comfort-enhancing properties in a sustained manner. This unique delivery system allows the product to be taken just twice daily while maintaining its efficacy throughout the day.

Safety

Suggested Adult Use: Take two tablets every 12 hours. Take 4 tablets daily.

Scientific References
1. Vidal y Plana, R.R., Bizzarri, D., Rovati, A.L. Articular cartilage pharmacology: I. In vitro studies on glucosamine and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Pharmacological Research Communications 1978; 10(6):557-569.

2. Tapadinhas M.J., Rivera, I.C. Bignamini, A.A. Oral glucosamine sulphate in the management of arthrosis: report on a multi-centre open investigation in Portugal. Pharmatherpeutica 1982; 3(3):157-68.

3. Vaz, A.L. Double-blind clinical evaluation of the relative efficacy of ibuprofen and glucosamine sulphate in the management of osteoarthrosis of the knee in out-patients. Current Medical Research and Opinion 1982; 8(3):145-149.

4. Kimmatkar N, Thawani V, Hingorani L, Khiyani R. Efficacy and tolerability of Boswellia serrata extract in treatment of osteoarthritis of knee--a randomized double blind placebo controlled trial. Phytomedicine. 2003 Jan;10(1):3-7.

5. Safayhi, H., Mack, T., Sabieraj, J., Anazodo, M.I., Subramanian, L.R., and Ammon, H.P.T. (1992) Boswellic acids: Novel, specific, nonredox inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 261(3), 1143-1146.

6. Boswellia serrata. Alternative Medicine Review Monographs – Volume One. 2002.

7. Kulkarni RR, Patki PS, Jog VP, Gandage SG, Patwardhan B. Treatment of osteoarthritis with a herbomineral formulation: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. J Ethnopharmacol. 1991 May-Jun;33(1-2):91-5.

8. Majeed, M., Badmaev, V., Shivakumar, U., Rajendran, R. Curcuminoids: Antioxidant Phytonutrients. 1995. Piscataway, NJ: NutriScience Publishers.

9. Snow, J.M. Herbal Monograph: Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae). The Protocol Journal of Botanical Medicine, Autumn 1995:43-46.

10. Rao, S., Rao, M.N.A. Nitric oxide scavenging by curcuminoids. J Pharm. Pharmacol. 1997;49:105-7.

11. Ramsewak, R.S., DeWitt, D.L., Nair, M.G. Cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of Curcumins I-III from Curcuma longa. Phytomedicine 2000;7(4):303-308.

12. Deodhar, S.D., Sethi, R. Srimal. R.C. Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin (diferoyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.

13. Atal, C., Zutshi, U., Rao, P. Scientific evidence on the role of Ayurvedic herbals on bioavailability of drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 1981;4:229-232.

14. Bioperine®–Nature's Bioavailability Enhancing Thermonutrient. Executive Summary. 1996; Sabinsa Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.

15. Shoba, G., et al. Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Planta Medica 1998;64(4):353-6.



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All Natural Hair Care Products - Salon Quality!
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Date: September 01, 2006 01:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: All Natural Hair Care Products - Salon Quality!

New from Jason Natural Salon and Fragrance Free Hair Care

Jason Natural Salon Hair Care: Perfectly Styles, Perfectly Beautiful, All Natural.

This new line features a full range of functional products for healthy, style-conscious women.  Jason has combined its expertise in developing natural and effective formulations with contemporary fashion to create luxurious styling and treatment specific products. Four specialized hair care systems offer a line of shampoos, conditioners, styling and finishing products to volumize, moisturize, naturalize, and style—for bold, sexy chic to soft, silky bounce.  All the products are enriched with conditioning essential oils and botanical extracts to nourish and revitalize radiantly beautiful, stylish hair.

  • Paraben-Free
  • No sodium lauryl/laureth sulfates
  • No animal by-products or testing
  • No harsh chemicals to strip hair, damage or irritate the scalp & harm the environment

Jason Fragrance Free: Pure and Natural

Studies indicate that 15-30% of the population reports some sensitivity to fragrance.  More than 80% report that exposure to fragrances is bothersome*.  Fragrance chemicals can cause health effects, primarily in the skin, lungs and brain.

Jason Fragrance Free is a line of hair and body care products formulated for individuals with fragrance or skin sensitivities and those who just want to steer clear of fragrance, dyes and synthetics.  Many “unscented” products mask the odor of the formula with fragrance so they remain a potential source of skin irritation.  Synthetic fragrances often contain phthalates which have been linked to birth defects and health related issues.

Unlike “unscented” products-which often contain fragrance to mask the scent of the formula—Jason Fragrance Free is truly sans fragrance. Stock up on Jason Naturals complete product line.

  • Great for use on sensitive skin
  • No sodium lauryl/laureth sulfates
  • Fragrance, phthalate and paraben free
  • No animal by-products or testing

*”scents and Sensitivity,” Environmental Health Perspectives, the research journal of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, www.herc.org, Nov. 1998

 



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L-Citrulline 500mg capsules of powder
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Date: September 01, 2006 01:03 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: L-Citrulline 500mg capsules of powder

L-Citrulline 500mg capsules of powder

 

Now Available!

  • Supports cardiovascular health and sexual function.
  • An amino acid that increases blood flow to the heart and organs.
  • Helps the liver’s detoxification process by converting toxic ammonia into urea for elimination.
  • The body converts l-Arginine to l-Citrulline, a byproduct of which is nitric oxide, a key component in the relaxation and dilation of blood vessels.
  • A readily available nutrient for cardio function, and a preferred source of nitric oxide synthesis.

L-Citrulline is produced in the urea cycle when carbamoyl phosphate is converted to Citrulline in the ornithine carbamoyl transferase reaction. When endogenous supplies of ornithine carbamoyl transferase are insufficient, supplemental L-Citrulline has been shown to support ammonia incorporation and liver detoxification of ammonia.



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Benefits of Best Alpha Lipoic 35!
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Date: February 12, 2006 03:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of Best Alpha Lipoic 35!

Benefits

Supports the Body’s Defense Against Free Radicals*

Recycles Antioxidant Nutrients such as Vitamin C and Vitamin E*
Helps Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level when used as part of the diet*

Alpha-lipoic Acid––the "Ideal Antioxidant"
The antioxidant potential of a substance is based on a number of criteria, including:
1) Ability to quench specific free-radicals.
2) Ability to bind or "chelate" metal ions that can generate free radicals.
3) Supports function of other antioxidants.
4) Absorption/bioavailability.
5) Concentration in tissues, cells and extra cellular fluids.
6) Ability to function as an antioxidant in fatty and watery environments.


The "ideal antioxidant" would meet all the above criteria. Very few antioxidants do, yet a particular antioxidant with but a few of the characteristics is still valuable and effective. Vitamin E, for example, is one of the most important dietary antioxidants, yet it only works in fatty environments such as cell membranes.

As a team, ALA and DHLA come close to the ideal, for the following reasons:1,2,3
1) ALA is easily absorbed when consumed orally.
2) ALA is readily converted to DHLA in various tissues.
3) As a pair, ALA and DHLA neutralize superoxide, hydroxyl, peroxyl, and hypochlorus radicals.
4) ALA and DHLA form stable complexes with metal ions such as iron, manganese, copper and zinc ions.
5) ALA and DHLA scavenge free radicals in fatty environments and watery environments.
6) DHLA recycles other important antioxidants.


DHLA-regenerates vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione

Within the cell, antioxidants work as a team to keep free radicals from damaging cell structures. In order to neutralize a free radical, an antioxidant such as vitamin C must give up an electron, which mean it becomes oxidized. Before it can function as an antioxidant once again, it must be regenerated back to its "reduced" form, by gaining an electron to replace the donated electron. For this, it needs the help of other antioxidants. Vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione are key antioxidants that can be generated by cycling between their oxidized and reduce forms. This is necessary to maintain the balance between oxidation and its reverse––the neutralization of free radicals by antioxidants.

DHLA is an essential component in the interaction between these antioxidants.4 Studies show that addition of alpha-lipoic acid to liver tissues results in increased vitamin C levels. It has been found that DHLA is responsible for regenerating vitamin C, which in turn regenerates vitamin E.3 DHLA also converts glutathione from its oxidized form back into its free radical scavenging reduced form.3,5 The ALA/DHLA pair is thus vital for prevention of "oxidative stress," which occurs which the balance is tipped in favor of oxidation in cells.4 DHLA helps preserve antioxidants in both the watery cell interior and the fatty structure of cell membranes.6 Evidence from animal studies suggests that DHLA protects the brain against free radical damage.7

Alpha-lipoic Acid and Blood Sugar

Alpha-lipoic acid is a key factor in the cellular process that metabolizes glucose to produce energy for cellular functions. The importance of ALA’s role in blood sugar metabolism is evidenced in studies on ALA and type-2 diabetes. In a small pilot study, 13 people with type-2 diabetes showed improved utilization of glucose in muscle tissue in response to intravenous administration of ALA.8 In a four week controlled multicenter trial, 74 people with type-2 diabetes took ALA in oral doses of 600, 1200 or 1800 mg per day. After 4 weeks, the normal lowering of blood sugar levels in response to insulin improved.9 In vitro studies have shown that ALA has a positive effect on insulin-stimulated uptake of glucose by muscle cells.10



Safety

Suggested Adult Use: One to six capsules daily with food.

Alpha-lipoic acid is considered safe, and no adverse effects have been seen with long-term supplementation.1

Scientific References
1. Packer, L.. Witt, E., Tritschler, H. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant. Free Radical Biology and Medicine 1995;19(2):227-50.
2. Suzuki, Y., et al. Thioctic acid and dihydrolipoic acid are novel antioxidants which interact with reactive oxygen species. Free Rad. Res. Comms. 15(5):255-63.
3. Biewenga, G., Haenen, G., Bast, A. The pharmacology of lipoic acid. Gen. Pharmac. 29(3):315-31.
4. Serbinova, E. Maitra, I., Packer, L. The synergy between vitamin E and alpha-lipoic acid--–possible relationship against oxidative stress in vivo. Life Chemistry Reports 1994;12:17-21.
5. Bast, A. Haenen, G. Interplay between lipoic acid and glutathione in the protection against microsomal lipid peroxidation. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1988; 963:558-561.
6. Kagan, V. et al. Dihydrolipoic acid––a universal antioxidant both in the membrane and in the aqueous phase. Reduction of peroxyl, ascorbyl and chromanoxyl radicals. Biochem Pharmacol 1992;44(8):1637.
7. Prehn, J. et al. Dihydrolipoate reduces neuronal injury after cerebral ischemia. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 1992;12(1):78-87.
8. Jacob, S. et al. Enhancement of glucose disposal in patients with type-2 diabetes by alpha-lipoic acid. Arzneimittelforschung 1995;45(8):872-4.
9. Jacob, S et al. Oral administration of RAC-alpha-lipoic acid modulates insulin sensitivity in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus: a placebo-controlled pilot trial. Free Radical Biology & Medicine 1999;27(3/4):309-14.
10. Estrada, D. et al. Stimulation of glucose uptake by the natural coenzyme alpha-lipoic acid/thioctic acid: participation of elements of the insulin signaling pathway. Diabetes 1996;45(12):1798-804.


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Best Alpha Lipoic 35 180 VC
Best Alpha Lipoic 35

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Omega-3 Fish Oils “Super Supplement of the Sea”
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Date: January 03, 2006 08:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Omega-3 Fish Oils “Super Supplement of the Sea”

  • Enteric Coated Molecularly Distilled Omega-3
  • PURIFICATION METHOD Molecularly distilled as pharmaceutical DHA 250 mg Softgels
  • PURIFICATION METHOD Molecularly distilled and purifi ed MaxEPA 1000mg Gels
  • PURIFICATION METHOD Advanced fi ltration via active carbon treatment Omega-3 1000mg, 180/120
  • PURIFICATION METHOD AAT (Advanced absorbent technology) SuperEPA 1200mg 360/240
  • PURIFICATION METHOD AAT with vacuum molecular (MD) distillation Super Omega 3-6-9 1200mg
  • PURIFICATION METHOD Advanced absorbent technology Molecularly Distilled Lemon Liq.
  • PURIFICATION METHOD Molecularly distilled as Pharmaceutical

References
1.) Vanderhaeghe L, Karst K, Healthy Fats for Life; Quarry Healthy Books. 2003
2.) Stoll AL, Severus WE, Freeman MP, et al. Omega 3 fatty acids in bipolar disorder: a preliminary double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Arch General Psychiatry. 1999
3.) Ascherio A, Rimm EB, Stampfer MJ, et al. Dietary intake of marine n-3 fatty acids, fi sh intake, and the risk of coronary disease among men. New England Journal Med. 1995
4.) Challem J, The Infl ammation Syndrome; John Wiley and Sons Publishing. 2003
5.) Giampapa R, Pero R, Zimmerman M, The Anti-aging Solution; John Wiley and Sons Publishing, 2004
6.) Croft J, Health from the Seas, Freedom from Disease; Vital Health Publishing. 2003

*This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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JOINT HEALTH
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Date: December 22, 2005 09:37 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: JOINT HEALTH

Glucosamine & Chondroitin - JOINT HEALTH

Everyone old enough to walk appreciates the value of fl exibility and ease of movement. Unfortunately many of us take such good things for granted. A famous folksinger sang, “You don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.” That’s certainly true for millions of Americans who live with stiff and uncomfortable joints.

Fortunately there are a number of nutrients available that provide the vital components of healthy joint structure and function and ease of mobility. These nutrients are referred to as “chondroprotective agents,” and include glucosamine and chondroitin, which supply the raw material necessary to produce new cartilage, and may even help rebuild worn cartilage. Other chondroprotective nutrients and herbs, like Cetyl Myristoleate, MSM, and Boswellin, work synergistically with glucosamine and chondroitin and further support normal joint function To understand how chondroprotective agents work, one must fi rst understand how joints work. The key element in human joints is articular cartilage, the shock-absorbing tissue that connects two bones together and allows pain-free movement. Articular cartilage is comprised of two different molecules, collagen and proteoglycans, with the remainder composed primarily of water (65-85%). Collagen, a protein that binds tissue together, provides elasticity. Proteoglycans, composed of sugars and protein, absorb water, which provides lubrication and resiliency, nature’s shock absorber for your joints. Both compounds are produced by chondrocytes, caretaker cells responsible for the formation and maintenance of cartilage. A defi ciency in any one of the above constituents will increase the likelihood of wear and tear on articular cartilage, which can eventually lead to compromised joint function.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are safe, natural and effective nutrients that support healthy joint function by supplying the materials needed to produce collagen and proteoglycans.

GLUCOSAMINE

Glucosamine is composed of glucose (a sugar) and glutamine (an amino acid). It is utilized by chondrocytes to form glycosaminoglycans (GSG) and proteoglycans (PG). Both of these constituents attract and bind water into cartilage, increasing resiliency. Research indicates that glucosamine may actually help your body repair damaged or eroded cartilage. A number of studies have been conducted on glucosamine sulfate and glucosamine hydrochloride, with a preponderance of positive results. Glucosamine sulfate is considered the more effective of the two. One study from the University of Liege in Liege, Belgium studied the effects of glucosamine sulfate on 212 patients with knee osteoarthritis. Participants took either 1,500 mg glucosamine or a placebo once daily for three years. The study compared joint-space width at enrollment, one year, and at the study’s conclusion.

The 106 patients on placebo had a progressive jointspace narrowing, while participants taking glucosamine experienced no significant joint-space loss, indicating glucosamine may benefi cially modify cartilage structure.3 A study published in the journal Osteoarthritis and Cartilage in 1998 investigated the in vitro effects of glucosamine sulfate on proteoglycan and collagen production by chondrocytes taken from osteoarthritic articular cartilage. The results showed “a statistically signifi cant stimulation of PG production by chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage cultured for up to 12 days in 3-dimensional cultures.” 4 Another study from Italy enrolled eighty inpatients with established OA. They received either 1,500 mg of glucosamine sulfate or placebo daily for 30 days. The patients treated with glucosamine sulfate experienced a reduction in symptoms almost twice as large and twice as fast as those receiving placebo. Researchers also used electron microscopy of patient’s articular cartilage to support this hypothesis. Patients who received glucosamine sulfate showed a picture more similar to healthy cartilage. The researchers concluded that glucosamine sulfate tends to rebuild damaged articular cartilage and restore articular function.5

CHONDROITIN

Chondroitin is classifi ed as a glycosaminoglycan. It bonds with collagen to form the basis of connective tissue. Chondroitin helps attract fl uid into proteoglycans, thereby bringing nutrients into cartilage and providing shock absorption. While glucosamine helps manufacture and maintain cartilage, chondroitin keeps cartilage from becoming malnourished. Chondroitin works synergistically with glucosamine, and these two nutrients form the basis of most joint health supplements on the market today. A 6-month randomized, multi-center, double-blind, doubledummy study published in 1996 compared the effectiveness of chondroitin versus a popular non-steroidal anti-infl ammatory drug (NSAID) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred and forty-six patients with knee OA were recruited and separated into two groups; an NSAID group and a chondroitin sulfate (CS) group. The NSAID group was given the NSAID and a placebo for the fi rst month, then placebo alone for months 2-3. The CS group was given the NSAID and CS for the fi rst month, and then CS alone for months 2-3. Both groups were then given 1200mg of CS for months 4-6. “Patients treated with the NSAID showed prompt and plain reduction of clinical symptoms, which, however, reappeared after the end of treatment; in the CS group, the therapeutic response appeared later in time but lasted for up to 3 months after the end of treatment. CS seems to have slow but gradually increasing clinical activity in OA; these benefi ts last for a long period after the end of treatment.”6

NOW® Foods is your source for natural joint support products. Our Extra Strength Glucosamine & Chondroitin is one of our best-selling products, and we also have combination supplements that include MSM, Concentrace® minerals, and more. We also carry both glucosamine and chondroitin as separate products, as well as in powder and lotion forms.

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Research on SAMe....
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Date: October 26, 2005 12:49 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Research on SAMe....

