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Why is Maca Called the Peruvian Ginseng and What Does this Herb Do?

old message Why is Maca Called the Peruvian Ginseng and What Does this Herb Do Darrell Miller 04/28/11


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Date: April 28, 2011 03:17 PM
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Subject: Why is Maca Called the Peruvian Ginseng and What Does this Herb Do

Maca: Stress, Energy, Libido, and More.

Maca is a root vegetable traditionally grown at high altitudes in Peru. It is related to radish and turnip, both of which it resembles in appearance, size, and proportion. Its historical uses denote its adaptogenic properties, the reason why it is often called the Peruvian ginseng today. It is the subject of numerous studies underway, and preliminary results point to its effects on the endocrine system.

Lepidium meyenii is a plant species that belongs to the Brassicaceae family, which comprises over three thousand species of edible plants called cruciferous vegetables. Hence, maca is related to many green leafy vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower, among others. Like these vegetables, maca contains an assortment of organic compounds that display bioactive properties.

Lepidium peruvianum refers to the same species. Modern herbalists argue that it is a more accurate scientific name for maca, though Lepidium meyenii remains in use in the scientific community. Until only recently, maca was exclusively cultivated in the Andes of Peru. Due to an increased interest in alternative forms of medicine in North America and Europe, it has enjoyed a sudden surge in popularity in the past few years.

Enhances Stress Resistance

Maca is marketed as an adaptogen, a natural remedy for stress. It has been compared to ginseng a number of times, earning itself the moniker Peruvian ginseng. Maca and ginseng do not interact with hormones in the body but rather contain phytochemicals that directly act on endocrine glands, including the hypothalamus, adrenals, and thyroid glands. These organs are pivotal to better management of stress. Several herbalists argue that maca is even more potent than ginseng in that it is believed to affect almost all endocrine glands and create a homeostatic effect on the chemical compounds that they secrete.

Modulates Energy Metabolism

The nutritional profile of maca has been described to be a combination of the nutrients found in whole grains and green leafy vegetables. It contains significant amounts of amino acids and dietary fiber. Its carbohydrate content accounts for 60 per cent of its dry weight, with emphasis on its low glycemic index. Its active constituents enable its carbohydrates to break down at a slow pace and release glucose into the bloodstream without raising blood sugar levels. By so doing, it provides the energy needed to fuel physical activities and athletic performance for extended periods of time.

Improves Sexual Performance

Maca is a popular aphrodisiac. In the old days, Inca warriors consumed large quantities of maca roots for the sole purpose of achieving desired virility. In addition to its energy-boosting and stress-relieving effects, regular intake of maca impacts sexual health as it contains organic compounds that stimulate gonadal tissues, especially in men. Randomized clinical trials have observed that maca affects semen quality, increases sperm count, and improves sexual performance, making it an ideal choice of supplement for men.

Maca root is an excellent herb for men and women. You can gain energy as well as a boost in energy with Maca root. Try maca root and feel the difference it can make on your life!







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