SearchBox:

Search Term: " Infusion "

  Messages 1-35 from 35 matching the search criteria.
A natural sugar molecule, D-ribose, found to improve heart function and blood flow Darrell Miller 7/4/18
Discover why Peppermint is the most powerful herb, ideal for cleansing the liver Darrell Miller 9/20/17
These Natural Remedies Will Help You To Remove The Stones In The Kidneys!! Darrell Miller 9/11/17
This Is What Doctors Will Never Tell You About The CLOVES So You Do Not Use Them. AMAZING! Darrell Miller 3/19/17
10 Health Benefits of Drinking Dandelion Tea Darrell Miller 2/22/17
Fewer grains and more fruits and vegetables may keep your bones strong Darrell Miller 2/7/17
Oregano Plant Is the Most Potent Antimicrobial In The world Darrell Miller 11/15/16
Chamomile: What You May Not Know! Darrell Miller 9/16/16
How Hyaluronic Acid Benefits The Skin Darrell Miller 5/20/14
Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root Darrell Miller 12/27/12
Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root Darrell Miller 12/21/12
History And Uses Of Xylitol Darrell Miller 2/7/12
Corn Silk Darrell Miller 10/16/09
Horehound Herb Darrell Miller 9/21/09
Red Clover Blossom Darrell Miller 8/29/09
Mustard Extract Darrell Miller 8/14/09
Senna Leaf Darrell Miller 8/6/09
Strengthen The Liver and Kidneys With Leucine Darrell Miller 4/27/09
Passion Flower Darrell Miller 3/26/09
Cat's Claw Bark Darrell Miller 12/19/08
Artichoke Promotes Healthy Fat Digestion and Metabolism Darrell Miller 1/30/08
D-Ribose Powder Benefits! Darrell Miller 4/10/07
Interview on symptoms of Fibromyalgia and one mans story Darrell Miller 8/9/06
Balestra and Mech La Decottopia Darrell Miller 5/6/06
Doctors Reject Dietary Supplement as Diabetes Treatment Darrell Miller 7/27/05
THE FDA AND STEVIA Darrell Miller 7/15/05
References Darrell Miller 7/15/05
HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia) Darrell Miller 7/11/05
All Calories Are Not Created Equal Darrell Miller 6/25/05
HISTORY Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Herbal Forms Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Vitali-Tea - Tea fits a healthy lifestyle to a T... Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Better Bones Darrell Miller 6/11/05
Diet Phen - Dietary Supplement and weight Loss ... Darrell Miller 6/1/05
the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) ... Darrell Miller 5/26/05



Now Foods Coconut Infusion Smoked Ghost Pepper Flavor
   12 oz $10.99 9% OFF $ 10.00
NOW FOODS Coconut Infusion With Garlic
   12 fl oz $10.99 8% OFF $ 10.11
NOW FOODS Coconut Infusions With Butter
   12 fl oz Glass $10.99 8% OFF $ 10.11
NEOCELL Collagen Beauty Infusion Powder Cranberry
   16 oz $38.23 15% OFF $ 32.50
NOW FOODS Keto Coconut Infusions Virgin Coconut Oil Butter Flavor
   3 Organic Packets $1.99 23% OFF $ 1.53
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusion Ginger Wasabi Cashew Butter
   10oz $10.99 23% OFF $ 8.46
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusion Mango Chili Cashew Butter
   10 oz $10.99 23% OFF $ 8.46
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusion Roasted Almond Butter
   10 oz $9.99 23% OFF $ 7.69
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusion Roasted Cashew Butter
   10 oz $9.99 23% OFF $ 7.69
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusions™ Almond Butter, Roasted
   10oz $9.99 28% OFF $ 7.19
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusions™ Cashew Butter, Ginger Wasabi
   10oz $10.99 28% OFF $ 7.91
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusions™ Cashew Butter, Mango Chili
   10oz $10.99 28% OFF $ 7.91
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusions™ Cashew Butter, Roasted
   10oz $9.99 28% OFF $ 7.19
NOW FOODS Nutty Infusions™ Cashew Butter, Salted Caramel
   10oz $10.99 28% OFF $ 7.91
ACORELLE Perfume Roll-On Citrus Infusion
   0.33 oz $15.00 37% OFF $ 9.45
ACORELLE Perfume Spray Neroli Infusion
   1 oz $35.00 28% OFF $ 25.20

A natural sugar molecule, D-ribose, found to improve heart function and blood flow
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 04, 2018 09:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: A natural sugar molecule, D-ribose, found to improve heart function and blood flow





A natural sugar molecule, D-ribose, found to improve heart function and blood flow

D-Ribose is a simple sugar molecule that plays an important role in energy metabolism within your body by helping to produce cellular energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Oxidative stress can deplete ATP, which can then cause further stress, in a vicious cycle for your heart. However, D-Ribose supplements can restore levels of ATP, which can improve heart function and exercise endurance in cardiac patients. Infusion of D-Ribose after a cardiac event may even be able to prevent dangerous ischemia reperfusion injuries.

Key Takeaways:

  • D-Ribose is a sugar molecule that plays a key role in producing cellular energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).
  • Supplementary D-Ribose can replenish depleted ATP in cardiac patients, improving heart function and exercise endurance.
  • Injections of D-Ribose can help to limit ischemic reperfusion injuries that can occur in the wake of a heart attack or stroke.

"With one occurring every 40 seconds in America, you likely know more than a few people who have experienced one."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-07-01-natural-sugar-molecule-d-ribose-improve-heart-function-and-blood-flow.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5654)


Discover why Peppermint is the most powerful herb, ideal for cleansing the liver
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 20, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Discover why Peppermint is the most powerful herb, ideal for cleansing the liver





Peppermint is the most powerful herb, and it is ideal for cleansing the liver too. When we glance at it, peppermint looks like a mint plant, but this amazing plant with bright leaves is called peppermint and it has many different health benefits. Peppermint is easily adaptable to the environment and can live pretty much anywhere. It can be fun to grow it on your own. One of the main things that peppermint does is clean and purify your liver.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKnThMRaYZ0&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Peppermint grows in many different environments so it can be easy to grow at home.
  • The liver collects and retains toxins. If we eat many unhealthy foods it can crowd the liver.
  • Create an Infusion of peppermint to help cleanse the liver by flushing toxins from the liver.

"One of the main functions of peppermint is to clean and purify, and the first organ benefited is the liver."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5265)


These Natural Remedies Will Help You To Remove The Stones In The Kidneys!!
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 11, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: These Natural Remedies Will Help You To Remove The Stones In The Kidneys!!





There are some natural remedies that will assist you with removing kidney stones. Stones in the kidneys are a common disease. So many people have experienced kidney stones in their lifetime. One of the remedies is lemon and apple cider vinegar. That helps to dissolve the stones that form in your kidneys. The Infusion of celery seeds is another thing that you will want to try. They help to stimulate kidney cleansing in the case of stones.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dotr38mpYao&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Kidney stones are a consistent pain for people who may have them. They want a remedy that actually works to remove the stones.
  • There are natural remedies that will keep people healthy as well. Kidney stones can be treated and even removed with the right approach.
  • Get help from medical experts who understand these natural remedies too. They are an excellent source of information that needs to be considered.

"The diuretic properties of celery seeds are useful to stimulate kidney cleansing in case of stones."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5241)


This Is What Doctors Will Never Tell You About The CLOVES So You Do Not Use Them. AMAZING!
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 19, 2017 11:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: This Is What Doctors Will Never Tell You About The CLOVES So You Do Not Use Them. AMAZING!





There is powerful medicine in many herbs that people would never think of as medicine. One of these powerful, health giving plant products is the Clove. Clove is a remedy which provides a natural alternative to pharmaceuticals which might have side effects. Clove treats nausea and vomiting when mixed with honey. Clove is known to help with dizziness when sipped with water. Clove is useful in helping heal dental infections. When one teaspoon of clove is mixed with an equal amount of warmed sesame oil, it can be used to treat ear ache. Clove is a remedy for many different types of ailments.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxC-2dlEOME&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Sometimes a healing alternative that is kinder to the wallet and is natural also works wonders.
  • Cloves, for example, help to naturally alleviate gas and ease digestion.
  • Various home remedies use cloves, in mixes and Infusions, to aide and soothe ear aches, tooth infections, ease dizziness, nausea, diarrhea and even labor contractions.

"The nature every day surprises us more, it is incredible the amount of mixes, shakes, Infusions, among other things can be prepared, either with: fruits, herbs, oils and other alternatives that can only provide mother earth."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4221)


10 Health Benefits of Drinking Dandelion Tea
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 22, 2017 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 10 Health Benefits of Drinking Dandelion Tea





It may be the arch nemesis of a yard savvy homeowner, but dandelions aren’t without their redeeming qualities. As a matter of fact, these weeds are commonly used in folk medicine, and have been for quite some time. When people talk about dandelion tea, they are largely talking about one of two different beverages: an Infusion made of the plant’s leaves, or one made of roasted dandelion roots. Both are considered safe and are used for a variety of purposes

Key Takeaways:

  • The truth of it is dandelion tea has a number of health benefits that are worth checking out. Dandelions are full of vitamins and minerals that are great for you as well.
  • According to SELF Nutrition Data, dandelion leaves and roots are an excellent source of vitamins and minerals, especially vitamins A and K.
  • The benefits of dandelion tea require more research-based evidence as most tests have been performed on animals and not humans. However, most benefits are based on the properties and nutritional facts of dandelion and human experiences as this weed has been consumed by humans for ages.

"Dandelions are full of vitamins and minerals that are great for you as well."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.foods4betterhealth.com/dandelion-tea-benefits-30194&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmY4MTYyZmQ1NTMyNTY3NGQ6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFWDxbVYQuRbNhpuJbNvCO-ROgqIQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3996)


Fewer grains and more fruits and vegetables may keep your bones strong
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 07, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fewer grains and more fruits and vegetables may keep your bones strong





It is a well known fact that vegetables and fruits and fresh food are much healthier than a heavy grain diet. What most people do not understand is that eating less grain can also mean stronger bones. Along with being healthier it is possible to save your bones with less grain in your diet.

Key Takeaways:

  • 92 percent of LEMTRADA patience had an Infusion reaction.
  • We get 500 more calories from grains than we did in the 1970's.
  • We eat 40 percent more grain than we did in the 1970's and need to eat less.

"The outlook for bone health isn't all doom and gloom, fortunately. In 2015, Dawson-Hughes and her team found that certain dietary supplements may counteract the effects of acid on bone. Their study, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, involved 244 women and men over age 50. Half were given daily supplements of potassium bicarbonate (a potent alkali), the rest a placebo."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-01-grains-fruits-vegetables-bones-strong.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNHx_edIr12oft9Ge13o6u5uOB00fQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3900)


Oregano Plant Is the Most Potent Antimicrobial In The world
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 15, 2016 07:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Oregano Plant Is the Most Potent Antimicrobial In The world

Along with its culinary usage, oregano shows antimicrobial and antioxidant properties and possess probable activity like an antispasmodic and in diabetes. But there is no clinical proof to facilitate the usage of oregano in any signs. Normal or wild oregano is a perennial plant grown in the Mediterranean region and Asia. It is also cultivated in the United States. The creeping rootstock of oregano makes a downy, square, purplish stem with reverse ovate leaves. The plant stem also grows about 76cm tall. Purple two lipped flowers develop in terminal groups from July to October.

Features of Oregano


This plant has been a normal ingredient in Italy, Spain and Italian dishes like a spice and flavouring compound for several years. Its basic purpose was like a cautious digestive and circulatory stimulant. This plant has been availed in perfumery for the volatile oil materials, particularly in scenting soaps. The antiseptic feature of medicinal and aromatic plants and the extracts have been identified since antiquity. It has been recommended that an Infusion of the new herb is useful in treating a collapsed stomach and indigestion, colic, headache and nervous problems as well as for some respiratory ailments. A mixture of the flowers has been utilized to avoid seasickness.

