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Search Term: " Acetyl-L-Carnitine "

  Messages 1-13 from 13 matching the search criteria.
Boost Energy With CoQ10 And L-Carnitine Darrell Miller 11/21/13
How does Acetyl-L-Carnitine Help With Heart Health? Darrell Miller 2/21/11
Natural Vitamins for the Heart Darrell Miller 7/6/10
Thrombophlebitis Darrell Miller 4/15/09
Boost Memory Darrell Miller 3/23/09
Alpha Lipoic Acid is a Powerful Antioxidant Darrell Miller 2/15/08
Benefits of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Darrell Miller 2/12/06
Acetyl L-Carnitine & Alpha Lipoic Acid - For Cellular Vitality Darrell Miller 6/24/05
Thanks for the Memory Darrell Miller 6/11/05
Diet Phen - Dietary Supplement and weight Loss ... Darrell Miller 6/1/05
Re: Acetyl-L-Carnitine - Anti-Aging Brain Nutrient ... Darrell Miller 5/31/05
Glycerylphosphorylcholine Darrell Miller 5/24/05
Glycerylphosphorylcholine -- Supports Cognitive Function in AD ... Darrell Miller 5/24/05



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Boost Energy With CoQ10 And L-Carnitine
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Date: November 21, 2013 08:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Boost Energy With CoQ10 And L-Carnitine

CoQ10 and L-Carnatine

 L-CarnatineCoQ10 and L-Carnitine offer double protection for the heart and the brain in just a single tablet. You obtain all benefits for your heart at 100% from CoQ10, while L-Carnitine supports your memory, learning ability, and focus. The exclusive combination of CoenzymeQ10 and L-Carnitine encloses an absorbable, water soluble capsule of CoQ10 and L-Carnitine, which is important for proper usage.

Why are CoQ10 and L-Carnitine Supportive in Energy Boost?

CoQ10 Energy Boost

CoQ10 is a vital nutritional element found in all body cells, in particular the mitochondria, in which most energy is generated. The major function of this coenzyme is to assist in the process of oxygen and food conversion into energy. As people grow older their ability to naturally, to produce this coenzyme decays.

At the same time as Coenzyme Q10 is taking part in the production of energy in each cell of your body, it is considered be remarkably imperative for the high energy requirements of the heart. The heart needs vast energy amounts, because it is the hardest worker in your entire body. Coenzyme Q10 seems to be indispensable for this process. It offers you sufficient antioxidant provision, protecting the body cells from damage of the free radicals, and proffering a dynamic function of the immune system.

L-Carnitine Energy Boost

L-Carnitine transports indispensable fat acids into the same organ where CoQ10 plays its major function - the mitochondria. There, with the help of L-Carnitine, all fatty acids are turned into energy. However, the beneficial function of L-Carnitine does not end here. In addition, it also supports the transportation of toxins outside the body. You can think of the problems that might occur if these vital body processes are not fully operational. At the same time however, the major impact of L-Carnitine over the body is directed towards the brain:
  • Cognitive function and concentration support
  • Cell membrane health support
  • Improves clarity and happiness
Encouraging the overall health of your brain, while offering your heart supreme support, the combination of CoQ10 and L-Carnitine is the best solution for you, in terms of:
  • Supporting your heart's energy needs
  • Providing essential nutrition for all cells of the body
  • Delivering powerful antioxidants, which protect your body
References:
  1. //www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-failure/tc/coenzyme-q10-topic-overview
  2. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1026-L-CARNITINE.aspx?activeIngredientId=1026&activeIngredientName=L-CARNITINE
  3. //www.poliquingroup.com/ArticlesMultimedia/Articles/Article/767/Top_12_Reasons_to_Use_Carnitine.aspx
  4. //nutritionalengineering.org/coq10-Acetyl-L-Carnitine-supplement.htm
  5. //www.livestrong.com/article/489829-why-should-i-take-l-carnitine-with-coq10/

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How does Acetyl-L-Carnitine Help With Heart Health?
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Date: February 21, 2011 02:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How does Acetyl-L-Carnitine Help With Heart Health?

Acetyl L Carnitine And Heart Health

Acetyl-L-Carnitine is a form of the chemical compound carnitine, which is active in the human body as the amino acid L-carnitine. It is an organic substance that is naturally occurring in mammals and many other animals, and it is released from the liver and kidneys to every tissue in the body. While our body is capable of manufacturing this amino acid, there are factors involved in its depleting levels at certain times, and thus it is made available as a nutritional supplement. Today it is primarily used as a treatment for heart diseases and other cardiovascular problems.

Helps Break Down Fats

One of the many factors that influence heart tissues is high levels of free fatty acids in the blood. Popular health magazines and the mainstream press have labeled transports of fat-soluble bioactive compounds in the water-based bloodstream as bad cholesterol, but free fatty acids are also to blame for the buildup of fatty debris in the blood vessel linings, resulting in the thickening of walls characteristic of many cases of heart diseases.

The body has a mechanism to utilize these fats more effectively in the presence of Acetyl-L-Carnitine, which is quite active as soon as it enters the cells of any tissue, notably muscle and skeletal tissues. Free fatty acids are formed as a by-product of triglycerides that remained in the blood, but once they pass the cell membranes, they can be a source of energy far more powerful than that produced from glucose. Acetyl-L-Carnitine makes it possible for these fatty molecules to be converted into energy.

Maintains Heart Wellness

Every cell has its own form of storage fuel, and glucose and its metabolites are probably the best known. However, tissues of the heart and the muscles prefer fatty acids. As you might have surmised, tissues found in the heart and those that build the form of our physique, classified as cardiac and skeletal respectively, needs more energy than other tissues of our body. The skeletal muscles are directly involved in daily physical exertion whereas the heart is, of course, in constant movement.

Fatty acids yield adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, the form of energy at the cellular level, which is in general more than two times the energy produced from either carbohydrates or proteins. This is one of the reasons why fatty acids can keep up with the hard work associated with cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. The absence of energy required for the healthy functioning of the heart leads to cell death and affects the heart’s ability to pump blood as described in cases of heart failure.

Promotes High Bioavailability

Acetyl-L-Carnitine has been touted to be more absorbable and ultimately incorporated in body tissues more effectively than other forms of carnitine. It is a known fact that acetylating organic molecules increases the effectiveness of administered doses, and this remains true with Acetyl-L-Carnitine, the reason why it is widely applied in serious medical conditions concerning the heart.

If you have heart problems, give Acetyl-L-Carnitine a try risk free.