Two groups of researchers have conducted analyses of trials that utilized SAM-e for mood enhancement. One meta-analysis was published in 1994. The researchers analyzed the efficacy of SAM-e in oral or injection forms based on published trials dated between 1973 and 1992. The authors concluded that there was a significant improvement of 17 to 38% seen in trials of SAM-e compared to placebo response. They state that the efficacy of SAM-e was superior to placebo and its administration caused few side effects.5 A second review was published in 2002. The authors analyzed studies in which SAM-e doses ranged from 200 to 1600 mg daily. They also found a significant effect of SAM-e in comparison to placebo, with an evident rapid onset of effect at enhancing mood.6

Promotes Joint Comfort and Mobility*

As a sulfur donor to connective tissue, SAM-e plays a major role in protecting the integrity of cartilage tissue. An in vitro trial assessed the actions of SAM-e in cultured human articular chondrocytes. At a concentration of 10 micrograms/ml, proteoglycan synthesis and sulfate residue incorporation in chondrocytes was shown to be 60% higher than control levels. Based on these results, it was shown that SAM-e has a positive influence on the growth and health of cartilaginous connective tissue.7

In a double-blind trial with 734 individuals with compromised joint health. SAM-e given orally at a dose of 1200 mg daily for 30 days was shown to significantly promote joint comfort compared to placebo, with a high level of tolerability and low incidence of side effects. The researchers concluded that SAM-e is a highly effective supplement for enhancing joint comfort.8

Another trial evaluated the response of individuals experiencing discomfort in the joints to a regimen of 1200 mg SAM-e for 1 week followed by 800 mg for the second week, and then 400 mg for weeks 3 through 8. This open trial of 20, 641 people showed a strong ability of SAM-e to enhance feelings of comfort within the joints. The treatment was rated as “very good” or “good” in 71% of the participants, with an additional 21% rating the treatment effect as “moderate”.9

In a long-term trial lasting 24 months, SAM-e was given to 108 participants with compromised joint function. Individuals were given 600 mg orally per day for the first two weeks followed by 400 mg daily for the remainder of the trial. Individuals experienced significant enhancements in joint comfort, with dramatic improvements noted after 2-4 weeks of treatment. Improvements continued to 6 months and beyond.10

In addition to the above studies, a review was conducted in 1987 to assess the results of SAM-e supplementation in clinical trials for enhancing joint mobility and function. Over 22,000 individuals had participated in the clinical trials that were the subject of this review. The author concluded from his analysis that SAM-e was shown to be highly efficacious, rivaling or surpassing the effectiveness of other treatments, and also possessing a high level of safety.11 Because of this, SAM-e may be the treatment of choice for enhancing joint function.

Supports Liver Health and Detoxification*

SAM-e supplementation can have profound benefits on liver function. These benefits center around its function as the major methyl donor in the liver, as well as its lipotropic activity. SAM-e also enhances the production of the antioxidant glutathione.

A number of trials have been conducted showing the ability of SAM-e to support liver detoxification functions and enhance liver health in individuals susceptible to toxin-induced liver compromise. SAM-e has the ability to normalize liver function by increasing the activity of enzymes needed to upregulate liver detoxification. These effects are comprehensive and rapid. Dosages used in these studies range from 600 mg to 1600 mg daily for 2 months to two years.12,13,14 In these trials, significant benefits of SAM-e supplementation were seen over placebo.

Safety

SAM-e has an excellent safety profile and is considered well-suited for long term use based on multiple clinical trials. Individuals diagnosed with manic depression should avoid SAM-e supplementation, as it may aggravate the manic phase *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Scientific References

1. Agnoli A, Andreoli V, Casacchia M, Cerbo R. Effect of s-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe) upon depressive symptoms. J Psychiatr Res. 1976;13(1):43-54.

2. De Leo D. S-adenosylmethionine as an antidepressant. Curr Ther Research. 1987;41(6):865-70.

3. Kagan BL, Sultzer DL, Rosenlicht N,Gerner RH. Oral S-adenosylmethionine in depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Am J Psychiatry. 1990 May;147(5):591-5.

4.Salmaggi P,Bressa GM,Nicchia G,Coniglio M,La Greca P,Le Grazie C.Doubleblind, placebo-controlled study of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in depressed postmenopausal women. Psychother Psychosom. 1993;59(1):34-40.

5. Bressa GM. S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe) as antidepressant: metaanalysis of clinical studies. Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1994;154:7-14. 6.Mischoulon D, Fava M. Role of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in the treatment of depression: a review of the evidence. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Nov;76(5):1158S-61S.

7. Harmand MF, Vilamitjana J,Maloche E, Duphil R, Ducassou D. Effects of Sadenosylmethionine on human articular chondrocyte differentiation. An in vitro study. Am J Med. 1987 Nov 20;83(5A):48-54.

8. Caruso I, . Italian double-blind multicenter study comparing S-adenosylmethionine, naproxen, and placebo in the treatment of degenerative joint disease. Am J Med. 1987 Nov 20;83(5A):66-71.

9. Berger R, Nowak H. A new medical approach to the treatment of osteoarthritis. Report of an open phase IV study with ademetionine (Gumbaral). Am J Med. 1987 Nov 20;83(5A):84-8.

10. Konig B. A long-term (two years) clinical trial with S-adenosylmethionine for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Am J Med. 1987 Nov 20;83(5A):89-94.

11. di Padova C. S-adenosylmethionine in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Review of the clinical studies. Am J Med. 1987 Nov 20;83(5A):60-5.

12. Frezza M, et al. S-adenosylmethionine counteracts oral contraceptive hepatotoxicity in women. Am J Med Sci. 1987; 293(4):234-238.

13. Frezza M, Surrenti C, Manzillo G, Fiaccadori F, Bortolini M, Di Padova C. Oral S-adenosylmethionine in the symptomatic treatment of intrahepatic cholestasis. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Gastroenterology. 1990 Jul;99(1):211-5.

14. Mato JM, et al. S-adenosylmethionine in alcoholic liver cirrhosis: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial. J Hepatol. 1999 Jun;30(6):1081-9.



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Nutrition Insurance ....
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Date: October 21, 2005 10:25 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nutrition Insurance ....

Nutrition Insurance

All authorities agree that taking prenatal vitamins is a smart idea. Especially important nutrients include:

-Folic Acid. This B vitamin helps prevent neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida, in which a malformed spinal cord can cause everything from fluid on the brain to paralysis. “The great news is that supplemental folic acid decreases the risk of neural tube defects pretty significantly,” says Higdon. “It’s recommended that women who are planning to become pregnant take a supplement that supplies 400 mcg.” Low folate is also associated with high levels of metabolic byproduct called homocysteine; it’s not clear whether high homocysteine is a symptom of folate deficiency or a cause of birth defects. To help folate control homocysteine, add vitamins B-6 and B-12 to your regimen, especially if you are a vegan.

-Iron. Iron deficiency is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the US, especially among women of childbearing age, and “has been associated with poor child development after birth along with increased risk of miscarriage and premature delivery,” according to Higdon. “Also, if you’re deficient you’ll get really tired-you get less oxygen delivered to your tissues an the baby’s” A supplement should supply 30mg; vegetarians have to pay particular attention to their iron levels. Eating foods rich in vitamin C can make it easier to absorb iron, as can eating such fermented soy goodies as tempeh and miso.

-Calcium. Building baby’s bones requires plenty of calcium; Jones and Hudson recommend getting 1200mg a day. If you are lactose intolerant-that is, you can’t properly digest milk products-they suggest you “try yogurt made with live active cultures, whose bacteria releases lactose-digesting enzymes.” Supplemental calcium is another option, preferably in gluconate or chelate form for better absorption. (Calcium can also help cut the leg cramps caused by the pressure of a growing baby.)

-Vitamin D. It doesn’t matter how much calcium you take if you’re not getting enough of the vitamin D that lets your body utilize calcium properly. “Vitamin D deficiency is increasingly common,” says Higdon, “and the RDIs (Reference Daily Intakes) might not be high enough for people who don’t get sun exposure.” Spending 15 minutes a day in the sun can restore your body’s supplies, but “the farther north you live, the longer that period in the winter you can’t make vitamin D, and it’s actually not in too many foods.” Taking 400 IU daily can make up the shortfall.

Believe it or not, iodine deficiency is a growing concern in the US as people cut back on salt, which is commonly fortified with iodine. Higdon says that most prenatal vitamins contain 150mcg.

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Benefits of Alpha Lipoic Acid
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Date: October 13, 2005 05:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of Alpha Lipoic Acid

Benefits of Alpha Lipoic Acid

  • Supports the Body’s Defense Against Free Radicals*
  • Recycles Antioxidant Nutrients such as Vitamin C and Vitamin E*
  • Helps Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level when used as part of the diet*

    Alpha-lipoic Acid––the "Ideal Antioxidant"

    The antioxidant potential of a substance is based on a number of criteria, including:
    1) Ability to quench specific free-radicals.
    2) Ability to bind or "chelate" metal ions that can generate free radicals.
    3) Supports function of other antioxidants.
    4) Absorption/bioavailability.
    5) Concentration in tissues, cells and extra cellular fluids.
    6) Ability to function as an antioxidant in fatty and watery environments.

    The "ideal antioxidant" would meet all the above criteria. Very few antioxidants do, yet a particular antioxidant with but a few of the characteristics is still valuable and effective. Vitamin E, for example, is one of the most important dietary antioxidants, yet it only works in fatty environments such as cell membranes.

    As a team, ALA and DHLA come close to the ideal, for the following reasons:1,2,3
    1) ALA is easily absorbed when consumed orally.
    2) ALA is readily converted to DHLA in various tissues.
    3) As a pair, ALA and DHLA neutralize superoxide, hydroxyl, peroxyl, and hypochlorus radicals.
    4) ALA and DHLA form stable complexes with metal ions such as iron, manganese, copper and zinc ions.
    5) ALA and DHLA scavenge free radicals in fatty environments and watery environments.
    6) DHLA recycles other important antioxidants.

    DHLA-regenerates vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione

    Within the cell, antioxidants work as a team to keep free radicals from damaging cell structures. In order to neutralize a free radical, an antioxidant such as vitamin C must give up an electron, which mean it becomes oxidized. Before it can function as an antioxidant once again, it must be regenerated back to its "reduced" form, by gaining an electron to replace the donated electron. For this, it needs the help of other antioxidants. Vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione are key antioxidants that can be generated by cycling between their oxidized and reduce forms. This is necessary to maintain the balance between oxidation and its reverse––the neutralization of free radicals by antioxidants.

    DHLA is an essential component in the interaction between these antioxidants.4 Studies show that addition of alpha-lipoic acid to liver tissues results in increased vitamin C levels. It has been found that DHLA is responsible for regenerating vitamin C, which in turn regenerates vitamin E.3 DHLA also converts glutathione from its oxidized form back into its free radical scavenging reduced form.3,5 The ALA/DHLA pair is thus vital for prevention of "oxidative stress," which occurs which the balance is tipped in favor of oxidation in cells.4 DHLA helps preserve antioxidants in both the watery cell interior and the fatty structure of cell membranes.6 Evidence from animal studies suggests that DHLA protects the brain against free radical damage.7

    Alpha-lipoic Acid and Blood Sugar

    Alpha-lipoic acid is a key factor in the cellular process that metabolizes glucose to produce energy for cellular functions. The importance of ALA’s role in blood sugar metabolism is evidenced in studies on ALA and type-2 diabetes. In a small pilot study, 13 people with type-2 diabetes showed improved utilization of glucose in muscle tissue in response to intravenous administration of ALA.8 In a four week controlled multicenter trial, 74 people with type-2 diabetes took ALA in oral doses of 600, 1200 or 1800 mg per day. After 4 weeks, the normal lowering of blood sugar levels in response to insulin improved.9 In vitro studies have shown that ALA has a positive effect on insulin-stimulated uptake of glucose by muscle cells.10

    Scientific References

    1. Packer, L.. Witt, E., Tritschler, H. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant. Free Radical Biology and Medicine 1995;19(2):227-50.

    2. Suzuki, Y., et al. Thioctic acid and dihydrolipoic acid are novel antioxidants which interact with reactive oxygen species. Free Rad. Res. Comms. 15(5):255-63.

    3. Biewenga, G., Haenen, G., Bast, A. The pharmacology of lipoic acid. Gen. Pharmac. 29(3):315-31.

    4. Serbinova, E. Maitra, I., Packer, L. The synergy between vitamin E and alpha-lipoic acid--–possible relationship against oxidative stress in vivo. Life Chemistry Reports 1994;12:17-21.

    5. Bast, A. Haenen, G. Interplay between lipoic acid and glutathione in the protection against microsomal lipid peroxidation. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1988; 963:558-561.

    6. Kagan, V. et al. Dihydrolipoic acid––a universal antioxidant both in the membrane and in the aqueous phase. Reduction of peroxyl, ascorbyl and chromanoxyl radicals. Biochem Pharmacol 1992;44(8):1637.

    7. Prehn, J. et al. Dihydrolipoate reduces neuronal injury after cerebral ischemia. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 1992;12(1):78-87.

    8. Jacob, S. et al. Enhancement of glucose disposal in patients with type-2 diabetes by alpha-lipoic acid. Arzneimittelforschung 1995;45(8):872-4.

    9. Jacob, S et al. Oral administration of RAC-alpha-lipoic acid modulates insulin sensitivity in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus: a placebo-controlled pilot trial. Free Radical Biology & Medicine 1999;27(3/4):309-14.

    10. Estrada, D. et al. Stimulation of glucose uptake by the natural coenzyme alpha-lipoic acid/thioctic acid: participation of elements of the insulin signaling pathway. Diabetes 1996;45(12):1798-804.



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    Curcumin - Turmeric Extract
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    Date: August 19, 2005 12:47 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Curcumin - Turmeric Extract

    Curcumin

    Turmeric- History and Traditional Usage

    Native to Southeast Asia, Curcuma longa is a tall
    tropical shrub with large oblong leaves and pale yellow flowers.
    The genus “Curcuma” belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, which
    includes ginger.1 The plant possesses a large root structure
    with fleshy, bulbous underground parts called “rhizomes.” These
    rhizomes, known as turmeric root, are harvested at maturity,
    dried and cured for commercial use. Chemical analysis shows that
    dried turmeric contains essential and volatile oils, with a
    curcuminoid content of 2.5 to 5.0 %.2

    In addition to its
    popularity as a spice, turmeric is used as a dye for cloth and
    coloring agent in foods and cosmetics, thanks to its rich yellow
    color. Turmeric also serves as a preservative, probably owing to
    the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of curcumin.
    Extracts of Curcuma longa have demonstrated in vitro
    antibacterial and anti-fungal effects.3

    Turmeric is named in
    ancient Ayurvedic and Chinese herbal texts as a traditional folk
    remedy. Historically, turmeric was used externally for wounds,
    and sprains, and internally for digestive complaints,
    rheumatism, liver disorders, coughs and colds.4
    Benefits

    Protects cells and tissues by fighting free radicals.*

    Supports joint function*

    The numerous beneficial
    effects attributed to turmeric stem in large measure from the
    antioxidant properties of curcumin. Antioxidants neutralize free
    radicals, which are highly unstable molecules that can damage
    cellular structures through abnormal oxidative reactions.
    Curcumin is a potent “scavenger” of the superoxide radical, a
    free radical that initiates potentially harmful oxidative
    processes such as lipid peroxidation.5 Through this activity,
    curcumin has been shown to protect skin cells from the injurious
    effect of nitroblue tetrazolium, a toxin that generates
    superoxide radicals. Curcumin also increases survival of cells
    exposed in vitro to the enzyme hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase,
    which stimulates superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production.
    Curcumin itself is not toxic to cells, even at high
    concentrations. Pure curcumin was shown to be less protective
    than a mixture of curcuminoids, indicating a possible synergism
    among curcuminoids.6 Because free radicals are involved in aging
    and exert harmful effects on skin, these results suggest
    curcumin may help slow skin aging.

    Curcumin demonstrates
    several other in vitro effects linked to free radical
    scavenging. Curcumin scavenges nitric oxide, a compound
    associated with the body’s inflammatory response.7 Pure curcumin
    and turmeric extracts protect red blood cells from lipid
    peroxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide.8 Curcumin has been
    shown to protect DNA from oxidative damage, inhibit binding of
    toxic metabolites to DNA, and reduce DNA mutations in the Ames’
    test.9 Although additional studies suggest an anticarcinogenic
    effect of curcumin, through protection of DNA,10 one in vitro
    study found that curcumin induced DNA damage in human gastric
    mucosal cells.11 It is speculated that curcumin may act as a
    pro-oxidant in the presence of transition metal ions such as
    copper and iron. (This is true for other antioxidants, including
    vitamin C.) Curcumin also demonstrates in vitro inhibition of
    COX-I and COX-II enzymes, which are involved in the inflammatory
    reaction.12 Together these results strongly suggest that
    curcumin is a potent bioprotectant with a potentially wide range
    of therapeutic applications.

    Animal studies- In vivo protective effects

    Through its free radical scavenging
    properties, curcumin has shown bioprotective effects in animals.
    In one study, rats were treated with isoproterenol, a chemical
    that causes cardiac hypertrophy (enlargement of the heart) due
    to abnormal collagen metabolism. Co-treatment with curcumin
    reversed the degradation of collagen and cardiac hypertrophy
    induced by isoproterenol.13 Curcumin protects mice from
    detrimental effects of radiation, by stabilizing the glyoxalase
    system, a biological system that regulates cell division.14
    Curcumin protects livers of rats from the damaging effects of
    carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a potent hepatoxin that injures the
    liver via its free radical metabolite, CCl3.15,16 Curcumin
    protected rats from alcohol-induced brain damage, in a study in
    which oral administration of curcumin reversed lipid
    peroxidation, reduced levels of free-radical metabolites and
    increased levels of glutathione, a major physiologic
    antioxidant.17 Curcuma longa extracts have shown
    anti-inflammatory effects in rats.18

    Human Trials

    Curcumin exhibits free-radical scavenging ability when
    administered to humans. In an open trial (uncontrolled), 18
    healthy individuals ranging in age from 27 to 67 years consumed
    a Curcuma longa extract, at a dose supplying 20 mg curcuminoids,
    for 45 days. Before and after blood tests showed a statistically
    significant decrease in lipid peroxides.19 Preliminary trials
    have tested the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin, with
    results that verify the traditional use of turmeric as an
    anti-rheumatic herb. In a short-term double-blind, cross-over,
    comparative study, 18 people received curcumin (1200 mg daily)
    or phenylbutazone for two week periods. Both curcumin and
    phenylbutazone produced measurable improvements in joint
    flexibility and walking time. The subjects reported results only
    with phenylbutazone, which may be explained by the short
    duration of the trial.20 In a small placebo-controlled trial
    comparing curcumin to phenylbutazone, 45 patients with
    post-operative inflammation received curcumin, phenylbutazone or
    placebo. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin and
    phenylbutazone were comparable and superior to placebo.21
    Curcumin has not been found to produce an analgesic (pain
    relieving) effect.

