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What Is Turmeric Good For? 10 Health Benefits of Turmeric | Turmeric Supplement Benefits Darrell Miller 2/13/17
Fight worms and fungus with black walnut Darrell Miller 9/6/16
Improve Your Skin Naturally with Tamanu Oil Darrell Miller 5/18/14
Oregano Oil, Can It Help Me? Darrell Miller 2/22/14
Castor oil Darrell Miller 12/29/13
Does your Health Depend On Colloidal Trace Minerals We Consume? Darrell Miller 10/28/13
Black walnut hull and its health benefits Darrell Miller 12/19/12
Fulvic Acid Darrell Miller 11/21/12
Hair health Darrell Miller 7/16/12
Can I Use Senna Leaves As A Laxative Daily? Darrell Miller 9/27/11
Goldenseal Root Darrell Miller 10/6/09
Sarsparilla Darrell Miller 7/31/09
Borage Seed Oil (GLA) Darrell Miller 6/10/09
Black Walnut Darrell Miller 6/5/09
Barberry Darrell Miller 5/13/09
Aloe Vera Darrell Miller 4/8/09
HERBAL FIRST AID KIT Darrell Miller 7/11/05
TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia) Darrell Miller 7/11/05
HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia) Darrell Miller 7/11/05
INFECTIONS AND GARLIC Darrell Miller 6/25/05



FORCES OF NATURE Ringworm
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What Is Turmeric Good For? 10 Health Benefits of Turmeric | Turmeric Supplement Benefits
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Date: February 13, 2017 10:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Turmeric Good For? 10 Health Benefits of Turmeric | Turmeric Supplement Benefits





It’s a quintessential spice in curry, a relative of ginger and one of the healthiest ways to add flavor and color to a home-cooked meal. Turmeric has been used to relieve everything from liver problems to depression to ringworm in folk medicine, but, like many alternative therapies, there’s not always much research to back up the ancient wisdom.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bS7XgByXWY

Key Takeaways:

  • Tumeric has anti-inflammatory,antiseptic, antifungal, antioxidant and antiviral properties.
  • Tumeric has many vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber and protein.
  • Tumeric is useful for healing wounds, and clearing skin, besides being an effective agent for fighting cancer cells, cholesterol, weight gain, arthritic pain, diabetes and more.

"Due to all these factors turmeric is often used to treat a wide variety of health problems."

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Fight worms and fungus with black walnut
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Date: September 06, 2016 02:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Fight worms and fungus with black walnut

Black walnuts are an astounding super food with numerous health advantages. With research and modern science, some nutritional elements have been discovered in black walnuts which make them efficient for multiple conditions.

Health Benefits

     These nuts contain an antifungal property which helps in treating ringworm, athlete foot including other fungal skin infections. The walnut powder can be smeared on the affected areas of the skin:

  •  Helps in treating other skin diseases such as eczema, acne, and psoriasis
  •  Treatment of cold sores, warts, and herpes
  •  It helps in reducing or stopping excessive sweating; they are thought to have an impact on overactive sweat glands and lessen the quantity of sweat produced.
  •  If you have sore throats, sores in the mouth and tonsillitis, gargle a mixture of black walnut extract and water to treat it.

Black walnut and Digestion:

     Black walnut hull tones and heals irritated intestines and recover the surrounding of the digestive track for efficient absorption and excretion.

     According to studies, cytotoxic compounds known as juglone have been found to be in black walnuts, and it contains an anti-cancer property which leads to the death of cancer cells.

     Black walnut extract aids in treatment of Candida yeast found in the body digestive system.

    Black walnut hulls, harvested green, are a renowned to lead in the prescription of pinworms, hookworms, tapeworms and other parasites in the intestines.


Refer to: //superfoodprofiles.com/black-walnut-benefits-health

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Improve Your Skin Naturally with Tamanu Oil
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Date: May 18, 2014 11:36 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Improve Your Skin Naturally with Tamanu Oil

tamanu plantWhat is a tamanu?

Tamanu oil is originated from Polynesia and prefers a salty and sandy soil, which is why it grows profusely near the sea. According to the native people, the best Tamanu oil comes from trees that grow near the coastal regions, better than those that grow inland.

Benefits of tamanu oil

The Tamanu oil is well known because of its healing properties, which can actually equal or even surpass contemporary skin care products. There are already scientific studies that the oil produce new skin tissues, as well as studies that support the natural antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-neuralgic, and antioxidant properties. Some of the ailments that Tamanu oil can treat include ringworm, itching, athlete's foot, dermaphytosis of the scalp or beard, burns and wounds. It also has a superb cicatrizing capacity that is far from other substances.

Cicatrization is the term coined for the process of forming new tissue. It is also amazingly effective for healing acne and acne scars, stretch marks, psoriasis, diabetic sores, blisters, sunburn, abrasions, cuts, burns, eczema, insect bites, herpes sores, fissures, and dry or scaly skin. It can even reduce or completely remove age spots!

One of the leading reasons tamanu oil profits skin is because of the oil holding an extent of lipids, including glycolipids, nonpartisan lipids and phospholipids, notwithstanding an exhibit of components not normally connected with different oils, including calophyllolide, that helps stop aggravation, lactone, which performs like an anti-infection, and calophyllic corrosive, which is an extraordinary type of vital unsaturated fat. An alternate segment, coumarin, adds to the mitigating impact of this astounding oil.

Generally, tamanu oil has received as being a germicide, a diuretic, an expectorant, an astringent in addition to a laxative. An alternate of the various tamanu oil ascribes is its ability to help mend skin conditions including sunburn, rankles, players foot, dermatitis, pimple inflammation, dried-out skin, rash, little cuts and bug chomps.

In Europe, now and again called Domba oil, it is been demonstrated to have a 70 to 75 percent rate of achievement in diminishing stiffness and scabies. In the Philippines, it’s utilized as an astringent for hemorrhoids. It is likewise significant on for administering to gout and ringworm. Loads of individuals additionally rub this oil into your skin to help for the torment coming about because of neuralgia; in addition to it can positively help decrease the visual appearance of scars and stretch imprints. It can help to treat diaper rash on a child.

Tamanu oil is normally utilized in numerous diverse skincare items as it is overall ingested by the skin and serves to keep skin feeling delicate. Unlike some other crucial oils, tamanu oil does not desert an oily film once you utilize it, in addition, it will not exacerbate slick skin. Some methods you do not generally need to hold up quite a while so you can get dressed in the wake of utilizing it to help make skin look velvety. Many individuals think about the emanation of this oil as being satisfying, then again it is just a mellow fragrance so it will not clash with any viable aroma you decide to utilize. Against maturing items, some of the time holds tamanu oils, because they are accepted to help recover your skin.

 

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Oregano Oil, Can It Help Me?
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Date: February 22, 2014 07:57 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Oregano Oil, Can It Help Me?

Oregano contents

oregano plantOregano oil contains powerful chemical substances that are responsible for its diverse medical applications. It contains a powerful combination of phytochemicals, flavonoids, and phenols that cannot be subdued by drug-resistant disease causing microorganisms. In addition, oregano oil is packed with considerable amounts of minerals, trace elements, and vitamins that make the body stronger and resistant to many diseases.

Benefits of oregano

Generally, oregano plant grows in harsh environments- conditions, which make it a good remedy for many stubborn health problems. To be precise, oregano plant grows in harsh environments in Portugal, Turkey, and Greece, where the soil is rich in minerals. The leaves of the oregano plant are crushed and distilled to get the oil, which is used for the following medical purposes.

Oregano oil is very effective in treating respiratory medical conditions such as pneumonia, colds, bronchitis, sinusitis, cold, and coughs. In most of the cases, antibiotics sold and bought in the drug stores are always not effective in getting rid of the viral cells that are mainly responsible for the majority of respiratory diseases. However, with oregano oil, it only takes a few drops to get rid of the viral cells from the respiratory tract.

Oregano oil is very important in the treatment of skin infections such as acne, ringworms, eczema, and skin rashes. The oil contains antiseptic chemicals that have the ability to get rid of all the bacterial microorganisms, which are responsible for various skin infections. In addition, the oil prevents the bacteria on the skin from multiplying and increasing in population.

Oregano oil is also used in the treatment of arthritis and herpes. The oil has an exceptional ability to fight and eliminate viral components in the body. As a result, it is used in fighting, killing, and eliminating Herpes Simplex Virus, which is responsible for herpes. Its anti-inflammatory qualities make it a good solution to arthritis and any other related problems.

Source

  1. www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266259.php

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Castor oil
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Date: December 29, 2013 05:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Castor oil

What is Castor Oil

castor oilCastor oil is an inflammatory and anti oxidant oil. A very pale yellow liquid extracted from castrol seed, with high concentration of unsaturated fatty acid,although with unpleasantand strong taste castor oil is used as medicine.

Benefits of castor oil

Castor oil have been found to help in many day to day problems, they include:

Yeast infection constipation: Castor oil has strong laxative thus very effective when it comes to constipation, you can mix with some juice to take away the bitterness.

Arthritis Natural remedy: Castor oil contains anti- inflammatory properties making it an excellent massage for reliving arthritic joints, nerve inflammation and sole muscles.

Acne: The medicinal content in castor oil makes the skin healthy and minimizes a menstrual disorder castor oil consist of ricinolec acid which is anti-inflammatory, oral consumption of 2 spoonful will reduce menstrual pains and other body pains.

Hair growth: Fatty acids and vitamin E aids in hair growth.

Anti allergic: Castor oil is anti allergic in nature thus helps in allergies related to skin ans naso-pharyngeal.

Increases immunity: Castor oil increases white blood cells thus fights infections.

Labor induction: When castor oil is given to pregnant female who are at full time pregnancy it induces labor by pushing of uterus contraction giving easy child birth.

Chemotherapy drugs: Castor oil acts as medium chemotherapy drug to some cancerous tumors. Castor oil is used to reduce warts, moles and cysts, apply castor oil with a pinch of banking soda and wait for the desired results. ringworm's known to be the most stubborn fungal infection castor oil has a compound known as undercylenic acid which is known to be effective in treating the fungal infections.