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Natural Vitamins for the Heart
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Date: July 06, 2010 02:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Vitamins for the Heart

It has been consistently revealed by epidemiological research that individuals with a high dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins have a risk that is lower-than-average of cardiovascular disease. This evidence seems to be especially consistent for vitamin E. Additionally, many clinical studies show that magnesium supplementation is of significant benefit in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and in reversing the depletion of potassium that comes along with a magnesium deficit. Many cardiovascular events like angina pectoris, congestive heart failure, and cardiomyopathy are related directly to low magnesium status. Coenzyme Q10 is an essential component in cellular energy production. This nutrient is also prevalent in the heart muscle. When tissue levels of CoQ10 are low, there is an association with several cardiovascular complications. Among these are angina, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and mitral valve prolapse. Research has found that the trio of coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, and magnesium plays a crucial role in the maintenance of cardiac health and the prevention of disease states.

The cardio-protective effect of vitamin E seems to come from its ability to bind to LDL cholesterol, which protects it from free-radical induce oxidative damage along with the consequent buildup of atherogenic plaque. Low levels of vitamin E in the blood are a predictive factor of heart health almost 70% of the time.

Studies on the general population have suggested that there is a link between the intake of calcium and blood pressure. Although results of the studies have not been consistent, there are several studies showing that calcium supplementation can lower blood pressure in those individuals who experience hypertension. Overall, those intakes of calcium that are sub-optimal contribute directly to hypertension. It seems that dietary calcium reduces blood pressure by normalizing intracellular calcium levels.

Supplementation with magnesium is of benefit for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and the prevention of potassium depletion. Both magnesium and potassium play an important role in the functioning of the heart. Several studies have found that there is improvement in heart function in those patients that have cardiomyopathies when they supplement with magnesium. Since magnesium acts in so many ways to enhance cardiac function and optimize cellular metabolism, magnesium is widely recognized as a critical nutrient for general cardiac support.

Several double-blind studies have taken place in those patients that experience various cardiomyopathies in order to show the benefits of CoQ10 supplementation. One study reported an 89% improvement rate in 80 cardiomyopathy patients who were treated with CoQ10. The coenzyme also appears to moderate blood pressure through the usual mechanism, as it lowers cholesterol levels and also stabilizes the vascular system with its antioxidant properties. Because of this, it is able to reduce vascular resistance. Several studies on CoQ10 supplementation have confirmed that this nutrient posses the ability lower both systolic and diastolic pressures by up to ten percent.

There are other nutrients that play important roles in optimizing cardiovascular health and reducing hypertension. Among these nutrients are gamma tocopherol, calcium, magnesium, l-carnitine, Acetyl-L-Carnitine, procyanidolic oligomers, phenolic compounds, and lycopene. As you can see there are many natural supplements that can help the cardiovascular system. Remember to always consult your doctor before adding supplements to your diet while on prescription drugs. Look to your local or internet health food store for quality vitamins, herbs, and specialty formulas to boost your health and wellness.

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Thrombophlebitis
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Date: April 15, 2009 01:20 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Thrombophlebitis

Thrombophlebitis is when inflammation occurs in the veins due to the formation of a blood clot in that vein. This problem usually occurs in the extremities, especially the legs. Thrombophlebitis can be considered superficial if it affects the subsutaneous vein, which is one of the veins near the skin’s surface.

In superficial thrombophlebitis, the affected vein can be felt and may be seen as a reddish line under the skin. Additionally, swelling, pain, and tenderness to touch can occur. If widespread vein involvement is included, the lymphatic vessels may become inflamed. Superficial thrombophlebitis is a relatively common disorder that can be brought about by trauma infection, standing for long periods of time, lack of exercise, and intravenous drug use. The risk of superficial thrombophlebitis can be increased by pregnancy, varicose veins, obesity, and smoking. Thrombophlebitis can also be associated with environmental sensitivities to allergies. This condition is usually diagnosed according to physical findings and a medical history that indicates an increased risk.

Deep thrombophlebitis (DVT) affects the intramuscular veins farther below the skin’s surface. DVT is a much more serious condition than superficial thrombophlebitis because the veins affected are larger and located deep within the musculature of the leg. These veins are responsible for the transport of 90 percent of the blood that flows back to the heart from the legs. Symptoms of DVT may include pain, warmth, swelling, and bluish discoloration of the skin of the affected limb. These symptoms are often accompanied by fever and chills. The pain is typically felt as a deep soreness that is worse when standing or walking and gets better with rest, especially with elevation of the leg. The veins directly under the skin may become dilated and more visible. Inflammation situated in a vein in the pelvis is referred to as pelvic vein thrombophlebitis.

The reason or reasons for the formation of the clots in the veins are often unknown. However, in most cases, clots are probably the result of a minor injury to the inside lining of a blood vessel. If the vessel lining receives a microscopic tear, clotting is initiated. Platelets clump together to protect the injured area, and a series of biochemical events is initiated that results in the transformation of fibrinogen, a circulating blood protein, into strands of insoluble fibrin, which are deposited to form a net that traps blood cells, plasma, and yet more platelets. This results in a blood clot. Other possible causes of the formation of DVT include abnormal clotting tendencies; poor circulation; certain types of cancer; and Behcet’s syndrome, which is a condition that affects small blood vessels that predispose an individual to the formation of clots. The following factors increase the risk of DVT: recent childbirth, surgery, trauma, the use of birth control pills; and prolonged bed rest.

The following nutrients are recommended for the prevention and treatment of thrombophlebitis: Acetyl-L-Carnitine, coenzyme Q10, flaxseed oil, garlic, l-cysteine, lecithin granules, l-histidine, magnesium, MSM, Pycnogenol, vitamin C with bioflavonoids, vitamin E, zinc, and vitamin B complex. Additionally, the following herbs may be beneficial: alfalfa, pau d’arco, red raspberry, rosemary, yarrow, butcher’s broom, cayenne, ginger, plantain, witch hazel, skullcap, valerian root, ginkgo biloba, goldenseal, hawthorn, and olive leaf extract.

Natural vitamins are a great way to help prevent conditions such as these. If you suspect that you have thrombophlebitis, consult your doctor before trying to take the problem into your own hands. Natural vitamins such as the ones listed above can be found at your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Natural vitamins and herbs are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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Boost Memory
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Date: March 23, 2009 01:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Boost Memory

Our memory is as natural to us as breathing. An ability we all have, but don’t often think of, it doesn’t seem to cross our mind until we perceive that we are losing the ability. Memory lapses are an annoyance in themselves, but the anxiety that often comes along with them seems to be even worse. We often wonder if our memory problems are a symptom of some other problem like midlife depression, arteriosclerosis, or even Alzheimer’s disease. Although Alzheimer’s disease is a fairly common disorder among older people, one must realize that most memory lapses have nothing to do with Alzheimer’s disease.

Generally, it is believed that increasing age brings about an increased likelihood of developing memory loss. The mildest form of this illness is called age-associated memory impairment. This is characterized by one’s perception of his or her own memory loss and it is estimated that it is experienced by 40 percent of Americans over the age of sixty-five. Not all memory loss is attributable to aging, as occasional memory lapses are a natural normal part of life at almost any age, and are not likely to precede serious memory loss. With a proper diet, nutrition, and memory use, the memory should remain sharp and active well into one’s nineties or beyond.