Uses of Oregano


The oil of this plant has been availed externally in lotions and liniments and to ease toothache. Oregano has been utilized like an ant repellent. Oregano has ursolic and oleanolic acids, hydroquinones, flavonoids, rosmarinic, caffeic,tannins, lithospermic acid and phenolic glycosides. The compounds of phenolic represent seventy one percent of the full oil. The carvacrol and polar phenols thymol are accountable for several of the properties of the necessary oil as well as terpinene and P-cymene. Research has compared the impacts of oregano necessary oil, carvacrol and thymol on fungi. All three totally reduced fungal development of aspergillus and penicillium species. The oil also seems to possess certain activity against Candida species, probably due to the reason of its carvacrol content.

The oregano volatile oil have explained in vitro antibacterial activity against different types of gram negative and gram positive microorganisms like pseudomonas, listeria, salmonella, proteus and clostridium species as well as certain methicillin resistant. There are different reports explaining antiparasitic activity of oregano. The origanum vulgare oil has been presented to remove normal parasites in pheasants and chickens. There are also some other Potent Antimicrobial seen in the world like clove, cinnamon, nutmeg, onion, garlic, anise, sassafras, ginger. These all have certain amount of antimicrobial properties in it.



Related Products

0210780153831

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3451)


Chamomile: What You May Not Know!
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 16, 2016 09:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Chamomile: What You May Not Know!


Chamomile is a plant resembling the daisy that has been used for centuries to calm and east stress. It is available in tea Infusions, tinctures, capsules and in a variety of oils and creams. Drinking chamomile tea comes with these great benefits:

  1. Sleep aid:  it calms the nervous system and slides you into a deep slumber, making it a good treatment for insomnia.
  2. The anti-inflammatory compounds contained in chamomile can ease joint, muscle and head pain.
  3. It provides relief from menstrual cramps by reducing muscle spasms. Drinking chamomile tea raises the levels of glycine in the bloodstream, a compound used by the body to control muscle spasms.
  4.  Managing stress and anxiety:  It has a soothing effect on the nerves, providing a natural solution for mental discomfort, stress and anxiety.
  5. Immune boost:  chamomile has antioxidants properties, antioxidants can  boosts your immune system and helps the body recover from damage.

Chamomile is an excellent tea that everybody should have at their disposal when you need to relax and calm down from a busy stressful work day.  The Tea is great tasting and easy to make.





REFERENCES

//www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/chamomile-topic-overview

https://www.drugs.com/npc/chamomile.html

//www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3090937/Is-chamomile-tea-secret-long-life-Herbal-brew-slash-risk-early-death.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamomile#Tea

//naturalsociety.com/9-amazing-health-benefits-of-chamomile-tea/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3293)


How Hyaluronic Acid Benefits The Skin
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 20, 2014 09:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Hyaluronic Acid Benefits The Skin

skinWhat is hyaluronic?

Hyaluronic corrosive is found in a great deal of hostile to maturing items. It helps your skin by enhancing the tone and composition. It is discovered characteristically in the body and serves to grease up specific territories.

Regularly Occurring

Your skin produces hyaluronic corrosive regularly. This happens in the deeper layers and keeps the skin stout and smooth. As we get more seasoned, our body thinks that it is hard to hold dampness so the skin starts to lose its tone and suppleness. Without sufficient dampness, the skin is inclined to hang and as it loses flexibility, wrinkles and scarcely discernible differences show up.

Hyaluronic Acid's Function

This corrosive functions as  against maturing element by helping your body to transform collagen. Collagen is an exceptionally imperative connective tissue found in the skin, which helps it to keep its structure. Surveys Hydroxatone has indicated that including this as a segment the skin gets back its sound shine and energy.

Hyaluronic corrosive additionally helps the skin to repair itself from natural harm, for instance the climate or airborne poisons. Audits Hydroxatone has indicated that this cream works well in light of the fact that the Hyaluronic corrosive can infiltrate profound into the skin. Notwithstanding decreasing wrinkles, it has been indicated to support with skin aggravation and in lessening pimple inflamation scars.

Superior to Botox

There is other mainstream approaches to lessen wrinkles, for example, Botox or plastic surgery. Then again, the principle issue with these systems is, separated from being considerably more exorbitant; they are extremely equivocal on the body and can have awful reactions. Hyaluronic corrosive is not dangerous: it is even generated regularly by the body. It is much less expensive to utilize and has not been indicated to have any significant symptoms. Likewise, dissimilar to Botox Infusions, creams holding this corrosive might be utilized anywhere on the face.

Hydration Properties

Hyaluronic corrosive can hydrate the skin successfully. Truth be told, it can hold 100 times its weight in water. One reason for wrinkles is skin dryness, so by holding more dampness in your skin, you can diminish the appearance of wrinkles as well as keep more from showing up.

Hyaluronic corrosive works successfully in against maturing. A substance discovered regularly in the body, it could infiltrate profound into the skin and serves to hold dampness. A cream holding this corrosive is a much more secure strategy than surgery and its belongings are longer enduring.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3123)


Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 27, 2012 10:38 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root

The Blue Cohosh Root is a perennial flowering plant belonging to the family 'Berberidaceae'. It is also known as 'Squaw Root' and produces fruits that resemble blue-berries. The foliage too has a bluish hue to it.

History Of The Blue Cohosh

Blue Cohosh is the native plant of North America. In the ancient times, it was commonly referred to as the 'Womens Herb' believed to bring relief during menstruation, relieve cramps, regulate erratic periods and facilitate or induce labour before delivery. Studies suggest that women consumed an Infusion of the root a couple of weeks before they were due for giving birth.The plant, supposedly, acted on the uterus in some way. Also, the root was decocted into a strong drink which was then used as a contraceptive.

Health Benefits

Blue Cohosh root may be used for certain medicinal purposes though its safe use is still a contentious issue. It might have a role in stimulating the uterus or acting as a laxative and relieving painful colic conditions. Some people believe it to be a beneficial remedy for sore throat, hiccups, muscular spasms, epileptic cases, joint problems etc. The root has similarities to the hormone called 'estrogen' which is found in the female body. The root can be used in its fresh or dried form both. It can be used alone or as a blend of other herbs. Some people also use it as a coffee bean substitute. 

Those who should avoid blue cohosh are:

However, it is recommended that it should be taken under professional advice and supervision of a physician to prevent any untoward side-effects. People suffering from heart ailments, diabetes or diarrhoea and pregnant women should avoid the root. There are incidents that prove the negative effect of the Blue Cohosh on the kidneys if used excessively. It is best to use the Blue Cohosh in a controlled and supervised manner.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2778)


Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 21, 2012 05:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root

The Blue Cohosh Root is a perennial flowering plant belonging to the family 'Berberidaceae'. It is also known as 'Squaw Root' and produces fruits that resemble blue-berries. The foliage too has a bluish hue to it. History Of The Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh is the native plant of North America. In the ancient times, it was commonly referred to as the 'Womens Herb' believed to bring relief during menstruation, relieve cramps, regulate erratic periods and facilitate or induce labour before delivery.

Studies suggest that women consumed an Infusion of the root a couple of weeks before they were due for giving birth. The plant, supposedly, acted on the uterus in some way. Also, the root was decocted into a strong drink which was then used as a contraceptive.

Health Benefits

Blue Cohosh root may be used for certain medicinal purposes though its safe use is still a contentious issue. It might have a role in stimulating the uterus or acting as a laxative and relieving painful colic conditions. Some people believe it to be a beneficial remedy for sore throat, hiccups, muscle spasms, epileptic cases, joint problems etc. The root has similarities to the hormone called 'estrogen' which is found in the female body.

The root can be used in its fresh or dried form both. It can be used alone or as a blend of other herbs. Some people also use it as a coffee bean substitute. However, it is recommended that it should be taken under professional advice and supervision of a physician to prevent any untoward side-effects. People suffering from heart ailments, diabetes or diarrhea and pregnant women should avoid the root. There are incidents that prove the negative effect of the Blue Cohosh on the kidneys if used excessively.


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2769)


History And Uses Of Xylitol
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 07, 2012 07:50 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanet.net)
Subject: History And Uses Of Xylitol

Xylitol is the 5-carbon sugar which is found within the birch tree sap and it's naturally found in the fibers of various vegetables and fruits. This is a sugar-alcohol sweetener commonly used as the sugar substitute.

History of xylitol

Although discovered in the 19th century during the Second World War, Xylitol has been recognized ever since the tardy 1800s. The researchers from Germany and France were the first individuals to try to produce this product approximately 100 years ago, but ended up creating syrup-like consistency mixture. This product became commercially available in the 1960s and the commercial process is still the same as it was during the 1960s.

Before 1943, the scientists' categorized this sugar with various sugary carbohydrates (polyols) and it lingered so till the beginning of the war-associated deficiency of sugar which initiated the call for an alternate sugar. This initiated further research in to the xylitols insulin-independent properties, this resulted in discovery of its other biological benefits. In 1962 this chemical was introduced in the Infusion therapy demonstrating that it can be introduced to ill individuals.

The commercial production process involves extraction of Polysaccharides rich in Xylose from various agricultural by-products and hardwoods. These are hydrolyzed with various intense acidic treatments and then it is purified before hydrogenation is done. This process needs a lot of harsh chemicals and is quite expensive and inefficient.

It was until 1970 that the odontological benefit of xylitol was ascertained in Finland, Turku. The initial study of the effects of this sugar on the dental plaque began during the same year. This resulted in large scale production of xylitol, in 1974 by the Finnish sugar company. Sugar-free dental product was first launched in Finland which was a xylitol chewing-gum.

How xylitol works

This sugar can prevent cavity in various ways by actually blocking the tooth decaying process. The bacteria causing decay cannot ferment this sugar into acids as it does with other sugars including dextrose, fructose, glucose and sucrose. This results in production of less acidic by-product thus interfering with the dental plaque environment which favors decaying. This results in prevention of tooth demineralization.

The high pH condition caused by xylitol sugar is not favorable for the cariogenic bacteria which are responsible for decaying. This results in fewer bacteria in the plaques and long-term exposure has an effect on which type of bacteria will prevail within the plaque. This also inhibits the growth of specific xylitol-sensitive bacteria strain. Since they cannot breakdown this sugar, they end up not reproducing and growing in population. The lack of fermentable sugars results in creation of anti-cavity effect.

The starvation effect created by this sugar prevents accumulation of cariogenic bacteria in the plaques. Long term xylitol exposure results in change of predominant cariogenic bacteria to xylitol-resistant strains from xylitol-sensitive. This xylitol-sensitive strain of bacteria cannot colonize the plaque since they have less adhering capabilities.

The less acidic condition in the dental plaque interface created by this sugar can initiate demineralization. Demineralization occurs when the plaque interface is at a pH of 5.5 or below since fewer bacteria live in the plaques. Studies have showed that demineralized tooth samples immersed in a solution containing 20% xylitol experienced a great remineralization degree. This is noted in the deep and middle tooth layers.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2558)


Corn Silk
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 16, 2009 03:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Corn Silk

Corn cob and silk with huskCornsilk is an herbal remedy that is made from stigmas, which are the yellowish thread-like strands, found inside the husks of corn. Stigmas are found on the female flower of corn and are a member of the grass family. This part of the corn plant measurers four to eight inches long and is collected for medicinal use before the plant is pollinated. Cornsilk can also be removed from corn cobs for use as a remedy. If fertilized, the stigmas will become dry and brown, with yellow corn kernels develop. Native to North America, corn now grows around the world in warm climates. Cornsilk is also known as mother’s hair, Indian corn, maize jagnog, Turkish corn, yu mi xu, and stigmata maydis.

Once used by the Inca tribe, cornsilk is thought to have originated in Central America. Traditionally, this herb was used to treat urogenital infections. Cornsilk is also used for bladder complaints, as it has a great cleansing effect on the urea as it circulates. This herb is also extremely valuable for the treatment of renal and cystic inflammation. Cornsilk helps with kidney problems, inflamed bladder, and prostate gland problems. This herb may be helpful for bed-wetting that is caused by an inflamed bladder. Additionally, it works to rid the body of morbid deposits by using the antiseptic properties that it is equipped with. Cornsilk has been used by physicians as a diuretic for conditions of cystitis.