Castor oil thickens eye brows and eye lashes, since castor oil enhances hair growth just apply castor oil in your eye brows and lids everyday.

References:

  • www.stylecraze.com and //castoroil.org

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Does your Health Depend On Colloidal Trace Minerals We Consume?
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Date: October 28, 2013 11:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Does your Health Depend On Colloidal Trace Minerals We Consume?

 mineralsColloidal Trace of Minerals

Trace minerals refer to a type of mineral that the body requires for good health but not in large quantities. This type of minerals supports energy, metabolism, antioxidant protection and immune system function. Colloidal trace mineral supplements offer better absorption by the body due to their small size; they are 7,000 times smaller than one’s red blood cells. Colloidal minerals are specially-prepared so that the body can fully meet its nutritional needs. They are 98% absorbable by the body, unlike a number of mineral supplements, which are 8-12 percent absorbable. Since they carry a negative electrical charge, these minerals can pass through intestinal wall pores right into the bloodstream. Therefore, our health heavily depends on these minerals. Here are the major health benefits of colloidal trace minerals.

Supports Hair Re-growth

If you have hair loss due to mineral or vitamin deficiency, then it can be attributed to lack of colloidal minerals. Therefore daily intake of the supplement will help your hair to regrow within a couple of weeks. Remember that colloidal trace minerals are usually hard to absorb and so must be prepared well before the body can utilize them.

Antibacterial

Colloidal trace minerals, such as silver, are effective in protecting the body against various bacterial infections. According to a study, even a 5 ppm solution can kill the bacteria that cause typhoid. It can also help to fight gonorrhea. Researchers put the number of pathogens that colloidal minerals can fight effectively at over 600.

Antiviral

The activity of colloidal silver against virus makes it the ideal option for fighting flu and colds for people who don’t like the conventional medications. Moreover, a 2005 study discovered that colloid silver can inhibit HIV from binding to host cells.

Anti-fungal

Colloidal minerals help to treat ringworms due to their antifungal properties. It can either be applied topically or taken internally for this purpose. It can also prove useful in treating candida.

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Black walnut hull and its health benefits
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Date: December 19, 2012 12:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Black walnut hull and its health benefits

Black walnut hull, also called Juglans Nigra, is the hull or outer shell of black walnut tree. This tree is a native of North America. While the tree is easy to grow, it is quite rare. Its health benefits Black walnut hull has several health benefits besides its effectiveness in treating parasites and fungal infections.

Some of its health benefits are as follows:

It is used for treating inflammatory skin conditions like ringworm, eczema, blisters, and acne. It's also effective for wounds and bruises. It is used to treat diarrhea, constipation, candida and giardia. It has been proven to build tooth enamel due to its fluoride content, balance glucose levels, and also to treat impetigo and herpes. It can be topically applied on cold sores and herpes. It is an excellent source of nutrients such as potassium, magnesium, copper, sulfur, manganese, and silica. It contains Juglone, a very effective fungicide, bactericide, and parricide.

It contains tannins that help the body to fight bacteria and protect against diarrhea, blood disorders, tumors, stress, and even cancer. In addition, tannins can tone body tissues when applied topically. This makes black walnut hull useful for treating bowel inflammatory conditions, especially hemorrhoids. Tannins also help to eliminate microbes from the large intestine. It contains iodine, a very popular antiseptic. Iodine helps to maintain thyroid health. Since iodine contains antiseptic properties, it also helps to strengthen the natural immune system of the body. How black walnut hull kills parasites Perhaps the most popular property of black walnut hull is that it can fight intestinal parasites.

It is a popular vermifuge that helps the body to get rid of parasites. It is a laxative that expels parasites when cleansing the body. Its high juglone and tannin content also helps to oxygenate blood and get rid of parasites. This herb is effective against ringworm, tapeworm, pinworm, and other parasites.

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Fulvic Acid
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Date: November 21, 2012 03:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fulvic Acid

Fulvic acid is derived from humeric substances that are components of decomposing plants and animal material. It is available over the counter and is famous for its ability to cure various ailments. Fulvic acid gives soil its brown color and is extracted from humeric substances using sodium hydroxide.

Health Benefits of Fulvic Acid

  • Fulvic acid has antioxidant properties that remove free radicals from the body
  • It removes toxins from the body that could build up and cause diseases
  • It enhances vitamins and mineral absorption in the body.
  • Taking fulvic acid will help the body maximize its absorption of nutrients from food
  • Fulvic acid is used to dress wounds as a topical dressing
  • It contains anti-viral elements that help in healing shingles and ringworms

In cases of poisoning caused by poison ivy and oak, fulvic acid can be used to neutralize the poison effects. Fulvic acid is derived from the soil and provides the body with the nutrients it needs to maintain good health.

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Hair health
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Date: July 16, 2012 08:39 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hair health

Hair health

Caring for your hair can be quite tricky sometimes, especially if you happen to own a little longer strands than average. The joy of keeping hair is seeing it shinny, silky, strong, consistent and admirable luster that it comes with. However, archiving these properties is next to impossible if there happen to be one to two hair disorders or diseases interacting with your hair.

The commonest and perhaps most frustrating of the hair disorders is hair loss, whichever the cause, the results are nowhere near to pleasing. Other disorders and diseases that make our hair loss its admirable beauty and luster include; trichodystrophy, alopecia areata, Telogen effluvium, Androgenetic alopecia, Infectious folliculitis, Lichen planus, Lupus erythematosus, ringworms just to name but a few.

You must have noted that a lot of hair shampoos, conditioners and “hair food” gels use a lot of herbal additives nowadays for improvinng hair health. Use of herbs is a natural way that can restore dry damaged or diseased hair and stimulate faster growth of stronger hair strands. You may apply hair herbal solutions directly to your hair and scalp or you may consume them for shiny and healthy hair depending on the formulation. Herbs can also go as far as treating dandruff, hair loss and restoring your luscious locks.

Are hair herbal products safe?

Herbs are a natural and safe way of treating and restoring hair health unlike their synthetic counterparts, this does not however mean that they are completely safe for everyone. Some people may have allergic reactions from use of some herbs so if you suspect any possibility of an allergic reaction you may want to perform a little test before using the herbs. You can apply a small amount on your wrist and check after two days to see if there is any reaction before proceeding to use the particular herb. Be sure to consult with your physician especially if you are pregnant.

Common herbs used to restore hair health

Rosemary: according to experts, rosemary helps fight dandruff, stimulate rapid and strong hair growth, and bring back luster to your hair. To get the above benefits from this herb, you can add rosemary in foods, or formulate rosemary water through socking the foliage in a cub of warm water for some times. You can then use the resulting water to rinse your hair.

Horsetail: this herb is an excellent source of silica. Silica is good at strengthening the hair from its core while restoring the shine. Horsetail herb can be used through deriving a shampoo from its foliage. Add 2-3 table spoons of crashed horsetail leaves into ½ cup of hot water. The mixture is the added to baby shampoo. Use this to shampoo your hair regularly.

Aloe Vera: aloe Vera gel extract is known for its numerous medicinal properties such calming irritated skin in addition to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. When the gel is massaged into the scalp, it has the ability to restore the hair's PH balance while sealing in the hair moisture content and consequently acting as a perfect natural conditioner. Additionally, aloe Vera also stimulates hair growth and therefore used for Alopecia treatment.

Ginkgo Biloba: this is a well known herbal remedy for quite a number of health issues including improving blood circulation to the skin and brain. Due to this medicinal property, Ginkgo Biloba helps in delivering of extra nutrients to the hair follicles and promotes hair growth. It's therefore recommended by most health practitioners for hair loss treatment. Stinging nettle-this herb stops conversion of testosterone to DHT which is the major contributor of hair lose in men. Stinging nettle extracts and powders are available commercially and are most effective when used together with pygeum or palmetto. You can also make green tea from the dried and ground powder of its leaves.

Other similarly useful herbs for restoring your health include marigold, licorice, chamomile, parsley, birch and burdock.

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Can I Use Senna Leaves As A Laxative Daily?
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Date: September 27, 2011 12:52 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can I Use Senna Leaves As A Laxative Daily?

What Are Senna Leaves Good For?

Senna is a plant which belongs to the family of flowering plants known as Fabaceae. This plant can be abundantly found in tropical regions. This plant is considered to be a shrub. However, some seemingly looks like an herb or a small tree. Senna is one of the most commonly used herbal laxatives. Other names of Senna are Cassia Senna, Tinnevelly Senna, India Senna, Alexandrian Senna, and Khartoum Senna.

The active ingredients of Senna are called Anthraquinone and glycosides. As a laxative, the active chemical in Senna acts primarily on the large intestine, therefore, this herb has a promising effect in relieving constipation. Clinical studies have also reported that Senna can enhance peristaltic movement of the intestines. This is possible because of its irritating effect on the mucosal lining of the intestines.

To be specific, Senna is an effective laxative. It is categorized as a bowel stimulant or irritant. This type of laxative acts primarily on the mucosa of the intestines and stimulates the nerve plexus to influence water and nutrient absorption as well as reabsorption. This alteration will then lead to the stimulation of peristaltic activity of the bowel. Thus, digestive tract movement is increased and stool elimination is induced. However, this may not be safe under certain circumstances. For this reason, stimulant laxatives must be used cautiously and employed for a short period of time only. As a result, Senna can also be employed as one of the weight loss herbal agents.

Moreover, the leaf of Senna plant consists of essential oils which can potentially destroy harmful microorganisms that can cause skin irritations such as rashes, blisters and acne. In the traditional medicine, Senna leaves are prepared in the form of paste which is then applied on skin to treat ringworms and other skin infections.

In addition, another health benefit of Senna is its potent antioxidant property. According to chemical studies, Senna herb contains high amount of antioxidants. Antioxidants are important to the body because they help prevent diseases by way of eliminating harmful toxins from the body. One of these harmful chemicals is called free radicals. These kinds of substances occur naturally in the body as an end – product of biological reactions. Free radicals can cause interruption on cellular division by altering replication of DNA. Aside from that, it can also cause damage to healthy cells of the body, thus promoting illnesses and diseases.