One big reason why people suffer from memory loss is an insufficient supply of necessary nutrients to the brain. The life of the body is in the blood, as it literally feeds and nourishes every cell within our bodies. Only certain substances are allowed to pass from the bloodstream into the brain, thanks to the protective envelope that is known as the blood-brain barrier. If the blood is thick with cholesterol and triglycerides, the amount of nutrient-rich blood that can pass through the blood-brain barrier decreases. This can result in the brain becoming malnourished over time.

The functioning of the brain also depends upon substances that are referred to as neurotransmitters, which are brain chemicals that act as electrical switches in the brain and are responsible for all the functions of the body. If the brain does not have an adequate supply of neurotransmitters, or the nutrients to make them, it starts to develop something similar to a power failure or a short circuit. If you are trying to recall as specific fact or piece of information and your mind goes blank, it is likely that the above “short circuit” has occurred.

There are many other factors that are involved in the deterioration of the memory. One of the most important is exposure to free radicals, which can cause huge amounts of damage if the memory is unchecked. Alcoholics and drug addicts often suffer a great deal of memory loss, with alcoholics being notorious for huge memory gaps that occur even though they are conscious. Allergies, candidiasis, stress, thyroid disorders, and poor circulation to the brain can also contribute to memory loss, while hypoglycemia can play a role in memory loss as well, as the brain requires that the level of glucose in the blood fall within a specific narrow range. Wide swings in blood sugar levels affect brain function and memory.

The following nutrients are beneficial in dealing with and preventing memory loss: acetylcholine, boron, DMAE, garlic, huperzine A, lecithin granules, manganese, multivitamin and mineral complex, omega-3 fatty acid complex, phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl serine, SOD, vitamin A, vitamin B complex, vitamin B3, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, Acetyl-L-Carnitine, l-glutamine, l-tyrosine, coenzyme Q10, DHEA, DMG, melatonin, NADH, pregnenolone, RNA and DNA, Brahmi, ginkgo biloba, anise, blue cohosh, ginseng, gotu kola, and rosemary.

All of the above mentioned as well as formulas tailored to help improve memory can be found in capsule, table, or power forms. Remember, only look to name brands such as Solaray, Source Naturals and Natures Plus for quality products. Memory vitamins and herbs can be found at your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Vitamins and herbs are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.



--
Vitanet ®. LLC

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Alpha Lipoic Acid is a Powerful Antioxidant
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Date: February 15, 2008 02:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Alpha Lipoic Acid is a Powerful Antioxidant

The discovery of alpha lipoic acid at the University Of Texas Chemistry Department in 1951 was not heralded with trumpets of joy at the revelation of such a powerful antioxidant, but was instead largely ignored. This is largely due to the biochemistry involved not being fully understood at that time, but by the 1980s it was a commonly used supplement, recommended for several medical conditions.

Chemically, the substance is a 5-membered cyclic disulphide with a carboxylic acid grouping. Biochemically, it’s extremely powerful antioxidant properties are largely due to the fact that it one of those rare active molecules that are soluble in both water and fats, and in fact is the only such antioxidant currently know. One of the properties that this ability enables it to possess is to cross the blood-brain barrier, and apply antioxidant propertied to the brain.

Antioxidants are essential to human life in that they destroy free radicals. These are compounds with free unpaired electrons that destroy human body cells in their hunt for electrons to pair with. Electrons come in pairs in organic animal tissue, just as they do in organic compounds. However, under certain circumstances this pairing can become destroyed, leaving a molecule with one of its electrons without a partner.

The factors that lead to this situation are many and varied, and our own biochemistry can produce free radicals during the normal chemical processes of life. However, pollution can also lead to the oxidation processes that create free radicals, common such pollutants being cigarette smoke, vehicle exhaust fumes, pesticides and the like. Excessive exposure to the UV content of sunlight can also create free radicals as can eating barbecued and smoked foods, and exposure to carbon monoxide and peroxides. Even the biochemical conversion of glucose to energy in our bodies creates free radicals.

These free radicals can destroy body cells, including DNA, and can create conditions such as premature aging due to destruction of skin cells, destruction of brain cells, strokes, cancers, diabetes, atherosclerosis due to oxidation of LDL cholesterol that deposits in the main arteries of the body, stiffening of the joints and many other undesirable conditions.

Free radicals are destroyed rapidly by antioxidants: the reaction is very rapid and most are destroyed immediately they are formed before they can do harm. Fortunately, if your diet is well maintained, the body possesses many antioxidants such as vitamins A, C and E, and other substances such as Coenzyme Q10, flavanoids, xanthenes, polyphenols and carotenoids. Many of these are found in highly colored foods, and if your food is brightly colored, it should contain a good supply of antioxidants.

However, the problem with all of these is that they are either fat and oil soluble or water soluble, which means that they can either be freely carried round the body by the blood or have to be emulsified by the bile and transported via the lymphatic system that places restrictions on their effectiveness in certain organs of the body. The fact that alpha lipoic acid is soluble in both water and fats enables it to be carried to all parts of the body and to every organ, and can cross water/fat barriers that other antioxidants cannot do.

It can therefore be carried via the blood to the brain and carry out an essential antioxidant function within our brains. It took a long time for this property of ALA to be recognized and its consequent health benefits understood. It is, in fact, the ideal antioxidant. The substance provides many known benefits to the body due to its antioxidant properties and also helps the body to generate the maximum possible amount of energy from the blood glucose and thus improve the energy balance of your body.

However, it is with its antioxidant properties that we are most concerned here. One of the benefits of these properties is its effect in holding back the visible effects of aging on your body. Because it is both water and fat soluble, alpha lipoic acid can help destroy free radicals in every part of your skin; the areas served by the blood and the fatty and oily secretions are protected simultaneously by the same strong antioxidant. The end result is a reduction in the destruction of the cells through the dermis and epidermis and a reduction in the degree of wrinkling with age.

Its antioxidant effect in the brain renders ALA in great demand for reducing cognitive impairment with age. In fact studies have indicated that alpha lipoic acid can improve memory and brain function in the aging and the elderly. This effect appears to be increased by the synergistic combination of alpha lipoic acid and Acetyl-L-Carnitine that work together to prevent cognitive decline in the brain through the effect of free radicals.

There is evidence that during a stroke, ALA works synergistically with vitamin E to reduce the effect of free radical damage on the vulnerable brain cells, and so reduce the longer term effects of the stroke. Together with ALC, it also reduces oxidative stress on the mitochondria of cells and in so doing helps once again to reduce the effects of aging, and maintain the body’s capacity to generate energy from blood glucose.

Cardiovascular disease is the main killer of the western world, largely due to our diets, and this is especially true of the USA. Although Americans appear unable to change their unhealthy diet, alpha lipoic acid and Acetyl-L-Carnitine can be used to offset much of the damage done. ALA reduces the development of atherosclerosis through its antioxidant properties and the reduction of the adhesion of monocytes to the artery walls.