Some herbalists believe that cornsilk is best when it is used fresh. However, it also can be found in dried forms. Although cornsilk is typically collected from the female flower or from corn cobs, cornsilk is available commercially in powdered and capsule form and as an extract. Cornsilk is often brewed as a tea and is considered to be very soothing as a beverage. This tea or Infusion can be made by pouring one cup of boiling water over two teaspoons of dried cornsilk. Then, the mixture is covered and steeped for ten to fifteen minutes. It is recommended that this tea be consumed three times each day. Additionally, a tincture of one teaspoon of cornsilk can be taken three times each day. This tincture can be purchased over the counter or made at home. At home, it is made by mixing the herb with water or alcohol at a ratio of 1:5 or 1:10. Cornsilk can also be purchased in capsule form with the usual dosage for 400-mg capsules being two capsules with meals three times daily. Corn silk and husk

The silk of cornsilk is used to provide alterative, antilithic, antiseptic, cholagogue, diuretic, demulcent, lithotriptic, mucilant, and mild stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are silicon, PABA, and vitamins K and B. Primarily, this herb is extremely beneficial in dealing with heart conditions, kidney problems, urinary incontinence, and urinary problems.

Additionally, this cornsilk has been proven to be extremely helpful in treating arteriosclerosis, bed-wetting, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cystic irritations, gonorrhea, obesity, and prostate problems. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by cornsilk, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2103)


Horehound Herb
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 21, 2009 11:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horehound Herb

Horehound has been around for thousands of years. The Romans used this herb in a combination as an antidote for poison. The horehound plant is a bushy plant that produces numerous annual branching stems. The plant is a foot or more in height and has whitish flowers. The leaves are much wrinkled, opposite, petiolate, and about an inch long. They are covered with white, felted hairs that give them a wooly appearance. The leaves have a strange, musky smell that can be diminished by drying the plant. Horehound is known to flower between June and September.

An ancient Greek physician by the name of Galen first recommended horehound for use in treating respiratory conditions. Early European physicians also used horehound to treat respiratory ailments. Early settlers in North America brought horehound with them to treat coughs, colds, and tuberculosis. The herb was also used to treat hepatitis, malaria, and intestinal worms. Horehound was also used to promote menstruation and sweating. Most commonly, the herb is used to treat colds and coughs, to soothe the throat and loosen mucus in the chest. Horehound is a well-known lung and throat remedy.

Warm Infusions of horehound are able to relieve congestion and hyperemic conditions of the lungs. They do this by promoting an outward flow of blood. In large doses, horehound will work as a mild laxative. Applying the dried herb topically is a great way to treat herpes simplex, eruptions, eczema, and shingles.

The Romans praised horehound because of its medicinal purposes. Its Latin name Marrubium is derived from the word Maria urbs, which is an ancient town of Italy. The plant was called the ‘Seed of Horus” or the ‘Bull’s Blood,’ and the ‘Eye of the Star’ by the Egyptian Priests. Horehound was a main ingredient in Caesar’s antidote for vegetable poisons. It was recommended, in addition to its uses in coughs and colds, for those that had drunk poison or had been bitten by serpents. Horehound was once thought of as an anti-magical herb. Additionally, horehound is a serviceable remedy against cankerworm in trees. Some believed that if it is put into new milk and set in a place where there are a lot of flies, it will quickly kill all of them.

The marrubiin content of horehound is believed to be the responsible component, giving it its ability to stimulate bronchial mucosa secretions. This information was obtained by German research done in 1959. Horehound can be used as a safe and effective expectorant.

The entire horehound plant should be used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antitussive, aromatic, bitter, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, mild purgative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are iron, potassium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and F. Primarily, horehound is extremely helpful in dealing with asthma, colds, coughs, croup, lung ailments, excessive mucus, phlegm, and respiratory problems.

Additionally, this herb is beneficial in treating bronchitis, infectious diseases, earaches, external eczema, fevers, glandular problems, jaundice, absent menstruation, and external shingles. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horehound, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2084)


Red Clover Blossom
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 29, 2009 01:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Red Clover Blossom

Red clover is also commonly referred to as wild clover, purple clover, meadow clover, honeysuckle clover, or cow grass. This herb is a member of the pea family. It is commonly found in pastures, lawns, along roadsides, and in meadows. Many consider this herb to be a nuisance and, thus, they try to eliminate it from their lawns. However, this is not easily accomplished due to red clover’s hearty nature.

The use of red clover most likely originated in Europe. There, it was used as an expectorant and a diuretic. Additionally, it was burned as incense to invoke the spirits of the deceased. Some people even wore the leaves of red clover as charms against evil. The red clover was revered by early Christians because they associated its three leaves with the Trinity. The flowers of this plant were dried by the ancient Chinese and then put in pillows to help relax both the body and mind. The Native Americans used red clover as an Infusion gargle for sore throats, whooping cough, and asthma. Additionally, they used it on children because it was a milder, safer way to fight debilitating childhood diseases.

This herb has been used for treating cancer, bronchitis, nervous conditions, spasms, and toxins in the body. It is considered by herbalists to be a blood cleanser. Herbalists also recommend this mild herb in formulas when using a cleansing program. Red clover is often mixed with honey and water to make a cough syrup and act as an expectorant. The herb is a mild sedative and is useful for spasmodic conditions, bronchitis, wheezing, and fatigue. Because red clover is mild, it can often be used by children.

Research has determined that red clover contains some antibiotic properties that are beneficial in fighting several kinds of bacteria. Among these types of bacteria is the one that causes tuberculosis. Additionally, red clover has a long history of use in treating cancer. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute have uncovered some anticancer activity in red clover, including daidzein and genistein activity. Even though the findings are preliminary and the use of red clover as a cancer treatment has not yet been validated, research is continuing to show promising results.

Externally, red clover has been used to treat skin problems such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, and even vaginal irritation. It can also be applied topically to burns, boils, sores, and ulcers. Red clover has also been documented for use in treating AIDS, syphilis, and leprosy. This herb can be applied externally to help soothe lymphatic swelling and as an eyewash.

In short, the flowers of red clover are used to provide alterative, antibiotic, antispasmodic, blood purifier, nutritive, sedative, stimulant, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in red clover are calcium, cobalt, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, selenium, sodium, tin, and vitamins A, C, B-complex, F, and P. Primarily, red clover is extremely beneficial in dealing with acne, AIDS/HIV, athlete’s foot, blood impurities, bronchitis, cancer, eczema, leukemia, liver disorders, nervous disorders, psoriasis, skin disorders, spasms, and the effects of toxins.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating arthritis, asthma, boils, burns, childhood diseases, colds, constipation, coughs, muscle cramps, fatigue, flu, gallbladder, gastric disorders, indigestion, leprosy, lymphatic irritations, rheumatism, sores, syphilis, sore throat, tuberculosis, ulcers, urinary infections, vaginal irritations, whooping cough, and wounds.

For more information on red clover, look for this wonderful herb at your local heath food store. Remember to always look for name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2069)


Mustard Extract
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 14, 2009 11:49 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Mustard Extract

Mustard is also referred to as mustard greens, Indian mustard, and leaf mustard. This herb is a species of the mustard plant. One of its sub-varieties includes Southern Giant Curled Mustard, which is very similar in appearance to headless cabbage such as Kale. However, it has a distinct horseradish-mustard flavor. It is also known as green mustard cabbage.

The leaves, seeds, and stems of the mustard plant are edible. The plant can be found in some forms of African, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and Soul food cuisine. The leaves are used in African cooking, and the leaves, seeds, and stems are used in Indian cuisine. The plant has a particularly thick stem, it is used to make the Indian pickle and the Chinese pickle. The mustard made from the seeds of this plant is called brown mustard. The leaves are also used in many Indian dishes.

This species of mustard plant is more pungent than closely-related greens like kale, cabbage, and collard greens. It is often mixed with these milder greens in a dish of mixed greens, which may even include wild greens like dandelion. Mustard greens are high in both vitamin A and K. Mustard greens are often used in Chinese and Japanese cuisines. Asian mustard greens are typically stir-fried or pickled.

The ancient Greeks used mustard for its medicinal value. Additionally, it was used for its flavoring. The Romans also used this herb. They added crushed seeds to wine for a spicy flavor. John Parkinson and Nicholas Culpeper, English herbalists, both recommended mustard for ailments like epileptic seizures and toothaches. The herb was used by Native Americans and early colonists for rheumatism and muscle pain.

Mustard is a strong stimulating herb. It is responsible for promoting the appetite and stimulating the gastric mucous membranes to aid in digestion. An Infusion of the mustard seed stimulates urine and helps to promote menstruation. Additionally, it is a valuable emetic for narcotic poisoning, as it empties the stomach without depression of the system. Mustard is often used externally as a plaster or poultice for sore, stiff muscles. A plaster of mustard can also be used to treat congestion, warm the skin, and clear the lungs.

The seeds of the mustard plant are used to provide alterative, analgesic, blood purifier, caminative, digestive, diuretic, emetic, expectorant, irritant, rubefacient, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in mustard are calcium, cobalt, iodine, iron, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B12, and C. Primarily, mustard is extremely beneficial in dealing with indigestion, liver disorders, and lung disorders.

Additionally, the herb is very helpful in treating appetite loss, arthritis, blood impurities, breath odor, bronchitis, emphysema, sore feet, fevers, gas, hiccups, kidney problems, pleurisy, pneumonia, snakebites, sprains, and sore throat. Before supplementing with this, or any other nutrient, it is important to consult your health care provider. In doing so, you will ensure yourself optimum health benefits. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by mustard, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2055)


Senna Leaf
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 06, 2009 12:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Senna Leaf

The American senna has been used widely for its mild purgative abilities. Native Americans used this as a drink to reduce fevers, for sore throat, and as a laxative. The herb was official in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1882. Senna was used in Chinese medicine. This herb, along with other laxatives, has been used since prehistoric times in order to treat colonic and menstrual obstructions. Senna can be found along the Nile River. The herb was used in Arab medicine as an effective and safe laxative. Nicholas Culpeper, the seventeenth-century herbalist, claimed that senna was able to clean the stomach and purge melancholy and phlegm from the head, brain, lungs, heart, liver, and spleen.

The senna plant held a major role in herbalism and folk medicine for millennia. The herb was and still is a significant item of trans-national trade by the Ababdeh people. It is grown both commercially and traditionally along the middle Nile. However, more generally, it is found in many regions around the northwestern Indian Ocean. Senna is similar to aloe and rhubarb, as it has similar active ingredients such as anthraquinone and their glucosides.

This herb is considered to be a useful laxative. It is responsible for intestinal parasitic movements. The herb has a strong effect on the entire intestinal tract, especially the colon. A lot of people believe that a clean colon can prevent autointoxication and may be an underlying cause of many diseases. Usually, senna is combined with other herbs, such as ginger or fennel, in order to prevent intestinal cramping and get better results. The herb should not be used if there is inflammation of the stomach. This is because it may aggravate the problem. Senna helps to tone and restore the digestive system through cleansing. The herb has been used throughout history and today, it is still used throughout the world.

Senna acts on the lower bowel. It increases the peristaltic movements of the colon. Most often, the plants are prepared as an Infusion. The long-standing use of senna is reflected by its presence in many herbal remedies and tonics. Today, senna is still used as the primary ingredient in certain commercial stimulant laxatives. However, it is also the primary ingredient found in dieter’s teas. However, the combination of acting as a stimulant, which reduces a dieter’s appetite, and the laxative properties that cause food to move through the system before many calories can be absorbed is a combination that can lead to rapid and even dangerous weight loss.

Senna is a powerful laxative. The anthroquinon glycosides that are found in senna are believed to be responsible for the stimulatory effect it provides on the colon. Laxative should not be used for extended periods of time or dependency may occur.

The leaves and pods of the senna plant are responsible for providing anthelmintic and mild purgative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, selenium, silicon, sodium, vitamins A, B-complex, and C, and zinc. Primarily, senna is extremely beneficial in treating constipation, jaundice, and worms. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with acne, excessive bile, breath odor, colic, gallstones, gout, menstrual symptoms, obesity, rheumatism, and skin disease.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by senna, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2048)


Strengthen The Liver and Kidneys With Leucine
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 27, 2009 02:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Strengthen The Liver and Kidneys With Leucine

L-leucine is an amino acid that is used by the body to fuel exercise and muscle-building to provide you with that athletic edge that gets you ahead of your opponents. It does so in a number of ways, none of them specifically by the direct generation of energy as such.