With the several health benefits of Senna, it must not be employed as a substitute to prescribed medications. This herb is available in supplements. You can purchase this product in many health and drug stores or even Online. However, it must not be abused. More importantly, medical consultation must be done first so that adverse effects and untoward drug interactions will be avoided. Use Senna herbal supplement as labeled or prescribed. Like any other laxative, do not use this in large amount and for a longer period of time. This may cause dependence in which you cannot have a bowel movement without the use of such supplement or laxative.

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Goldenseal Root
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Date: October 06, 2009 01:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Goldenseal Root

goldenseal root plant Goldenseal was used by the Native Americans as a tonic, for sore throats, eye infections, ulcers, and even arrow wounds. It was also used as an insect repellant and pesticide for crops. When boiled in water, it was used externally for skin conditions. The dried root of the goldenseal plant was official in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1831 to 1842 and was readmitted in 1863 to 1936.

Traditionally, goldenseal has been used for many different conditions. Among these are boosting the glandular system, hormone imbalance, congestion, inflammation, female problems, infection, bronchitis, menstrual problems, catarrh of the bladder, gastritis, ulcers, bowel stimulation, antiseptic, and as an immune system builder. Those with low blood sugar or pregnant women should not use this herb.

Recent studies have determined that goldenseal is beneficial in fighting viruses and infections. This herb contains the alkaloids hyrastine and hyrastinine, which possess strong astringent and antiseptic benefits on the mucous membranes. The berberine that is found in goldenseal, and can also be found in barberry, Oregon grape, and goldthread, is effective in fighting infections of the mucous membranes, which includes the mouth, throat, and sinuses. It has also been found to kill toxic bacteria in the intestinal tract like giardiasis, which is found in streams of North America. Goldenseal can help to relieve diarrhea in cases of giardiasis, amoebiasis, or other gastrointestinal infections.goldenseal root plant

The alkaloid content of goldenseal gives it its antibiotic properties. Goldenseal has a long history of use for fighting both colds and flu viruses. The berbine content is effective as a natural antibiotic and immune stimulant. The herb may also help to prevent candida infection which is the result of antibiotic use. Goldenseal is thought to help strengthen the immune system and may work by increasing the blood supply to the spleen. This enables the spleen to function and release compounds which are known to improve immune function. Some herbalists in England consider goldenseal to be the wonder remedy for digestive problems. This herb is recommended for use after the onset of a cold instead of as preventative action. For this reason, it is often found in cold remedy combinations.

The rhizome and root of the goldenseal plant are used to provide adaptogen, alterative, anthelmintic, antibiotic, antiperiodic, antiseptic, cholagogue, emmenagoggue, hepatic, nephritic, stomachic,, and mild purgative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, copper, iron, manganese, phosphorus, potassium sodium, vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and F, and zinc. Primarily, this herb is extremely helpful in treating bronchitis, poor circulation, colds, colitis, colon problems, coughs, diarrhea, eye infections, gonorrhea, gum disease, hemorrhages, hemorrhoids, infection, inflammation, intestinal problems, kidney problems, liver disorders, excessive menstruation, membrane infections, mouth sores, nosebleeds, and sore throat. goldenseal root plant

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with allergies, hay fever, asthma, Bright’s disease, burns, chicken pox, constipation, earaches, eczema, fever, flu, gallbladder problems, gastric disorders, gastritis, glandular problems, heart conditions, herpes, membrane irritation, nausea, nervous disorders, ringworm, skin disorders, spleen ailments, tonsitilits, and urinary problems. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by goldenseal, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Sarsparilla
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Date: July 31, 2009 12:03 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sarsparilla

Sarsaparilla can be found natively growing in the Pacific regions of Mexico, along the coast to Peru. The root is commonly used to make root beer. The sarsaparilla plant is mostly a find. It can primarily be found in Mexico, Central America and South America. The root of the plant is the most valued portion. It has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries, much like ginseng or licorice root. Sarsaparilla root is very bitter. Because of this, it was a common practice for pharmacists to distill the useful chemicals from this herb and mix them with sugar water. From this, a very popular beverage called sarsaparilla was born. This was years before other chemists would invent other medicinal drinks like the original Pepsi and 7-Up.

The sarsaparilla plant was most definitely used as a medicinal tonic, but it was often served as a sweetened beverage. Some formulas substituted sarsaparilla root with a combination of birch oil and sassafras, which is a treat that is found in the western United States. Some believe that the informal name of the drink, sasparilla, indicates the use of sassafras extract, while others say the name is a corruption of the original sarsaparilla. Unfortunately, the modern beverage is closer to a birch oil/sassafras mixture than the more bitter sarsaparilla extract. The roots of the sarsaparilla plant can be purchased in certain grocery or health food stores. The beverage called sarsaparilla is a little more difficult to find. Smaller bottling companies may produce a version for local consumption, but that national interest in root beer, sarsaparilla’s cousin, has made it much harder to come by.

Often, sarsaparilla is used in glandular balance formulas. This is because components in sarsaparilla help with the production of testosterone and progesterone. The herb also stimulates the metabolism, aids digestion, and improves the appetite. It has been used to help with gas and edema, along with other related conditions. Additionally, studies have shown that this herb contains diuretic activity and also increased the elimination of chlorides and uric acid. Sarsaparilla is beneficial for many skin ailments. Among these are psoriasis, eczema, and leprosy. This has been found to be true in various studies. The herb also works as an anti-inflammatory by increasing circulation to rheumatic joints. It also helps to relieve arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. This herb also stimulates breathing when congestion occurs. It even helps to purify the blood.

The root of the sarsaparilla plant are used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, aromatic, blood purifier, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, febrifuge, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are copper, iodine, iron, manganese, silicon, sodium, vitamins A, B-complex, and C, and zinc. Primarily, sarsaparilla is extremely beneficial in treating joint aches and pains, arthritis, blood impurities, eczema, gas, glandular problems, hormone imbalance, inflammation, psoriasis, skin diseases, and syphilis.

Additionally, the herb is very helpful in dealing with age spots, appetite loss, cods, congestion, edema, sore eyes, fevers, gout, impotence, leprosy, menopausal symptoms, metabolism disorders, skin parasites, chronic rheumatism, ringworms, primary tuberculosis, and sores. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen to prevent prescription drug interaction. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by sarsaparilla, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

Sarsaparilla root is available in capsule and tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. It is recommended that you look for name brands like Solaray, Natures Way, and Natures Plus to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

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Borage Seed Oil (GLA)
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Date: June 10, 2009 11:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Borage Seed Oil (GLA)

Borage, often referred to as starflower, is an annual herb that originated in Syria. However, it was naturalized throughout the Mediterranean region and in Asia Minor, Europe, North Africa, and South America. The plant grows to a height of two to three feet, having a bristly hair all over the stems and leaves. The leaves are alternate, simple, and ranging from two to six inches in length, while the flower are complete with five narrow, triangular-pointed petals. The borage flower is most often blue in color, but occasionally pink flowers are observed. White flowers can also be cultivated. The plant has an indeterminate growth habit, which may lead to prolific spreading. In milder climates, borage will bloom for most of the year continuously.

Borage was often used to flavor wine drank by ancient Celtic warriors before going into battle because it held the reputation of enhancing both courage and strength. During the middle Ages, the leaves and flowers of the borage plant were combined with wine to relieve melancholy. The Roman scholar Pliny believed that this herb was useful for treating depression and lifting the spirits. John Gerard, a sixteenth-century herbalist, thought of borage as an herb to comfort the heart and increase joy.

In addition to its mood-boosting properties, borage is often used to treat bronchitis. This is because of its soothing effect and its ability to reduce inflammation and detoxify the body. Borage is known to help heal the mucous membranes of the mouth and throat and to stimulate activity in the kidneys and adrenal glands to rid the body of catarrh.

Also, borage is useful for restoring vitality during recovery from an illness. This herb is helpful for treating problems of the digestive system and has been used to increase quantity and quality of mother’s milk. Borage was traditionally cultivated for culinary and medicinal uses, but today it is commercially cultivated as an oilseed. The seed oil provides a desired source of GLA, for which borage is the highest known plant-based source. Virgin borage oil contains essential fatty acids, especially when they are in concentrations with gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). This fatty acid can account for as much as 26 percent of the oil’s content. It is best known for its source of concentrated GLA. The borage plant is known to stimulate the adrenal glands to help the body during stressful times.

Borage includes use as either a fresh vegetable or a dried herb. As a fresh vegetable, borage has a cucumber-like taste and is often used in salads or as a garnish. The flower has a sweet honey-like taste and is one of the few truly blue-colored things that are edible, making it popular for the decoration of dessert.

The leaves of the borage plant are used to provide blood purifier, diaphoretic, febrifuge, galactoagogue, and purgative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb include calcium and potassium. Primarily, borage is most beneficial in dealing with bronchitis, congestion, inflammation of the eyes, fevers, heart problems, absence of lactation, excessive mucus, PMS and rashes. Additionally, this herb is extremely helpful in treating blood impurities, colds, gastric disorders, insomnia, jaundice, lung disorders, nervous disorders, pleurisy, ringworm, and urinary problems.

Borage oil is available in softgel or bulk liquid forms at your local or internet health food store. Always purchase name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase. For more information on the beneficial effects of borage, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Black Walnut
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Date: June 05, 2009 10:13 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Black Walnut

Black walnut is a species of flowering tree in the hickory family. This plant grows mostly from southern Ontario, west to southeast South Dakota, south to Georgia, northern Florida, and southwest to central Texas. The black walnut is large tree that reaches heights of 30 to 40 feet. The bark is grey-black and deeply furrowed. The leaves are alternate are about 30-60 centimeters in length. The male flowers droop to about eight to ten centimeters long, while the female flowers are terminal and can be found in clusters of two to five. These flowers ripen during the autumn into a fruit that has a brownish-green, semi-fleshy hush, and brown nut. The whole fruit falls in October. Although native to the Midwest and east central United States, the black walnut tree was introduced into Europe in 1629. Black walnut is more resistant to frost than the English walnut, but it thrives best in the warmer regions of fertile, lowland soils with a high water table. The nuts are harvested by hand from wild trees, with about 65% of the annual wild harvest coming from the U.S. state of Missouri.