    Bioperine-Nature’s Absorption Enhancer
    Boosts Curcumin Absorption*

    Traditional Ayurvedic herbal
    formulas often include black pepper and long pepper as
    synergistic herbs. The active ingredient in both black pepper
    and long pepper is the alkaloid, piperine. Experiments carried
    out to evaluate the scientific basis for the use of peppers have
    shown that piperine significantly enhances bioavailability when
    consumed with other substances.22 Several double-blind clinical
    studies have confirmed that Bioperine® increases absorption of
    nutrients.23

    Curcumin is poorly absorbed in the intestinal
    tract, limiting its therapeutic effectiveness. Oral doses are
    largely excreted in feces, and only trace amounts appear in the
    blood. Concomitant administration of 20 mg of piperine with 2
    grams of curcumin increases the bioavailability of curcumin by
    2000%.24

    Scientific References


    1. Majeed, M., Badmaev,
    V., Shivakumar, U., Rajendran, R. Curcuminoids. 1995.
    Piscataway, NJ: NutriScience Publishers.
    2. Srimal, R.C.
    Turmeric: a brief review of its medicinal properties.
    Fitoterapia 1997;68(6):483-93.
    3. Ammon, H.P.T., Wahl, M.A.
    Pharmacology of Curcuma longa. Planta Medica 1991;57:1-7.
    4.
    Snow, J.M. Herbal Monograph: Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae).
    The Protocol Journal of Botanical Medicine, Autumn
    1995:43-46.
    5. Rao, N.S., Rao, M.N.A. Free radical scavenging
    activity of curcuminoids. Arzneim.-Forsch./Drug Res.
    1996;46(2):169-171.
    6. Bonté. F. et al. Protective effect of
    curcuminoids on epidermal skin cells under free oxygen radical
    stress. Planta Medica 1997;63:265-66.
    7. Rao, S., Rao, M.N.A.
    Nitric oxide scavenging by curcuminoids. J Pharm. Pharmacol.
    1997;49:105-7.
    8. Lalitha, S., Selvam, R. Prevention of
    H2Os-induced red blood cell lipid peroxidation by aqueous
    extracted turmeric. Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr
    1999;8(2):113-14.
    9. Deshpande, S.S., Maru, G.B. Effects of
    curcumin on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene derived DNA adducts
    in vitro. Cancer Letters 1995;96:71-80.
    10. Subramanian, M., et
    al. Diminution of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage by curcumin
    and related antioxidants. Mutation Research
    1994;311:249-55.
    11. Blasiak, J., Trzeciak, A., Kowalik, J.
    Curcumin damages DNA in human gastric mucosa cells and
    lymphocytes. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and
    Oncology 1999;18(4):271-76.
    12. Ramsewak, R.S., DeWitt, D.L.,
    Nair, M.G. Cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory
    activities of Curcumins I-III from Curcuma longa. Phytomedicine
    2000;7(4):303-308.
    13. Nirmala, C. Anand, S., Puvanakrishnan,
    R. Curcumin treatment modulates collagen metabolism in
    isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Molecular and
    Cellular Biochemistry 1999;197:31-37.
    14. Choudhary, D.,
    Chandra, D. Kale, R.K. Modulation of radioresponse of glyoxalase
    system by curcumin. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
    1999;64:1-7.
    15. Park, E-J. et al. Protective effect of
    curcumin in rat liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride. J
    Pharm. Pharmacol. 2000;52:437-40.
    16. Deshpande, U.R. et al.
    Protective effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract on
    carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in rats. Indian
    Journal of Experimental Biology 1998;36:573-77.
    17.
    Rajakrishnan, V. et al. Neuroprotective role of curcumin from
    Curcuma longa on ethanol-induced brain damage. Phytotherapy
    Research 1999;13:571-74.
    18. Arora, R.B. Basu, N., Kapoor, V.,
    Jain, A.P. Anti-inflammatory studies on Curcuma longa
    (Turmeric). Indian J Med Res 1971;59(8):1289-95.
    19.
    Ramirez-Bosca, A. et al. Antioxidant curcuma extracts decrease
    the blood peroxide levels of human subjects. Age
    1995;18:167-69.
    20. Deodhar, S.D., Sethi, R. Srimal. R.C.
    Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin
    (diferoyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.
    21.
    Satoskar, R.R., Shah, S J. Shenoy, S.G. Evaluation of
    anti-inflammatory property of curcumin (diferoyl methane) in
    patients with postoperative inflammation. International Journal
    of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy and Toxicolgy
    1986;24(12):651-54.
    22. Atal, C., Zutshi, U., Rao, P.
    Scientific evidence on the role of Ayurvedic herbals on
    bioavailability of drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
    1981;4:229-232.
    23. Bioperine®–Nature's Bioavailability
    Enhancing Thermonutrient. Executive Summary. 1996; Sabinsa
    Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.
    24. Shoba, G., et al. Influence
    of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and
    human volunteers. Planta Medica 1998;64(4):353-6.

    © 2002
    Doctor's Best, Inc. Revised 8/13/02

    *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.



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    GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine) Versatile Life Support Nutrient ....
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 21, 2005 05:25 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine) Versatile Life Support Nutrient ....

    GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine): Versatile Life Support Nutrient

    Parris Kidd, Ph.D.

  • GPC - Marked Benefits to the Brain
  • GPC Supports Normal Brain Function
  • GPC Works Through Multiple Mechanisms
  • Dosing, Safety, Tolerability, Compatibility
  • GPC: Nutrient for All Ages
  • GPC or GlyceroPhosphoCholine (pronounced gli-sero-fos-fo-ko-lean) is a nutrient with many different roles in human health. It reaches extremely high concentrations within our cells, and its abundance in mother's milk suggests it is crucial to life processes. Clinically, GPC has been most intensively researched for its brain benefits. Biologically, it has great importance for the skeletal "voluntary" muscles, the autonomic nervous system, kidneys, liver, and reproductive organs. GPC goes beyond being a brain nutrient; it is a nutrient for vitality and long life.

    Marked Benefits to the Brain

    As a dietary supplement, GPC's brain benefits are unique. It boosts mental performance in healthy young people, as shown by three double-blind trials. In trials on middle aged subjects, GPC improved several physiologic measures of mental performance: reaction time, visual evoked potential, and EEG delta slow waves. In the elderly, GPC improves mental performance and provides noticeable revitalisation. In 11 human trials with 1,799 patients, memory, attention, and other cognitive measures improved. So did mood (including irritability and emotional lability), and patients often developed renewed interest in relatives and friends. GPC was well tolerated, and generated no bad drug interactions. A large trial on elderly subjects with memory challenges published in 2003 concluded GPC had significant benefits for these individuals.

    GPC Supports Normal Brain Function

    Circulatory deprivation or surgery can challenge healthy brain function. GPC can speed recovery and support improved quality of life. In four trials with GPC on 2,804 subjects who experienced difficulties under these circumstances, up to 95% showed good or excellent improvement. GPC consistently improved space-time orientation, degree of consciousness, language, motor capacity, and overall quality of life. The investigators concluded GPC offered marked benefits, with an excellent benefit-to-risk profile. Up to half of patients who survive bypass surgery experience problems with memory and other mental performance. A double-blind trial conducted with bypass survivors for six months determined that the GPC group had no remaining memory deterioration, while the placebo group failed to improve.

    GPC Works Through Multiple Mechanisms

    GPC supports human health through a variety of mechanisms:

    1. It helps keep choline and acetylcholine available to the tissues. Choline is an essential nutrient and GPC appears to be the body's main choline reservoir. GPC in mother's milk represents the baby's main source of dietary choline. Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important substance employed extensively throughout the body. ACh is a major brain transmitter; the motor nerves use ACh to drive the skeletal ("voluntary") muscles; the autonomic nervous system uses it to pace all the organs. ACh is also central to mental and physical endurance, and mind-body coordination.

    2. GPC is a major cell-level protectant, not as another antioxidant but in pivotal roles of osmotic pressure regulator and metabolic antitoxin. GPC for osmotic regulation can reach very high concentrations in the kidney, bladder, liver, brain, and other organs. As metabolic protectant, GPC shields proteins against urea buildup.

    3. GPC is a major reservoir for cell membrane omega-3 phospholipids. These substances are the major building blocks for cell membranes. Enzymes couple GPC with the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, to make the phospholipid PC-DHA. This makes membranes especially fluid, enabling membrane proteins to perform with better efficiency. GPC produces PC-DHA in the skeletal muscles, wherein fluidity is essential for contraction. Muscles that function abnormally can show GPC deficiency.

    4. GPC contributes to both male and female in reproduction. As spermatozoa mature, GPC is used to make PC-DHA that makes their membranes fluid to enable motility. With men, the lower their semen GPC the greater the likelihood of poor sperm motility and with it, infertility. Once semen is inserted into the female, an enzyme in uterine secretions breaks down the semen's GPC into substances that energize the sperm to achieve fertilization.

    Dosing, Safety, Tolerability, Compatibility

    Oral intake of GPC in the clinical trials was usually 1,200 milligrams (mg) per day, taken early in the day on an empty stomach. A reasonable dietary supplementation regimen is 1200 mg/day, taken in divided doses (AM and PM) between meals for 15-30 days, and thereafter 600 mg/day for maintenance. Symptomatic subjects can take 1200 mg/day until adequate improvement is achieved. Young, healthy subjects may experience benefit from daily intakes as low as 300 milligrams. GPC is very safe, being compatible with vitamins and nutrients and with pharmaceuticals. In clinical trial comparisons, GPC's benefits surpassed the nutrients acetylcarnitine and CDP-choline.

    GPC: Nutrient for All Ages

    GPC is unmatched for its support of active living and healthy aging. In some 23 clinical trials GPC improved mental performance in all functional categories. GPC can revitalize the aging brain, facilitating growth hormone (GH) release and boosting nerve growth factor actions. GPC's ample presence in human mother's milk suggests it could be conditionally essential. By supporting mental integrity, mind-body integration, the autonomic system, and the body's other organs, GPC enhances the active lifestyle. GPC is remarkable nutritional support for optimal health at any age.

    Parris M. Kidd, PhD is a cell biologist trained at the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco. Since entering the dietary supplement field in 1983, he has published many in-depth reviews of integrative medicine in the journal Alternative Medicine Reviews, and is science columnist for totalhealth magazine. Dr. Kidd is internationally recognized for his accomplishments in dietary supplement product development, documentation and quality control.

    Disclaimer: the above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider.



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    America's Most Wanted
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    Date: June 14, 2005 05:23 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: America's Most Wanted

    America's Most Wanted

    by Brian Amherst Energy Times, January 6, 2000

    The United States eats well, a little too well, according to experts. Amply supplied with a large supply of high-calorie food, our diets might seem to be chock full of every conceivable nutrient. Well, to the question "Getting all the right vitamins, minerals and other nutrients?" the most appropriate answer seems to be "Not exactly." Eating a lot doesn't equal eating a lot of the most important vitamins and minerals. So, which vitamins and minerals are likely to show up in short supply in the typical American diet? Calcium certainly sits at the top of list. According to the most recent Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, which is conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), women and girls age 12 and up are not consuming adequate calcium from their diet. Research reveals that about 1200 mg. day suffices for those over age 50 and 1000 mg a day should be adequate if you're between the ages of 19 and 50. Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Stanford University, ". . .osteoporosis is a pediatric disease." For long-range protection against that bone-weakening disease, kids should eat calcium-rich, low-fat dairy products and plenty of leafy greens (broccoli, cabbage, kale) as well as salmon (with bones), seafood and soy. But the calcium campaign does not end in early adulthood. Bone mass begins to deteriorate at about age 30. Menopausal hormonal changes can exacerbate bone brittleness. Medical conditions, including cancer, liver disease and intestinal disorders; prescription drugs; tobacco and alcohol indulgence; or a decline in activity, especially the weight-bearing kind, also jeopardize bone strength. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, about one in every two American women will break a bone after age 50 due to osteoporosis. That translates into about half a million fractured vertebrae and more than 300,000 shattered hips. Frequently, those breaks are life-threatening.

    Crucial Calcium

    The critical role of calcium in many body functions is perhaps the most extensively clinically documented among nutrients. Researchers in the Department of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, reviewed epidemiological and clinical studies conducted over the past two years on the relationship between dietary calcium and blood pressure (J Am Coll Nutr October 1999: 398S-405S). "Nearly 20 years of investigation in this area has culminated in remarkable and compelling agreement in the data," the researchers report, "confirming the need for and benefit of regular consumption of the recommended daily levels of dietary calcium." Investigators at the State University of New York, Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, presented results of their studies of calcium and vitamin C and gum disease at the June 26, 1998 meeting of the International Association for Dental Research. Two separate inquiries revealed that people who consumed too little calcium as young adults, and those with low levels of vitamin C in their diets, appear to have nearly twice the risk of developing periodontal disease later in life than folks with higher dietary levels of either nutrient.

    Calcium: Much Documented Researchers offer extensive evidence of calcium's benefits on many fronts: n Osteoporosis poses a threat to older men as well as women, according to Randi L. Wolf, PhD, research associate at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Dr. Wolf presented her award-winning study to an October 3, 1999 meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Dr. Wolf suggests that men increase their consumption of calcium, particularly after age 80, to avoid age-related declines in the amount of calcium absorbed. According to Dr. Wolf, "It appears that the hormonal form of vitamin D, which is the main regulator of intestinal calcium absorption, may have an important role. We are conducting more research to better understand the reasons for why calcium absorption declines with age in men." n Scientists at Tufts University in Boston did some earlier work on the calcium-vitamin D connection and reported it in the September 4, 1997 New England Journal of Medicine. Using the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) increased recommended daily intake of 1200 milligrams of calcium and 400 to 600 international units of vitamin D for people over 50, the Tufts researchers found that with supplementation of the nutrients, men and women 65 and older lost significantly less body bone and, in some cases, gained bone mineral density. n Two studies published in American Heart Association journals show that atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be linked by a common problem in the way the body uses calcium. The September 1997 Stroke revealed that, in a group of 30 postmenopausal women 67 to 85 years old, bone mineral density declined as atherosclerotic plaque increased. Researchers reporting in Circulation (September 15, 1997) advanced the theory that the osteoporosis-atherosclerosis connection may be related to a problem in handling calcium. n For people who had colon polyps removed, taking calcium supplements decreased the number of new polyps by 24% and cut the risk of recurrence by 19%, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Medicine. The study, published in the January 14, 1999 New England Journal of Medicine, was a first in crediting calcium with anti-cancer properties.

    The D Factor

    Without adequate vitamin D, your absorption of calcium slips and bone loss can accelerate, increasing the risk for fractures. Fifty percent of women with osteoporosis hospitalized for hip fractures at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston had a previously undetected vitamin D deficiency (Journal of the American Medical Association, April 28, 1999). University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers told participants at the April 14, 1997 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research that vitamin D "significantly inhibits highly metastatic, or widespread, prostate cancer in animals," suggesting its potential for treating men with similar conditions. Few foods that Americans eat, except dairy, contain much vitamin D, but we can usually synthesize sufficient amounts from as few as five minutes' exposure to the sun. But as skin ages, its ability to act as a vitamin D factory decreases. According to Michael F. Holick, the director of the Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical Center, upwards of 40% of the adult population over age 50 that he sees in his clinic are deficient in vitamin D. Recently, the National Academy of Sciences (the official body that decrees the required amounts of necessary nutrients) increased the daily recommendations of vitamin D to 600 IU for people over 71, 400 IU for those aged 51 to 70 and 200 IU for people under 50. The best dietary sources, apart from dependable supplements, are dairy and fatty fish like salmon. Four ounces of salmon provide about 300 IU.

    The Facts About Fats

    The American lust for low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets filled with sugary foods has exploded into nothing short of "obsession," according to experts at the General Research Center at Stanford University Medical Center (Am J Clin Nutr 70, 1999: 512S-5S). That mania oftens robs us of the crucial balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids typical of the Mediterranean diet that protect us from heart disease by controlling cholesterol and making blood less likely to form clots. These fatty acids cannot be made by the body but are critical for health: n Omega-3 fatty acid (linolenic acid) comes from fresh, deepwater fish (salmon, mackerel, sardines) and vegetable oils such as canola, flaxseed and walnut. n Omega-6 fatty acid (linoleic acid) found primarily in raw nuts, seeds and legumes and in saturated vegetable oils such as borage, grape seed, primrose, sesame and soybean. The American Heart Association recommends limiting total fat consumption to 30% of daily calories. Saturated fats like those in dairy and meat products as well as vegetable oil should comprise 10% of total calories; total unsaturated fat (fish oils, soybean, safflower nuts and nut oils) should be restricted to 20 to 22% of daily calories.

    Be Sure About B12

    Vitamin B12 presents a particular problem for the elderly because older digestive systems often don't secrete enough stomach acid to liberate this nutrient from food. (The elderly have no problem absorbing B12 from supplements, because it's not bound to food.) Vitamins generally moderate the aging process but, ironically, that process and the diseases that frequently accompany it affect vitamin metabolism (Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax 83, 1994: 262-6). And because of those changes, we need more of certain vitamins. This is the case for vitamins D, B6, riboflavin and B12. Crucial for health, B12 is necessary to prevent anemia, and, according to recent studies, needed (along with folate and B6) to help stave off heart disease. B12, with thiamine and niacin, boosts cognition (Adv Nutr Res 7, 1985: 71-100). Screening for vitamin B12 deficiency and thyroid disease is cheap and easy and can prevent conditions such as dementia, depression or irreversible tissue damage (Lakartidningen 94, 1997: 4329-32). In the January 5-12, 1999 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA urged doctors to screen levels of homocysteine (the amino acid byproduct of protein digestion that damages arteries, causes heart disease and, possibly, strokes) in patients at high risk for heart disease. They also recommended all Americans to up their daily levels of vitamins B6 and B12, as well as folic acid. Since fruits, vegetables or grains lack B12, vegetarians need B12 supplements. And they're a good idea for the rest of us, too.