It is also an essential amino acid, since it cannot be manufactured by your body and hence must be taken as a supplement or as part of your diet. Foods rich in leucine include nuts, whole wheat products such as wholemeal bread, and brown rice. It is a hydrophobic amino acid, meaning that it does not like water.

It is also one of three essential branched chain amino acids, the other two being L-valine and L-isoleucine, and offers many benefits to athletic performance that shall be discussed below It also helps to preserve the body's stores of glycogen, used as an emergency energy source. Other than these properties, it possesses others, such as the maintenance of the nitrogen balance in the body.

So how does it work to fuel your body while you are exercising? The answer is not as you might think. L-leucine doesn't increase your energy levels as creatine does when it elevates your ATP (adenosine triphosphate) levels. ATP is the molecule of energy that is synthesized in your body cells, and is then converted back to ADP, the diphosphate, with the release of energy in the form of muscular contractions.

This amino acid is what is referred to as a 'limiting' substance, in that the other amino acids cannot do their jobs in your body unless you have sufficient L-leucine in proportion to them. Specifically, you need two parts of L-valine and two parts of L-leucine to one part of L-isoleucine for optimum usage of the food that you eat.

Therefore you cannot just take the supplement without considering how much should be taken to ensure this balance. Excess will be wasted and a deficiency would fail to make proper use of the protein content of your food.

If you suffer from a deficiency, therefore, your body cannot make best use of the protein in your diet to the extent that muscle tissue will not be generated during exercise. In fact it causes catabolism, or the breakdown of muscle tissue, resulting in a loss of performance and possible increase in fatty tissue as opposed to lean muscle. The only way to build muscle is take in sufficient nitrogen in the form of amino acids and protein, along with L-leucine to put that protein to best use.

One of the major properties of L-leucine is in stimulating the synthesis of skeletal muscle tissue and by using a supplement, the protein balance can be positive after a workout. It has been shown that this protein balance is generally negative until specifically L-leucine is consumed.

The way it works is to activate a muscle-generating pathway known as mTOR (mammalian Target of Rapamycin). mTOR is normally activated when the levels of ATP in the muscle cells is high, and when these levels drop then mTOR is deactivated. The activity of mTOR is sensitive to the concentration of L-leucine, and when the concentration of the amino acid in the body rises it informs mTOR that the protein in the diet is sufficient to manufacture skeletal muscle tissue, and so mTOR s activated.

Exactly how this is done is unknown, but is a fact the mTOR depends upon both L-leucine concentration and also ATP levels. This amino acid also decreases catabolism through a number of different mechanisms, one of which involves increasing insulin levels.

In fact, when insulin and L-leucine levels increase at the same time, there is a synergy that promotes the synthesis of new protein. Not only that, but the response of insulin to the presence of carbohydrates is enhanced, this resulting in an enhancement of your body's metabolism.

The amino acid can also be used to help those suffering from kidney and liver problems because it increases liver protein synthesis. It is therefore a useful adjunct both to diabetics and those suffering from liver and kidney disease.

However, because L-leucine is an essential amino acid with so many important properties, a deficiency can have specific consequences. Catabolism has been stated earlier as one such reaction to a deficiency, and others include decreased energy levels and irregularities in the levels of blood sugar.

Everything about this substance is not good however, and when taken by itself in excess, it can reduce the amount of the other amino acids in the blood, particularly of the other two branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). This in turn upsets the balance of amino acids, and reduces further the ability of the body to produce muscle tissue until a balanced supplement is taken.

Leucine also helps to maintain the nitrogen balance. It is essential for the human body to maintain a positive nitrogen balance, and L-leucine supports this. In fact, one study has demonstrated that after 12 hours Infusion with L-leucine, nitrogen balance was improved by as much as 23%.

A supplement alone is not always sufficient to maintain a positive nitrogen balance. It is generally essential that you rest your body for a sufficient length of time to allow protein to be generated. If you don't take the required amount of rest, a surplus of protein could be used to maintain energy levels rather than replace lost protein and maintain a good nitrogen balance.

A positive nitrogen balance is essential for the generation of muscle tissue, such as in bodybuilding for example, since all proteins contain nitrogen and the net nitrogen intake must exceed the excretion rate. Not in gaseous form, of course, but in the intake of amino acids and proteins. The more positive your nitrogen balance is, the faster you will recover after exercise. It is essential for anabolic exercise.

L-leucine, therefore, is a supplement that can help to maintain your current muscle mass while undergoing strenuous exercise, in addition to increasing it while resting. It offers other health benefits, one being helping to maintain clarity of thought in the aged. However, it is for its effect on muscular build-up and the athletic edge that provides that the supplement is most commonly taken.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1997)


Passion Flower
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 26, 2009 03:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Passion Flower

Passion flower has been long known and appreciated for its nervine abilities. The Aztecs used this herb as a sedative as well as for pain. From 1916 until 1936, it was listed in the National Formulary as a sedative. During the early twentieth century, passionflower was included in many over-the-counter sedative and sleep aids. Today, passionflower is available as an over-the-counter sedative in Germany. It is also used in many German homeopathic medicines to treat pain, insomnia, and nervous restlessness. Professional herbalists use passionflower today in combination with other calming herbs to help treat insomnia, tension, and other health problems that are related to anxiety and nervousness.

Passion flower is a perennial climbing vine that grows to a length of nearly ten meters. Each leaf on the passionflower has petals that vary in color from white to pale red. It possesses a fruit that is orange-colored, multi-seeded, and egg-shaped. This fruit is edible, containing a sweetish yellow pulp. According to folklore, the passionflower was given its name because it resembles the crown of thorns worn by Jesus during the crucifixion.

Recent research on passion flower has concluded that it is also useful for insomnia, fatigue, spasms, and nervous tension. The majority of the research done on this herb has focused on its sedative action and found good results. Studies have even found that an extract of passionflower can reduce locomotor activity and prolong sleeping. Some additional tests indicate that this herb has pain reliving abilities as well as sedative effects. It also contains anti-inflammatory properties which make it useful for those who are suffering from arthritis.

This plant contains passiflorine, which is thought to be the active ingredient, as its principles are similar to that of morphine. This herb is even occasionally referred to as the nonpoisonous, safe opium of the natural physician. It is extremely soothing to the nervous system. It is a good way to treat hysteria, anxiety, and hyperactivity. This herb possesses the ability to depress the central nervous system and also lower high blood pressure. Herbal combinations that contain valerian and passionflower are considered to be very useful as a natural tranquilizer. Additionally, passionflower contains calcium and magnesium, both of which are essential for the nervous system. This herb has been proven safe for both children and the elderly.

Passion flower remedies are made from either fresh or dried flowers as well as other ground parts of the plant. Whole and raw plant materials are used. The flowering shoots, which grow 10 to 15 centimeters above the ground, are harvested after the first fruits have matured. They are then either air-dried or hay dried. Passion flower is available as an Infusion, tea, liquid extract, or tincture. For adults taking an Infusion, the recommended amount is 2 to 5 grams of dried herb three times a day.

Fluid extracts should be taken three times a day, using about 10 to 30 drops, while a tincture should also be taken three times a day using 10 to 60 drops. For children, the recommended adult dose should be adjusted to account for the child’s weight. Since most herbal dosages for adults are calculated on a 150 pound adult, a child who weighs 50 lbs should receive an appropriate dose of passionflower of 1/3 of an adult dosage. Generally speaking, passionflower is considered to be safe and nontoxic. Passionflower should not be taken if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Passion flower can be found at your local and internet health food store and available in capsule, tablet, and powder form. When looking to purchase this supplement, stick with name brands such as Solaray and Source Naturals. Name brand companies back their product for any reason and put in pure quality ingredients in each bottle.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1982)


Cat's Claw Bark
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 19, 2008 09:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cat's Claw Bark

We are currently living in a time when vital health issues that greatly affect our families are a huge concern. Cat's claw has been shown to offer a huge array of therapeutic actions, as it is currently drawing a huge amount of attention in health-care. Because cat's claw has anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, and anti-viral capabilities, it is currently being widely used in Europe for the treatment of cancer, aids, arthritis, and several other degenerative diseases.

Cat's claws emergence could not have been better timed, as many people feel that the war on cancer is being lost, with new potentially fatal viruses continuing to evolve and the over-prescription of antibiotics making us even more vulnerable to infection. Recently, taking supplements such as cat's claw is becoming more of the rule than the exception.

It is safe to say that almost all of us want to know how to reduce our risk of cancer, protect ourselves from toxins and pollutants, boost our immune system to fight off new viral strains and bacterial diseases, and prevent premature aging and degenerative diseases. Additionally, many of us have found that treating the disease after the fact is much less desirable than the protecting our immune systems, as a well-nourished and healthy immune system can keep us from developing diseases, including cancer. Cat's claw has the ability to fortify immunity, works to scavenge free radicals, and eases inflammation.

Cat's claw was traditionally used by Peruvian natives in a variety of applications. They apply its leaves for headaches, use teas for infections including influenza, and have placed plants in antipyretic baths for fevers. Additionally, gargles are used frequently and poultices of the boiled crushed bark have been applied to affected areas. Peruvian tribal medicine has also vigorously rubbed Infusions of the raw bark on parts of the body, such as the limbs. The vines of cat's claw are often macerated with a pestle or stems are allowed to stand in water for several hours. In Peruvian culture, snuffing or smoking the dried leaves or bark occurs on occasion. Also, enemas are used in some regions of the tropical South America, but they are relatively rare in the Amazon.

Cat's claw can be taken in many forms including a dried, powdered form that is usually available in gelatin capsules; compressed tablets; a decoction or tea; or a liquid suspension that are in the form of gels or extracts, which can often be taken in soft gelatin form. Some experts seem to think that cat's claw extracts have not yet proven their potency and therefore, they recommend taking reliable sources of the plant which use the inner bark of the vine. The alkaloid content of some plants can vary significantly because of many different factors, so only reputable sources of cat's claw are recommended to be purchased.

Many studies that have taken place in Europe have shown that cat's claw has extremely low toxicity, even when it is taken in large doses. Anyone who has had a transplant or any pregnant or nursing women should not take cat's claw. Taking cat's claw can potentially cause diarrhea or adjust bowel consistency in some people.

If one is looking for a immune boosting herb from the Amazon look no further, cat's claw can help the sick get well and keep the healthy person free from disease by boosting the immune system.

--
Buy Cat's Claw At Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1950)


Artichoke Promotes Healthy Fat Digestion and Metabolism
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 30, 2008 10:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Artichoke Promotes Healthy Fat Digestion and Metabolism

In discussing the health benefits of the artichoke, and the way it promotes healthy fat digestion and metabolism, we are talking here about the true artichoke: the globe artichoke. The alternative Jerusalem artichoke is not an artichoke at all, but a member of the sunflower family. The globe artichoke is a type of thistle.

It is in fact a perennial thistle that originated in the Mediterranean area and is now cultivated world wide. The edible portions are the lower parts of the bracts and the base of the buds, known as the heart while the inedible portion in the center of the bud is known as the ‘choke’. Globe artichokes were introduced to the USA in the 19th century by French and Spanish immigrants who settled in Louisiana and California respectively. Contrary to popular opinion its name did not come from the ‘heart’ and the ‘choke’, but from the Arabic for ground thorn: ‘ardi shauki’.

In today’s world of fast foods, a high consumption of fats and red meat and excessive alcohol consumption, your liver is put under a great strain. Its main function is as a chemical factory, to produce the chemicals, such as enzymes and other proteins, needed to maintain life and also to metabolise the nutrients we need from the food we eat. If you overtax your liver it will not work as it should, which results in poor digestion and assimilation of the nutrients in your food and an increase in the toxins in your blood.