For centuries, black walnut has been used in Europe to treat skin ailments and constipation. Recent research has led to findings that support its use for skin problems like boils, eczema, herpes, and ringworm. Additionally, it has many benefits for the stomach that are well represented. Black walnut was used by Native Americans as a laxative. Additionally, black walnut was used as a remedy for diarrhea and dysentery during the Civil War.

Black walnut has also been used for syphilis, TB, varicose veins, chronic infections of the intestines, and urogenital problems. Black walnut is considered to be very useful for killing parasites, tapeworms, and ringworm by herbalists. This nutrient causes oxygenation of the blood, which kills parasites. This fact has been proven through recent research. The brown stain that is found in the green husk of the black walnut is known to contain organic iodine, which has both antiseptic and healing properties.

It has been determined by scientific research that black walnut contains astringent properties that are healing to the skin and mucous membranes of the body. Black walnut can be gargled to clean stains on the teeth as well.

The hulls and leaves of the black walnut plant are used to provide alterative, anthelmintic, antigalactagogue, antineoplastic, antiseptic, astringent, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in black walnut are calcium, chlorine, iron, magnesium, manganese, niacin, organic iodine, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silicon, selenium, vitamin A, B1, B2, B6, B15, C, P, and bioflavonoids. Primarily, black walnut is extremely beneficial in treating athlete’s foot, Candidiasis, canker sores, cold sores, dandruff, fungus, gum disease, herpes, infection, malaria, parasites, rashes, ringworm, and tapeworm.

Additionally, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with abscesses, acne, asthma, body odor, boils, cancer, colitis, diarrhea, diphtheria, dysentery, eczema, eye diseases, fevers, hemorrhoids, liver disorders, lupus, poison ivy, skin diseases, tonsillitis, primary tuberculosis, tumors, ulcers, varicose veins, and wounds. For more information on the many beneficial effects of black walnut, please contact a representative from your local health food store with questions. Black walnut is available in capsule and tablet forms at your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Black walnut is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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Barberry
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Date: May 13, 2009 12:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Barberry

The barberry plant is a shrub that has gray, thorny branches. This shrub can grow up to nine feet tall. The flower of the barberry plant are bright yellow and bloom between the months of April and June. These flowers then become dark, drooping bunches of red berries in the fall.

The use of barberry dates back approximately three thousand years, originating in China in India where it was used for the treatment of diarrhea and intestinal infections. The barberry plant was used by Native Americans for treating liver conditions like jaundice. Additionally, Egyptians mixed the berries of the plant with fennel seed to protect themselves from the plague. Barberry is made up of an alkaloid known as berberine, which can also be found in other medicinal herbs such as goldenseal and Orgeon grape. The therapeutic effects of barberry can be attributed to its berberine content.

Studies have concluded that berberine contains properties that are effective against a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. These studies also found that berberine was much more effective in treating some bacteria than even a strong antibiotic. Other studies have found that barberry has the potential to kill microorganisms including staphylococci, streptococci, salmonella, Giardia lamblia, Escherichia coli, shigella, and Candida albicans. The berberine in barberry has been noted to contain antidarrheal properties. This alkaloid is also recommended for stimulating the immune system.

The effects of barberry include helping against cancer, liver problems, kidney problems, coughs, cholera, diarrhea, fever, inflammation, hypertension, and tumors. Barberry has also been recommended to increase bile secretions and stimulate the appetite. This herb may also help in cases of anemia and malnutrition. Barberry stimulates bile production for liver problems and also dilates blood vessels to lower blood pressure.

Barberry is used in easing inflammation and infection of the urinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts, as well as candida infections of the both the skin and vagina. Barberry extract has also been shown to improve symptoms that are associated with certain skin conditions, such as psoriasis. However, more research is still needed on determining the reliability of these findings. Barberry is shown to be an extremely effective treatment for diarrhea. A few studies have found that barberry is able to improve symptoms faster than antibiotics. This is possibly because of its astringent properties. However antibiotics are still thought to be more effective at killing bacteria in the intestines. For this reason, it is best to use barberry to ease symptoms, along with a standard antibiotic, as bacterial diarrhea can have extremely serious consequences.

The bark, root, and berries of the barberry plant are used to provide alterative, antibacterial, antineoplastic, antiseptic, aromatic, astringent, blood purifier, cholagogue, diuretic, hepatic, hypotensive, purgative, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients provided by this herb include iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamin C. Primarily, barberry can be beneficial in dealing with loss of appetite, high blood pressure, impurities in the blood, candidiasis, constipation, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, indigestion, infections, jaundice, liver disorders, pyorrhea, and sore throat. However, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with anemia, arthritis, boils, breath odor, cholera, gallstones, heart problems, heartburn, hemorrhages, itching, kidney problems, migraines, rheumatisms, ringworm, and skin conditions. For more information on barberry or to make a purchase, along with its many beneficial effects, feel free to contact a representative at your local health food store.

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Aloe Vera
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Date: April 08, 2009 07:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Aloe Vera

There have been few herbs throughout history that have been valued as highly as the aloe vera plant. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years because of its medicinal value and therapeutic benefits. Today, it is widely used and cultivated all over the world. The aloe vera plant is a member of the lily family. However, it looks much more like a cactus plant. This perennial produces yellow flowers and has tough, stiff, spiny, and triangular leaves. This plant may grow up to twenty inches long and five inches across, while the leaves grow in a rosette with three layers.

Historically, aloe has been used by many people. This includes the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Hebrews, Chinese, Indians, Algerians, Moroccans, Tunisians, and Arabians. Records of folklore have indicated many medicinal uses of aloe, with recent research adding validity to the many beneficial uses of the aloe plant.

Traditionally, aloe vera has been used to treat wounds, frostbite, burns, radiation burns, and external pain. This herb also aids in digestion and combats constipation, inflammation, ulcers, kidney stones, and tissue damage from X-ray exposure and other forms of radiation. Aloe vera can prevent scarring and heal minor scars because it contains enzymes, saponins, hormones, and amino acids that can be absorbed into the skin. Aloe vera can also promote the growth of living cells. Aloe contains many substances that are referred to as uronic acids. These uronic acids are natural detoxicants which take part in the healing process by stripping toxic materials of their harmful effects.

Aloe vera is best known for its soothing and external healing effect on burns, wounds, and rashes. According to modern research, when aloe is applied externally, it can help speed healing and restore skin tissue. This is primarily because of the plant’s moisturizing effects. Aloe is easily absorbed into the skin, preventing the air from drying damaged skin tissue and helping to relieve the pain that is associated with both burns and wounds.

Many studies have found the positive effects that are linked to the use of aloe juice in the digestive process. Used in the digestive process, this herb can treat stomach disorders, ulcers, colitis, constipation, and other colon-related problems. Aloe can also help to soothe, reduce inflammation, and heal the digestive tract. One study found that ulcer patients can be completely healed with the use of aloe juice just as effectively as anti-ulcer drugs and without the chance of toxic side effects.

Aloe gel is made up of acemannan, which is a complex carbohydrate that possesses immune-stimulating and antiviral properties. The acemannan in aloe has shown antiviral activity against HIV-1, as it inhibits the reproduction of HIV-1. Aloe gel has also been found to be effective in fighting the spread of some viruses, like herpes, measles, and rhinotracheitis.

The primary applications of aloe vera are to treat insect bites, burns and scalds, hemorrhoids, body odor, gastric disorders, and scar tissues. However, aloe vera has also been shown to be extremely beneficial in dealing with abrasions, acne, anemia, constipation, heartburn, poison ivy/oak, psoriasis, ringworm, sores, sunburn, tapeworm, tuberculosis, wrinkles, leg ulcers, and peptic ulcers.

Aloe vera is available in capsule, tablet, liquid and powder forms. Always purchase a liquid form to ensure freshness. When looking to purchase this product, always stick to name brands that you can find in your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Aloe vera is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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HERBAL FIRST AID KIT
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Date: July 11, 2005 09:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HERBAL FIRST AID KIT

HERBAL FIRST AID KIT

It is important to know the area where you will be going to determine plants that will be available in case they are needed and access to emergency help if necessary. The herbal first aid kit is meant to be used for minor conditions that may occur while traveling. Any serious condition should be seen by a health care professional. Gathering herbs along the trail can be fun as well as useful. Simple plant remedies can be brought along in the first aid kit. Major injuries require immediate medical attention by a professional. Minor problems can often be taken care of with simple herbal remedies. Supplies can be obtained from the local health food store or by collecting plants locally.

Along with the herbs, a few supplies should be part of the kit available at the local drugstore or market.


1. scissors
2. thermometer
3. band aids of all sizes
4. gauze
5. tweezers
6. blister kit
7. needle
8. moleskin for blisters
9. adhesive tape
10. first aid instruction manual
11. herbal first aid manual

ALOE VERA: Aloe is great for minor skin abrasions, burns and as a natural laxative. It is excellent to soothe and repair damage from a sunburn. Aloe can be applied to stings and bites to soothe and heal.

TEA TREE OIL: Tea tree oil is a natural antiseptic and contains many antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. It helps to speed the healing process and is excellent to apply externally on wounds to promote healing and prevent infection. It is also a natural bug repellent and can soothe and promote healing after bites and stings.

ECHINACEA: One of the most often used herbs, echinacea is useful for pre venting infection by stimulating the immune function. It can be found in herbal salve preparations and applied directly to the wound. A salve can also be applied to skin irritations from contact with poison ivy or oak. LAVENDER: Lavender is a natural bug repellent and can be applied topically to bites and stings.

GINGER: Ginger root is excellent for an upset stomach. It is effective when used to combat motion and altitude sickness. Studies have found ginger to be just as effective when treating motion sickness due to riding in the car, boating or flying in and airplane, as over the counter remedies which often have side effects such as drowsiness. Ginger can be made into a tea or taken in capsule form. ARNICA: Arnica can be applied externally to areas of bruising and swelling, but not to broken skin. It can help to reduce inflammation.