    Folic Acid Benefits

    Folic acid made headlines in the early 1990s when the U.S. Public Health Service declared that "to reduce the frequency of neural tube defects [spina bifida, or open spine, and anencephaly, a lethal defect of the brain and skull] and their resulting disability, all women of childbearing age in the United States who are capable of becoming pregnant should consume .4 milligrams (400 micrograms) of folic acid per day." This recommendation followed voluminous research that showed taking folic acid was associated with a significantly reduced risk of birth defects. (The advisory is based on the fact that nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned. If you think you are pregnant, consult your health practitioner for supplementary advice.)

    A Team Player

    Folic acid's efficacy intensifies when it works with other nutrients. Among many studies on the preventive powers of folic acid on birth defects, one published in The New England Journal of Medicine (327, Dec. 24, 1992: 1,832-1,835), disclosed an even greater decrease in neural tube defects when supplements of folic acid contained copper, manganese, zinc and vitamin C. As a warrior against homocysteine, folic acid joins the battalion of B12 and B6 in detoxifying this harmful protein. At the University of Washington's Northwest Prevention Effectiveness Center, researchers recently analyzed 38 published studies of the relationship between folic acid, homocysteine and cardiovascular disease and, according to associate professor Shirley A. Beresford, MD, folic acid and vitamin B12 and B6 deficiencies can lead to a buildup of homocysteine.

    Compelling Evidence

    Canadian researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (275, 1996: 1893-1896) that men and women with low folic acid have a 69% increase in the risk of fatal coronary heart disease. This 15-year study of more than 5,000 people stressed the need for dietary supplementation of folic acid. Folic acid also has been credited with the potential to protect against cancers of the lungs, colon and cervix. It appears to help reverse cervical dysplasia, the precursor cells to cervical cancer, especially for women taking oral contraceptives, which may cause a localized deficiency of folic acid in the cells of the cervix. According to Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning, authors of The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery), folic acid derivatives work with neurotransmitters, the chemicals that permit signals to be sent from nerve fiber to nerve fiber. A lack of folic acid can cause some nervous-system disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia and dementia; it also may be related to some forms of mental retardation. Other supporting roles of folic acid, according to researchers: the formation of normal red blood cells, important for preventing the type of anemia characterized by oversized red blood cells; strengthening and improving white blood cell action against disease; limiting production of uric acid, the cause of gout.

    The Best Sources

    Many foods are rich in folic acid: beef, lamb, pork and chicken liver, spinach, kale and beet greens, asparagus, broccoli, whole wheat and brewer's yeast. But experts believe that only 25 to 50% of the folic acid in food is bioavailable. Processing also reduces an estimated 50 to 90% of its content. Folic acid supplementation overcomes these obstacles with little risk, as it has no known toxicity. Women taking folic acid who are current or former users of oral contraceptives may require additional zinc. And be sure to augment your folic acid supplement with its synergistic counterpart, vitamin B12.

    Focus on Fiber

    The American Heart Association came out squarely behind fiber in a June 16, 1997 issue of its journal Circulation: Double your daily intake to lower cholesterol and the risk of heart disease. The American diet is consistently low in fiber, notes Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD, author of the article. Twenty-five to 30 grams a day from foods (or supplements) are not only heart healthy but seem to aid weight control.

    Iron Problem

    Getting enough iron? An estimated 25% of adolescent girls in the United States are iron deficient, according to an October 12, 1996 issue of the British medical journal The Lancet, which reported that girls who took iron supplements performed significantly better on verbal tests than those who took a placebo. "Teenage girls should be regularly tested for iron deficiency because rapid growth and the onset of menstruation during puberty increase the body's need for iron," says Ann Bruner, MD, of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and a lead author of the study.USDA data reveal that women up to age 50 also tend to get much less than recommended levels of iron, a lack of which leads to anemia, a deficiency of red blood cells, hemoglobin or volume of blood. For kids, deficiency is more common from six months to four years and during the rapid growth spurts of adolescence when the body is growing so quickly that the body's iron stores may sink to dangerous levels. Vegetarian women run the greatest risk for deficiency, as meat is iron-rich; foods like beans, grains and vegetables also contain some iron. Supplements, of course, supply easily absorbable iron. And to absorb iron from vegetarian sources, take vitamin C with your meals. That boosts the amount of this mineral you will take in. Bear in mind, however, that certain folks-older men and post-menopausal women-generally have adequate dietary supplies of iron. Of greater concern, in fact, is excessive iron, and for these folks iron-free multivitamin and mineral supplements are available.

    Ante Up the Antioxidants

    Antioxidant nutrients help protect the body from oxygen-scavenging molecules called free radicals. The products of pollution, the body's own metabolic processes and other sources, free radicals are linked to heart disease, cancer and other chronic health problems. The most important antioxidants, which include vitamin C, E, beta carotene, and selenium, are often lacking in the American diet. Plus, optimal amounts of vitamin E cannot be consumed from food. You need supplements. The bottom line: even though we live in a land of plenty, you can still miss vital nutrients. So make sure to consume these vital substances.

    Sprouts: Nutritional

    Source of Missing Nutrients In the search for the nutrients missing from America's diet, one big help is the sprout. The sprout is truly one of nature's heavyweights: fresh, tiny and moist, its power punch of vitamins, minerals, protein, chlorophyll and disease-busting phytochemicals land it in a weight class far beyond that of its full-grown competitors. Size does NOT matter to this nutritional giant. A championship belt currently wraps around the miniscule broccoli sprout, catapulted into the ring by Paul Talalay, MD, professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Talalay discovered that the seedlings contain substantially more of the cancer-fighting substance sulforaphane than mature plants (Proc. Natnl. Acad. Sci. USA, 94, 10367-10372). Sprouts, the quintessential health food of the Sixties, provide a wonderfully varied and versatile way to get your daily greens. Raw or cooked, strong or mild, vegetable and grass sprouts and their algae cousins add low-calorie texture to recipes and a rich, diverse complement of nutrients and fiber.

    Ancient Asia to the Modern Lab

    Asians stir-fried sprouts as one of the earliest fast foods as long as 5,000 years ago. The ancient Chinese relied on sprouts for year-round vegetables in colder regions of their vast country. Today, researchers studying sprouts and adult plants have identified their important chemoprotective and other health-bolstering substances. In Paul Talalay's research project at Johns Hopkins, scientists found that three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain up to 50 times more sulforaphane than mature plants, which prompts the body to produce an enzyme that prevents cancer tumors from forming. Uniform levels of the compound saturate the shoots, unlike the chemically uneven adult plants. The Brassica family of broccoli and cabbage is richly endowed with phytochemicals that also help reduce estrogen levels associated with breast cancer. Other phytochemical compounds in the Brassica family are associated with the prevention of stomach and lung cancers. Most of the initial landmark work on phytochemicals' cancer-fighting powers has taken place since 1989 under the aegis of the National Cancer Institute's "Designer Food Program," which isolated, for example, the isoflavones in beans that seem to neutralize cancer-gene enzymes.

    Strong Suit: Soy and Spirulina

    The isoflavones and phytosterols in soy produce an estrogenic effect that appears to relieve menopausal symptoms and help prevent breast cancer. Soy foods expert Mark Messina, PhD, has done extensive work on the subject, some of which has been published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute 83, 1991: 541-6. Researchers also have synthesized a bone-strengthening form of soy isoflavones called ipriflavone, following impressive clinical trials in the treatment of osteoporosis (American Journal of Medicine, 95 [Suppl. 5A] (1993): 69S-74S). Spirulina and other micro-algae are fascinating organisms that inhabit a niche between the plant and animals kingdoms. Named for its tiny spirals, spirulina, a blue-green algae, grows in saline lakes but is cultured for maximum nutritional content. In her book Whole Foods Companion (Chelsea Green), Dianne Onstad notes that spirulina contains "the highest sources of protein, beta carotene and nucleic acids of any animal or plant food." Its nucleic acids, she says, benefit cellular regeneration; its fatty acids, especially GLA and omega-3 acids, make it one of the most complete foods. Sprouts, like any other produce, should be rinsed thoroughly before serving. People at high risk for bacterial illness-young children, the very elderly or folks with weakened immune systems-should limit their consumption of raw sprouts. But no matter how you eat them, you may find more spring in your step from these tiny, sprouting nutritional wonders.



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    Bone Power - Natures Plus
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    Date: June 11, 2005 04:41 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Bone Power - Natures Plus

    Bone Power by no author Energy Times, May 1, 1997

    Patricia Q. stopped smoking 20 years ago. At 61, she is active, tries to exercise regularly, eats properly and takes a multivitamin. Most would consider Patricia's lifestyle a sufficient safeguard against the diseases of aging. But one debilitating possibility still concerns her: Osteoporosis-bone thinning. She worries that her bones may have begun weakening almost a decade ago. Although her good health habits can slow the demineralization of her bones, osteoporosis may still take its toll. And as her neck and back begin to obviously round, a possible sign of bone weakness, Patricia frets about her future.

    The weakening of bones brought on by age makes them more prone to fracture. One of every two women older than age 50 suffers an osteoporosis-related fracture during her lifetime. Osteoporosis literally means "porous bones," bones that deteriorate and particularly increase the risk of damage to the hip, spine and wrist. In extreme cases, everyday activities assume danger: fractures can result from simply lifting a bag of groceries or from what would otherwise be a minor fall. Some women, fearful of fractures, eliminate many seemingly innocuous activities from their daily lives. Their fear is well founded. Complications from these fractures are a major killer of women.

    As women grow older, the risk grows, too. Ten million individuals already have the disease, and 18 million have low bone mass, placing them at risk for osteoporosis.

    But research shows that osteoporosis may be preventable and controllable. Regardless of age, eating right, getting enough calcium and performing weight-bearing exercises, can lower your risk for this disease.

    Understanding Your Bones

    Bones are not static structures but living tissue constantly reformed in a process called remodeling. Every day old bone is removed and replaced with new bone tissue. When more bone is broken down than is replaced (demineralization), bones weaken. When the structure loses sufficient density, you face eminent danger of a fracture.

    Generally speaking, bones continue to increase their density and calcium content until you reach your 30s, at which point you probably have attained your peak bone mass. Afterward you may either maintain this mass or begin to lose calcium yearly, but you rarely can increase bone density. The loss of bone density can increase at menopause, when your body ceases producing estrogen, a hormone required to improve bone strength. In addition, some medications, used for a long period, compromise bone density.

    Stop Calcium Loss

    Eating a diet rich in nutrients that help your bones stay strong should be the first step in stopping or slowing the process of osteoporosis. Calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, phosphorus, soy-based foods and fluoride compose the major nutrients that strengthen bone.

    At this moment, 98 percent of your body's calcium resides in your bones, the rest circulates in the blood, taking part in metabolic functions. Because the body cannot manufacture calcium, you must eat calcium in your daily diet to replace the amounts that are constantly lost. When the diet lacks sufficient calcium to replace the amount that is excreted, the body begins to break down bone for the calcium necessary for life-preserving metabolic processes.

    Calcium in the diet can generally slow calcium loss from bones, but it usually doesn't seem to replace calcium already gone. The National Institutes of Health recommend 1000-1200 milligrams of dietary calcium per day for premenopausal women and 1200-1500 milligrams for menopausal and postmenopausal women

    Good sources of calcium include milk and milk products, yogurt, ricotta, cheese, oysters, salmon, collard greens, spinach, ice cream, cottage cheese, kale, broccoli and oranges.

    If you cannot tolerate dairy products, calcium supplements are an easy way to consume calcium. Take supplements with a meal to aid absorption of calcium from the stomach.

    In Total Health for Women, Dr. Kendra Kale, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, urges women to read supplement labels. Scrutinize the fine print to see how many grams are considered "elemental"or "bioavailable"-the form of calcium your body will absorb. If you're taking a 750 milligram supplement, chances are only 300 milligrams are elemental. You should also check that the pill will dissolve within 30 minutes and meets the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) standards. If tablets do not break down within 30 minutes, they may pass through you unabsorbed and you won't digest the calcium from them that you need.

    Absorbing calcium from your digestive tract also requires the presence of vitamin D. Ten to 15 minutes of sun exposure daily usually satisfies vitamin D requirements since most people's bodies can use sunlight to manufacture this substance. So walking to work, or going outside for lunch should supply sufficient ultraviolet light to facilitate calcium absorption.

    As we age, however, our body's ability to produce vitamin D gradually diminishes. Our diets can make up the difference: Good dietary sources of vitamin D include egg yolks, liver and fish or nutritional supplements. Many foods, like milk, are supplemented with vitamin D.

    Magnesium is another mineral that helps to build bones. Found in leafy, green vegetables, nuts, soybeans, seeds and whole grains, your daily requirement of magnesium should be about half of your calcium intake.

    Absorbing calcium for bone health also requires phosphorus, but be careful not to get too much of a good thing: excess phosphorus can actually increase your body's need for calcium. This can present a problem for people who drink bottle after bottle of cola soft drinks or who eat an abundance of processed foods which are often high in phosphorus.

    New Soy Research

    New research suggests that soy foods, like tofu or soy milk may be vital for preserving bones. A study of more than 60 postmenopausal women who consumed either diets rich in soy's isoflavones or milk protein found that eating soy restored calcium to some of the women's bones. Even though the researchers didn't think such a replacement due to soy was even possible!

    The researchers at the University of Illinois believe that isoflavones behave in the body in some of the same ways that estrogen does. The study measured bone density at the lumbar spine, a part of the body at the small of the back that is liable to fractures due to osteoporosis.

    Fluoride: Not Just For Teeth

    Although most people associate the mineral fluoride with strong teeth, fluoride is just as important for bone strength. Surveys report that osteoporosis is reportedly less common in communities that drink fluoridated water. Fluoride combines with calcium in the bones to slow mineral loss after mid-life. Good sources of this mineral include fish, tea and most animal foods.

    Cut Back on Alcohol and Coffee

    According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, consuming lots of caffeine is thought to increase the calcium excreted in your urine. In addition, high levels of protein and sodium in your diet are also believed to increase calcium excretion. And although more studies of protein and sodium are needed to precisely determine how these substances influence calcium loss you should limit the caffeine, protein and salt you take in.

    On top of those findings, researchers say that the diuretic action of alcohol and caffeine speed skeletal calcium loss. They believe alcohol may interfere with intestinal absorption of calcium.

    Pumping Up

    Along with a bone-friendly diet, your exercise program should also be designed to preserve bone. Weight-bearing exercise-exercise that places stress on the bones-strengthens bone density and wards off osteoporosis. Weight-bearing exercises include weight lifting, walking, jogging and jumping rope.

    Exercise possesses many benefits for preserving bone, according to Miriam Nelson, Ph.D., author of Strong Women Stay Young. Among them: exercise can help you retain the balance necessary to resist falls and strengthen the muscles that keep you erect. Studies performed on women of all ages found that by doing strength training exercises two times a week for a year, without use of estrogen or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), women, on average, added three pounds of muscle and lost three pounds of fat. They were also 75 percent stronger with improved balance and bone density.

    Although strength training can be performed by anyone at any age, Nelson recommends that if you have an unstable medical condition or if you have recently undergone surgery, wait until you recover and speak with your doctor before beginning an exercise program. If you have not exercised in a long time, consult a health practitioner knowledgeable in sports medicine before beginning an exercise program.

    Other Options

    Drug therapies are now available to combat osteoporosis. One of the most popular is HRT, which supplies estrogen to women undergoing menopause. However, medical experts are still arguing over HRT 's possible role in increasing your risk of cancer, particularly breast cancer.

    According to Jan Rattner-Heilman, co-author of Estrogen, the Facts Can Change Your Life, the conflicting studies that balance the benefits and risk of HRT are bound to confuse the average consumer. Estrogen is recommended to prevent bone loss and forestall heart disease and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Most women take estrogen to ease the discomforts of menopause such as hot flashes, and many experts do not believe that it unduly increases the risk of breast cancer for those at low risk.

    Heilman warns, however, that estrogen probably should not be taken by women especially at risk for breast cancer risk or those who are already suffer the disease.

    Patricia Q. is reluctant to try HRT. "I'm at risk for breast cancer-my mother had it-so I won't take estrogen. I'd rather do what I can without medications. My preference is to watch my diet and exercise as much as I can. That gives me my best chance to avoid osteoporosis."

    Doctor Nelson agrees with this perspective She believes that exercise possesses enough benefits to make it the treatment of choice. "The difference between estrogen and strength training is that strength training has a huge spillover effect; you aren't just decreasing one type of disease. You become stronger with more muscles and less fat, and you become more fit. This decreases your chances for many types of diseases, not just osteoporosis. It can decrease risks for heart disease, diabetes, sleep disturbances, hypertension and more."

    If you believe you are at risk for osteoporosis, ask your doctor about the benefits of bone mineral density screening. DEXA scan (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) measures the bone density in a 15-minute test. But the test is expensive: the cost of this test ranges from $75-200 or more and may not be covered by your health insurance. But financial help may be on the way. A Bone Mass Standardization Act has been introduced in Congress to ensure that the cost of bone mass measurement is covered under Medicare and that standards for coverage are clear and consistent for anyone with medical insurance.

    Fighting Osteoporosis at Different Ages

    Childbearing years (30-40): These years are particularly important for preserving bone through exercise and good nutrition. Eat plenty of low-fat dairy products, vegetables and soy. Perform weight-bearing exercise such as walking, jogging and weight lifting to attain the greatest amount of bone and muscle possible. Being active reduces risk of injury and makes you stronger. If you smoke, now's the time to stop.

    Menopausal years (late 40s-50s): During this time, muscle, bone and estrogen decreases. Minimize loss through diet, walking and weight lifting. Your exercise intensity may have to be decreased but you should not stop being physically active.

    Post Menopause (over 60): Focus on reducing your risk of falling. Minimize balance problems and increase muscle strength through exercise.



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    PHOSPHATIDYL SERINE (PS) - Maintain healthy cells ...
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    Date: June 04, 2005 11:08 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: PHOSPHATIDYL SERINE (PS) - Maintain healthy cells ...