You will feel tired and run down, with digestion problems and many other health complaints. Liver abuse can result in malnutrition, which also results in cirrhosis which is not curable. You should seriously appraise your diet, and identify the eating and drinking habits that are causing the problem, and give your liver a rest. Artichoke extract is a great liver tonic, and your liver will respond well to a break from alcohol and fatty foods, and a course of artichoke leaves and extract.

The main active ingredient of the artichoke is cynarine (1,5-dicaffeylquinic acid), a substance that stimulates the production of bile, and hence renders the artichoke an excellent starter for any meal. This is yet another example of science finding a logical reason for people eating artichokes for centuries in order to promote the health of their liver and digestive system. It is not only for its cynarine content that the globe artichoke is useful, however, but also the luteolin and chlorogenic acids that it contains.

The stimulation of bile production by the cynarine is one the more important of the effects of artichoke on your well being. Bile emulsifies fats and renders them into an easily digested form. Most of the digestive chemicals are water soluble, and without this emulsification of the fat with water then most of the fats we consume would pass through the body unchanged. We would the vats majority of the fat soluble nutrients in our food, including vitamins A, D, E and K.

Bile enables us to digest fats and to absorb vitamins from our food, and also promotes the general health of our digestive system. It is biosynthesized in the liver from various enzymes and triglycerides and then stored in the gall bladder until needed. Its use is prompted by the presence of fats in the system, and this is stimulated by the cynarine in the artichoke leaves.

Its ability to improve bile flow has been recognized by scientist’s world wide, and artichoke juice has been used by the French for many years as a liver tonic. However, it is not just for the liver and the digestive system that artichokes are useful in maintaining good health. They also have an effect on the cholesterol levels in your blood. This is believed to be due to the inhibition of the activity of enzyme HMG CoA Reductase that helps the liver to generate cholesterol. Inhibiting the activity of this enzyme reduces the amount of cholesterol produced.

This can have the effect of reduced the possibility of you developing atherosclerosis, a condition caused by deposition of low density lipid (LDL) cholesterol through the effect of free radical oxidation of the lipid. The less cholesterol to be transported by your blood, then the lower levels of the low density lipid needed to do this. This effect is also possibly due to the fact that bile is formed from cholesterol and triglycerides, and so stimulated bile production would possibly leave less cholesterol in the bloodstream.

Artichoke also possesses antioxidant properties that would contribute even further to this effect by preventing the oxidation of the LDL by free radicals. These free radicals, formed in the body both naturally and by the effects of pollutants such as pesticides, cigarette smoke and traffic fumes, are destroyed by antioxidants. In atherosclerosis the LDL lipids are oxidised and deposited under the surface cells of the blood vessels, and are then digested by certain blood cells forming a hard fatty deposit that can eventually block the arteries affected.

The result can be a heart attack or a stroke, depending on where in the body the blood vessels are affected, and if the cholesterol levels in the body are decreased through it being used to produce bile, then the concentration of LDL lipids used to transport it will also be reduced and the condition will be less likely to occur..

Apart from the liver, the gall bladder is also given a boost by artichoke because that is where bile is stored, and a regular flow to and from the gall bladder maintains its health. The only thing you should be aware of if is that if you are prone to gallstones then the increase in bile flow could cause the stones to be stuck in the bile duct. You should therefore refer to your physician before embarking on a course of artichoke extract if you have a propensity to develop gallstones.

Apart from the phytonutrients already discussed, the globe artichoke also contains a good supply of fiber and minerals such as potassium, iron, calcium and phosphorus, and also some trace elements that your body needs. It is therefore more than just a bile stimulant, but provides a wide range off essential nutrition to your body. It is know to aid conditions such as gout, high blood sugar, and digestive complaints such as flatulence, bloating and abdominal cramps.

Apart from cooking and eating the tender parts of the leaves, or bracts, you can make an Infusion of the parts that you don’t eat. Chop up the tougher leaves and pour boiling water over them as if making tea. Leave it to infuse for a few minutes and then drink. Honey can be used to take away the bitter taste; honey rather than sugar due to its greater nutritional content.



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1710)


D-Ribose Powder Benefits!
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 10, 2007 11:57 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: D-Ribose Powder Benefits!

Benefits

Supports normal heart function*

A significant amount of in vitro, animal and human research suggests benefits of ribose on heart function.* Studies have shown that ribose supplementation can enhance cardiac energy levels and support cardiovascular metabolism.* Ribose has been shown in clinical trials to enhance the recovery of heart muscle ATP levels and improve myocardial function following exercise.

Studies suggest that ribose supplementation can increase the tolerability of the cardiovascular system to exercise-induced fatigue.1 In one study, twenty men underwent treadmill exercise tests on two consecutive days to confirm the onset of fatigue secondary to exercise. The participants were then randomized to the treatment group or a placebo group. The groups received either four doses of 15 grams of D-ribose (60 grams/day total) or the same amount of placebo each day. After three days of treatment, another treadmill test was performed. The time it took to reach the specified level of fatigue was significantly greater in the ribose group than in the placebo group.

Another study investigated the ability of ribose to support healthy heart function and quality of life.2 In a randomized, crossover design study, fifteen individuals were given 5 grams three times a day of either D-ribose or placebo. Each treatment period lasted three weeks. In patients receiving ribose, echocardiography demonstrated enhancement of heart function, reflecting a “more efficient relaxation phase of the heart”. Participants also had a significant improvement in their subjective quality of life scores compared to placebo.  

Scientists suggest that suboptimal heart function is a result of the heart requiring more energy to function properly. Ribose supports the heart’s enhanced energy requirements, promoting optimal heart function. It does so by enhancing the stores of high-energy phosphates in heart tissue. These intermediates are necessary for the production and resynthesis of ATP. A double-blind crossover study in which 12 individuals were randomized to receive either ribose or dextrose (both administered as 5 grams three times daily for three weeks, followed by a 1-week washout period and crossover of treatments for three additional weeks) suggested significant enhancements in normal cardiac function during the period of ribose supplementation.3

Perhaps one of the more useful illustrations of the potential for ribose to support heart function comes from a study in which 20 rats received a continuous Infusion of ribose for 24 hours (control rats received an Infusion of saline). The hearts were then explanted (as they would be for heart transplants) and placed in preservation solution that was enriched with ribose for 4 hours. ATP levels were measured from tissue biopsies and revealed that 10 of the ribose-treated hearts had ATP levels higher than 12.3 micromoles per gram whereas saline-treated hearts (controls) had lower ATP levels, with 20% showing levels below 10 micromoles per gram of tissue. This provides support for the hypothesis that ribose may enhance the preservation of ATP levels in cardiac tissue, promoting normal heart function.4

Further animal studies have shown that ribose significantly enhances heart function after experimentally induced cardiac depression. Rats were injected with isoproterenol (a drug that stimulates sympathetic nervous system function) and had their abdominal aorta constricted to induce depression of heart function and reduce cardiac ATP levels. The decrease in ATP was primarily responsible for the depression of heart function. Continuous Infusion of ribose for 24 hours replenished ATP concentrations to normal levels and normalized heart function in these animals.5

Ribose may strengthen and support the body’s crucial antioxidant defenses*

Ribose may support the body’s innate antioxidant mechanisms while promoting an antioxidant effect of its own. Intense exercise and other strenuous activity can induce the production of free radicals. Preliminary studies suggest that ribose can attenuate some of the effects of oxidation seen after performance of intensive exercise.

One small human study indicated that ribose administered at a dose of seven grams before and after a bout of cycling exercise may reduce free radical production.6 Seven volunteers ingested either ribose or placebo both before and after intense exercise. Markers of lipid peroxidation, including malondialdehyde, significantly decreased in the ribose-supplemented group, while increasing in the control group. The results of this study indicate a possible effect of ribose in supporting antioxidant activity.

Supports healthy energy levels in heart and muscle tissue*

After bouts of intense exercise, ATP levels have been shown to decrease by an average of 15 to 20%.7 The amount of ATP stored in the muscle is limited and so the body must have the potential to rebuild ATP stores. ATP is the fuel necessary for the integrity and function of a cell. In addition, several studies have found correlations between ATP content and heart function.1 Research that was also alluded to above suggests that ribose stimulates ATP synthesis and supports heart and muscle function by enhancing ATP levels in cardiac and muscle tissue. D-ribose is an essential building block for the synthesis of ATP through the pentose phosphate pathway. 

The results of ribose supplementation enhancing ATP levels in muscle are evidenced by studies suggesting beneficial effects on anaerobic performance. In a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study assessing the effects of acute ribose supplementation, participants receiving the ribose supplement had increases in mean power (a measure of average overall muscular strength output during the sprint) and peak power (a measure of the highest muscular strength output during the sprint) when undergoing a series of cycle sprints.8 While this effect was not noted in all of the six short cycling sprints that the participants underwent, the study does illustrate the potential benefits of ribose on ATP production and, secondarily, on enhancing exercise performance.

A second placebo-controlled trial investigated the effects of four weeks of ribose-supplementation (10 grams /day) on male bodybuilders. Of the 20 participants who were recruited, twelve completed the study. Each subject participated in a heavy-resistance training program designed to increase skeletal muscle mass. The effects of ribose on body composition (body weight, body fat, lean body mass, fat mass, and bone mineral content) were also assessed. The results suggested that ribose increased total work capacity and bench press strength compared to placebo, without altering body composition.9

Supports energy recovery after exercise*

Animal studies have suggested that the administration of ribose after exercise increases the rate of adenine salvage by five to seven-fold in muscle tissue7, supporting energy recovery after exercise. When ATP is utilized by muscle tissue, the degradation products include adenine nucleotides (Adenine is one of two purine bases that is a component of DNA). Adenine is recycled to synthesize DNA, and the salvage of adenine within the muscle tissue is crucial to energy recovery. Studies have shown that the presence of adequate ribose concentrations is the rate-limiting step in the purine salvage pathway. Therefore, increased adenine salvage could potentially help in the recovery and regeneration of ATP after intense bouts of activity.

A study investigated the effect of oral intake of ribose on the synthesis of AMP, a precursor to ATP.10 Participants performed intense cycle training for seven days. They then received either ribose (at a concentration of 200 mg/kg body weight, which is equivalent to 14 grams per day for an average 70 kilogram male) or placebo three times a day for the following three days. Exercise tests were performed again on day 4. Muscle biopsy samples were taken before the first training session, immediately after, and again five hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours after the last training session. No differences were seen in exercise performance between the groups. The intense exercise caused the ATP levels in muscle to decrease in both groups. However, at 72 hours post-exercise, the ribose group exhibited a much higher ATP level than the placebo group. The muscle levels of critical building blocks for ATP, including total adenine nucleotides (TAN) and inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP), were also significantly higher in the ribose group compared to the placebo group at 24 hours after exercise. Ribose-supplementation was shown to enhance the resynthesis of ATP after intense exercise.

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Safety

Caution: Insulin-dependent diabetics and pregnant women should consult their physician before use.

Suggested Adult Use: Take 1 or 2 scoops mixed in water, juice or other beverage two times per day. May be taken with or without food.

Scientific References

1) Pliml, W., von Arnim, T., Stablein, A., Hofmann, H., Zimmer, H., Erdmann, E. Effects of ribose on exercise-induced ischaemia in stable coronary artery disease. The Lancet. 1992;340:507-510.

2) Omran, H., Illien, S., MacCarter, D., St. Cyr, J.A., Luderitz, B. D-Ribose improves diastolic function and quality of life in congestive heart failure patients: a prospective feasibility study. The European Journal of Heart Failure. 2003;5:615-619.

3) Illien, S., Omran, H., MacCarter, D., St. Cyr, J.A. Ribose improves myocardial function in congestive heart failure. FASEB Journal 2001;15(5): A1142

 

4) Muller C., Zimmer H., Gross M., Gresser U., Brotsack I., Wehling M., Pliml W. Effect of ribose on cardiac adenine nucleotides in a donor model for heart transplantation. Eur J Med Res. 1998 Dec 16;3(12):554-8.

5) Zimmer H.G. Normalization of depressed heart function in rats by ribose. Science. 1983 Apr 1;220(4592):81-2.