PLANTAIN: A poultice of plantain can help reduce inflammation when applied to the affected area. It can also help with bites, stings, scratches and cuts. GARLIC: Along with being a natural antibiotic to help prevent infection, garlic also helps to keep mosquitoes away. They don’t seem to like the scent of garlic. Capsules or pills should be taken internally.

CAYENNE (CAPSICUM): This is effective for both internal and external bleeding. Externally, apply pressure and raise affected area. Sprinkle cayenne powder over the wound. MINT: Mint leaves, often found growing in the wild, can be made into a tea to help with digestion and calm the nerves. Some members of the mint family include peppermint, spearmint, catnip and horsemint.

FEVERFEW: This daisy like plant found growing in the wild, can help with migraine headaches and inflammation.

Chew the leaves, make into a tea or take in capsule form. Some have developed mouth irritations from chewing the leaves.

Tea Tree Oil Fights Staph Infection

There is much concern regarding the overuse of antibiotics leading to drug resistant strains of bacteria. Some forms of bacteria are difficult to control as they change form. Tea tree oil holds promise as an effective treatment for inactivating Staphylococcus aureus.

A study reported in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, (1995; 35: 421-45), and lead by Dr. C. F. Carson, researched tea tree oil at the University of Western Australia. The results were significant. Tea tree oil successfully inactivated the staph bacteria which was resistant to methicillin, a salt of penicillin. It is a versatile substance with a broad spectrum of capabilities. It is generally used topically.

Blueberries for Health

Blueberries are packed full of nutritional value. A study published in the Food and Nutrition Re s e a rch Br i e f s , January, 1997, found that two-thirds of a cup of blueberries had more antioxidants than the recommended daily amounts of vitamins E and C. Blueberries were followed by Concord grape juice, strawberries, kale and spinach in their antioxidant content.

Antioxidants are an important part of optimal health. They protect the body from free radical damage which can lead to a variety of conditions such as aging, cancer, heart disease and other diseases. Adding blueberries could aid in p rotecting the body and strengthening the immune response.

Worldwide Concern About Antibiotic Overuse

A recent report called for doctors throughout the world to be careful in administering antibiotics needlessly. Overuse of antibiotics has lead to germ mutations resistant and untreatable with current antibiotics. Pediatricians in the United States have received a brochure from the American Academy of Pediatrics urging them to take precautions before prescribing. Antibiotics are not always the answer as they do not work on viral infections which cause the common cold, sore throats and some ear infections. Staphylococcus aureus is one example of an antibiotic resistant strain. Over 90 percent of this staph strain are resistant to penicillin and other antibiotics. And other bacteria are also developing a resistance to antibiotic therapy. Save antibiotics for conditions that require their use.

Aloe Vera, Woodland Health Series

Aloe vera is one of the most widely used plants for medicinal purposes. It has been used for over 4,000 year for its therapeutic benefits. Aloe Vera, a pamphlet written by Deanne Tenney, offers valuable information and up to date research on the aloe vera plant.

The benefits of the aloe plant are truly amazing. It has been used to treat burns, radiation burns, skin disorders, wounds, scratches, sunburn, dermatitis, constipation, digestion, ulcer, kidney stones, bacterial and viral infections, and to relieve pain. It is widely used for skin disorders, but its benefits go far beyond the skin.

As a natural home remedy, there are few plants more valuable than the aloe. It is a simple and easy way to treat minor injuries. The plant contains antiseptic, antiviral, antibacterial, anesthetic and tissue healing properties. The Aloe Vera pamphlet offers historical as well as modern uses for this ancient plant. Aloe Vera is available through Woodland Publishing.

Tea Tree Oil, Woodland Health Series

Tea tree oil is derived from the leaves of the Melaleuca alternifolia, a shrub-like tree found in Australia. It contains significant medicinal value and beneficial properties. Another pamphlet in the Woodland Publishing Health Series, Tea Tree Oil offers historical uses as well as current scientific information.

The essential oil of the tea tree leaves is one of the most powerful essential oils. It is used extensively in Australia, and popularity is growing throughout the world. It contains antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties helping to prevent and heal infection.

Tea tree oil has been used successfully for many conditions such as athlete’s foot, acne, burns, warts, vaginal yeast infections, ringworm, skin rashes, herpes, cold sores, canker sores, insect bites and in preventing infection to name a few. Tea tree oil is a natural alternative that can be used effectively for extended periods of time without.



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TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia)
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Date: July 11, 2005 09:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia)

TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia)

Another important component of the first aid kit is tea tree oil. It can help with many minor conditions that commonly occur. Some include athlete’s foot, acne, boils, burns, warts, vaginal infections, tonsillitis, sinus infections, ringworm, skin rashes, impetigo, herpes, corns, head lice, cold sores, canker sores, insect bites, insect repellent and fungal infections. It is truly a remarkable oil with valuable properties for healing and to prevent infection. Tea tree oil is extracted from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia which is a shrub like tree found in the northeast t ropical coastal region of New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. There are over 300 different varieties of tea tree but only a few are known to produce the valuable, medicinal oil.

Tea tree oil contains at least 48 different organic compounds. The compounds work together to produce the healing abilities found in the oil. Research done in the 1950s and early 1960s found that tea tree oil is a germicide and fungicide with additional characteristics of dissolving pus and debris.1 Recent studies have found it effective for thrush, vaginal infections of candida albicans, staph infections, athlete’s foot, hair and scalp problems, mouth sores, muscle and joint pain, pain, and boils.2

Tea tree oil is a valuable antiseptic for skin infections. It is able to penetrate the epidermis to heal from within. Clinical studies have found that tea tree oil can heal quickly and with less scarring than other treatments. The oil is even effective against Staphylococcus aureus, which is often difficult to treat and is becoming resistant to antibiotic therapy. The oil can be applied two to three times a day with full strength or diluted. If an irritation occurs, a diluted solution can be tried. Even highly diluted concentrations have been found to heal in clinical studies.

Organisms against which tea tree oil has been shown to be effective include aspergillus, baceroides, Candida, clostridium, cryptosporidium, diptheroids, E. Coli, enter-obacter, epidermophyton, fusobacterium, gonococcus, hemophilus, herpes viruses, meningococcus. microsporium, petococcus, proteus, pseudomonas, spirochetes, staph, strep, trichinosis, and trichophyton3

Tea tree oil is an effective bactericide. It is safe for healthy tissue. It is a strong organic solvent and will help heal and disperse pus in pimples and wounds. It has been used to neutralize the venom of minor insect bites. It is able to kill bacteria by penetrating the skin layers and reaching deep into abscesses in the gums and even beneath the fingernails. It has been found to have some of the strongest antimicrobial properties ever discovered in a plant.4 Tea tree oil can help with fungal infections such as candida. Dr. Eduardo F. Pena, M.D. has studied Melaleuca alternifolia oil for its value in treating vaginitis and candida albicans.5 In studying candida researchers have gone to the extreme of infecting healthy volunteers with the organism. The yeasts proceeded to invade the bloodstream and internal organs. Then they were cultured from these regions. However, within a matter of hours yeasts could no longer be cultured, indicating that the immune systems of these individuals efficiently cleared the organisms from the tissues. Unfortunately, in today’s era a great many people are afflicted with compromised immune function.6

Tea tree oil acts as a mild anesthetic when applied to painful areas and to soothe cuts, burns, and mouth sores. It can help heal as well as reduce scarring. Burn victims in Australia are often treated with tea tree oil to help prevent infection, relieve pain and speed healing.

Tea tree oil can help prevent and heal acne. Tea tree oil has a reputation of being gentle on the skin. It does not produce the side effects of some medications such as dry skin, stinging, burning and slight redness after application. Tea tree oil can help to heal and prevent infections from occurring. A minor scrape or scratch can sometimes result in infection. Tea tree oil applied to the area can help prevent infection. The oil is effective in healing many types of bacteria but the most amazing thing is that is does not damage the skin tissue. Many of the recommended treatments can actually do damage to the skin resulting in scarring and sensitivity.

Tea tree oil can be used to prevent bites and stings. Bugs don’t like the scent and may stay away. There is no way to entirely void coming into contact with insects. Anyone who likes to be outdoors is vulnerable. Whether you live in the city or the country or anywhere in between, bugs abound. Tea tree oil or lotions and creams containing the oil can also be used to prevent bites. Insects don’t like the scent of the oil and are actually repelled by it. The Australian tea tree oil has been found to be highly effective in treating infections and destroying microbes while not irritating the skin. Many antiseptics can cause skin irritation, but tea tree oil seems to cause no harm to skin tissue.

Tea tree oil is an antiseptic and generally not taken internally. Some evidence has suggested mild organ damage from internal use. The oil when absorbed through the skin is non-toxic. Tea tree oil is most often recommended for exposed surfaces of the body such as the skin tissue and the mucous membranes. It should be noted that the original Australian aborigines made tea from the leaves without adverse affects. And the early settlers followed their exam - ple with positive results. But the tea was a very diluted form and the distilled oil is much stronger.

Endnotes

1. Cynthia B. Olsen. Australian Tea Tree Oil. (Pagosa Springs, CO: Kali Press, 1991).
2. James F. Balch MD and Phyllis A. Balch, Prescription for Nutritional Healing. (Garden City Park, N.Y.: Avery Publishing Group Inc., 1990), 681, 682.
3. Cass Ingram, Killed On Contact. (Cedar Rapids, Iowa: Literary Visions Publishing, Inc.), 15.
4. Michael A. Schmidt, Lendon H. Smith and Keith W. Sehnert. Beyond Antibiotics. (Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books), 207.
5. Olsen, 8.
6. Ingram, 64-65.