    All we have ever known or will ever feel, begins and ends with the hundreds of billions of nerve cells that form our brain. Without them, there can be no experience; for us, nothing would exist. Our mind and personality, the sense of who we are, emanate from this immensely intricate system of nerves. The brain’s remarkable ability to perceive and perform, remember and learn, is severely challenged by today’s social and physical environment. These environmental factors accelerate the decline in nerve cell activity that normally occurs with age. Recent clinical research is revealing how previously unrecognized nutrients can strengthen the body’s natural defenses against age-related cognitive decline. Source Naturals is proud to present the latest breakthrough in nutritional support for the brain: PHOSPHATIDYL SERINE.

    Phosphatidyl Serine (PS) is a phospholipid which forms an essential part of every human cell, but it’s particularly concentrated in the membranes of nerve cells. Since the electronic messages that communicate and regulate every aspect of our lives travel along nerve cell membranes, the structural integrity of these membranes is imperative to our health. The nerve cell membrane is the site where molecules of sodium and potassium exchange electrons, causing the electrical impulse to be generated. This bio-electric current then travels along the membrane to trigger the release of neurotransmitters. These are the chemical messengers that cross synapses (gaps between nerve cells) to relay information to neighboring nerve cells. This sets other electrical currents in motion– along thousands of other nerve cells. This happens billions of times each second, and is how the brain and nerves coordinate and communicate with the rest of the body. PS has a very important function in the nerve cell membrane. As a key bio-structural molecule, PS provides vital support for the membrane proteins that enable nerve cells to communicate and grow.

    Regulating the Flow

    Unlike other cells in the body, nerve cells do not reproduce. Instead, they repair and rebuild themselves, using proteins called Nerve Growth Factor (NGF). Experiments verify that PS enhances the synthesis and reception of NGF, which tend to drop off radically with age.1 PS supplements enhance the cerebral cortex’s output of acetylcholine, the neurotransmitter associated with our ability to think, reason, and concentrate. PS also stimulates the synthesis and release of dopamine, related to heightened states of attention.2 The brain’s response to stress also appears to be related to PS. When healthy young men were subjected to exercise-induced stress, those taking PS had a lowered stress response. This was measured by blood levels of ACTH, the pituitary hormone that triggers the adrenals to secrete the stress hormone cortisol.3

    Well-Tested

    Subjects taking PS showed increased levels of brain energy metabolism and scored higher on cognitive tests.4 Behavioral factors were also measured in elderly subjects; PS positively affected their mood states.5 Over 23 clinical trials have investigated the effect of PS supplements on more than 1200 human subjects, ages 40-93. Consistent and statistically significant results suggest that PS supports brain functions that tend to diminish with age.

    Wellness Redefined

    Nutritional research continually reveals new potentials for wellness. Source Naturals is committed to helping people achieve a fulfilling life, and a fully functioning nervous system is central to this aim. Source Naturals PHOSPHATIDYL SERINE can help support your body’s natural regenerative processes, keeping your brain healthy and vital for a long, long time. Experience the difference with Source Naturals PHOSPHATIDYL SERINE.

    References:
    1. Aporti, F., et al., 1986. “Age-dependent spontaneous EEG bursts in rats: effects of brain phosphatidylserine.” Neurobiology of Aging 7: 115-120. 2. Caffarra, P., and V. Santamaria, 1987. “The effects of phosphatidylserine in subjects with mild cognitive decline.” Clin. Trials J. 24: 109-114. 3. Heiss, W.D., et al., 1993. “Activation PET as an instrument to determine therapeutic efficacy in Alzheimer’s Disease.” Annals N.Y. Acad. Sci. 695: 327-31. 4. Monteleone, P., et al., 1990. “Effects of phosphatidylserine on the neuroendocrine response to physical stress in humans.” Neuroendocrinol. 52: 243-48. 5. Nunzi, M.G., et al., 1990. “Therapeutic properties of phosphatidylserine in the aging brain.” In, Phospholipids: Biochemical, Pharmaceutical and Analytical Considerations (ed. I. Hanin and G. Pepeu). New York: Plenum Press.



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    Liquid Calcium 1200 with Magnesium
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    Date: June 02, 2005 01:21 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Liquid Calcium 1200 with Magnesium

    Committed to providing you with the most advanced and effective forms of nutrition, Source Naturals now offers LIQUID CALCIUM 1200 WITH MAGNESIUM. More than a convenient and great tasting way to ensure your daily intake of calcium, Source Naturals LIQUID CALCIUM 1200 WITH MAGNESIUM also supplies 100% of the magnesium and vitamin D your body needs to utilize calcium—enabling this essential mineral to maintain proper bone and muscle function. And all the minerals in Source Naturals LIQUID CALCIUM 1200 WITH MAGNESIUM are highly soluble and more easily assimilated because they’re in the lactate form, which is nondairy yet highly bio-available. Source Naturals LIQUID CALCIUM 1200 WITH MAGNESIUM is ideal for those who dislike taking large tablets or who have trouble digesting them. One of Source Naturals’ most popular formulas, this unique combination of high-quality nutrition and convenience comes without the chalky taste of many other liquid mineral supplements. Great tasting creamy orange natural flavor.

    Calcium is well-known for its role in building strong bones and teeth, but this essential mineral has many other vital functions, including regulating the transmission of nerve impulses throughout the body and the passage of nutrients into and wastes out of cells. Magnesium, too, has numerous metabolic functions in the body. More than 300 different enzymes depend on magnesium, including ones that help convert dietary sugars and fats into energy. Magnesium is needed to synthesize DNA, RNA, and the brain proteins that store and retrieve memories. What’s more, your body uses magnesium to make sure calcium gets into your bones, not your soft tissues.

    Calcium and Magnesium Work Together

    Even with sufficient calcium in the diet, bone health still depends on adequate levels of magnesium. That’s because vitamin D needs magnesium to synthesize the calcium-binding proteins that transport calcium from the intestine into the blood. Magnesium also controls secretion of thyrocalcitonin, the hormone that directs calcium into bones. And adequate magnesium helps prevent over-secretion of parathyroid hormone that dissolves calcium from bones.

    Cardiovascular Health

    Taking magnesium with calcium is not only a wise strategy to ensure a healthy skeletal system, it’s also heart smart. Both calcium and magnesium support proper blood coagulation. Calcium affects muscle contraction while magnesium affects muscle relaxation including the heart muscle. The micromuscles surrounding arteries require sufficient magnesium to keep from excessive constriction or spasm. And with potassium, magnesium regulates the heart’s electrical activity. Epidemiological studies worldwide show a direct relationship between heart health and levels of magnesium and calcium in drinking water. A 30-year study of more than 7,000 men found a significant association between higher daily magnesium intake and cardiovascular health. Magnesium supplementation is important because modern diets are low in this vital mineral, and many factors increase magnesium loss from the body. Alcohol is the most notorious depleter of magnesium. Dietary imbalances such as high intakes of fat and/or calcium can intensify magnesium inadequacy. Stress hormones also deplete calcium from bones.

    Calcium without the Cow

    Source Naturals LIQUID CALCIUM 1200 WITHMAGNESIUM’s highly soluble mineral lactates (unrelated to lactose) offer excellent bio-availability for maximal absorption. This great tasting nondairy mineral supplement takes advantage of the latest knowledge in nutritional science to optimize the many vital functions of calcium and magnesium in the body. It is available in 16 oz and 32 oz sizes.

    References
    Abbott RD et al. Sept 2003. Dietary magnesium intake and the future risk of coronary heart disease (the Honolulu Heart Program). Am J Cardiol 92(6): 665-9. Seelig MS. Oct 1994. Consequences of magnesium deficiency on the enhancement of stress reactions; preventive and therapeutic implications (a review). J Am Coll Nutr 13(5): 429-46.



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    Life Minerals - Why are Minerals So Important?
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    Date: June 02, 2005 01:14 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Life Minerals - Why are Minerals So Important?

    Why Are Minerals So Important?

    The value of adequate mineral intake for overall health cannot be overstated. Their effects are vast and broad; their deficiencies devastating. Minerals are components of body tissues and fluids that work in combination with enzymes, hormones, vitamins and transport substances. Minerals participate in nerve transmission, muscle contraction, cell permeability, tissue structure, blood formation, acid-base balance, fluid regulation, blood pressure control, protein metabolism and energy production. The human body requires large amounts of some minerals, and trace amounts of others, while some minerals – such as Lead, Mercury and Aluminum – are toxic to the body. Those minerals that are essential to health in relatively high amounts – Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sulphur, Sodium, Chlorine, and Magnesium – are called macrominerals. Trace minerals – Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Iron, Chromium, Selenium, Iodine and Molybdenum, to name a few – are those which are present in the body in minute amounts, but are just as essential to health as the major minerals. One of the main functions of minerals in the body is to activate enzymes. Magnesium, for example, activates over 300 different enzymes, while Zinc “turns on” over 100. Enzymes are catalysts, functioning in the cells to accelerate chemical reactions. All of these chemical reactions collectively are referred to as “metabolism”, which is the very basis of life.

    Why Do We Need Minerals Now More Than Ever?


    I. The Decreasing Levels of Minerals in Today’s Foods Unlike the compost fertilizers of the past, today’s “high-tech” fertilizers do not replace many of the nutrients essential to both the natural growth of crop plants and to human beings, who depend on them for adequate nutrition. As a result, even a “good” diet may provide less nutrition than is generally required. In addition, many modern food additives bind minerals so tightly in food that they can no longer be absorbed or utilized by the body. A moderate intake of one such additive, EDTA (estimated American daily intake is 50-100 mg), was found in a scientific study to reduce iron absorption by 50%! Dietary studies have shown that mineral deficiencies are so prevalent, it’s rare that anyone gets even the minimum RDA levels of them all. The following are examples of the unfortunate findings:

  • • A study by the USDA in the mid-1980s on Chromium status in adults found that NONE of the people tested consumed even the lower level of the Chromium “Safe & Adequate Intake” range of 50 to 200 mcg.
  • • It is estimated that up to 90% of all Americans may be Magnesium-deficient, even by RDA standards (considered by many Magnesium experts to be already too low).
  • • A study published in the prestigious American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in the late 1970s found 70% of Americans getting less than the 15 mg RDA for Zinc, with most getting only 8- 11 mg per day.
  • • Among Americans who do not eat a high-dairy diet or take Calcium supplements/antacids regularly, virtually no one will achieve the current 1000 mg per day RDA for Calcium.
  • • According to nutritionists, women not taking Iron supplements would need to consume a 3000 calorie diet daily(!) to regularly achieve the U.S.RDA for Iron of 18 mg. Yet most women, especially those who are weight-conscious, consume less than 2000 calories a day, many as little as 1200-1500 calories!


    II. The Increasing Need for Minerals in Today’s Environment and Lifestyle Various aspects of the modern environment and lifestyle — some of which are discussed here — severely affect mineral nutrition in the body.

  • • The results of studies conducted in Michigan and Maryland medical facilities show that physical and psychological stress in healthy adults produces acute deficiencies of trace minerals despite otherwise adequate dietary intake. Given the fact that many adults in America are not healthy by medical standards, the loss of minerals with stress is possibly even greater than has been measured.
  • • In addition, many of the prescription drugs that Americans commonly take chelate, or bind, with one or more minerals, making those minerals unavailable to the body. For example, diuretics flush Potassium out of the body and deplete Magnesium, and sedatives can lower blood levels of Calcium and Magnesium.
  • • Heavy metal toxicity is also a major problem in modern America. Cadmium, Mercury and Lead, for example, are cumulative poisons, toxic even in low doses, and are increasingly prevalent in our environment because of their industrial uses. In the 1960s alone, over 200 million pounds of lead per year were released into the environment from the use of leaded gasoline. Data, published in 1987, indicates that people who have a good supply of the minerals Calcium, Zinc, Iron, Selenium, Copper, Chromium, and Manganese in their diets are largely protected against heavy metal poisoning. Conversely, if these minerals are deficient in the diet, there is a much greater danger of heavy metal toxicity.
  • • Poor diet, cigarettes, alcohol, drugs, and the heating and spoiling of polyunsaturated fats all deplete mineral levels and produce damaging free radicals in the body. Minerals such as Selenium, Iron, Copper and Manganese, and Vitamins, such as C, work in the body to neutralize free radicals and thus diminish their harmful effects.

    What Is The Krebs’ Cycle? And What Are “Krebs’ Cycle Minerals”?

    The Krebs’ Cycle is the energetic root of life, taking place in every cell of the body. It produces 90% of the body’s total energy in the form of ATP. Krebs’ Cycle Minerals are those which are bound to the organic acids used in the Krebs’ Cycle. Such mineral complexes are increasingly becoming the standard in mineralinclusive supplements because they’re so good at what they do: Transport. They are especially effective at penetrating various cell membranes and organelle membranes, thus carrying their mineral partners inside the cell. Many of these organelles have membranes to keep out biochemical invaders; therefore, not just any substance can penetrate cells and their organelles.

    Source Naturals’ Life Minerals™: Optimal Mineral Supplementation

    All this technical and scientific information has been brought together by the experts at Source Naturals into one comprehensive multi-mineral formula: Life Minerals™. Many of the minerals in Life Minerals™ — Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Manganese and Iron — are bound to some of the best known transport agents in the body, the Krebs’ Cycle organic compounds. In addition, there are minerals not usually found in other mineral supplements, such as Silicon, Boron, Copper, and Molybdenum. Plus there are the Vitamins B6, C and D3, which have been shown to significantly enhance mineral absorption and utilization. In addition to the Krebs’ Cycle minerals, Life Minerals™ also uses superior forms of other minerals. The Zinc is OptiZinc™ Zinc Monomethionine, shown in scientific studies to be highly bioavailable, offering increased absorption. The Chromium is ChromeMate®, the non-yeast Glucose Tolerance Factor Chromium, believed by many to be the most superior form of Chromium. Copper Sebacate, a more bioavailable form of Copper, is also included. Minerals are crucial to both the structure and function of the body in hundreds of ways. But what good are mineral supplements if your body cannot utilize them to their fullest advantage? Supplementing your diet with Life Minerals™ is an important aid against deficiencies that may be more significant than suspected. By providing minerals with the highest bioavailability, and including significant potencies of each, Source Naturals’ Life Minerals is your best chance of reaping all the benefits that minerals have to offer.



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    Higher Mind - Smart Nutrients for the Performance of a Lifetime...
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    Date: June 02, 2005 12:18 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Higher Mind - Smart Nutrients for the Performance of a Lifetime...

    Our adult years are the time to reap the fruit of an active, meaningful life – appreciated by family and friends who value our experience and knowledge. For some, however, their later years are clouded by a mental decline that erodes their capacity to enjoy life. More of us are becoming apprehensive about the future health of our minds. Will we still be able to communicate our needs as well as our wisdom? As science focuses its investigative might on the workings of the human brain, new findings suggest that it is possible to enjoy a vital, healthy brain and mind – well into old age. Based on compelling research, Source Naturals formulated HIGHER MIND. It contains the most important Neuroceuticals™ now recognized by nutrition scientists – including phosphatidyl serine, a natural nutrient that promotes cognitive function. The connection is clear: nourish your brain; enrich your life.

    To have a healthy, well-functioning brain and nervous system, we need the correct nutrients. Our diets must provide the necessary raw materials for nerve cells to grow, for the synthesis of neurochemicals, and for the maintenance of nerve cell membranes. Nutritional deficiencies can alter the brain’s metabolism, which is expressed by changes in perception and thinking, behavior and mood.

    Brain Cells – Issued at Birth

    Before birth, neurons (nerve cells) are created at the amazing rate of 15 million per hour. As infants, we have over 100 billion neurons, but this is the most we will ever have because – unlike most other cells in our body – nerve cells do not reproduce. A different strategy is used to replace the neurons that are naturally lost throughout life: nerve cells repair themselves and grow by extending branches of nerve fibers called dendrites (from the Latin word for tree). These are the communication links with other neurons that form the circuitry of the brain. A single neuron may be in contact with up to a hundred thousand others! When the density of this fragile organic communication network decreases, we experience a corresponding decline in mental acuity.

    Brain Cell Membranes

    The membrane is the working surface of a cell. It needs to be strong yet flexible, so the cell can maintain its integrity and be able to move and change shape. The membrane regulates the flow of nutrients into the cell and the removal of waste, plus controls the passage of molecular messages from outside the cell to its interior. Membrane ion pumps use a third of the cell’s energy just to maintain the correct ratio of sodium to potassium. In neurons, a rapid exchange of sodium and potassium ions across the nerve membrane is responsible for their unique ability to generate the electrical impulses that are the basis of all communication in the nervous system. As cells age, their membranes become less fluid and more rigid. Key membrane molecules called phospholipids are crucial to the health of neuron membranes, allowing the brain to maintain its youthful quality. The phospholipids in HIGHER MIND – especially phosphatidyl serine and phosphatidyl choline – are essential nutritional supplements for the aging brain.