6) Seifert, J.G., Subudhi, A., Fu, M., Riska, J.J. The effects of ribose ingestion on indices of free radical production during hypoxic exercise. Free Rad Biol Med 2002; 33(Suppl 1) S269.

7) Zarzeczny, R., Brault, J.J., Abraham, K.A., Hancock, C.R., Terjung, R. Influence of ribose on adenine salvage after intense muscle contractions. J Applied Physiology. 2001;91:1775-1781. 

8) Berardi J.M., Ziegenfuss T.N. Effects of ribose supplementation on repeated sprint performance in men. J Strength Cond Res. 2003 Feb;17(1):47-52.

9) Van Gammeren, D.V., Falk, D., Antonio, J. The effects of four weeks of ribose supplementation on body composition and exercise performance in healthy, young, male recreational bodybuilders: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Current Ther Research. 2002;63(8):486-495.

10) Hellsten, Y., Skadhauge, L., Bangsbo, J. Effect of ribose supplementation on resynthesis of adenine nucleotides after intense intermittent training in humans. American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 2004;286:R182-R188.



--
Buy Ribose at Vitanet at a Discount

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1510)


Interview on symptoms of Fibromyalgia and one mans story
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 09, 2006 03:25 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Interview on symptoms of Fibromyalgia and one mans story

Interview with Todd Williams from Source Naturals

Todd: Michael, many of us know someone with fibromyalgia, but many of us don’t know what FM is. Can you help explain the disease?

Michael: Yes. Fibromyalgia (pronounced Fie-bro-my-AL-ja) is a complex chronic pain illness that challenges patients and health care professionals alike. It is estimated that fibromyalgia affects 8 – 10 million women, men, and children in the U.S. alone. Symptoms include: extreme fatigue, sleep abnormalities, cognitive problems, difficulty speaking clearly, memory loss, brain fog, and so on. There’s also irritable bowel syndrome, restless legs, migraine headaches, neurological symptoms, anxiety and environmental sensitivities. Ninety percent of those afflicted with fibromyalgia are women. Ten percent are men. What activates fibromyalgia within a person can be anything from a thyroid condition to an auto accident, or some type of trauma or emotional stress. There is often a compromised immune system, hormonal imbalance, and even a possible enzyme deficiency. Because the stomach and intestines are made up of muscles, fibromyalgia affects the entire digestive tract. The members in my fibromyalgia support group in Santa Monica all have stomach problems. One of the doctors believes that the fibromyalgia I have to battle with daily is a result of a thyroid problem. Thyroid problems run in my family and, not surprisingly, my brother, who lives on the other side of the country has fibromyalgia as well. We correspond and share with each other what does and doesn’t work. My ten-year career as a schoolteacher came to an end due to having fibromyalgia. I lost the energy I needed to work non-stop ten-hour days. I was forced by necessity to go into early retirement. As a result, I had to find a new manageable way to live. So I then went to Los Angeles to pursue a part time acting career. Now, regardless of whether a task is big or small, I just try to do my best, one day at a time.

Todd: Michael, how did you experience the onset of Fibromyalgia?

Michael: although I’ve really had fibromyalgia for fifteen years, I wasn’t actually diagnosed by my doctor until 1996. I was very energetic and athletic while growing up. During my twenties, I first went to University of Arizona in Tucson, and then to Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and later to Point Loma University in San Diego, where I received a Master’s Degree in education. I followed that by moving to Florida to teach and to spend some time with my family. During summer breaks from teaching, I would go down to Florida Keys and visit Miami for fun. I had plenty of energy up until I was 28-30 years old, when I noticed a drastic drop in my energy level. At that time, when I would exercise, it was very difficult for my muscles to recover after a workout, even if it was a light workout. By the time I was thirty, the muscles in my feet became unbearably tight. It became very difficult to stand or even walk very far. I had my feet X-rayed, and the reports would say that nothing was wrong. When I was thiry-five, I took some antibiotics to get rid of a cold and I ended up with severe reaction to the antibiotic, erythromycin. My stomach swelled up like a balloon and felt unbearably tight. This was my first experience with IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome). I could no longer digest my food. I developed severe food and chemical sensitivities. I could no longer digest vitamin B properly. I would be in excruciating pain for several hours after eating almost anything. I had to leave my teaching position and I ended up being mostly bedridden for two years due to exhaustion and the inability to digest food. During this time I went to twenty doctors. I had colonoscopys, endoscopies, barium x-rays and thyroid tests, but the results were always indicating a normal range. I knew that I was horribly sick but the doctors and the tests repeatedly said that nothing was wrong with me. nevertheless, the doctors did provide more prescription medicines, especially antibiotics. It’s strange that not one of these doctors mentioned or prescribed probiotics in any form for rebuilding the flora in my intestines that was destroyed by the long antibiotic regimen. Eventually I would end up spending a large sum of money and going to 40 more doctors, with each helping just a little. It was a relief when I was finally diagnosed with fibromyalgia, because it helped me narrow in on what was really going on. Which everything falling apart, it was a relief to know it wasn’t a rare foot disease, or a stomach parasite, or AIDS. I wanted to encourage men and women who are finally diagnosed with fibromyalgia to not see it as a death notice, but rather a step in recovery. In 2002, I tried something new. I went online and submitted my medical history to Dr. Teitelbaum’s Diagnosis Program, which you can find at www.vitality101.com. His incredible program spat out about 200 pages of very insightful information on what my body was deficient in. I began taking some of his recommended supplements and began to see some definite results. In spite of my poor track record with medical tests, he also recommended thyroid testing for fibromyalgia suffers, even though it is well known that thyroid tests are frequently wrong. Dr. Teitelbaum believes that many people who have fibromyalgia were actually having a thyroid problem, even though their thyroid tests come out in the normal range. I’ve had numerous thyroid tests over the years, and they’ve all been normal. I trekked back to my doctor and pleaded with him, even mentioning that there was a history of thyroid problems in my family. At first, he refused, simply because the tests said normal. I think doctors, fearing litigation, are reluctant to try a treatment path unsupported by test results. When you think about it, test ranges are really averages. What happens if your physiology falls outside the normal average? The tragic answer is: you can fall through the cracks! Finally, after much debate and arguing, I was able to get my doctor to provide a prescription for a small dosage of thyroid medicine. I began taking it immediately after two days I began to notice that the tight muscles in my stomach and legs began to loosen up. This seemed miraculous. Unfortunately, I also had some negative side effects from the medicine, so I stopped taking it. Nevertheless, I was amazed at how my body responded to such a small does of thyroid medicine. I think Dr. Teitelbaum is onto something. If you are fortunate enough to have an open minded doctor, perhaps that avenue is worth exploring. In Dr. Teitelbaum’s book, From Fatigue to Fantastic, he also advocates supplements for helping people with Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue. I can verify that supplements have absolutely becomes part of my program and helped with restoring my systems to their natural balance. Some supplements that really helped me are: NADH, Glutathione, L-Carnitine, Acetyl L-Carnitine, revitalizing sleep formula, daily Infusion powder and calcium D-Glucarate. Please feel free to check out the full list of supplements on my website. If you are fatigued, you should really read Dr. Teitelbaum’s book. To fibromyalgia sufferers, I highly recommend checking this list, visiting these doctors’ web pages, and trying their protocols. Thanks to these doctors and various regimens, including supplements, my health is much, much better. Most people would have never guessed I went through such an ordeal. I still have to pace myself, and not push the limits. Staying healthy and maintaining my energy is a priority, so I’ve learned not to over-extend myself. I’ve learned to say no to some projects and activities and not feel guilty about it.

Todd: Wow! That’s a lot to go through. Facing such huge obstacles, how did you keep your ship facing forward?

Michael: Well, living and healing are spiritual events. I am fortunate to have a degree in theology and I have a strong daily spiritual practice, which has helped me to survive and thrive with complications of fibromyalgia. That’s not to say there haven’t been some very dark days, but faith in God and the support of my spiritual network, including my wonderful family and friends have made all the difference. After arriving at LA, I had moved into a little apartment across the street from Warner brothers. My roommate and I had decided to start a little bible study. We invited our neighbors and we prayed for many things including for my health to improve. One of our requests was for a door to open at Warner Brothers. Within a short time, our Bible Study group grew and our home couldn’t contain all the people. A year later, the doors opened for me at Warner Brothers, and I was working on the West Wing.

Todd: that’s Great! Can we tell the folks about your new show?

Michael: My web page has a new category called, “Nutrition Show”, which will provide all the details.

Todd: Thanks Mike! For more about Mike and fibromyalgia, please visit his website at: www.captainhastings.com



--
Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1348)


Balestra and Mech La Decottopia
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 06, 2006 01:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Balestra and Mech La Decottopia

A century of herbal excellence

An innovative herbal extraction and preservation process developed and modified over a century of careful product formulation. Originating in Italy’s Piedmont region, the history of the Decottopia liquid herbal tonic formulations can be traced back to the 18th century. Over the years, the Decottopia tradition eventually became the trusted legacy of the Balestra & Mech brand. Their flagship product was a natural digestive aid launched in 1911 named “Fernet Balestra.”

Decottopia highlights an old, proprietary process, used to extract active components from a minimum of ten herbs and maintain them in a balanced liquid solution without the use of alcohol, sugar or preservatives!

The herbs used are carefully selected and combined for maximum synergistic effects. The actives are extracted using water and gentle procedures such as Infusion, maceration and decoction and then concentrated in liquid suspension allowing its conservation.

Today, the descendents of the formulation founders have turned an ancient herbal craft into a thriving and fully modern enterprise. Balestra & Mech is poised to bring a century of herbal excellence to the American consumer.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1259)


Doctors Reject Dietary Supplement as Diabetes Treatment
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 27, 2005 10:27 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Doctors Reject Dietary Supplement as Diabetes Treatment

Doctors Reject Dietary Supplement as Diabetes Treatment

(2/23) SUZANNE LEIGH c.1999 Medical Tribune News Service

Doctors say they will not be recommending a drug that has been found to improve insulin resistance in type 2 diabetics.

In a study published in the current issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, patients with type 2 diabetes had less insulin resistance after undergoing an Infusion of the amino acid L-carnitine.

Oral and injectable forms of this amino acid _ which is produced naturally in the liver_ are already prescribed as the drug levocarnitine for patients with carnitine deficiency. The drug also is available as a dietary supplement. Makers claim it can enhance athletic performance and protect against liver, kidney and heart disease.

Unlike patients with type 1 diabetes, who do not produce insulin, patients with the type 2 variation may manufacture adequate levels of insulin but develop resistance to its effects. Insulin is essential for the transportation of blood sugar, or glucose, into cells so they can produce energy.

Dr. Geltrude Mingrone and colleagues from the Catholic University in Rome evaluated the effects of insulin and L-carnitine on 15 type 2 diabetics and 20 healthy volunteers.

Earlier studies cited in the report found that L-carnitine improved heart function in diabetics and increased the level of glucose oxidation, a process that helps cells make use of glucose. The researchers found that both the diabetic group and the healthy volunteers experienced an 8-percent increase in glucose use with L-carnitine compared with a placebo.

This 8-percent increase compares modestly with a previous study using a higher dose of L-carnitine that found glucose use was increased by 17 percent. Dr. Richard K. Bernstein, director of the New York Diabetes Center in Mamaroneck, said the study demonstrated benefits that were ``only slightly higher than marginal."

Bernstein said that he prescribed L-carnitine with some success to patients with poor circulation, but did not expect to recommend it for insulin resistance. ``If we were to see an increase of 50 percent in glucose utilization, then we might want to look at the study more closely," he said. A leading national diabetes expert, who refused to be named, described the results of the study as not impressive and ``certainly no breakthrough." He said the study indicated that L-carnitine was a long way from being clinically recommended for type 2 diabetics.

Doctors said they would continue to prescribe drugs like metformin and troglitazone for insulin resistance. Dr. David M. Nathan, director of the Diabetes Center and the General Clinical Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, said he was satisfied with the safety and effectiveness of both drugs provided the patient was monitored at regular intervals for kidney and liver function.