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HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)
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Date: July 11, 2005 08:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)

INTRODUCTION

In a time when we are more concerned than ever with issues of health, a tried and true tropical herb called noni needs t o be added t o our list of the best natural remedies. It susage over hundreds of years supports it s description as a veritable panacea of therapeutic actions. At this writing, noni continues to accrue impressive medicinal credentials, and its emergence as an effective nat ural healing agent is a timely one. Amidst rising cancer rates, the high incidence of degenerative diseases like diabetes, and the evolution of ant ibiotic resist ant bacteria and new viral strains, herbs like noni are sought after for their natural pharmaceutical properties. Unquest ionably, all of us want to know how to:

  • • protect ourselves f rom toxins and pollut ants
  • • prevent t he premature onset of age-related diseases such as arthritis, heart disease, diabetes and stroke
  • • boost our immune defenses to protect ourselves from new viral and bacterial strains that have become antibiotic-resist ant
  • • reduce our risk of developing cancer
  • • better digest our food for proper assimilation and purge the intestinal system wit hout the dangerous side effects of harsh drugs. Its actions are multifaceted and must be considered when assessing natural treatment s for disease or injury. It s impressive and widespread use among various native cult ures of t ropical island regions supports the notion that it does indeed possess valuable, therapeutic compounds.

    Genus Rubiaceae

    Common Names

    Indian Mulberry (India), Noni (Hawaii), Nono (Tahiti and Raratonga), Polynesian Bush Fruit, Painkiller Tree (Caribbean islands), Lada (Guam), Mengkudo (Malaysia), Nhau (Southeast Asia), Grand Morinda (Vietnam), Cheesefruit (Australia), Kura (Fiji), Bumbo (Africa) Note: This is only a small sampling of vernacular names for Morinda citrifolia. Almost every island nation of the South Pacific and Caribbean has a term for this particular plant . This booklet will refer to the herb mainly as “ noni” or M. citrifolia, and is referring primarily to Hawaiin noni.

    Parts Used

    The parts of the noni plant most used for their medicinal and nutritional purposes are the fruit, seeds, bark, leaves, and flowers. Virtually every part of the noni plant is utilized for its individual medicinal properties; however, it is the fruit portion that is regarded as its most valuable. The seeds have a purgative action, the leaves are used to treat external inflammations and relieve pain, the bark has strong astringent properties and can treat malaria, the root extracts lower blood pressure, the flower essences relieve eye inflammations and the f ruit has a number of medicinal actions.

    Physical Description

    Morinda citrifolia is technically an evergreen shrub or bush, which can grow to heights of fifteen to twenty feet . It has rigid, coarse branches which bear dark, oval, glossy leaves. Small white fragrant flowers bloom out of cluster-like pods which bear creamy-white colored fruit. The fruit is fleshy and gel-like when ripened, resembling a small breadf ruit . The flesh of the fruit is characterist ically bitter, and when completely ripe produces a rancid and very dist inctive odor. Noni has buoyant seeds that can float formont hs in ocean bodies. The wood of the inflammatory, astringent, emollient, emmenagogue, laxative, sedative, hypotensive (lowers blood pressure) , blood purif ier, and tonic.

    Chemical Constituents

    Noni has various chemical constituents. First, it has an impressive array of terpene compounds, three of which—L. Asperuloside, aucubin, and glucose— have been identified by their actyl derivatives. Both caproic and caprylic acids have been isolated.1 Second, bushfruits, a category of which noni fruit is a member, are also considered a good source of vit - amin C.2 Third, Hawaiin noni has been linked to the synthesis of xeronine in the body which has significant and widespread health implications. Last , the alkaloid cont ent of the noni fruit is thought to be responsible for its therapeutic actions. Alkaloids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological and biological act ivitiesin the human body. They are nitrogencontaining organic compounds which can react with acids to form salts and which are the basis of many medicines. The following is an in-depth chemical analysis of each plant part and it s chemical constituents.

  • • amino acids (which include alanine, arginine, asparticacids, cysteine, cystine, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan tyrosine, and valine)
  • • anthraquinones
  • • glycosides
  • • phenolic compounds
  • • resins
  • • B-sitosterol
  • • ursolic acid

    FLOWER

  • • acacet in 7-0-D (+) -glucophyranoside
  • • 5,7,-dimet hylapigenin-4-0-8-D(+) -galactophyranoside
  • • 6,8,-dimet hoxy-3-methyl anthroquinone-1-0-8-rhamnosyl glucophyranoside

    FRUIT

  • • antioxidant
  • • alizarin
  • • anthraquinones
  • • caproic and caprylic acids

    discovered an alkaloid in the Hawaiin noni fruit which he calls proxeronine and which he believes has appreciable physiological actions by acting as a precursor to xeronine, a very crucial compound (see later sections) . In addition, a compound found in the fruit called damnacanthol is believed to help inhibit cert ain viruses and cellular mutations involved in cancer.

    ROOT AND ROOT BARK

  • • carbonate
  • • chlorubin
  • • rubicholric acid
  • • soranjidol
  • • chrysophanol
  • • phosphate
  • • magnesium
  • • ferric iron
  • • sodium
  • • glycosides
  • • morinadadiol
  • • morindine
  • • resins
  • • rubiadin
  • • sterols4

    Pharmacology

    Recent surveys have suggested that noni fruit exerts antibiotic action. In fact, a variety of compounds which have antibacterial properties (such as aucubin) have been identified in the fruit.5 The 6-Dglucopyranose pentaacet ate of the fruit extract is not considered bacteriostatic.6 Constituents found in the fruit portion have exhibited ant imicrobial action against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi (and other types) , Shigella paradysenteriae, and Staphylococcus aureaus. Compounds found in the root have the ability to reduce swollen mucous membrane and lower blood pressure in animal studies. Proxeronine is an alkaloid constituent found in Hawaiin noni fruit which may prompt the production of xeronine in the body. It is considered a xeronine precursor and was discovered in noni fruit by Dr. Ralph M. Heinicke. He has theorized that this proenzyme can be effective in initiating a series of beneficial cellular reactions through its involvement with the integrity of specific proteins. He points out that tissues contain cells which possess certain recept or sites for xeronine. Because the reactions that can occur are so varied, many different therapeutic actions can result when xeronine production escalates, explaining why Hawaiin noni is good for so many seemingly unrelated disorders. Damnacanthol is another compound contained in the fruit of the Hawaiin noni plant which has shown the ability to block or inhibit the cellular function of RAS cells, considered pre-cancerous cells.

    Body Systems Targeted

    The following body systems have all been effec-freeze-dried capsules, dehydrated powder or fruit, and oil. Noni plant constituents are sometimes offered in combination with other herbs. Some products contain a percent age of the fruit, bark, root and seeds for their individual therapeutic properties.

    Satety

    Extracts of M. citrifolia are considered safe if used as directed; however, pregnant or nursing mothers should consult their physicians before taking any supplement . High doses of root extracts may cause constipation. Taking noni supplements with coffee, alcohol or nicotine is not recommended.

    Suggested Uses

    Ideally, noni extracts should be taken on an empty stomach prior to meals. The process of digesting food can interfere with the medicinal value of the alkaloid compounds found in Hawaiin noni, especially in its fruit . Apparently, stomach acids and enzymes destroy the specific enzyme which frees up the xeronine compound. Take noni supplements without food, coffee, nicotine or alcohol. Using supplements that have been made from the semi-ripe or light - green fruit is also considered preferable to the ripe, whit ish fruit .

    NONI: ITS USE AND HISTORY

    Noni is a tropical wandering plant indigenous to areas of Australia, Malaysia and Polynesia. It is considered native to Southeast Asia although it grows from India to the eastern region of Polynesia. Morinda citrifolia has a long history of medicinal use throughout these areas. It is thought to be the “most widely and commonly used medicinal plant prior to the European era.” 7 Centuries ago, the bushfruit was introduced to native Hawaiians, who subsequently called it “noni” and considered its fruit and root as prized medicinal agents. Among all Polynesian botanical agents of the 19th and 20th centuries, Hawaiin noni has the widest array of medical applications. Samoan and Hawaiian medical practitioners used noni for bowel disorders (especially infant diarrhea, constipation, or intestinal parasites) , indigestion, skin inflammation, infection, mouth sores, fever, contusions and sprains. Hawaiians commonly prepared noni tonics designed to treat diabetes, stings, burns and fish poisoning.8 The herb’s remarkable ability to purge the intestinal tract and promote colon health was well known among older Hawaiian and Tahitian natives and folk healers. Interestingly, field observations regarding its repu-remarkable healing agent .

    Wonder Herb of Island Folk Healers

    Common to t he thickets and forests of Malaysia and Polynesia, and the low hilly regions of the Philippine islands, noni has been cultivated throughout communities in the South Pacific for hundreds of years. Its Hawaiian use is thought to originate from inter-island canoe travel and settlement dating to before Christ . Its hardy seeds have the ability to float which has also contributed to its distribution among various seacoasts in the South Pacific region. Historical investigation has established the fact that some of Hawaii’s earliest settlers probably came viaTahiti. For this reason, Tahitian herbal practices have specific bearing on the herbal therapeutics of islands to the nort h. The very obvious similarities between the Hawaiian vernacular for herbal plants like noni and Tahitian names strongly suggests the theory of Polynesian migrations to Hawaii. Cultures native to these regions favored using Morinda citrifolia for treating major diseases and ut ilized it as a source of nourishment in times of famine.9 Noni fruit has been recognized for centuries as an excellent source of nutrition. The peoples of Fiji, Samoa and Rarat onga use the fruit in both its raw and cooked forms.10 Traditionally, the fruit was propicked before it was fully ripe and placed in the sunlight . After being allowed to ripen, it was typically mashed and its juice extracted through a cloth. Noni leaves provided a veget able dish and their resiliency made them desirable as a fish wrap for cooking.

    Noni’s Medical Reputation

    Elaborate traditionalrituals and praying rites usually accompanied the administration of noni. Int erestingly, cultures indigenous to the Polynesian islands had a significant understanding of their flora. For example, native Hawaiians maint ained a folkmedicine taxonomy t hat was considered second to none.11 Noni was not only used for medicinal purposes but for its food value, for clot hing and for cloth dyes as well. Research indicates that noni was among the few herbal remedies that islanders considered “ tried and true.” In Hawaii, trained herbal practitioners reserved the right to prescribe plant therapies.12 Records indicate that Hawaiian medical practices were based on extensive and very meticulous descriptions of symptoms and their prescribed herbal treatments. Dosages were controlled and the collection and administration of plant extracts was carefully monitored.13 In addition to Morinda, it was not uncommon for these herbal doctors to also recommend using In regard to its application for common ailments, Hawaiians and other island communities traditionally prescribed noni to purge the bowel, reduce fever, cure respiratory infections such as asthma, ease skin inflammations, and heal bruises and sprains. In other words, noni was widely used and highly regarded as a botanical medicine.