    Phosphatidyl Serine – Key to Cognition

    For the past decade, researchers have been investigating the role in brain health of a remarkable neuroceutical, phosphatidyl serine (PS). This key structural molecule is integral to the matrix of fats and proteins that compose cell membranes. Although PS is found in all the cells of the body, its highest concentration is in nerve cell membranes. PS is rarely found in the foods we eat, so the body has to synthesize it, but the process is energy- intensive and becomes less efficient with age. Consequently, our levels of PS tend to decline as we get older. PS taken as a dietary supplement is well-absorbed, readily reaching the brain, where it helps create more effective, well-structured nerve cell membranes. The positive effects of PS supplementation have been demonstrated by 23 clinical studies with over 1200 human subjects, ages 43 to 90. Consistent and statistically significant results have confirmed the value of PS in improving age-related cognitive decline, as well as in improving behavioral aspects such as apathy and withdrawal.1 A major study concluded that for one particular measurable parameter of higher mental functions, PS recipients achieved scores of persons roughly 12 years younger.2 Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is one of the most important proteins the body makes. It enables neurons to extend dendrites out to other neurons, allowing the brain to maintain an effective communication network. In experiments, PS enhanced the production and reception of NGF, which tend to drop off radically with age.3 The effects of PS at the cellular level are manifest in the performance of the brain as a whole. Subjects taking PS showed increased levels of brain energy metabolism. This enhancement corresponded to higher performances on cognitive tests.4

    The Chemistry of Thought

    Science now understands the role of neurotransmitters in regulating the body’s complex network of behavior. Neurotransmitters are the chemicals used by neurons to communicate with each other. Activated by a neuron’s electrical impulse, neurotransmitters travel between nerve cells, where they excite or inhibit (in various degrees) the electrical impulse in neighboring cells. One of HIGHER MIND’S key strategies is to improve the brain’s ability to produce and use acetylcholine, a key excitatory neurotransmitter. Acetylcholine is essential for both the storage and recall of memory, and partly responsible for concentration and focus. It also plays a significant role in muscular coordination. Patients showing cognitive decline may exhibit reduced ability to synthesize and utilize acetylcholine.5 The chemical building blocks of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters are called precursors. The most important one for acetylcholine is DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol). This natural substance is found in various fish, such as anchovies and sardines. Supplements of DMAE (and phosphatidyl choline) promote increased levels of choline in the brain. Acetylcholine is created when an acetyl group is attached to the choline molecule, with the help of choline acetyl transferase (CAT), a key brain enzyme. Acetyl L-carnitine is an amino acid that activates this enzyme. Acetyl L-carnitine may also help reduce lipofuscin deposits in the brain because of its involvement in the metabolism of fatty acids.6 Lipofuscin is composed of oxidized fats and proteins; the brown “age spots” on the back of an elderly person’s hand are made of lipofuscin. The amino acid L-pyroglutamic acid sensitizes the acetylcholine receptor sites on a neuron membrane. A given amount of acetylcholine will then have a larger, more powerful effect. Studies have shown that supplements of L-pyroglutamic acid seem to enhance the ability to focus, remember, and learn.

    Total Nutrition for the Brain

    The neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenalin are critical to motor coordination, motivation, concentration, and alertness. Like acetylcholine, their production tends to decline with age. The precursors and activators of dopamine and noradrenalin included in HIGHER MIND are the amino acids N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine and DL-phenylalanine (DLPA), plus folic acid, vitamins B-3, B-6, and C. DLPA is also a precursor to PEA, a neuroamine that has a stimulating effect on the brain. Glutamine is an amino acid precursor to glutamic acid, a major excitatory neurotransmitter involved in mental activity and learning. Glutamine acts as an alternative fuel source for the brain when blood sugar levels are low. It also helps the brain dispose of waste ammonia, which is a natural result of protein breakdown but is irritating to neurons even at low levels. GABA is a dietary amino acid which is also an inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABA works to calm and balance the mind, enhancing mental focus. Along with taurine, these two relaxing neurotransmitters provide a balancing influence to the other, excitatory neurotransmitters. Taurine is found in brain tissue more than anywhere else in the body. It has antioxidant properties and serves as a nerve cell membrane stabilizer, preventing excessive or erratic electrical activity in the brain.

    The Importance of Magnesium

    Magnesium must be present in adequate amounts in the synaptic gaps between neurons or the neurons become hyper-reactive: causing noises to sound excessively loud and emotional reactions to be extreme. Magnesium also activates a key enzyme responsible for maintaining cellular sodium- potassium balance, which is absolutely essential to the electrical activity of nerve cells, as well as to the existence of the cell itself. (Cells would burst if the sodium-potassium ratio were wrong.) Magnesium also helps relax cerebral blood vessels and is important to the manufacture of ATP, the chief energy molecule of the brain. A buildup of aluminum has been found in the brains of some elderly. In 1989, the British medical journal Lancet published a study showing that drinking water with aluminum can increase the risk of damage by up to 50%. An abundant natural element, aluminum is now a common feature in our culture. It’s found in tap water, cookware, deodorants, beverage containers, baked goods, and of course as aluminum foil. In the brain, aluminum breaks down the structure of neurons – causing them to starve – by displacing magnesium from tubulin, a glycoprotein responsible for making microtubules. These tiny pipe-like structures within a neuron provide needed rigidity, as well as transport nutrients from the nucleus down the dendrites to the ends of the nerve cell. Magnesium malate is an excellent form of magnesium that ensures neurons receive this vital mineral.

    B is for Brain Vitamins

    HIGHER MIND also contains a high profile of B vitamins and other key nutrients that are often N A T U R A L S S O U R C E Strategies for Wellness SM ¤ lacking in older individuals. A deficiency in any of the B vitamins can alter nerve function and psychological well-being. Thiamine (B-1), known as the “nerve vitamin,” was first recognized because its deficiency caused beriberi, a degenerative nerve disease. Thiamine is part of the structure of nerve cell membranes and is important to the reparative process that neurons need to offset the stress of continual firing of the electrical impulse. Low amounts of thiamine can cause cell malnutrition in the hypothalamus, the brain’s memory center. 7 NAD and NADH, two coenzyme forms of Niacin (B-3), are the most plentiful coenzymes in the brain. They are essential to hundreds of enzymatic reactions, including ones that produce energy. NADH can stimulate the synthesis of key mood-elevating neurotransmitters. It is also one of the body’s most potent antioxidants. Pantothenic acid (B-5), cyanocobalamin (B-12), and folic acid are required to form the myelin sheath – the insulating covering of nerve fibers. A diet low in pantothenic acid has been shown to make test subjects emotionally upset, irritable, and depressed.7 A lack of B-12 can result in poor concentration and, in severe deficiencies, hallucinations. Pyridoxine (B-6) is precursor to over 60 enzymatic reactions and is involved in the synthesis of several neurotransmitters.

    Brain Power

    Brain cells almost exclusively burn glucose for their energy (other cells can also burn fat), and typically require 50% of all the glucose in the blood. Two B-like vitamins help in the utilization of glucose: PAK (pyridoxine alpha-ketoglutarate) may potentiate the effects of insulin and improve glucose utilization to the cells;8 Biotin is important for the transformation of glucose into energy in the brain. Lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 are metabolic energizers that help produce ATP, the primary energy molecule in the body. Since the brain uses 20% of the body’s total energy supply, efficient ATP production is vital. Lipoic acid and CoQ10 are also powerful antioxidants that help regenerate other antioxidants in the body. The blood vessels feeding the brain become less efficient as we pass middle age. Since the brain depends on the bloodstream to deliver nutrients and oxygen and to remove waste, the quality of this blood flow is paramount to proper brain nutrition. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown in scientific studies to increase blood flow to the brain by helping vessels to dilate. It also promotes the smoothness and healthy integrity of blood vessel linings.

    For the Life of Your Mind Without proper nutrition, the brain will deteriorate; therefore strategies are needed to both enhance current brain function and protect it throughout life. Based on the latest scientific findings, Source Naturals HIGHER MIND is formulated with neuroceuticals that support the mental functions that tend to decline with age. They give your brain the nourishment it needs to integrate perception, memory, and learning into a more comprehensive awareness – so you can excel for a lifetime.

    References
    1. Palmieri, G., et al. (1987). Clin. Trials J. 24: 73- 83.
    2. Crook, T.H., et al. (1991). Neurol. 41: 644-49.
    3. Nunzi, M.G., et al. In Phospholipids: Biochemical, Pharmaceutical and Analytical Considerations (ed. I. Hanin and G. Pepeu).
    New York: Plenum Press, 1990.
    4. Heiss, W.D., et al. (1993). Annals N.Y. Acad. Sci. 695: 327-31.
    5. Passeri, M., et al. (1990). Int. J. Clin. Pharm. Res. X(1/2): 75-79.
    6. Kohjimoto, Y., et al. (1988). Japanese Journal of Pharmacology 48(3): 365-71.
    7. Philpott, William H. Brain Allergies: the Psychonutrient Connection. New Canaan: Keats, 1987.
    8. Passariello, N., et al. (1983). Int. J. Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. Toxicol. 21: 252-56.



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    Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ...
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    Date: June 02, 2005 12:07 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ...

    Heart Science 30 tabs

    Your heart is crucial to every function of your body. It is the sole organ which pumps oxygen-rich blood through the entire circulatory system, feeding your cells and making life possible. Only recently are Americans realizing the importance of a proper low-fat diet, regular exercise, giving up cigarette smoking, and cutting down alcohol consumption to maintaining a healthy heart. Unfortunately, there has been a huge gap in the number of nutritional supplements which provide nutrients and herbs to support normal heart function. That’s where Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE comes in. Two years in the making, and backed by numerous scientific studies, the nutrients in HEART SCIENCE are some of the most soundly researched of all. Combining high potencies of these super-nutrients, HEART SCIENCE is the most comprehensive, cutting edge nutritional approach to proper heart care available.

    Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE— The Five Tiered Approach to Heart Health

    Your heart never rests. Even while you sleep, your heart must keep working, relying on the constant generation of energy by the body for its very survival. If this vital organ stops beating for even a short amount of time, all bodily functions cease and life ends. Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE helps support heart function on the chemical, cellular, structural, and energetic levels. This broad spectrum formula includes ingredients specifically geared for
    1) generating energy,
    2) decreasing harmful homocysteine levels,
    3) fighting oxidized cholesterol,
    4) maintaining the heart’s electrical rhythm, and
    5) protecting artery and capillary linings.

    Energy Generators for An Energetic Organ

    Every day, the human heart beats about 104,000 times, pumping over 8,000 liters of blood through the body! Because it requires so much energy to perform efficiently, the experts at Source Naturals included specialty nutrients in HEART SCIENCE such as Coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine — integral factors in the body’s energy production cycles — to enhance the body’s energy supply.

    There are three main interconnected energy generating cycles in our cells — the Glycolytic (sugar-burning) cycle, the Krebs’ (citric acid) cycle, and the Electron Transport Chain. Together they supply about 90 to 95% of our body’s entire energy supply, using fats, sugars, and amino acids as fuel. Coenzyme Q10 is one of the non-vitamin nutrients needed to maximally convert food into ATP (the energy producing molecule). It is the vital connecting link for three of the four main enzyme complexes in the Electron Transport Chain, the next step in energy generation after the Krebs’ cycle. Using the raw materials generated by the Krebs’ cycle, the Electron Transport Chain produces most of the body’s total energy! The heart is one of the bodily organs which contains the highest levels of CoQ10, precisely because it needs so much energy to function efficiently.

    CoQ10 is one of the most promising nutrients for the heart under investigation today. It has been postulated that as a result of its participation in energy production, CoQ10 improves heart muscle metabolism and the electrical functioning of the heart by enhancing its pumping capacity.8 Many factors such as a high fat diet, lack of exercise, and cigarette smoking can lead to suboptimal functioning of the heart, and therefore failure of the heart to maintain adequate circulation of blood. Interestingly, people whose lifestyles reflect the above factors also tend to have depleted levels of CoQ10 in the heart muscle.10

    Researchers suggest taking between 10-100 mg per day of CoQ10;18,29 HEART SCIENCE provides an impressive 60 mg of CoQ10 per 6 tablets. Similar to CoQ10, L-Carnitine is important for energy production in heart cells. It is a natural amino acid-like substance which plays a key role in transporting fatty acids, the heart’s main source of energy, to the mitochondria, the “power plants” of each cell, where they are utilized for the production of ATP. Heart and skeletal muscles are particularly vulnerable to L-Carnitine deficiency. Studies have shown that supplementation with LCarnitine improves exercise tolerance in individuals with suboptimal heart and circulatory function, and seems to lower blood lipid status and increase HDL (good) cholesterol.16, 22 Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE contains 500 mg of this extremely important compound.

    Like CoQ10 and L-Carnitine, B Vitamins help improve the ability of the heart muscle to function optimally. Each B Vitamin, after being converted to its active coenzyme form, acts as a catalytic “spark plug” for the body’s production of energy. Vitamin B-1, for example, is converted to Cocarboxylase, which serves as a critical link between the Glycolytic and Krebs’ Cycles, and also participates in the conversion of amino acids into energy. A deficiency of B coenzymes within contracting muscle cells can lead to a weakened pumping of the heart.21

    HEART SCIENCE is formulated with high quantities of the most absorbable forms of B Vitamins providing maximum nutrition for the high energy demands of heart cells.

    Homocysteine Regulators

    B Vitamins also play a crucial role in the conversion of homocysteine, a group of potentially harmful amino acids produced by the body, to methionine, another more beneficial amino acid. While it is normal for the body to produce some homocysteine, even a small elevation in homocysteine levels can have negative implications. It is well documented that individuals who are genetically predisposed to having elevated homocysteine levels (homocysteinemics) tend to have excessive plaque accumulation in the arteries and premature damage to endothelial cells (cells lining the blood vessels and heart).26 Researchers have found that even those without this genetic abnormality, whose homocysteine levels are much lower than those of homocysteinemics, still have an increased risk for premature endothelial damage and the development of plaque in the arteries.24, 26 One study conducted among normal men and women found that those with the highest levels of homocysteine were twice as likely to have clogged arteries as were those with the lowest levels.24 Furthermore, it was found that the lower the research subjects’ blood levels of folate and B-6, the higher their homocysteine levels.24 Another study found that Folic Acid administered to normal men and women who were not even deficient in folate caused a significant reduction in plasma concentrations of homocysteine!3 In order to regulate homocysteine levels, it is critical to provide the body with sufficient amounts of B-6, B-12, and Folate, whether through the diet or through supplementation. HEART SCIENCE includes high levels of these three nutrients, providing B-6 in the regular and coenzyme form for maximum utilization.

    The Dangers of Oxidized LDL Cholesterol

    While many people have heard that high cholesterol levels may negatively affect normal heart function, few people understand exactly what cholesterol is, or how it can become harmful. Cholesterol is a white, waxy substance produced in the liver by all animals, and used for a variety of necessary activities in the body. Your liver also manufactures two main kinds of carrier molecules which transport cholesterol throughout the system: Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and High Density Lipoprotein (HDL). Cholesterol is either carried out by LDL from the liver to all tissues in the body where it is deposited, or carried back by HDLs which remove cholesterol deposits from the arteries and carry them to the liver for disposal. Because of this, LDL cholesterol is considered damaging, while HDL is considered protective. Problems occur when there is too much LDL cholesterol in the body and not enough HDL.

    When the body becomes overloaded with fat, an over-abundance of LDL particles are manufactured to process it, and they in turn become elevated in the body to a degree that the liver cannot handle. Rich in fatty acids and cholesterol, these particles are highly susceptible to free radical attack (oxidation). Once oxidized, LDL particles are no longer recognized by the body, which attacks them with immune cells. Immune cells which are bloated by oxidized lipids (called foam cells) are a key factor in the development of “fatty streaks” — the first sign of excess arterial fat accumulation. The bloated immune cells accumulate in artery lesions and create plaque in blood vessels, leading to obstruction and constriction of the vessels. Plus, these lodged foam cells continue to secrete free radicals into the bloodstream, making the problem worse.

    The development of lesions in the arteries is not an uncommon problem. Arterial (and all blood vessel) walls are composed of a chemical matrix which holds the endothelial cells in place. That endothelial layer is the first and most important line of defense in preventing large molecules, such as cholesterol and fat, from entering the vessel wall. This matrix is composed of proteins, collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans (amino sugars). Arterial lesions can be caused by suboptimal collagen and elastin synthesis due to three factors: 1. Vitamin C deficiency (since Vitamin C is a key building block for collagen and elastin); 2. excessive consumption of rancid fats, or heavy usage of alcohol or cigarettes; and 3. free radical damage. Once these lesions are created, the body attempts to repair them by depositing LDL cholesterol — similar to the way one would patch a tire. If that cholesterol is not oxidized, i.e. chemically changed to a harmful, unstable molecule, then this process does not create a problem. But when arterial lesions are “patched” with foam cells, arterial walls suffer page 3 page 4 even more damage, because those foam cells release free radicals which can further damage cell membranes.

    Unfortunately, most people have a lot of oxidized cholesterol floating through the bloodstream. The typical American diet, with its low antioxidant intake and overconsumption of fried and overcooked foods, contributes to the overall levels of harmful oxidized cholesterol. In fact, the average American intake of antioxidants is low even by USRDA standards, making Americans particularly prone to having high levels of oxidized cholesterol.