LDL trapped in the wall of the artery can be oxidized and enable monocytes to also enter under the surface of the arterial wall, where it changes into macrophages and ingests the oxidised LDL, causing the plaque that forms atherosclerosis. As the plaque thickens, the artery becomes increasingly restricted until the blood flow is significantly reduced or even stopped, causing cardiac failure or a stroke.

Alpha lipoic acid can prevent this free radical oxidation from occurring by destroying them before they act on the low density lipoprotein (LDL). Acetyl-L-Carnitine works with the ALA to achieve this, as does another substance known as carnosine. Between them, these three musketeers work to keep your arteries clear and your brain functioning as it should, though it is the ALA that is most powerful due to its oil and water solubility properties.

Although alpha lipoic acid is available as a supplement, either alone or in combination with Acetyl-L-Carnitine, it is also available from natural food sources. It is particularly rich in offal such as heart and kidney, and also in broccoli, spinach and brewer’s yeast. It is also available in beef, and it is here that burgers can perhaps repay some of the damage that it causes. However, it is not a recommended source since burgers still cause more damage to your health than any of their constituent nutrients can allay.

Like any other supplement, you should seek medical advice before taking any substance if you have a health condition. Nevertheless, the benefits of alpha lipoic acid are such that it is difficult to see it doing anything but good. However, please consult your physician if are taking other drugs.

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Benefits of Acetyl-L-Carnitine
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Date: February 12, 2006 01:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of Acetyl-L-Carnitine

Benefits

Supports cognitive function*

ALC has been studied for its effect on cognitive performance and emotional health in the elderly. In a single-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 481 elderly subjects exhibiting mild memory impairment improved their scores on a memory test after taking 1500 mg of ALC a day for 90 days.2 Hospitalized elderly people taking ALC have shown improvements in mental outlook.3 While ALC is not a treatment or cure for Alzheimer's disease, double-blind studies suggest it may help slow the rate at which early-stage Alzheimer's patients deteriorate.4 In particular, ALC seems to benefit short-term memory in these patients.5

Supports biosynthesis of acetylcholine, a key neurotransmitter for brain and nerve function* Brain function requires coordinated communication between brain cells. Brain and nerve cells ("neurons") communicate across tiny cell-to-cell gaps called "synapses." The passage of an electrical impulse from one neuron to the next requires a "neurotransmitter." When an electrical signal arrives at the synaptic junction, the neuron releases a neurotransmitter into the synapse. The neuron on the other side of the synapse contains receptors for the neurotransmitter; these receptors bind the neurotransmitter, triggering a series of chemical events that sends a new electrical signal down the membrane of the receiving neuron. Neurotransmitters work together like an orchestra to transmit information throughout the brain and nervous system. Acetylcholine is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the body, regulating activities of vital organs, blood vessels and communication between nerves and muscles. In the brain, acetylcholine helps facilitate memory and learning as well as influence emotions. ALC is structurally similar to acetylcholine, and brain neurons stimulated by acetylcholine are receptive to stimulation by ALC.6 It has been shown experimentally that ALC supplies acetyl groups for the biosynthesis of acetylcholine.7 ALC's hypothesized cholinomimetic (acts like acetylcholine) activity has led researchers to investigate its effects on mental function and emotional health.8

Helps supply the brain with energy by improving energetics in the mitochondrion*

The acetyl groups donated by ALC can be used to synthesize acetyl-CoA, the key substrate for energy metabolism in the mitochondrion. 9 Acetyl-CoA enters the Krebs cycle, the mitochondrial mechanism that generates cellular energy in the form of ATP. ALC easily crosses the blood-brain barrier, allowing it to play various roles in maintaining brain neuron (nerve cell) function. When given by oral administration, the concentration of ALC is increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid.10

Stabilizes intracellular membranes*

ALC was found to improve membrane phospholipid metabolism in early-stage Alzheimer's patients.11 Phospholipids are structural components of brain cell membranes that regulate neuron function. ALC donates acetyl groups that can be used to modify the functional activity of proteins in neuronal membranes.12 ALC thus plays a role in maintaining membrane function. ALC also increases membrane stability and structural integrity.13

Increases nerve growth factor production*

The body produces various specialized proteins called "growth factors" which are essential to growth and repair of tissue. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) protects neurons from death, prolonging survival of neurons in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is theorized that aging of the central nervous system is associated with a loss of NGF. ALC has shown the ability to reverse age-related decrease in the binding of NGF to its receptors in neuron membranes.14 Given to aged rats, ALC increases the level and utilization of NGF in the rats. ALC protects cholinergic neurons (nerve cells stimulated by acetylcholine) in rats from degeneration due to lack of NGF.15 These results, together with other data from animal studies, suggest that ALC positively influences NGF activity.16

Has a protective influence on brain neurons*

Several animal studies have revealed that ALC exerts a protective effect on neurons. In one experiment, brain cells from rats exposed to NMDA, a known neurotoxin, were protected by being simultaneously exposed to ALC.17 Rats injected with ALC were protected from mortality caused by the neurotoxin MPP+.18 ALC has been shown to raise levels of glutathione, a highly valuable antioxidant, in isolated mouse brain tissue.19 ALC prevents buildup of malondyhaldeyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation.20 ALC is also a chelator of iron, which can generate free radicals. It also reinforces antioxidant mechanisms in the brain.21 As a whole, data from test tube and animal studies, showing that ALC has a protective, restorative effect on brain neurons and neuronal energetic processes, suggest that ALC is an anti-aging nutrient for the brain. This hypothesis is supported by human studies demonstrating measurable benefits for brain function in elderly persons taking ALC by oral consumption.


Safety
Suggested Adult Use: 1 to 4 capsules daily.
ALC is considered safe and well-tolerated when consumed orally. ALC has been administered in doses as high as 3 grams per day for periods of two to six months, with no reports of serious side effects. Some patients have experienced occasional mild abdominal discomfort, nausea, skin rash, restlessness, vertigo and headache. The severity and incidence of these side effects are reported as minor.22