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=692)


THE FDA AND STEVIA
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 15, 2005 12:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: THE FDA AND STEVIA

THE FDA AND STEVIA

While stevia in no way qualifies as an “artificial sweetener,” it has been subject to rigorous inquiry and unprecedented restraints. In 1986, FDA officials began to investigate herb companies selling stevia and suddenly banned its sale, calling it “an unapproved food additive.” Then in 1991, the FDA unexpectedly announced that all importation of stevia leaves and products must cease, with the exception of certain liquid extracts which are designed for skin care only. They also issued formal warnings to companies and claimed that the herb was illegal. The FDA was unusually aggressive in its goal to eliminate stevia from American markets, utilizing search and seizure tactics, embargoes and import bans. Speculation as to why the FDA intervened in stevia commerce points to the politics of influential sugar marketers and the artificial-sweetener industry.

During the same year, the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) began their defense of the herb with the goal of convincing the FDA that stevia is completely safe. They gathered documented literature and research on both stevia and other non-caloric sweeteners. The overwhelming consensus was that stevia is indeed safe, and the AHPA petitioned the FDA to exempt stevia from food additive regulations.

Food Additive vs. Dietary Supplement

FDA regulations of stevia were based on its designation as a food additive. The claim was that scientific study on stevia as a food additive was inadequate. Ironically, extensive Japanese testing of stevia was disregarde—regardless of the fact that this body of documented evidence more than sufficiently supported its safe use. Many experts who have studied stevia and its FDA requirements have commented that the FDA wants far more proof that stevia is safe than they would demand from chemical additives like aspartame.

Stevia advocates point out that stevia not a food additive, but rather, a food. Apparently, foods that have traditionally been consumed do not require laborious and expensive testing for safety under FDA regulations. The fact that so many toxicology studies have been conducted in Japan, coupled with the herb’s long history of safe consumption, makes a strong case for stevia being accepted by the FDA as a safe dietary substance. Still, it was denied the official GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status and designated a food additive by the FDA.

The FDA Reverses Its Position

As a result of the Health Freedom Act passed in September of 1995, stevia leaves, stevia extract, and stevioside can be imported to the United States. However, ingredient labels of products that contain stevia must qualify as dietary supplements.

Stevia had been redesignated as a dietary supplement by the FDA and consequently can be legally sold in the United States solely as a supplement. Its addition to teas or other packaged foods is still banned. Moreover, stevia cannot, under any circumstances, be marketed as a sweetener or flavor enhancer.

SUGAR, SUGAR EVERYWHERE

Ralph Nader once said, “If God meant us to eat sugar, he wouldn’t have invented dentists.” The average American eats over 125 pounds of white sugar every year. It has been estimated that sugar makes up 25 percent of our daily caloric intake, with soda pop supplying the majority of our sugar ingestion. Desserts and sugar-laden snacks continually tempt us, resulting in an escalated taste for sweets.

The amount of sugar we consume has a profound effect on both our physical and mental well-being. Sugar is a powerful substance which can have drug-like effects and is considered addictive by some nutritional experts. William Duffy, the author of Sugar Blues, states,“The difference between sugar addiction and narcotic addition is largely one of degree.” In excess, sugar can be toxic. Sufficient amounts of B-vitamins are actually required to metabolize and detoxify sugar in our bodies. When the body experiences a sugar overload, the assimilation of nutrients from other foods can be inhibited. In other words, our bodies were not designed to cope with the enormous quantity of sugar we routinely ingest. Eating too much sugar can generate a type of nutrient malnutrition, not to mention its contribution to obesity, diabetes, hyperactivity, and other disorders. Sugar can also predispose the body to yeast infections, aggravate some types of arthritis and asthma, cause tooth decay, and may even elevate our blood lipid levels. Eating excess sugar can also contribute to amino acid depletion, which has been linked with depression and other mood disorders. To make matters worse, eating too much sugar can actually compromise our immune systems by lowering white blood cells counts. This makes us more susceptible to colds and other infections. Sugar consumption has also been linked to PMS, osteoporosis and coronary heart disease.

Why Do We Crave Sweets?

Considering the sobering effects of a high sugar diet, why do we eat so much of it? One reason is that sugar gives us a quick Infusion of energy. It can also help to raise the level of certain brain neurotransmitters which may temporarily elevate our mood. Sugar cravings stem from a complex mix of physiological and psychological components. Even the most brilliant scientists fail to totally comprehend this intriguing chemical dependence which, for the most part, hurts our overall health.

What we do know is that when sugary foods are consumed, the pancreas must secrete insulin, a hormone which serves to bring blood glucose levels down. This allows sugar to enter our cells where it is either burned off or stored. The constant ups and downs of blood sugar levels can become exaggerated in some individuals and cause all kinds of health problems. Have you ever been around someone who is prone to sudden mood swings characterized by violent verbal attacks or irritability? This type of volatile behavior is typical of people who crave sugar, eat it and then experience sugar highs and lows. Erratic mood swings can be linked to dramatic drops in blood sugar levels.

Hypoglycemia: Sign of Hard Times?

It is rather disturbing to learn that statisticians estimate that almost 20 million Americans suffer from some type of faulty glucose tolerance. Hypoglycemia and diabetes are the two major forms of blood sugar disorders and can deservedly be called modern day plagues. Hypoglycemia is an actual disorder that can cause of number of seemingly unrelated symptoms. More and more studies are pointing to physiological as well as psychological disorders linked to disturbed glucose utilization in brain cells. One study, in particular, showed that depressed people have overall lower glucose metabolism (Slagle, 22). Hypoglycemia occurs when too much insulin is secreted in order to compensate for high blood sugar levels resulting from eating sugary or high carbohydrate foods. To deal with the excess insulin, glucagon, cortisol and adrenalin pour into the system to help raise the blood sugar back to acceptable levels. This can inadvertently result in the secretion of more insulin and the vicious cycle repeats itself.

A hypoglycemic reaction can cause mood swings, fatigue, drowsiness, tremors, headaches, dizziness, panic attacks, indigestion, cold sweats, and fainting. When blood sugar drops too low, an overwhelming craving for carbohydrates results. To satisfy the craving and compensate for feelings of weakness and abnormal hunger, sugary foods are once again consumed in excess.

Unfortunately, great numbers of people suffer from hypoglycemic symptoms. Ironically, a simple switch from a high sugar diet to one that emphasizes protein can help. In addition, because sugar cravings are so hard to control, a product like stevia can be of enormous value in preventing roller coaster blood sugar levels. One Colorado internist states: People who are chronically stressed and are on a roller coaster of blood sugar going up and down are especially prone to dips in energy at certain times of day. Their adrenals are not functioning optimally, and when they hit a real low point, they want sugar. It usually happens in mid-afternoon when the adrenal glands are at their lowest level of functioning. (Janiger, 71) Our craving for sweets in not intrinsically a bad thing; however, what we reach for to satisfy that craving can dramatically determine how we feel. Stevia can help to satisfy the urge to eat something sweet without changing blood sugar levels in a perfectly natural way and without any of the risks associated with other non-nutritive sweeteners.

Diabetes: Pancreas Overload?

Diabetes is a disease typical of western cultures and is evidence of the influence that diet has on the human body. Perhaps more than any other disease, diabetes shuts down the mechanisms which permit proper carbohydrate/sugar metabolism. When the pancreas no longer secretes adequate amounts of insulin to metabolize sugar, that sugar continues to circulate in the bloodstream causing all kinds of health problems. The type of diabetes that comes in later years is almost always related to obesity and involves the inability of sugar to enter cells, even when insulin is present. Diabetes can cause blindness, atherosclerosis, kidney disease, the loss of nerve function, recurring infections, and the inability to heal. Heredity plays a profound role in the incidence of diabetes, but a diet high in white sugar and empty carbohydrates unquestionably contributes to the onset of the disease. It is estimated that over five million Americans are currently undergoing medical treatment for diabetes and studies suggest that there are at least four million Americans with undetected forms of adult onset diabetes. Diabetes is the third cause of death in this country and reflects the devastating results of a diet low in fiber and high in simple carbohydrates. Most of us start our children on diets filled with candy, pop, chips, cookies, doughnuts, sugary juice, etc. Studies have found that diabetes is a disease which usually plagues societies that eat highly refined foods. Because we live in a culture that worships sweets, the availability of a safe sweetener like stevia, which does not cause stress on the pancreas is extremely valuable. If sugar consumption was cut in half by using stevia to

  • “stretch”
  • sweetening power, our risk for developing blood sugar disorders like diabetes and hypoglycemia could dramatically decrease.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=642)


    References
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 15, 2005 09:52 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: References

    ENDNOTES

    1. Ritchason, Jack. Little Herb Encyclopedia. (Pleasant Grove, UT: Woodland Publishing, 1994; 208-9).
    2. Diwu, Z. “Novel Therapeutic and Diagnostic Applications of Hy p o c rellins and Hypericins.” Ph o t o c h e m i s t ry - Ph o t o b i o l o gy, 1995, 61(6) 529-39.
    3. Ritchason, 208.
    4. Andreoni, A. et al. “Laser Photosensitization of Cells by Hypericin.” Photochemistry-Photobiology, 1996, 59(5): 529-33.
    5. (Encyclopedia Britannica, 1993: 8, p.21
    6. Flynn, Rebecca, M.S. and Roest, Mark. Your Guide to Standardized Herbal Products. (Prescott, Az..: One World Press, 1995, 73-4.
    7. Linde, et al. “St. John’s Wort for Depression — An Overview and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Clinical Trials.” The Br i t i s h Medical Journal. 1996, 313(7052): 253.
    8. Lohse, Mueller et al. Arzneiverordnungreport ‘94. 1994: 354.
    9. Linde, et al., 254
    10. Witte, et al.
    11. Jackson, Adam. “Herbal Help for Depression.” Nursing Times, 1995: 9(30): 49.
    12. Ha r re r, G.; H. So m m e r. “Treatment of Mi l d / Mo d e r a t e Depression with Hypericum.” Phytomedicine. 1994, 1: 3-8.
    13. Krylov, A., Ibatov A. “The Use of an Infusion of St. John’s Wort in the Combined Treatment of Alcoholics with Peptic Ulcer and Chronic Gastritis.” Vrach.-Delo. 1993 Feb.-Mar.(2-3): 146-8.
    14. Lavie, G. et. al. “Hypericin as an Inactivator of Infectious Viruses in Blood Components.” Transfusion. 1995, May 35(5): 392-400.
    15. Hudson, J.B., Lopez-Bazzocchi, I., Towers, G.H. “Antiviral Activities of Hypericin.” Antiviral—Res. 1991, Feb. 15(2): 101- 12.
    16. Science, 1991, 254: 522.
    17. Ibid.
    18. American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy. 1994, 51(18): 2251-67.
    19. Journal of Association of Nurses Aids Care. 1995, Jan-Feb.: 225.
    20. Diwu, 34.
    21. Schulz, H. “Effects of hypericum extract on the sleep EEG in older volunteers.” The Jo u rnal of Ge r i a t ry, Ps yc h i a t ry and Neurology. 1994, Oct., 7: S39-43.
    22. Vander Werf, QM. et al. “Hypericin: a new laser phototargeting agent for human cancer cells.” Lanryngyscope. 1996, April, 106: 479-83.
    23. Miskovsky, P., et al. “ Subcellular Distribution of Hypericin in Human Cancer Cells.” Photochem-Photobiol, 1995, Sept. 62(3): 546-9.
    24. “Hypericin as an inactivator of infectious viruses in blood components,” Transfusion, 1995, May 35(5): 392-400.
    25. Wagner, H. and S. Bladt. “Pharmaceutical Quality of Hypericum Extracts.” Journal of Geriatry, Psychiatry and Neurology. Oct. 7, 1994: S65-8.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=637)


    HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 11, 2005 08:50 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)

    INTRODUCTION

    In a time when we are more concerned than ever with issues of health, a tried and true tropical herb called noni needs t o be added t o our list of the best natural remedies. It susage over hundreds of years supports it s description as a veritable panacea of therapeutic actions. At this writing, noni continues to accrue impressive medicinal credentials, and its emergence as an effective nat ural healing agent is a timely one. Amidst rising cancer rates, the high incidence of degenerative diseases like diabetes, and the evolution of ant ibiotic resist ant bacteria and new viral strains, herbs like noni are sought after for their natural pharmaceutical properties. Unquest ionably, all of us want to know how to:

  • • protect ourselves f rom toxins and pollut ants
  • • prevent t he premature onset of age-related diseases such as arthritis, heart disease, diabetes and stroke
  • • boost our immune defenses to protect ourselves from new viral and bacterial strains that have become antibiotic-resist ant
  • • reduce our risk of developing cancer
  • • better digest our food for proper assimilation and purge the intestinal system wit hout the dangerous side effects of harsh drugs. Its actions are multifaceted and must be considered when assessing natural treatment s for disease or injury. It s impressive and widespread use among various native cult ures of t ropical island regions supports the notion that it does indeed possess valuable, therapeutic compounds.