    Cholesterol Fighters

    Fortunately, there are concrete steps you can take to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol, and its subsequent ill effects on health. In addition to cutting out high-cholesterol and fatty foods, supplementation can protect existing cholesterol and all tissue cells — from oxidation. Antioxidants, substances which scavenge and neutralize free radicals, protect the cardiovascular system by halting the oxidation of cholesterol, and helping to prevent plaque accumulation in the arteries and the continual secretion of free radicals by foam cells. Supplementing the diet with high amounts of Vitamin C, a key antioxidant, also encourages a more healthy “patching” of existing lesions by using collagen (made from Vitamin C) instead of cholesterol. HEART SCIENCE contains generous amounts of the following antioxidants for their protective benefits:

  • • Beta Carotene, a plant pigment, is the naturally occurring precursor to Vitamin A. When the body takes in high enough amounts of Beta Carotene, this lipid-soluble free radical scavenger concentrates in circulating lipoproteins and atherosclerotic plaques, where it performs its antioxidant functions. Beta Carotene is particularly unique and powerful as an antioxidant because it is capable of trapping a very toxic form of di-oxygen, called singlet oxygen, which can result in severe tissue damage. Beta Carotene is one of the most efficient quenchers of singlet oxygen thus far discovered. Six tablets of HEART SCIENCE provide an unprecedented 45,000 IU of Beta Carotene!
  • • Vitamin C is found in plasma, the watery component of blood, where it functions as a potent antioxidant. In addition to strengthening artery linings through collagen manufacture, Vitamin C is involved in the regeneration of Vitamin E within LDL particles. Vitamin C also plays an important role in the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids by the liver, a crucial step in reducing blood cholesterol levels. Once converted into bile acids, and then into bile salts, cholesterol can be excreted from the body, preventing build-up. Supplementation with Vitamin C may lower levels of LDL cholesterol and increase those of HDL cholesterol.25 It may also have a part in actually removing cholesterol deposits from artery walls — good news for people who are already experiencing plaque buildup.25 Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE provides 1,500 mg of Vitamin C in its bioactive mineral ascorbate form.
  • • Vitamin E, together with Beta Carotene, protects lipids from free radical attack. It is the major antioxidant vitamin that is carried in the lipid fraction of the LDL particle, where it protects the LDL particle from damaging oxidation. Within an LDL particle, one molecule of Vitamin E has the ability to protect about 200 molecules of polyunsaturated fatty acids from free radical damage! Vitamin E also aids in protecting the heart by interfering with the abnormal clumping of blood cell fragments, called platelets, within blood vessels.4 It has been shown to inhibit the formation of thromboxanes and increase the production of prostacyclins, which together decrease abnormal platelet aggregation.11 A high potency of Vitamin E — 400 IU’s — is included in six tablets of HEART SCIENCE in the natural d-alpha succinate form, recognized by scientific researchers to be the most absorbable form!
  • • Selenium is an important mineral which has only recently gained attention. When incorporated into the enzyme Glutathione Peroxidase, it has highly powerful free radical-scavenging abilities, and has been shown to work synergistically with Vitamins A, C, and E. An essential mineral, Selenium used to be derived from eating foods grown in Selenium-rich soil. However, modern agricultural practices have depleted soil of its natural Selenium content, leaving many Americans deficient in this vital nutrient. Several epidemiological studies show that the incidence of advanced fatty deposits in blood vessels is much greater in individuals living in geographic areas of the United States and other parts of the world where the Selenium content of the soil is very low.27
  • Proanthodyn,™ an extract of grape seeds, is being called the most powerful antioxidant yet discovered. This highly potent, water-soluble bioflavonoid contains between 93-95% proanthocyanidins, the highest concentration of any nutrient available today. The protective actions of proanthocyanidins may help to prevent the development of plaque in artery walls by inhibiting the free radicals which are produced during the oxidation of cholesterol. The optimal daily amount (100 mg) of Proanthodyn is included in six tablets of HEART SCIENCE. In addition to the protective actions of antioxidants, several other nutrients can contribute to healthier cholesterol ratios.
  • • Chromium is a trace mineral which functions to aid the entrance of glucose into cells. Six tablets of HEART SCIENCE provide 300 mcg of Chromium in the form of Chromate® Chromium Polynicotinate and Chromium Picolinate — the most bioactive forms of Chromium. Not many people are familiar with the vital role Copper plays in the body. This trace mineral is found in all tissues of the body, and is particularly concentrated in the heart. Copper is part of several enzymes, and, in this capacity, is necessary for the development and maintenance of the cardiovascular system, including the heart, arteries, and other blood vessels. Because of its role in elastin production, Copper deficiency can severely damage blood vessels and heart tissue. In fact, researchers have found an inverse relationship between Copper status and increased risk for heart damage.10
  • • L-Proline and L-Lysine are two natural amino acids which show exciting promise in helping to prevent fatty deposits in blood vessels. Researchers have recently identified a particle associated with LDL called apoprotein (a) which is believed to be a main culprit in plaque development. 17 Scientific investigation has revealed that the lipoprotein (a) particle has an adhesive quality that makes the lipoprotein fat globule stick inside blood vessels. The sticky fat globules accumulate, leading to fatty deposits in blood vessels and the subsequent clogging of the arteries. L-Proline and L-Lysine tend to form a barrierlike layer around the apoprotein (a) particle, helping to push it away from the blood vessel wall, and impeding deposit.21

    The Regulating Trio

    Three nutrients — Magnesium, Potassium, and Taurine — work closely together in the body to help maintain the normal electrical rhythm of the heart, promote proper fluid balance, and prevent excessive Calcium levels from building up in the heart and artery linings.

  • • Magnesium is one of the single most important nutrients for maintaining a healthy heart. It plays an extremely vital role in maintaining the electrical and physical integrity of the heart muscle. It has been well established that Magnesium deficiency predisposes humans to serious disruptions of normal cardiac rhythm. One theory is that because Magnesium has a relaxing effect on muscle tissue, inadequate Magnesium stores may make the coronary arteries more susceptible to muscle spasm.10 Too little Magnesium can cause a Calcium/Magnesium imbalance, which can lead to the influx of too much Calcium into heart cells, and potentiate spasms in heart tissue. Another point for consideration is that because it relaxes the blood vessels, Magnesium keeps these vessels open, allowing for maximum blood flow to the heart. Magnesium also has the unique ability to stop unnecessary blood clotting by helping to reduce platelet adhesion.31 Blood clots are naturally produced by the body as a protective device to stop excessive blood flow when the body is injured. The clotting response happens when the body senses that the normally smooth blood vessel linings are rough, indicating that there is a cut. However, sometimes the body mistakes the rough surface of plaque-covered arteries as cuts, and creates unnecessary blood clots. Or, if a high fat meal has just been eaten, tiny fat globules called chylomicrons enter the bloodstream and can cause platelets to become abnormally sticky, possibly creating clots. When these clots flow through the bloodstream and reach a part of the artery which has plaque buildup, normal blood flow is blocked, and the amount of blood which reaches the heart is severely compromised. Magnesium is also crucial for the entrance of Potassium — a key mineral for many bodily functions — into the cells. Even if the body’s Potassium stores are high, without enough Magnesium, the Potassium will not be able to enter the cells and be utilized by the body. 300 mg of Magnesium (75% of the U.S.RDA) are contained in each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE. Along with Magnesium, Potassium helps to regulate normal heartbeat and blood pressure, and is necessary for the contraction and relaxation of muscle tissue. Potassium and Sodium are present in all body fluids; Potassium is found primarily within cell fluids, while Sodium is usually present in fluids surrounding cells. Together, they function to maintain the normal balance and distribution of fluids throughout the body. The body ideally should have a Potassium/Sodium balance of about 1:1; however, because the body holds onto Sodium, yet eliminates Potassium quickly, it is important that the dietary ratio of these two minerals be at least 3:1. Unfortunately, the typical American diet, with its emphasis on processed, salty (Sodiumrich) foods and lack of fresh fruits and vegetables, severely alters the body’s natural Potassium/ Sodium balance. Diets in the United States are extremely high in Sodium — sometimes containing as much as 15 times the recommended daily intake! A high Sodium/low Potassium diet interferes with the normal regulation of heartbeat and blood pressure, and has been linked with elevated blood pressure.25 Taurine is an amino acid which helps normalize electrical and mechanical activity of the heart muscle by regulating Potassium flux in and out of the heart muscle cells.

    Artery Lining Protectors

    Your arteries form an integral part of your cardiovascular system, carrying blood away from the heart to nourish other parts of the body. In a healthy heart, blood surges through the arteries with every beat of the heart. The arteries expand with each pulse to accommodate the flow of blood. When arteries become hardened and narrowed by the build-up of plaque, they can’t expand and are not able to transport blood efficiently throughout the body. This inability to open up increases blood pressure, putting a strain on the heart as well as the arteries. HEART SCIENCE includes ingredients specifically geared to protect against plaque formation within arteries and maintain the flexibility of these vital blood vessels. N-Acetyl Glucosamine (NAG) is a key amino sugar which forms the building blocks of mucopolysaccharides. Mucopolysaccharides, which are long chain sugars, are an integral component of connective tissue. They combine to form gel-like matrixes which are present throughout tissues in the body, helping to maintain the elasticity of blood vessels which must continually adapt to the changing pressures of blood flow. Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE provides 500 mg — a substantial amount — of this vital tissue building block. There is evidence indicating that Silicon, a natural mineral, may protect against plaque formation in the arteries. Silicon is found mainly in connective tissues, where it helps bind the body’s chemical matrix. Bound Silicon is found in high amounts in arterial walls. Researchers have found that there is a steady decline in the Silicon content of the aorta and other arteries as we age. This may be due to the low fiber content of the typical American diet, since fiber is a key dietary source of Silicon.23 HEART SCIENCE includes 400 mg of Horsetail herb extract, a natural source of Silicon. Hawthorn Berry is without question the herb most widely used to encourage normal heart function. The beneficial actions of Hawthorn Berry on cardiac function have been repeatedly demonstrated in experimental studies. Supplementation with Hawthorn Berry has been shown to improve both the blood supply to the heart by dilating coronary vessels, and the metabolic processes in the heart, resulting in normal, strong contractions of the heart muscle.34 Also, Hawthorn may inhibit the angiotensen converting enzyme, which is responsible for converting angiotensen I to angiotensen II, a powerful constrictor of blood vessels.34 Bromelain, a natural enzyme derived from pineapples, has become well-known for its neuromuscular relaxing properties. Researchers have reported favorable results when using Bromelain for soothing vascular linings. Initial research also indicates that Bromelain may break down fibrin, the glue which holds platelets together to form blood clots.6

    Capillary Strengtheners

    Capillaries are the smallest, yet some of the most important, blood vessels. If you think of your cardiovascular system as a series of roads which transport blood and oxygen, then your arteries are akin to interstate highways, your arterioles are the main city boulevards, and your capillaries are local residential streets. Capillaries are so small, in fact, that single red blood cells actually have to fold up to fit through them. Because of their tiny size and the intricate nature of their network throughout the body, capillaries are responsible for actually nourishing each individual tissue cell! Along the length of the capillaries are small openings called slit pores through which oxygen, glucose, and nutrients leave the capillaries and enter the surrounding interstitial fluid. From there, they cross cell membranes and nourish the cells. Similarly, the waste products of cells enter the fluid and cross over into the capillaries, where they are then transported to the liver and kidneys for disposal. If the capillary slit pores are torn or have lesions, then blood proteins and Sodium will leak out and cause the interstitial fluid to take on a more gel-like nature. This makes the transfer of oxygen and nutrients to the cells more difficult, as well as the disposal of cell waste products, turning the fluid into a stagnant swamp instead of a flowing river. In addition to its powerful antioxidant actions, Proanthodyn also helps protect collagen and elastin, the main constituents of tissue in the capillaries, and throughout the body. It is absolutely essential for capillary walls — which are only one cell thick — to be strong and stable, so that they do not allow blood proteins to leak into the interstitial fluid. Once the interstitial fluid takes on a gel-like consistency, the surrounding cells literally become starved from lack of nutrition. The exciting news is that the proanthocyanidins contained in Proanthodyn are among the few substances yet discovered which can help strengthen capillary walls, ensuring the liquid nature of the interstitial fluid.2 Plus, proanthocyanidins help keep capillary and artery walls flexible, allowing for proper blood flow to the heart.

    Heart Smarts

    The 1990’s mark a decade of increased awareness among Americans of important health issues. Much of the discussion has revolved around protecting that precious center of life we call the heart. Simple lifestyle change is one of the most effective ways to maintain and protect the functioning of the cardiovascular system. In order to take a holistic approach to heart care, make sure you include plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, if possible) in your diet, and cut down on fatty and cholesterol-forming foods. Reduce your salt and alcohol intake to a minimum. Try to get regular, sustained aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes three times a week. Don’t smoke – or if you do smoke, try to eat even more fresh fruits and antioxidant-rich vegetables to counter the amount of free radicals being produced in your body. Lastly, consider adding Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE to your health regimen. HEART SCIENCE, the most comprehensive formula of its kind, provides targeted protection to the entire cardiovascular system. By approaching the promotion of normal heart function on five different levels — through the inclusion of ingredients which supply energy, decrease harmful homocysteine levels, fight cholesterol build-up, help regulate electrical rhythm, and protect artery and capillary linings — HEART SCIENCE is the perfect addition to a holistic approach to heart care.

    Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE™


    The Five Tiered Approach to Heart Health
    Six tablets contain:
    Vitamins and Minerals %USRDA
    Pro-Vit A (Beta Carotene) 45,000 IU 900%
    Vit B1 (Thiamine) 50 mg 3333%
    Vit B3 (Inositol Hexanicotinate) 500 mg 2500%
    Vit B6 (Pyridoxine HCl) 25 mg 1250%
    Coenzyme B6 (Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate)
    25 mg yielding: 16.9 mg of Vit B6 845% (Total Vitamin B6 Activity) (41.9 mg) (2095%)
    Vit B12 (Cyanocobalamin) 500 mcg 8333%
    Folic Acid 800 mcg 200%
    Vit C (Magnesium Ascorbate) 1500 mg 2500%
    Vit E (d-alpha Tocopheryl Succinate) 400 IU 1333%
    Chromium (ChromeMate® †Polynicotinate-150 mcg & Chromium Picolinate††-150 mcg) 300 mcg *
    Copper (Sebacate) 750 mcg 37.5%
    Magnesium (Ascorbate, Taurinate & Oxide) 300 mg 75%
    Potassium (Citrate) 99 mg *
    Selenium (L-Selenomethionine) 200 mcg *
    Silicon (From 400 mg of Horsetail Extract) 13mg *
    * U.S. RDA not established.
    Other Ingredients and Herbs
    Coenzyme Q10 (Ubiquinone) 60 mg
    L-Carnitine (L-Tartrate) 500 mg
    Hawthorn Berry Extract 400 mg
    Proanthodyn™ (Yielding 95 mg of Proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract) 100 mg
    L-Proline 500 mg
    L-Lysine (HCl) 500 mg
    NAG™ (N-Acetyl Glucosamine) 500 mg
    Bromelain (2000 G.D.U. per gram) 1200 G.D.U.
    Taurine (Magnesium Taurinate) 500 mg
    Horsetail Extract (Yielding 31 mg of Silica) 400 mg
    Inositol (Hexanicotinate) 50 mg

    Reference:
    1. Azuma, J., Sawamura, A., & Awata, N. (1992, Jan). “Usefulness of Taurine... and its Prospective Application.” Japanese Circulation Journal, 56(1), 95-9.
    2. Blazso, G and Gabor, M. (1980). “Odema-inhibiting Effect of Procyanidin.” Acta Physiologica Academiae ScientiarumHungaricae, 56(2), 235-240.
    3. Brattstrom, E. L, Hultberg, L. B., & Hardebo, E. J. (1985, Nov.). “Folic Acid Responsive Postmenopausal Homocysteinemia.” Metabolism, (34)11, 1073-1077.
    4. Colette, C., et al., (1988). “Platelet Function in Type I Diabetes: Effects of Supplementation with Large Doses of Vitamin E.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 47, 256-61.
    5. England, M. R., et al. (1992, Nov. 4). “Magnesium Administration and Dysrhythmias...A Placebo-controlled, Double-blind, Randomized Trial.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 268(17), 2395-402.
    6. Felton, G. E. (1980, Nov.). “Fibrinolytic and Antithrombotic Action of Bromelain...” Medical Hypotheses (11)6, 1123-33.
    7. Grundy, S. M. (1993, Apr.). “Oxidized LDL and Atherogenesis: Relation to Risk Factors...” Clinical Cardiology, 16 (4 Suppl.I), I3-5.
    8. Hano, O. et al. (1994, June). “Coenzyme Q10 Enhances Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Recovery and Reduces Ca2+ Overload during Postischemic Reperfusion.” American Journal of Physiology, 266(6 Pt 2), H2174-81.
    9. Heineke, et al. (1972). “Effect of Bromelain (Ananase) on Human Platelet Aggregation.” Experientia V. 23, 844-45.
    10. Hendler, S. S. (1991). The Doctors’ Vitamin and Mineral Encyclopedia. NewYork: Fireside.
    11. Jandak, et al. (1988, Dec. 15). “Reduction of Platelet Adhesiveness by Vitamin E Supplementation in Humans.” Thrombosis Research 49(4), 393-404.
    12. Jialal, I., et al. (1991, Oct. 15). “Beta-Carotene Inhibits the Oxidative Modification of Low-density Lipoprotein.” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 1086(1), 134-8.
    13. Jialal, I. & Fuller, C. J. (1993, Apr. 16). “Oxidized LDL and Antioxidants.” Clinical Cardiology, Vol. 16 (Suppl. I), I6-9.
    14. Jialal, I., & Grundy, S.M. (1991, Feb.). “Preservation of the Endogenous Antioxidants in Low Density Lipoprotein...” Journal of Clinical Investigation, 87(2), 597-601.
    15. Kamikawa, T., et al. (1985). “Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Exercise Tolerance...” American Journal of Cardiology, 56, 247-251.
    16. Kosolcharoen, P., et al. (1981, Nov.). “Improved Exercise Tolerance after Administration of Carnitine.” Current Therapeutic Research, 753-764.
    17. Lawn, R. (1992, June). “Lipoprotein (a) in ...” Medicine, 12-18.
    18. Mortensen, S.A.et al. (1985). “Long-term coenzyme Q10 therapy: A major advance in the management of resistant myocardial failure.” Drugs Exp. Clin. Res., 11(8), 581-93.
    19. Nayler, W. G. (1980). “The Use of Coenzyme Q10 to Protect Ischemic Heart Muscle.” In: Yamamura Y., Folkners K., Ito Y., eds. Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Vol. 2, Amsterdam: Elsevier/North-Holland Biochemical Press, 409-425.
    20. Press, R.I., & Geller, J., (1990, Jan.). “The Effect of Chromium Picolinate on Serum Cholesterol and Apolipoprotein Fractions in Human Subjects.” Western Journal of Medicine, 152, 41-45.
    21. Rath, M. (1993). Eradicating Heart Disease. San Francisco: Health Now.
    22. Rossi, C. S., & Silliprandi, N. (1982, Feb.). “Effect of Carnitine on Serum HDL Cholesterol: Report of Two Cases.” Johns Hopkins Medical Journal, 150(2), 51-4.
    23. Schwarz, K. (1977, Feb. 2). “Silicon, Fibre, and Atherosclerosis.” The Lancet, 454-456.
    24. Selhub, J., et al. (1995, Feb. 2). “Association Between Plasma Homocysteine Concentrations and Extracranial Carotid-artery Stenosis.” New England Journal of Medicine, 332(5), 286-291.
    25. Somer, Elizabeth. (1992). The Essential Guide to Vitamins and Minerals. New York: Health Media of America.
    26. Stampfer, M. J., et al. (1992, Aug. 19). “A Prospective Study of Plasma Homocyst(e)ine...” Journal of the American Medical Association, 268(7), 877-881.
    27. Suadicani, P., Hein, H. O., & Gyntelberg, F. (1992, Sept.). “Serum Selenium Concentration...in a Prospective Cohort Study of 3000 Males.” Atherosclerosis, 96(1), 33-42.
    28. Thomas, C. L. (Eds.). (1985). Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, (15th ed.). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
    29. Tsuyusaki, T. et al. “Mechanocardiography of ischemic or hypertensive heart failure,” in Yamaura Y et al., Biomed. & Clin. Aspects of Coenzyme Q.2 Amsterdam, Elsevier/North Holland Biomedical Press, 1980, 273-88.
    30. Verlangieri, A. J., & Stevens, J. W. (1979). “L-Ascorbic Acid: Effects on Aortic Glycosaminoglycan S Incorporation...” Blood Vessels, 16(4), 177-185.
    31. Werbach, M. R. (1987). Nutritional Influences on Illness: A Sourcebook of Clinical Research. New Canaan: Keats Publishing, Inc.
    32. White, R.R., et al. (1988, Jul-Aug.). “Bioavailability of 125I Bromelain after Oral Administration to Rats.” Biopharmaceutics and Drug Disposition, 9(4), 397-403.
    33. Whitney, E. N., Hamilton, Nunnelly, E. M. (1984). Understanding Nutrition, (3rd ed.). St. Paul: West Publishing Company.
    34. Willard, Terry, Ph.D. (1992). Textbook of Advanced Herbology. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: Wild Rose College of Natural Healing.
    35. Xiang, H., Heyliger, et al. (1988, Nov.). “Effect of Myo-inositol and T3 on Myocardial Lipids and Cardiac Function in Streptozocin-induced Diabetic Rats.” Diabetes, 37(11), 1542-8.