Scientific References
1. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-Carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
2. Salvioli, G. Neri , M. L-acetylcarnitine treatment of mental decline in the elderly. Drugs Exptl. Clin. Res. 1994; 20(4):169-76.
3. Tempesta, E, et al. L-acetylcarnitine in depressed elderly subjects. A cross-over study vs. placebo. Drugs Exptl. Clin. Res. 1987;8(7):417-23.
4. Spagnoli, A et al. Long-term Acetyl-L-Carnitine treatment in Alzheimer's disease. Neurology 1991;41:1726-32.
5. Rai, G et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Acetyl-L-Carnitine in patients with Alzheimer's dementia. Curr. Med Res. Opin. 1990;11:638-47.
6. Falchetto, S, Kato, G, Provini, L. The action of carnitines on cortical neurons. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 1971; 49(1):1:7.
7. Dolezal, V., Tucek, S. Utilization of citrate, acetylcarnitine, acetate, pyruvate and glucose for the synthesis of acetylcholine in rat brain slices. J Neurochem 1981;36(4):1323.30.
8. Passeri, M, et al. Mental impairment in aging: selection of patients, methods of evaluation and therapeutic possibilities of Acetyl-L-Carnitine. Int. J. Clin. Pharm. Res. 1988;8(5):367-76.
9. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-Carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
10. Parnetti, L, et al. Pharmacokinetics of IV and oral Acetyl-L-Carnitine in multiple dose regimen in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type. Eur. J. Clin Pharmacol 1992;42:89-93.
11. Pettegrew, JW, et al. Clinical and neurochemical effects of Acetyl-L-Carnitine in Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiology of Aging 1995;16(1):1-4.
12. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-Carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
13. Arduni, A, et al. Effect of L-carnitine and Acetyl-L-Carnitine on the human erythrocyte membrane stability and deformability. Life Sci 1990;47(26):2395-2400.
14. Taglialatela, G, et al. Stimulation of nerve growth factor receptors in PC12 by Acetyl-L-Carnitine. Biochem Pharmacol 1992;44(3):577-85.
15. Taglialatela, G, et al. Acetyl-L-Carnitine treatment increases nerve growth factor levels and choline acetyltransferase activity in the central nervous system of aged rats. Exp Gerontol 1994;29(1):55-56.
16. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-Carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
17. Forloni, G, Angeretti, N, Smiroldo, S. Neuroprotective activity of Acetyl-L-Carnitine: studies in vitro. J Neurosci Res 1994;37(1):92-6.
18. Steffen, V, et al. Effect of intraventricular injection of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium: protection by Acetyl-L-Carnitine. Hum Exp Toxicol 1995;14(11):865-71.
19. Fariello, RG, et al. Systemic Acetyl-L-Carnitine elevates nigral levels of glutathione and GABA. Life Sci 1988;43(3):289-92.
20. Calvani, M, et al. Action of Acetyl-L-Carnitine in neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease. Ann Ny Acad Sci 1992;663:483-86.
21. Calvani, M, Carta, A. Clues to the mechanism of action of Acetyl-L-Carnitine in the central nervous system. Dementia 1991;2:1-6.
22. Zdanowicz, M. Acetyl-L-Carnitine's healing potential. Continuing Education Module. New Hope Institute of Retailing. October, 2001.


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Acetyl L-Carnitine & Alpha Lipoic Acid - For Cellular Vitality
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Date: June 24, 2005 05:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Acetyl L-Carnitine & Alpha Lipoic Acid - For Cellular Vitality

You may not think that your good health is related to the vitality of your cells, but it is. Your body is comprised of billions and billions of cells that work together in complex systems to keep you healthy.

But each of these cells also has a unique life. A primary role of your body is to keep these cells healthy and vital in every part of your body throughout your life. And to stay healthy, each of these self-contained cells must produce its own energy – cells can’t borrow energy from each other. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to maintain these cells that are so critical to your good health.

Source Naturals, the science company, introduces ACETYL L-CARNITINE & ALPHA LIPOIC ACID for your cellular vitality. It contains alpha lipoic acid and acetyl L-carnitine, two compounds that can support your cellular vitality for your better overall health.

For Cellular Vitality

ACETYL L-CARNITINE & ALPHA LIPOIC ACID is a groundbreaking new combination of two amazing nutrients, alpha lipoic acid and acetyl L-carnitine, that support your body’s own system for maintenance of cell function as you age.

Alpha Lipoic Acid for Vitality

Alpha lipoic acid is a fat and water soluble compound that is naturally found in your body. It directly recycles vitamin C and indirectly recycles vitamin E to help your body maintain beneficial levels of these important and protective antioxidants. Alpha-lipoic acid also supports the immune system and healthy liver function.

One of the most important roles alpha lipoic acid plays in your body is its role in cellular energy production. Alpha-lipoic acid is a coenzyme that assists in the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coA. Acetyl-coA is the beginning point for the Krebs cycle, one of the body's main energy production cycles, which produces the high-energy molecule ATP (adenosine triphosphate). By supporting the Krebs cycle, alpha lipoic acid supports your cellular vitality.

Acetyl L-Carnitine for Vitality

Acetyl L-carnitine is a nutrient for your mind and your body. Medical experts believe that this form of carnitine, derived from an amino acid, is the most bioavailable form available. It supports your body’s synthesis of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that is critical for learning and memory. One of the most important functions that acetyl L-carnitine performs in your body is its role in supporting cellular energy. This critical biochemical compound transports longchain fatty acids into the mitochondria in your cells. Cellular mitochondria are where these fatty acids are used to generate ATP, the metabolic energy for your cellular vitality.

Join the Wellness Revolution

Your life can seem to move at a dizzying pace. You might not have a lot of time to focus on your good health, and mainstream medicine doesn’t always incorporate the scientific advances of recent decades into their health recommendations for you. But you can benefit from new information right now by shopping for products like ACETYL L-CARNITINE& ALPHA LIPOIC ACID at your local health food stores and outlets, the only places where you will find these groundbreaking products to support your lifelong vitality.

References

Packer L et al. (1995). Alpha-Lipoic Acid as a Biological Antioxidant. Free Radical Biology and Medicine. 19(2): 227-250. Hagen T et al. (2002). Feeding Acetyl-L-Carnitine and lipoic acid to old rats significantly improves metabolic function while decreasing oxidative stress. PNAS. 99(4): 1870-1875. Kern M et al. (2003) Effects of Acetyl-LCarnitine and Lipoic Acid supplementation on physiologic and psychological factors in older men. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 35(5S): 267.



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Thanks for the Memory
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Date: June 11, 2005 03:49 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Thanks for the Memory

Thanks for the Memory by Estelle Sobel , February 6, 2002

Thanks for the Memory By Estelle Sobel

"I feel like every day, I lose my memory more and more. It started when I couldn't find my car keys, sometimes I forget directions. My mother has Alzheimer's so I'm concerned," says Jerry Solowitz, a 63 year old man.

Ellen Lerner, 37, sometimes worries that she can't keep track of everything in her job as a public relations executive. "I feel like stress can get to me easily, and I worry because I forget simple things like where I put a file."

Should these people be concerned?

"Yes," says Lynda Toth, Ph.D., co-author with Pavel Yutsis, M.D., of Why Can't I Remember? Reversing Memory Loss (Avery, 1999).

Jerry should start a specific program with a health practitioner who specializes in memory loss, due to lots of unsuspected new causes for memory dysfunction. Ellen needs to make lifestyle changes, as stress can definitely lead to memory loss.

"Cortisol, which is one of the stress hormones, can be harmful because it keeps calcium in the memory pathway too long and destroys the neurons, which is very damaging to the brain," notes Toth.

Why Does Memory Fail?

Memory fails for several reasons, says Augustine DiGiovanna, M.D., author of Human Aging: Biological Perspectives, (McGraw-Hill 2000), and Professor of Biology at Salisbury State University in Salisbury, MD.