    A Timely Reemer gence

    Today, the natural pharmaceutical actions of the chemical constituents contained in noni are scientif-ically emerging as valuable bot anical medicines. Tahitian “nono” intrigued medical practitioners decades ago; however, due to the eventual emergence of synthetic drugs, interest in this island botanical diminished until recent years. Ethnobot anists are once again rediscovering why Hawaiian people havet reasured and cultivat ed Morinda citrifolia for generations. Noni is now finding its way into western therapeutics and is referred to as “ the queen” of the genus Rubiaceae. Its ability to reduce joint inflammation and target the immune system have made it the focus of the modern scientific inquiry. Dr. Ralph Heinicke has conducted some fascinating studies on the chemical constituents of the Hawaiin noni fruit. His research centers on the proxeronine content of the fruit juice and how it profoundly influences human physiology. In addition, scientific studies investigating noni as an anti-cancer agent have been encouraging. It s conspicuous attributes and varied uses have elevat edits status to one of the best of the healing herbs. Today Morinda citrifolia is available in liquid, juice, freezedried capsules, or oil forms, and is considered one of nature’s most precious botanicals.

    TRADITIONAL USES OF NONI

    Throughout tropical regions, virtually every part of Morinda citrifolia was used to treat disease or injury. Its curative properties were well known and commonly employed. PatoaTama Benioni, a member of the Maoritribe from the Cook Islands and a lecturer on island plants explains: Traditionally Polynesians use noni for basically everything in the treatment of illness. Noni is a part of our lives. Any Polynesian boy will tell you he’s had exper ience with it . We use juice from its roots, its flowers, and its fruit... my grandmother taught me to use noni from the roots and the leaves to make medicine for external as well as internal use, and for all kinds of ailments, such as coughs, boils, diseases of the skin, and cuts.15

    decoctions to stimulate delayed menst ruation.

  • • Noni was frequently utilized for its antiparasitic activity.
  • • Respiratory ailments, coughs, and colds were treated with noni.
  • • A juice made from pounding noni leaves, roots and fruit mixed with water was administered for diarrhea.
  • • Dried and powdered forms of the bark mixed with water and administ ered with a spoon treated infant diarrhea.
  • • Small pieces of fruit and root infused with water were given to kill intestinal parasites.
  • • Boiled bark decoctions were given as a drink for stomach ailments.
  • • Coughs were treated with grated bark.
  • • Charred unripe fruit was used with salt on diseased gums.
  • • Pounded fruit combined with kava and sugar cane was used to treat tuberculosis.
  • • Babies were rubbed with fresh, crushed leaves for serious chest colds accompanied by fever.
  • • Eye washes were made from decoctions for eye complaint s from flower extracts.
  • • Leaf infusions were traditionally taken to treat adult fevers.
  • • A mouthwash consisting of crushed ripe fruit and juice was used for inflamed gums in young boys.
  • • Pounded leaf juice was used for adult gingivitis.
  • • Sore throats were treated by chewing the leaves and swallowing the juice.
  • • Skin abscesses and boils were covered with leaf poultices.
  • • Swelling was controlled with leaf macerations.
  • • Heated leaves were often used for arthritic joins and for ringworm.16

    XERONINE: THE SECRET OF NONI?

    One informed professional on the subject of noni is Dr. Ralph Heinicke, a biochemist who has researched the active compounds of noni fruit for a number of years. He discovered that the Hawaiin noni fruit contains an alkaloid precursor to a very vital compound called xeronine. Wit hout xeronine, life would cease. In Dr. Heinicke’s view, noni fruit provides a safe and effective way to increase xeronine levels, which exert a crucial influence on cell health and protction. His research suggests that the juice from the M. citrifolia fruit contains what could technically be considered a precursor of xeronine—proxeronine. This compound initiates the release of xeronine in the intestinal tract after it comes in contact with a specific enzyme which is also contained in the fruit .

    Because proteins and enzymes have so many varied roles within cell processes, the normalization of these proteins with noni supplemenation could initiate avery wide variety of body responses and treat many disease condit ions. Proteins are the most important catalysts found in the body. The beauty of obtaining a precursor to xeronine from the noni fruit is that the body naturally decides how much of this precursor to convert to xeronine. Disease, stress, anger, trauma and injury can lower xeronine levels in the body, thus creat ing a xeronine deficit . Supplementing the body with noni fruit is considered an excellent way to safely and naturally raise xeronine levels. It is the research and theories of Dr. Heinicke which have made the juice of the Hawaiin noni fruit a viable medicinal substance. He writes: Xeronine is analkaloid, a substance the body produces in order to activate enzymes so they can function properly. It also energizes and regulates the body. This par-ticular alkaloid has never been found because the body makes it, immediately uses it, and then breaks it down. At no time is there an appreciable, isolable amount in the blood. But xeronine is so basic to the functioning of proteins, we would die without it . Its absence can cause many kinds of illness.17 Because so many diseases result from an enzyme malfunction, Dr. Heinicke believes that using the noni fruit can result in an impressive array of curative applications. Interestingly, he believes that we manufacture proxeronine while we are sleeping. He proposes t hat if we could constantly supply our bodies wit h proxeronine from other sources, our need to sleep would diminish.18

    NONI PROCESSING

    How an herb is processed is crucial to how beneficial it is: this is especially true of noni, with its unique enzymes and alkaloids. Morinda citrifolia should be picked when the fruit is turning from its dark green immature color to its lighter green color, and certainly before it ripens to its white, almost translucent color. Once picked, noni, like aloe, will denature extremely quickly due to its very active enzymes. After harvesting, it should swiftly be flash frozen. This is similar to what is done to fish caught at sea to keep them f esh. This stops it from losing its potency while not damaging any of its constituents. To process noni, freeze-drying is recommended. This removes only the water without damaging any of this miracle plant’s vital enzymes and other phytonutrients like xeronine and proxeronine. This pure high-quality noni fruit juice powder is then encapsu-has a very harsh taste and an extremely foul smell, similar to the fruit it self . Other methods of processing include thermal processing, dehydrat ion and air drying. Thermal processing is generally found in liquids, while the dehydrat ed noni is then milled and encapsulated. Unfortunately both methods utilize high heat (110+°F) , which can deactivate many of the vital compounds that make noni so import ant . Air-drying is effect ive without using damaging heat but has serious quality control problems for commercial production.

    MODERN APPLICATIONS OF NONI

    Overview

    Noni possesses a wide variety of medicinal properties which originat e from its differing plant component s. The fruit and leaves of the shrub exert antibacterial activities. Its roots promote the expulsion of mucus and the shrinkage of swollen membranes making it an ideal therapeutic for nasal congest ion, lung infect ions, and hemorrhoids. Noni root compounds have also shown natural sedative properties as well as the ability to lower blood pressure.

    Leaf extracts are able to inhibit excessive blood flow or to inhibit the formation of blood clots. Noni is particularly useful for its ability to treat painful joint conditions and to resolve skin inflammations. Many people drink noni fruit extracts in juice form for hypert ension, painful menstruation, arthritis, gastric ulcers, diabetes, and depression. Recent studies suggest that its anticancer activit y should also be considered. Concerning the therapeutic potential of the Hawaiin noni fruit, Dr. Heinicke writes: I have seen the compound found in noni work wonders. When I was still investigating its possibilities, I had a friend who was a medical research scientist administer the proxeronine to a woman who had been comatose for three months. Two hour safter receiving the compound, she sat up in bed and asked where she was. . . . Noni is probably the best source of proxeronine that we have today.19 Studies and surveys combined support the ability of noni to act as an immunost imulant, inhibit the growth of certain tumors, enhance and normalize cellular function and boost tissue regeneration. It is considered a powerful blood purifier and contributor to overall homeostasis.

    xeronine, which appears to be able to regulate the shape and integrity of cert in proteins that individually contribute to specific cellular activities. Interestingly, this effect seems to occur after ingestion, inferring that the most active compound of noni may not be present in uneaten forms of the fruit or other plant parts. Some practitioners believe that xeronine is best obtained from a noni fruit juice precursor compound. The enzymatic reactions that occur with taking the juice on an empty stomach are what Dr. Heinicke believes set cellular repair intomotion.

    Cancer

    A study conducted in 1994 cited the anticancer activity of Morinda citrifolia against lung cancer. A team of scientists from the University of Hawaii used live laboratory mice to test the medicinal properties of the fruit against Lewis lung carcinomas which were artificially transferred to lung tissue. The mice that were left untreated died in nine to twelve days. However, giving noni juice in consistent daily doses significantly prolonged their life span. Almost half of these mice lived for more than fifty days.20 Research conclusions state that the chemical constituents of the juice acted indirectly by enhancing the ability of the immune system to deal with the invading malig-nancy by boosting macrophage or lymphocyte activit y. Furt her evaluation theorizes that the unique chemical constituents of Morinda citrifolia initiate enhanced T-cell activity, a reaction that may explain noni’s ability to treat a variety of infectious diseases. 21

    In Japan, similar studies on tropical plant extracts found that damnacanthol, a compound found in Morinda citrifolia, is able to inhibit the function of KRAS- NRK cells, which are considered precursors to certain types of malignancies.22 The experiment involved adding noni plant extract to RAS cells and incubating them for a number of days. Observation disclosed that noni was able to significantly inhibit RAS cellular function. Among 500 plant extracts, Morinda citrifolia was determined to contain the most effective compounds against RAS cells. Its damnacanthol content was clinically described in 1993 as “a new inhibit or of RAS function.” 2 3 The xeronine fact or is also involved in that xeronine helps to normalize the way malignant cells behave. While they are still technically cancer cells, they no longer function as cells with unchecked growth. In time, the body’s immune system may be able to eradicate these cells.