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    KudZu, Treatment of alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 19, 2005 09:29 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: KudZu, Treatment of alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse

    For millennia, folk medicines have been used to treat ‘‘alcohol addiction’’ in China. A thorough literature search of the ancient Chinese pharmacopoeias revealed a long list of traditional remedies, including the 16 ‘‘stop-drinking’’ formulae of Sun Simiao (ca. 600 AD) and the ‘‘anti-alcohol addiction’’ formula of Li Dongyuan (ca. 1200 AD), 2 of the most reputed ‘‘medical doctors’’ in the history of Traditional Chinese Medicine. However, like those discovered by the ancient Romans,11 most of the ancient Chinese remedies for ‘‘alcohol addiction’’ were based on psychological aversion: to deter patients from further drinking by associating alcohol drinking with an unpleasant experience. Interestingly, as time went by, treatments based solely on psychological aversion were gradually eliminated from the ancient Chinese pharmacopoeias, presumably because of their ineffectiveness and/or undesirable side effects. The only remedies that have survived this historical trial-anderror scrutiny are those consisting the root (Radix puerariae, RP) or flower (Flos puerariae, FP) of Pueraria lobata (a medicinal plant known to the West as kudzu). It was on the basis of this historical backdrop, we initiated the search of safe and efficacious anti-dipsotropic (alcohol intake suppressive) agents from RP. This approach has led to the discovery of daidzin,12 an isoflavone that has since been shown to reduce alcohol drinking in all alcohol preferring animal models tested to date.

    Alcohol abuse

    Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence (i.e., alcoholism) are serious public health problems of modern society. In the United States alone, an estimated 13 million adults exhibit symptoms of alcohol dependence due to excessive alcohol intake, and an additional 7 million abuse alcohol without showing symptoms of dependence according to U.S. Government projections from studies conducted in the mid-1980s. Alcohol dependence and abuse are very expensive: in economic and medical terms, it will cost the U.S. well over $200 billion in 1991 with no prospect of falling or leveling off. The social and psychological damages inflicted on individuals as a consequence of alcohol abuse, e.g., children born with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and victims of alcohol-related accidental death, homicide, suicide, etc., are immense.

    While it is generally accepted that alcoholism and alcohol abuse are afflictions with staggering international economic, social, medical, and psychological repercussions, success in preventing or otherwise ameliorating the consequences of these problems has been an elusive goal. Only very recently the public view that alcoholism and alcohol abuse are remediable solely by moral imperatives has been changed to include an awareness of alcoholism and alcohol abuse as physiological aberrations whose etiology may be understood and for which therapy may be found through scientific pursuits. Both alcohol abuse and dependence arise as a result of different, complex, and as yet incompletely understood processes. At present, alcohol research is in the mainstream of scientific efforts.

    Our studies on alcohol (ethanol or ethyl alcohol) have been based on the hypothesis that its abuse can ultimately be understood and dealt with at the molecular level. Such a molecular understanding, if achieved, would provide a basis for the identification and development of appropriate therapeutic agents. Our view hypothesizes that the clinical manifestations of alcoholism and alcohol abuse are the consequence of aberrations or defects within one or more metabolic pathways, affected by the presence of ethyl alcohol. In order to test this hypothesis, our initial studies focused on physical, chemical, and enzymatic properties of human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the enzyme that catalyzes alcohol oxidation according to the following reaction formula:

    CH.sub.3 CH.sub.2 OH+NAD.sup.+ .fwdarw.CH.sub.3 CHO+NADH

    In addition, our studies more recently have focused on the aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) which catalyze the subsequent step in the major pathway of ethanol metabolism according to the following reaction formula:

    CH.sub.3 CHO+NAD.sup.+ .fwdarw.CH.sub.3 COOH+NADH

    Prior to our research (for example, see Blair and Vallee, 1966, Biochemistry 5:2026-2034), ADH in man was thought to exist in but one or two forms, primarily in the liver, where it was considered the exclusive enzyme for the metabolism of ethanol. Currently, four different classes of ADH encompassing over twenty ADH isozymes have been identified and isolated from human tissues. There is no reason to believe that all of these ADH isozymes are necessary to catalyze the metabolism of a single molecule, ethanol, even though all of them can interact with it. We have proposed that the normal function of these isozymes is to metabolize other types of alcohols that participate in critical, physiologically important processes, and that ethanol interferes with their function (Vallee, 1966, Therapeutic Notes 14:71-74). Further, we predicted that individual differences in alcohol tolerance might well be based on both qualitative and quantitative differences in isozyme endowment (Vallee, 1966, supra).

    Our research has established the structures, properties, tissue distribution, and developmental changes for most of the ADH isozymes, which while structurally quite similar, and presumed to have evolved from a common precursor, are functionally remarkably varied. Of the more than 120 publications from our laboratory that relate to the above subjects, the following, arranged in six categories, are especially useful for instruction in the prior art.

  • Kudzu Recovery 60ct

  • Kudzu Recovery 120ct

  • Kudzu Root Extract 50caps

  • Kudzu Root Extract from Solaray 60ct



  • Recover from stress, lessen desire for alcohol, primary cleansing, and liver support


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    Acute administration of red yeast rice depletes tissue CoQ10
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    Date: May 13, 2005 03:00 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Acute administration of red yeast rice depletes tissue CoQ10

    Basically, if you are taking a Cholesterol lowering product that works on the same order as prescription drugs, you need to supplement CoQ10 to replace what the body is removing.

    British Journal of Nutrition (2005), 93, 131–135 DOI: 10.1079/BJN20041285 q The Authors 2004

    >

    Acute administration of red yeast rice (Monascus purpureus) depletes tissue coenzyme Q10 levels in ICR mice



  • Red Yeast rice with COQ10 from Solaray 60ct
  • Red Yeast Rice with COQ10 from Solaray 90ct
  • Beyond Red Yeast Rice with Niacin Flush Free From Kal 60ct
  • Red Yeast Rice with COQ10 from Doctors Best 60ct


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    Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control.
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    Date: May 12, 2005 10:00 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control.

    Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Solutions for Cholesterol and Triglyceride Control

    by Richard Conant, L.Ac., C.N.

    Fat and human existence are inseparable. Setting aside the fear and loathing over fat in the body that pervades our culture, we understand that fat is our friend. We cannot live without fat.

    The human body contains many different kinds of fats and fat-like molecules. Collectively known as "lipids" these fatty substances include fatty acids, lipoproteins, phospholipids, glycolipids, triglycerides, steroid hormones and the infamous, dreaded cholesterol.

    Lipids (fats) are found everywhere in the body, performing a variety of vital functions. The brain is a fat-rich organ. Brain neurons and all other nerve cells are protected by a myelin sheath, made largely out of fatty material. Cell membranes consist almost entirely of phospholipids (lipids that contain phosphorus) arranged in a sandwich-like double layer embedded with proteins. Sex hormones are lipids, belonging to the group of complex lipid molecules known as "steroids." Vitamin D is a lipid.

    The body stores and transports fatty acids in the form of triglycerides. A triglyceride contains three fatty acid molecules, which have a chain-like structure, linked to glycerol. (There are also mono- and di-glycerides, which have one and two fatty acid chains, respectively, attached to glycerol.)

    Like many other things necessary to life, fat is a two-edged sword. Fat insulates us from the cold, cushions and protects our vital organs and serves as a storehouse for energy. Yet, when present in excess to the point of obesity, fat threatens health, happiness, self-esteem, social standing and longevity. The same is true of other lipids, most notably triglycerides and cholesterol. Transported throughout the body in the bloodstream, these essential lipids become a health liability when the blood contains too much of them.

    Keeping fat in it its proper place, not eliminating or drastically reducing it, is the goal we should seek. In the blood, lipids must be maintained at healthy levels and ratios. When they are, an important foundation of good health is established.

    How do we keep the blood lipids we need——triglycerides and the various forms of cholesterol——balanced at healthy levels? Diet and exercise are indispensable, these basics must come first. Along with the recommended dietary practices, a number of nutritional approaches offer help for maintaining healthy blood lipids. We will now give several of these a closer look.

    Gugulipid

    In 1990, an herb used for centuries in the Far East was introduced to U.S. consumers. This herb, called "gum guggul," is proving to be one of the most effective natural cholesterol-lowering agents ever discovered. It also brings triglycerides down and raises HDL, the "good" cholesterol. The changes are substantial; gum guggul single-handedly normalizes the entire blood lipid profile, even in people with high starting levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

    Gum guggul, also called simply "guggul," is a gummy resin tapped from the Commiphora tree. A cousin of myrrh gum, guggul has been used by Ayurvedic herbalists of India for at least 3,000 years; texts dating from around 1,000 B.C. mention the herb. Guggul was traditionally given for rheumatism and poor health caused by excess consumption of fatty foods. One ancient Sanskrit text describes in detail what happens in the body when blood fats are out of balance, due to sedentary lifestyle and overeating. The name of this condition has been translated as "coating and obstruction of channels."

    Intrigued by the obvious similarity between "coating and obstruction of channels" and arteries clogged by fatty plaque, Indian researchers initiated a series of experimental and clinical studies in the 1960's to see if gum guggul would lower excess blood lipids.1 Both human and animal studies consistently showed cholesterol and triglyceride reductions.

    Detailed pharmacological studies showed that guggul's lipid-lowering effects are produced by compounds in the resin called "guggulsterones."2 An Indian pharmaceutical firm then patented a standardized extract of gum guggul under the trade name "Gugulipid." The product contains a uniform 2.5 percent guggulsterones, which is higher than guggul resin in its natural state.

    Because Gugulipid guarantees the necessary intake of guggulsterones needed for blood fat reduction, it has become the product used in clinical research. Phase I efficacy safety trials and Phase II efficacy trials have yielded more positive data.3,4,5 Most of the studies on gum guggul have used relatively small numbers of subjects; this tends to make mainstream medical scientists reluctant about natural remedies. A large, well-publicized double-blind Gugulipid trial on 400 to 500 people would go a long way toward giving this herb the credibility it deserves.

    Pantethine

    Another effective natural solution for blood fat control that should be better known is a relative of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5). Pantethine is the active form of pantothenic acid in the body. Pantethine forms CoA, an essential co-enzyme for utilization of fat. CoA transports "active acetate," an important byproduct of fat metabolism that provides fuel for generating cellular energy. By promoting the burning of fats for energy, pantethine helps keep triglyceride levels down.6 Pantethine also helps regulate cholesterol production, by facilitating the conversion of fat into other lipid-based molecules needed in the body.6

    Japanese researchers began studying the effect of pantethine on blood fats nearly twenty years ago. They reported their promising results at the Seventh International Symposium on Drugs Affecting Lipid Metabolism, held in Milan, Italy in 1980.7 Few in the medical or scientific communities took notice. Italian researchers followed up with several small clinical trials that confirmed the preliminary reports.6,8,9 An excellent cholesterol and triglyceride lowering agent that is safe and free of side-effects, pantethine remains, for the most part, ignored by mainstream science, although its usage is growing in alternative medicine circles. Pantethine it will no doubt prove to be one of the most important supplements for maintaining healthy blood fat levels.

    Niacin

    When taken in high enough doses, niacin (vitamin B3) substantially lowers cholesterol. This has been known to medical science for many years.10 studies on niacin as a cholesterol-lowering agent go back to the 1950's. There was a fair amount of initial enthusiasm for niacin because it improves, unlike most lipid-lowering drugs, all parameters of the blood lipid profile. Niacin reduces total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. It also raises HDL cholesterol quite well. Interest in niacin has faded, in part because the necessary dose, 1200 milligrams a day or more, can cause flushing and gastrointestinal disturbances. Very high doses may be harmful to the liver if taken for too long.

    There is a solution to the side-effect problem with niacin which, again, has failed to gain widespread attention. Inositol hexanicotinate is a flush-free form of niacin composed of six niacin molecules bonded to one molecule of inositol, another B-complex nutrient. Absorbed as an intact structure, inositol hexanicotinate is metabolized slowly, releasing free niacin into the bloodstream over a period of hours following ingestion.11 Inositol hexanicotinate has all the benefits of niacin for controlling blood fats. The flushing effect of ordinary niacin, which metabolizes much more rapidly, does not occur. Taking as much as four grams per day has not been reported to raise liver enzymes or cause other side-effects, but prudence dictates that people with liver problems should avoid very high doses of inositol hexanicotinate, or any form of niacin.12

    Tocotrienols

    We often think of vitamin E as synonymous with d-alpha tocopherol. Vitamin E is actually a whole family of compounds that includes various tocopherols and a group of lesser known but highly beneficial substances called "tocotrienols." All have vitamin E activity. Tocotrienols are similar in chemical structure to tocopherols, but they have important differences which give them unique and highly beneficial properties for human health.

    Vitamin E is one of the most recognized antioxidants, nutrients that deactivate potentially toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism known as free radicals. Vitamin E neutralizes peroxides, which result from the free radical oxidation of lipids, making it a key antioxidant in cell membranes. While d-alpha tocopherol has generally been regarded as the form of vitamin E with the strongest antioxidant activity, tocotrienols are even stronger.

    The tocotrienol story is another example of a natural product slow to gain recognition. A Univeristy of California research team discovered that d-alpha tocotrienol is over six times more effective than d-alpha tocopherol at protecting cell membranes against free radical damage.13 In the presence of vitamin C, which recycles vitamin E-like compounds, its antioxidant activity is 40 to 60 times higher than d-alpha tocopherol. This study was published in 1991. Its safe to say few cardiac physicians know about tocotrienols, and we have yet to see 60 Minutes do a piece on "the powerful new form of vitamin E."

    It would be a tremendous service to public health if they did, because the benefits of tocotrienols go far beyond their stellar antioxidant ability. Tocotrienols also lower total cholesterol and LDL, by impressive percentages. In one double-blind controlled study, tocotrienols reduced total cholesterol by 16 percent and LDL by 21 percent after twelve weeks. Another study recorded drops of 15 to 22 percent in total cholesterol along with 10 to 20 percent decreases in LDL levels.14 Now appearing on health food store shelves, tocotrienols are a health-protecting nutrients whose long overdue time has come. Derived from food oils such as palm oil and rice bran oil, tocotrienols have the same lack of toxicity as ordinary vitamin E.

    References

    1. Satyavati, G. Gugulipid: a promising hypolipidaemic agent from gum guggul (Commiphora wightii). Economic and Medicinal Plant Research 1991;5:47-82.

    2. Dev, S. A modern look at an age-old Ayurvedic drug—guggulu. Science Age July 1987:13-18.

    3. Nityanand, S., Srivastava, J.S., Asthana, O.P. Clinical trials with gugulipid. J. Ass. Physicians of India 1989;37(5):323-28.

    4. Agarwal, R.C. et. al. Clinical trial of gugulipid—a new hypolipidemic agent of plant origin in primary hyperlipidemia. Indian J Med Res 1986;84:626-34.

    5. 'Gugulipid' Drugs of the Future 1988;13(7):618-619.

    6. Maggi, G.C., Donati, C., Criscuoli, G. Pantethine: A physiological lipomodulating agent, in the treatment of hyperlipidemias. Current Therapeutic Research 1982;32(3):380-86.

    7. Kimura, S., Furukawa, Y., Wakasugi, J. Effects of pantethine on the serum lipoprotiens in rats fed a high cholesterol diet (Abstract) Seventh International Symposium on Drugs Affecting Lipid Metabolism, Milan, Italy, 1980.

    8. Arsenio, L. Bodria, P. Effectiveness of long-term treatment with pantethine in patients with dyslipidemia. Clinical Therapeutics 1986;8(5):537-45.

    9. Avogaro, P. Bittolo Bon, G. Fusello, M. Effect of pantethine on lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins in man. Current Therapeutic Research 1983;33(3):488-93.

    10. Crouse, J.R. New developments in the use of niacin for treatment of hyperlipidemia: new considerations in the use of an old drug. Coronary Artery Disease 1996;7(4):321-26.

    11. Welsh, A.L. Ede, M. Inositol hexanicotinate for improved nicotinic acid therapy. International Record of Food Medicine 1961;174(1):9-15.

    12. "Inositol hexaniacinate" (Monograph). Alternative Medicine Review 1998;3(3):222-3.

    13. Serbinova, E., et. al. Free radical recycling and intramembrane mobility in the antioxidant properties of alpha-tocopherol and alpha tocotrienol. Free Radical Biology and Medicine 1991;10:263-275.

    14. Qureshi, N. Qureshi, A.A. Tocotrienols: Novel Hypercholesterolemic Agents with Antioxidant Properties. in 'Vitamin E in Health and Disease' Lester Packer and Jürgen Fuchs, Editors. 1993; New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.

    Control Cholesterol with the following Supplements

  • Policosanol -- Reduces Production of Cholesterol by the Liver
  • Red Yeast Rice -- Reduces production of cholesterol like pharmaceutical Statins on the market today
  • Sytrinol -- Lowers Cholesterol by reducing production of cholesterol in the body like Statins on the market today
  • Fiber -- Helps elimate waste and reduce cholesterol


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    VitaNet ® Staff

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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 09, 2005 11:35 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

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