Normal Aging: Much of diminished memory as we age is due to reduced blood flow to the brain from atherosclerosis, which is hardening and narrowing of the arteries. Decreased blood flow causes neurons to shrink and function less effectively.

Also, as we age we lose neurons and neuron connections that can lead to memory loss. So the way people think, how much they remember, and the mental activities they do determine how many brain cells survive through the years.

Finally, as people live longer, the chance is greater that the body's immune system and other defense mechanisms won't be able to protect against certain diseases that affect the brain and memory (Parkinson's, strokes, Alzheimers, atherosclerosis).

A Starving Brain: The brain is not getting fed the nutrients it needs (vitamins, minerals, amino acids, glucose). Without the right "food" the brain's energy levels become lowered and stop powering the memory cells. Then, free radicals can do more dirty work and continue to rust memory cells.

Drink And Sink: Alcohol passes through the blood-brain barrier and slows down the processing of information between memory neurons. Memory loss increases over time, as memory tissues shrink.

Sad Stories: Depression can imbalance the neurotransmitters and electrical charges of neurons.

Tense and Tight: High blood pressure can constrict and narrow blood vessels, limiting blood and oxygen flow to the brain.

Memory-Sustaining Supplements

One way to boost brain power is to take the right supplements.

Ginkgo biloba: The powerful medicinal herb ginkgo biloba increases blood flow and circulation to the head by dilating blood vessels in the brain, allowing more oxygenated blood to get to the neurons. It also protects against free radical damage.

Research: Ginkgo biloba extract displayed a significant effect on helping the mental abilities of people 50-59 years old (Phytotherapy Research 13, 1999: 408-415).

Pregnenolone: This powerful hormone regulates the balance between excitation and inhibition in the nervous system and helps enhance memory and brain function, possibly by repairing a fatty substance that is part of the myelin sheath that surrounds nerve cells. Research: A St. Louis University School of Medicine study on mice showed that pregnenolone enhanced memory and helped mice to navigate mazes better.

Huperzine A: This herbal supplement is derived from club moss found in China; in purified form it inhibits the enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter produced in the brain that you need for memory.

Research: Studies conducted by Alan Mazurek, M.D., found that huperzine A in purified form improves memory, enhances focus and concentration and has been used to improve memory loss in Alzheimer's patients (Alt. Ther. in Health Med. 5 [2], March 1999: 97-98).

Another study in The Journal of Neuroscience Research showed that huperzine A is a potent inhibitor of cholinesterase, which penetrates the brain and produces a dose-dependent increase of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine, norepinephrine and dopamine in rat cortex (41, 1995: 828-835).

Phosphatidylserine (PS): This substance, which occurs naturally in nerve cell membranes, helps keep fatty substances soluble and cell membranes fluid and helps reduce levels of cortisone which are damaging to tissues.

Research: Phosphatidylserine encourages a sense of calm by raising the levels of alpha brain waves and increasing the production of acetylcholine (Neuropsychobiology 24, 1990-1991: 42-48).

Vitamin E: This potent antioxidant attaches to bad cholesterol and helps prevent free radical damage to cells.

Research: Age-related processes like memory function and problem solving can be affected by free radical damage. Several studies show that vitamin E might slow the effects of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (JAMA 282, August 18, 1999: 621). Acetyl-L-Carnitine: Increases cognitive performance because it rejuvenates cellular membranes of mitochondria, the storehouses of energy contained in every living cell.

Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Preserves memory tissue by increasing glutathione levels, which protect fat stores in neurons from being damaged.

Nine Ways to Remember

Dr. Lynda Toth suggests the following ways to make the most of what you've now got.

1) Power Up Your Smile. Remove dental fillings and replace them with porcelain or ceramic ones. The mercury in metal fillings may be harmful (some believe) and can affect the brain and nervous system, inflaming memory tissue and preventing the entry of nutrients into the cells.

2) Don't Be a Tin Man/Woman Avoid exposure to aluminum. Don't use aluminum pots to cook in. Aluminum accumulates in memory tissue, damaging cells. In fact, autopsies of Alzheimers patients show they have unusually huge amounts of aluminum in the brain. But no one knows where this aluminum comes from.

3) Eat Right. Eat organic and pesticide-free foods. Pesticides get into the cells and can damage DNA.

4) A Matter of Taste. Avoid foods with artificial coloring, monosodium glutamate (MSG, often called "natural flavors" or "natural seasoning"). Also avoid processed foods with taste enhancers called exito toxins such as l-cysteine and aspartic acid.

5) In the Raw. Make sure that your diet consists of enzyme-rich 50% raw foods (fruits and vegetables) to feed the brain. Eat less animal fats.

* Drink green juices to support levels of the brain's clean-up enzymes.

*Eat lots of fiber, which helps remove toxins from the body. Pick up psyllium fiber.

*Limit intake of processed sugar, caffeine and alcohol to lessen the load on the liver and pancreas.

6) Cut Bait. Watch the fish that you eat. Lots of ocean and inland-caught fish are contaminated with mercury. Go for deep, cold water fish such as cod. Avoid shark and swordfish.

7). Oil Up. Supplement your diet with omega-3 fatty acids, such as cod liver oil or flaxseed oil. These fats lubricate memory cells.

8) Work That Body. Stay fit and exercise. Exercise helps oxygenate the body, reduces cholesterol, and builds and energizes new memory cells which reduces wear and tear on the brain function.

9) Do Mind Games. Read, listen to music. Tune into different radio stations than the ones you normally listen to. Do crossword puzzles and a wide selection of word games which can stretch your brain and give it a tough workout.

Student of Life

You need to keep learning your whole life to keep your brain and memory in tip top shape. The brain is adaptable, and you are always building new neurons, says Dr. Toth, which means that there is no limit to how long it can develop. Anything that stimulates the brain will help it to grow. That's why as you get older it's even more important to take classes, start a new hobby, travel. In fact, the challenge of learning and doing new things (without stopping in a fit of frustration) causes your brain to grow, says Dr. Mazurek.

The Good News

As people get older, their brains may actually improve and repair themselves through a complicated process that is designed to eliminate faulty neurons that are prone to making mistakes. At the same time, brain activity goes on that results in the development of new and improved connections with neighboring neurons.

Research also shows that memory improves if you train people to have faith in themselves. (The brain helps those who help themselves.) Apparently, a confident perspective can encourage the brain to actually improve to the point where its new-found abilities may increase to the point where it fulfills expectations.

So keep your chin up and stay away from the artery-clogging saturated fat that can cut off the brain's blood supply. It's all in the attitude, says Dr. DiGiovanna. And, of course, the key to a long and happy life with your brain is also on the end of your fork and in that bottle of supplements.

Estelle Sobel, is the co-author of Beautiful Skin: Every Woman's Guide to Looking Her Best at Any Age (Adams Media, May 2000).