    Arthritis

    with arthritic disease. One link to arthritic pain may be the inability to properly or completely digest proteins which can then form crystal-like deposits in the joints. The ability of noni fruit to enhance protein digestion through enhanced enzymatic function may help to eliminate this particular phenomenon. In addition, the alkaloid compounds and plant met abolites of noni may be linked to its apparent anti-inflammatory action. Plant sterols can assist in inhibiting the inflammatory response which causes swelling and pain. In addition, the antioxidant effect of noni may help to decrease free radical damage in joint cells, which can exacerbate discomfort and degeneration.

    Immune System

    The alkaloid and other chemical compounds found in noni have proven themselves to effectively control or kill over six types of infectious bacterial strains including: Escherichia coli, salmonellatyphi (and other types) , shigella paradysenteriae, and staphylo - coccus aureaus.25 In addition, damnacanthol, was able to inhibitt he early antigen stage of the Epstein- Barr virus.

    The bioactive components of the whole plant, combined or in separate portions, have demonst rat - ed the ability to inhibit several different strains of bacteria. Anecdotal reports support this action in that noni seems particularly effective in shortening the duration of certain types of infection. This may explain why noni is commonly used to treat colds and flu. The chemical constituents found in noni and the possibility that they stimulate xeronine production— as well as initiate alkaloid therapy—may explain noni’s reputation for having immuno-stimulatory properties. Alkaloids have been able to boost phagocytosis which is the process in which certain white blood cells called macrophages attack and literally digest infectious organisms. Interestingly, the ant it umoraction of noni has been ascribed to an immune system response which involves stimulating T-cells. tropical regions during World War II learned of the fruit’s ability to boost endurance and stamina. Native cultures in Samoa, Tahiti, Raratonga and Australia used the fruit in cooked and raw forms. M. citrifolia is considered a tonic and is especially recommended for debilitated conditions.

    Antioxidant

    The process of aging bombards the body with free radicals which can cause all kinds of degenerative diseases. The xeronine theory promoted by Dr. Heinicke submit s t hat as our bodies age, we lose our ability to synthesize xeronine. To make matters worse, the presence of many environment altoxins actually blocks the production of xeronine as well. He believes that the proxeronine content of Hawaiin noni fruit juice can help to block these actions, thereby working as an antiaging compound.26 The phytonutrients found in noni assist in promot - ing cell nourishment and prot ect ion from free radicals created by exposure to pollution and other potentially damaging agents. In addition, Morinda citrifolia contains selenium, which is considered one of the best antioxidant compounds available.

    Diabetes

    While scientific studies are lacking in this particular application of noni, Hawaiians used various parts of the plant and its fruit to treat blood sugar disorders. Anecdotal surveys have found t hat noni is current ly recommended for anyone with diabetes.

    Pain Killer

    A 1990 study found that extracts derived from the Morinda citrifolia root have the ability to kill pain in animal experiments.27 Interest ingly, it was during this study that the natural sedative action of the root was also noted. This study involved a French team of scientists who noted a significant central analgesic activity in laboratory mice.28 Dr. Heinicke has stated, “Xeronine also acts as a pain reliever. A man wit h very advanced int est inal cancer was given three months to live. He began taking the proxeronine and lived for a whole year, pain-free.” 29

    Skin Healing Agent

    One of the most prevalent hist rical uses of noni was in poultice form for cuts, wounds, abrasions, burns and bruises. Using its fruit extract for very serious burns has resulted in some extraordinary healing. Because skin is comprised of protein, it immediately responds to the presence of xeronine.

    burn site throught he direct application of a noni poultice is considered quite effective by Dr. Heinicke and his colleagues, who have studied enzymatic therapy. Concerning burns, he has written: I believe that each tissue has cells which contain proteins which have receptor sites for the absorption of xeronine. Certain of these proteins are the inert for ms of enzymes which require absorbed xeronine to become active. This xeronine, by converting the body’s procol- langenase system into a specific protease, quickly and safely removes the dead tissue from burns.30

    Drug Addiction

    The xeronine link to treat ing drug addiction is based on the notion that flooding t he brain with extra xeronine can reverse the neurochemical basis for addiction. This natural alkaloid is thought to normalize brain receptors which subsequent ly results in the cessation of physiological dependence on a certain chemical like nicotine.3 1 The potential of Hawaiin noni as a natural stimulat or for t he production of xeronine may have profound implications in treating various types of addictions.

    Complementary Agents of Noni

  • cat’s claw papaya
  • kava kava
  • pau d’arco
  • bioflavonoids
  • selenium
  • germanium
  • grapeseed extract
  • echinacea
  • proteolytic enzymes
  • aloe vera
  • glucosamine
  • shark
  • cartilage

    PrimaryApplications of Noni

  • abrasions
  • arthritis
  • atherosclerosis
  • bladder infections
  • boils bowel disorders
  • burns cancer
  • chronicfatigue syndrome
  • circulatory weakness
  • colds congest ion
  • cold sores constipation
  • depression diabetes
  • eye inf lammations fever
  • fract ures gastric ulcers
  • gingivit is headaches
  • high blood pressure immune
  • weakness
  • indigestion intestinal parasites
  • kidney disease menstrual



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    INFECTIONS AND GARLIC
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 10:12 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: INFECTIONS AND GARLIC

    INFECTIONS AND GARLIC

    Bacterial Infections

    With the advent of modern antibiotic drugs, garlic lost its status as an effective infection fighter. Unfortunately, Garlic’s past track record was diminished by the arrival of new and potent antibiotics like penicillin. Ironically, several years ago, garlic was reported to be more valuable than penicillin when treating throat infections.26

    One reason for this may be that the allicin component of garlic is effective against the streptococci bacteria. Traditional Oriental medicine utilized garlic in a variety of forms to treat all kinds of infections: garlic juice for typhoid, and meningitis, garlic vapors for whooping cough, garlic suppositories for yeast infections and garlic soup for pneumonia.27 According to studies in the Journal of the National Medical Association, Garlic has proved its ability to act as a potent antibiotic against various gram-negative, gram-positive and acid fast bacteria.

    In view of the fact that garlic has even been shown to be effective against some antibiotic-resistent organisms, it should be utilized more in standard medical treatments. Several medical practitioners have discovered that like throat infections, ear infections also respond nicely to garlic. The great advantage of using garlic over antibiotics is that Garlic will not kill friendly intestinal bacteria or make one more susceptible to future infections. Antibiotics will. In cases where antibiotics are deemed necessary, they should at the very least be supplemented with garlic.

    Current research supports the fact that garlic does indeed inhibit bacterial growth.28 Several strains of Mycobacterium are suppressed by the presence of garlic. For anyone who fights chronic bladder infections, garlic may prove invaluable. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several organisms associated with urinary tract infections.29

    Evidence suggests that garlic can effectively treat bacterial ear infections, sore throats, and infected wounds. Several reports have shown that aged garlic extract is particularly effective for the kind of ear infections that children are prone to develop. (Note: Ingesting raw garlic is not a practical way to utilize its allicin compounds as an effective antibiotic. Too much raw garlic would be required to be effective.)

    Viral Infections

    It is common knowledge that as of now, viruses do not respond to antibiotics and are extremely resistent to other forms of treatment. A virus usually has to run its course, as those of us who suffer periodically from colds and flu know all too well. Because viruses are so hardy, it is important to know that garlic possesses antiviral as well as antibacterial properties. Dr. Andrew Weil M.D. states that the best home remedy he has found for the treatment of colds is to eat several cloves of raw garlic at the first indication that a cold is developing.30 Several laboratory tests have shown that garlic is an effectual treatment for both the influenza B virus and herpes simplex virus.31

    Two independent researchers in Japan and Romania have found that garlic is able to protect living organisms form the influenza virus.32 Chinese scientists have studies the effect of garlic on viral encephalitis for almost 30 years.

    Clarissa McCord of Cloverdale, British Columbia used garlic extract to treat a stubborn virus that attacks horses. She relates:

    “A bottle of liquid garlic administered on two successive days to each animal does the job of curing. One of my race hors es developed the virus symptoms and was to be scratched from the racing program scheduled for the following day. I gave one bottle of liquid garlic to the animal and he improved sufficiently to enter the race. He hit the board first, second and third.”33

    In relation to human beings, it would seem that Garlic is especially effective in cases of influenza as both a treatment to shorten the duration of the disease and as a preventative. Again, garlic’s ability to stimulate the immune system seems intrinsically linked to its anti-viral action. Whether the infection is bacterial or viral, garlic mobilizes immune function, thereby potentiating the body’s ability to defend itself against infectious organisms.

    Fungal Infections

    Garlic in certain forms is considered a potent antibiotic and can be particularly effective against certain fungal infections. Like viruses, fungal infections are particularly difficult to treat . Traditional medical treatments for fungal infections are usually toxic and can be ineffectual over the long term. To the contrary, garlic has proven itself as an effective anti-fungal agent against candida, aspergillus and cryptococci.

    A report from a Chinese medical journal delineates the use of intravenous garlic to treat a potentially fatal and rare fungal infection of the brain called cryptococcal meningitis. In the report, the Chinese compared the effectiveness of the garlic with standard medical treatment which involved a very toxic antibiotic called Amphotericin-B. The study revealed that intravenous garlic was more effective than the drug and was not toxic regardless of its dosage.34

    One study using liquid garlic extract found that candida colonies were substantially reduced in mice that had been treated with the garlic. This same study also revealed that garlic stimulated phagocytic activity. This implies that infections such as candida may be controlled because garlic stimulates the body’s own defenses. Applied externally, garlic oil can be used to treat ringworm, skin parasites and warts. Lesions that were caused by skin fungi in rabbits and guinea pigs were treated with external applications of garlic extract and began to heal after seven days.35

    Allicin is primarily a fungistatic substance which can slow or completely stop the proliferation of the microorganisms. As an external treatment, garlic has also been found to effectively treat acne and thrush.

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