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Diet Phen - Dietary Supplement and weight Loss ...
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Date: June 01, 2005 12:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Diet Phen - Dietary Supplement and weight Loss ...

Diet Phen for weight Loss

Getting slim, trim and fit is no easy task. To do it you need adequate Energy, Nutritional and Emotional Support, and a Positive Attitude. Source Naturals puts them all together in the DIET-PHEN Weight Loss Plan. The plan includes an herbal-safe nutrient formula that combines optimal amounts of St. John’s wort with synephrine and green tea extract, plus L-phenylalanine and chromium. Meet your weight loss goals the natural way. Try Source Naturals DIET-PHEN dietary supplement in conjunction with the Diet-Phen Weight Loss Plan.

THE PLAN HELPS TO:

  • • Increase metabolic rate.
  • • Lose unwanted body fat.
  • • Boost energy levels.
  • • Build and tone muscle.
  • • Support a positive mental attitude.

    DIETING – It Starts in Your Head.

    Successful dieting depends on the right mind-set: you need a positive outlook and determination. When your head is in the right place, your body may follow. That’s why the DIET-PHEN Weight Loss Plan includes natural herbs and amino acids to help support a sense of active calm.

    ST. JOHN’S WORT – The CenterPeace of DIET-PHEN. In use since ancient times, Hypericum perforatum is a flowering herb highly valued for its positive influence on mental well-being. Known for its soothing effect, it seems to promote relaxation without drowsiness. Recent research has focused on the connection between hypericin (the principal phytochemical in St. John’s wort) and serotonin, a key neurotransmitter associated with mood. About 90% of your serotonin receptors are found in your brain’s emotional center, the limbic system.

    SYNEPHRINE, GREEN TEA AND L-PHENYLALANINE – Energize with an Attitude! Synephrine and green tea extract are added for that extra energy needed during dieting. The brain uses phenylalanine to manufacture dopamine and norepinephrine, two neurotransmitters that play an important role in drive and determination.

    ACETYL L-CARNITINE – Transporting Fat to the Furnace. Within each of your trillions of cells are thousands of tiny energy factories called mitochondria. They convert fats and sugars into metabolic energy. Acetyl L-carnitine supports this process by transporting fat molecules to the mitochondria.

    THE PLAN INCLUDES A DAILY SERVING OF 3 DIET-PHEN TABLETS TO PROVIDE:

  • • 900 mg of St. John’s wort, the traditional herb used to support a positive mood.
  • • 24 mg of synephrine and 300 mg of green tea extract, for energy.
  • • 500 mg of L-phenylalanine, an essential amino acid that acts as the building block for key brain neurotransmitters that support a positive mental attitude.
  • • 200 mcg of chromium, a trace element which may work closely with insulin to help facilitate the uptake of glucose into cells.
  • • 50 mg of acetyl L-carnitine, the bioactive form of this amino acid involved in cellular fat transport.
  • • 25 mg each of niacin and vitamin B-6, nutrients essential to the body’s production of serotonin.

    GET STARTED WITH THE PLAN ! Get DIET-PHEN dietary supplements and the Weight Loss Plan at VitaNet health food store.

    REFERENCES:

  • • Johnson, D., et al. (June 1992). TW Neurologie Psychiatrie, 6, 436-444.
  • • Johnson, D., et al. (1994). J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol, 7 (suppl 1), S44-S46.
  • • Pasquali, R. et al. (1987). International Journal of Obesity, 11, 163-168.
  • • Sabelli, H.C. (Feb 1986). J Clin Psychiatry, 47 (2), 66-70.
  • • Schulz, H. & Jobert, M. (1994). J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol, 7 (suppl 1), S39-S43.
  • • Stock, M.J. (1989). Infusionstherapie, 16, 282-284.



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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 31, 2005 04:39 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    Acetyl-L-Carnitine is truly a mind-body nutrient. It helps synthesize acetylcholine, the brain's principal neurotransmitter responsible for learning and memory. And it is a more bioavailable form of L-carnitine, an amino acid derivative that performs the vital function of transporting longchain fatty acids into the cellular mitochondria where they are oxidized to generate metabolic energy. Supplemental Acetyl-L-Carnitine supports the activity of brain cells that depend on acetylcholine. It can also reduce the metabolic waste products that damage cells over time. As one of the most important nutrients to help slow the aging process, Acetyl-L-Carnitine is at the heart of Source Naturals' commitment to empower people to take charge of their own health.

    Acetylcholine is the brain's principal neurochemical of thought. Neurons need it to communicate with each other, especially to create and recall memories. Acetylcholine is also involved in muscular coordination. At neuromuscular junctions throughout the body, it tells muscles when to contract. But the efficiency of cells that use acetylcholine naturally declines with age, partly because of decreased activity of the enzyme that synthesizes this neurotransmitter.

    Neurotransmitter Production

    Acetylcholine is created when the enzyme choline acetyl transferase (CAT) attaches an acetyl group to a choline molecule. CAT activity is heightened by Acetyl-L-Carnitine, which donates its acetyl group. Acetyl-L-Carnitine is made in small amounts naturally in the body, but its production begins to decline in midlife. In well-controlled human studies, supplemental Acetyl-L-Carnitine slowed the progress of mental decline by notably improving attention and memory. When supplemental Acetyl-L-Carnitine was combined with lipoic acid (a powerful natural antioxidant), significant improvement in memory was seen in animals. Researchers said that together the two chemicals "tune up" the mitochondria, the energy-producing organelles that power all cells. Mitochondrial decay is believed to be the primary reason for age-related deterioration of cognitive function and energy levels.

    Cellular Energy and Protection

    As the active form of L-carnitine, acetyl L-carnitine efficiently transports long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria where they are converted into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy molecule. Animal studies suggest that supplemental acetyl L-carnitine has a positive effect on energy generation as well as on the structural integrity of aging mitochondria. By supporting fatty acid metabolism, acetyl L-carnitine also helps reduce lipofuscin, a metabolic waste product composed of damaged proteins and rancid fats. The brown "liver spots" on some elderly hands are composed of this aging pigment that gradually builds up in cells of the heart, liver, brain, and lens of the eye.

    Muscle Performance

    Ninety-five percent of the body's carnitine is found in muscle cells, especially in the heart where mitochondria comprise nearly 50% of a cell's volume. During prolonged exercise, muscles have a high demand for carnitine because fats can account for up to twothirds of the energy burned. L-carnitine supplements can increase exercise endurance and reduce fatigue. Acetyl L-carnitine is also a key nutrient in Source Naturals' legendary neuroceutical formulas MEGAMIND™ and HIGHER MIND™. And because acetyl L-carnitine also generates the basic energy that affects all biological and mental processes, this mind-body nutrient is one of the few nutritional compounds with such a broad range of action in maintaining youthful functioning. Source Naturals ACETYL L-CARNITINE is therefore an essential part of a smart strategy to live well, age well.

    References

    Carta A. and M. Calvani. Acetyl-L-Carnitine: a drug able to slow the progress of Alzheimer's disease? Ann NY Acad Sci 1991; 640: 228-232. Hagen T.M. et al. August 4, 1998. Acetyl-L-Carnitine fed to old rats partially restores mitochondrial function and ambulatory activity. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95(16):9562-6. Liu J. et al. February 19, 2002. Age-associated mitochondrial oxidative decay: Improvement of carnitine acetyltransferase substrate-binding affinity and activity in brain by feeding old rats Acetyl-L-Carnitine and/or R-alpha-lipoic acid. PNAS 99(4):1876-81. Spagnoli A.U. et al. 1991. Long-term Acetyl-L-Carnitine treatment in Alzheimer’s disease. Neurology. 41(11):1726-1732.



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    Glycerylphosphorylcholine
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 24, 2005 10:05 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Glycerylphosphorylcholine

    Dietary supplement

    Abstract A dietary supplement for promoting healthy hormonal balance in adult human subjects, and especially in elderly subjects, that comprises a secretagogue for stimulating the release by the pituitary, and the conversion by to Insulin-Like G, in combination with 7-keto dehydroepiandosterone (7-keto DHEA). The dietary supplement also includes other interacting ingredients for delivering antioxidants for retarding damage at the cellular level caused by the presence of free radicals, and natural herbs for promoting physiological health.

    Other References Jamieson, J. et al., "The Role of Intermediates as an Alternative to High Injections," American College for Advancement in Medicine, (Oct. 30, 1997).

    Claims

    What is claimed is:

    L-lysine monohydrochloride, glycine, and gamma aminobutyric acid.

    L-dopa

    7-keto dehydroepiandrosterone

    resveratrol

    L-arginine

    Acetyl-L-Carnitine.

    L-glutathione.

    n-acetyl cysteine



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    Glycerylphosphorylcholine -- Supports Cognitive Function in AD ...
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    Date: May 24, 2005 09:52 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Glycerylphosphorylcholine -- Supports Cognitive Function in AD ...

    Cognitive Improvement in Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Dementia After Treatment with the Acetylcholine Precursor Choline Alfoscerate: A Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial Maria De Jesus Moreno Moreno, MD Instituto Nacional de la Senectud, Mexico City, Mexico


    This study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of the cholinergic precursor choline alfoscerate (CA) in the treatment of cognitive impairment due to mild to moderate AD (Alzheimer's disease).

    in both men and woman they consistently improved after 90 and 180 days versus baseline with adiministration of GPC three times a day, whereas in the placebo group they remained unchanged or worsened. Statistically significant differences were observed between treatments after 90 and 180 days.

    Keypoints:

  • improved cognition and global function
  • showed a statistically significant improvement after 90 and 180 days of treatment
  • Increased neurotransmission
  • With out treatment men and woman declined consistantly
  • references:

    Bartus RT, Dean RL III, Beer B, Lippa AS. The cholinergic hypothesis of geriatric memory dysfunction, Science. 1982;217:408-414. 2. Larson EB, Kukull WA, Katzman RL. Cognitive impairment: Dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Annu Rev Public Health. 1992;13:431-449. 3. Hofman A, Rocca WA, Brayne C, et al, for the European Prevalence Research Group. The prevalence of dementia in Europe: A collaborative study of 1980-1990 findings. Int d Epidemiol. 1991;20:736-748. 4. Blackwood W, Corsellis JAN, eds. Greenfield's Neuropathology. 3rd ed. London: Arnold; 1976. 5. Geldmacher DS. Cost-effective recognition and diagnosis of dementia. 5emin Neurol. 2002;22:63-70. 6. Perry EK, Tomlinson BE, Blessed G, et al. Correlation of cholinergic abnormalities with senile plaques and mental test scores in senile dementia. BMJ. 1978;2:1457-1459. 7. Perry EK. The cholinergic hypothesis--ten years on. Br Med Bull. 1986;42:63-69. 8. Giacobini E. From molecular structure to Alzheimer therapy. Jpn d Pharmacol. 1997;74:225-241. 9. Giacobini E. Invited review: Cholinesterase inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease therapy: From tacrine to future applications. Neurochem Int. 1998;32:413-419. 10. Brinkman SD, Smith RC, Meyer JS, et al. Lecithin and memory training in suspected Alzheimer's disease. J Gerontol. 1982;37:4-9. 11. Davis E, Emmerling MR, Jaen JC, et al. Therapeutic intervention in dementia. Crit Rev Neurobiol. 1993;7:41-83. 12. Amenta E Parnetti L, Gallai V, Wallin A. Treatment of cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease with cholinergic precursors. Ineffective treatments or inappropiate approaches? Mech Ageing Dev. 2001;122:2025-2040. 13. Sigala S, Imperato A, Rizzonelli P, et al. k-Alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine antagonizes scopolamine-induced amnesia and enhances hippocampal cholinergic transmission in the rat. Eurd Pharmacol. 1992;211:351-358. 14. Govoni S, Battaini E Lucchi L, et al. Effects of alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine in counteracting drug-induced amnesia: Through cholinergic and non-cholinergic mechanisms [in Italian]. Basi Raz Ter. 1991;21:75-78. 15. Canonico PL, Nicoletti F, Scapagnini U. Neurochemical and behavioral effects of alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine [in Italian]. Basi Raz Te~ 1990;20: 53-54. 191 CLINICAL THERAPEUTICS ® 16. Parnetti L, Amenta E Gallai V. Choline alphoscerate in cognitive decline and in acute cerebrovascular disease: An analysis of published clinical data. Mech Ageing Dev. 2001;122:2041-2055. 17. Venn RD. The Sandoz Clinical Assessment-Geriatric (SCAG) scale. A general-purpose psychogeriatric rating scale. Gerontology. 1983;29:185-198. 18. Di Perri R, Coppola G, Ambrosio LA, et al. A multicentre trial to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine versus cytosine diphosphocholine in patients with vascular dementia. J Int Med Res. 1991;19:330-341. 19. Frattola L, Piolti R, Bassi S, et al. Multicenter clinical comparison of the effects of choline alphoscerate and cytidine diphosphocholine in the treatment of multi-infarct dementia. Curt Ther Res Clin Exp. 1991;49:683-693. 20. Muratorio A, Bonuccelli U, Nuti A, et al. A neurotropic approach to the treatment of multi-infarct dementia using L-c~-glycerylphosphorylcholine. Curt Ther Res Clin Exp. 1992;52:741-75l. 21. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington, DC: APA; 1994. 22. McKhann G, Drachman D, Folstein M, et al. Clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: Report of the NINCDS-ADRDA Work Group under the auspices of Department of Health and Human Services Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease. Neurology. 1984;34:939-944. 23. Folstein ME Folstein SE. "Mini-mental state": A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. J Psychiatr Res. 1975; 12:189-198. 24. Loeb C, Gandolfo C. 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