    Genus Rubiaceae

    Common Names

    Indian Mulberry (India), Noni (Hawaii), Nono (Tahiti and Raratonga), Polynesian Bush Fruit, Painkiller Tree (Caribbean islands), Lada (Guam), Mengkudo (Malaysia), Nhau (Southeast Asia), Grand Morinda (Vietnam), Cheesefruit (Australia), Kura (Fiji), Bumbo (Africa) Note: This is only a small sampling of vernacular names for Morinda citrifolia. Almost every island nation of the South Pacific and Caribbean has a term for this particular plant . This booklet will refer to the herb mainly as “ noni” or M. citrifolia, and is referring primarily to Hawaiin noni.

    Parts Used

    The parts of the noni plant most used for their medicinal and nutritional purposes are the fruit, seeds, bark, leaves, and flowers. Virtually every part of the noni plant is utilized for its individual medicinal properties; however, it is the fruit portion that is regarded as its most valuable. The seeds have a purgative action, the leaves are used to treat external inflammations and relieve pain, the bark has strong astringent properties and can treat malaria, the root extracts lower blood pressure, the flower essences relieve eye inflammations and the f ruit has a number of medicinal actions.

    Physical Description

    Morinda citrifolia is technically an evergreen shrub or bush, which can grow to heights of fifteen to twenty feet . It has rigid, coarse branches which bear dark, oval, glossy leaves. Small white fragrant flowers bloom out of cluster-like pods which bear creamy-white colored fruit. The fruit is fleshy and gel-like when ripened, resembling a small breadf ruit . The flesh of the fruit is characterist ically bitter, and when completely ripe produces a rancid and very dist inctive odor. Noni has buoyant seeds that can float formont hs in ocean bodies. The wood of the inflammatory, astringent, emollient, emmenagogue, laxative, sedative, hypotensive (lowers blood pressure) , blood purif ier, and tonic.

    Chemical Constituents

    Noni has various chemical constituents. First, it has an impressive array of terpene compounds, three of which—L. Asperuloside, aucubin, and glucose— have been identified by their actyl derivatives. Both caproic and caprylic acids have been isolated.1 Second, bushfruits, a category of which noni fruit is a member, are also considered a good source of vit - amin C.2 Third, Hawaiin noni has been linked to the synthesis of xeronine in the body which has significant and widespread health implications. Last , the alkaloid cont ent of the noni fruit is thought to be responsible for its therapeutic actions. Alkaloids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological and biological act ivitiesin the human body. They are nitrogencontaining organic compounds which can react with acids to form salts and which are the basis of many medicines. The following is an in-depth chemical analysis of each plant part and it s chemical constituents.

  • • amino acids (which include alanine, arginine, asparticacids, cysteine, cystine, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan tyrosine, and valine)
  • • anthraquinones
  • • glycosides
  • • phenolic compounds
  • • resins
  • • B-sitosterol
  • • ursolic acid

    FLOWER

  • • acacet in 7-0-D (+) -glucophyranoside
  • • 5,7,-dimet hylapigenin-4-0-8-D(+) -galactophyranoside
  • • 6,8,-dimet hoxy-3-methyl anthroquinone-1-0-8-rhamnosyl glucophyranoside

    FRUIT

  • • antioxidant
  • • alizarin
  • • anthraquinones
  • • caproic and caprylic acids

    discovered an alkaloid in the Hawaiin noni fruit which he calls proxeronine and which he believes has appreciable physiological actions by acting as a precursor to xeronine, a very crucial compound (see later sections) . In addition, a compound found in the fruit called damnacanthol is believed to help inhibit cert ain viruses and cellular mutations involved in cancer.

    ROOT AND ROOT BARK

  • • carbonate
  • • chlorubin
  • • rubicholric acid
  • • soranjidol
  • • chrysophanol
  • • phosphate
  • • magnesium
  • • ferric iron
  • • sodium
  • • glycosides
  • • morinadadiol
  • • morindine
  • • resins
  • • rubiadin
  • • sterols4

    Pharmacology

    Recent surveys have suggested that noni fruit exerts antibiotic action. In fact, a variety of compounds which have antibacterial properties (such as aucubin) have been identified in the fruit.5 The 6-Dglucopyranose pentaacet ate of the fruit extract is not considered bacteriostatic.6 Constituents found in the fruit portion have exhibited ant imicrobial action against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi (and other types) , Shigella paradysenteriae, and Staphylococcus aureaus. Compounds found in the root have the ability to reduce swollen mucous membrane and lower blood pressure in animal studies. Proxeronine is an alkaloid constituent found in Hawaiin noni fruit which may prompt the production of xeronine in the body. It is considered a xeronine precursor and was discovered in noni fruit by Dr. Ralph M. Heinicke. He has theorized that this proenzyme can be effective in initiating a series of beneficial cellular reactions through its involvement with the integrity of specific proteins. He points out that tissues contain cells which possess certain recept or sites for xeronine. Because the reactions that can occur are so varied, many different therapeutic actions can result when xeronine production escalates, explaining why Hawaiin noni is good for so many seemingly unrelated disorders. Damnacanthol is another compound contained in the fruit of the Hawaiin noni plant which has shown the ability to block or inhibit the cellular function of RAS cells, considered pre-cancerous cells.

    Body Systems Targeted

    The following body systems have all been effec-freeze-dried capsules, dehydrated powder or fruit, and oil. Noni plant constituents are sometimes offered in combination with other herbs. Some products contain a percent age of the fruit, bark, root and seeds for their individual therapeutic properties.

    Satety

    Extracts of M. citrifolia are considered safe if used as directed; however, pregnant or nursing mothers should consult their physicians before taking any supplement . High doses of root extracts may cause constipation. Taking noni supplements with coffee, alcohol or nicotine is not recommended.

    Suggested Uses

    Ideally, noni extracts should be taken on an empty stomach prior to meals. The process of digesting food can interfere with the medicinal value of the alkaloid compounds found in Hawaiin noni, especially in its fruit . Apparently, stomach acids and enzymes destroy the specific enzyme which frees up the xeronine compound. Take noni supplements without food, coffee, nicotine or alcohol. Using supplements that have been made from the semi-ripe or light - green fruit is also considered preferable to the ripe, whit ish fruit .

    NONI: ITS USE AND HISTORY

    Noni is a tropical wandering plant indigenous to areas of Australia, Malaysia and Polynesia. It is considered native to Southeast Asia although it grows from India to the eastern region of Polynesia. Morinda citrifolia has a long history of medicinal use throughout these areas. It is thought to be the “most widely and commonly used medicinal plant prior to the European era.” 7 Centuries ago, the bushfruit was introduced to native Hawaiians, who subsequently called it “noni” and considered its fruit and root as prized medicinal agents. Among all Polynesian botanical agents of the 19th and 20th centuries, Hawaiin noni has the widest array of medical applications. Samoan and Hawaiian medical practitioners used noni for bowel disorders (especially infant diarrhea, constipation, or intestinal parasites) , indigestion, skin inflammation, infection, mouth sores, fever, contusions and sprains. Hawaiians commonly prepared noni tonics designed to treat diabetes, stings, burns and fish poisoning.8 The herb’s remarkable ability to purge the intestinal tract and promote colon health was well known among older Hawaiian and Tahitian natives and folk healers. Interestingly, field observations regarding its repu-remarkable healing agent .

    Wonder Herb of Island Folk Healers

    Common to t he thickets and forests of Malaysia and Polynesia, and the low hilly regions of the Philippine islands, noni has been cultivated throughout communities in the South Pacific for hundreds of years. Its Hawaiian use is thought to originate from inter-island canoe travel and settlement dating to before Christ . Its hardy seeds have the ability to float which has also contributed to its distribution among various seacoasts in the South Pacific region. Historical investigation has established the fact that some of Hawaii’s earliest settlers probably came viaTahiti. For this reason, Tahitian herbal practices have specific bearing on the herbal therapeutics of islands to the nort h. The very obvious similarities between the Hawaiian vernacular for herbal plants like noni and Tahitian names strongly suggests the theory of Polynesian migrations to Hawaii. Cultures native to these regions favored using Morinda citrifolia for treating major diseases and ut ilized it as a source of nourishment in times of famine.9 Noni fruit has been recognized for centuries as an excellent source of nutrition. The peoples of Fiji, Samoa and Rarat onga use the fruit in both its raw and cooked forms.10 Traditionally, the fruit was propicked before it was fully ripe and placed in the sunlight . After being allowed to ripen, it was typically mashed and its juice extracted through a cloth. Noni leaves provided a veget able dish and their resiliency made them desirable as a fish wrap for cooking.

    Noni’s Medical Reputation

    Elaborate traditionalrituals and praying rites usually accompanied the administration of noni. Int erestingly, cultures indigenous to the Polynesian islands had a significant understanding of their flora. For example, native Hawaiians maint ained a folkmedicine taxonomy t hat was considered second to none.11 Noni was not only used for medicinal purposes but for its food value, for clot hing and for cloth dyes as well. Research indicates that noni was among the few herbal remedies that islanders considered “ tried and true.” In Hawaii, trained herbal practitioners reserved the right to prescribe plant therapies.12 Records indicate that Hawaiian medical practices were based on extensive and very meticulous descriptions of symptoms and their prescribed herbal treatments. Dosages were controlled and the collection and administration of plant extracts was carefully monitored.13 In addition to Morinda, it was not uncommon for these herbal doctors to also recommend using In regard to its application for common ailments, Hawaiians and other island communities traditionally prescribed noni to purge the bowel, reduce fever, cure respiratory infections such as asthma, ease skin inflammations, and heal bruises and sprains. In other words, noni was widely used and highly regarded as a botanical medicine.

    A Timely Reemer gence

    Today, the natural pharmaceutical actions of the chemical constituents contained in noni are scientif-ically emerging as valuable bot anical medicines. Tahitian “nono” intrigued medical practitioners decades ago; however, due to the eventual emergence of synthetic drugs, interest in this island botanical diminished until recent years. Ethnobot anists are once again rediscovering why Hawaiian people havet reasured and cultivat ed Morinda citrifolia for generations. Noni is now finding its way into western therapeutics and is referred to as “ the queen” of the genus Rubiaceae. Its ability to reduce joint inflammation and target the immune system have made it the focus of the modern scientific inquiry. Dr. Ralph Heinicke has conducted some fascinating studies on the chemical constituents of the Hawaiin noni fruit. His research centers on the proxeronine content of the fruit juice and how it profoundly influences human physiology. In addition, scientific studies investigating noni as an anti-cancer agent have been encouraging. It s conspicuous attributes and varied uses have elevat edits status to one of the best of the healing herbs. Today Morinda citrifolia is available in liquid, juice, freezedried capsules, or oil forms, and is considered one of nature’s most precious botanicals.

    TRADITIONAL USES OF NONI

    Throughout tropical regions, virtually every part of Morinda citrifolia was used to treat disease or injury. Its curative properties were well known and commonly employed. PatoaTama Benioni, a member of the Maoritribe from the Cook Islands and a lecturer on island plants explains: Traditionally Polynesians use noni for basically everything in the treatment of illness. Noni is a part of our lives. Any Polynesian boy will tell you he’s had exper ience with it . We use juice from its roots, its flowers, and its fruit... my grandmother taught me to use noni from the roots and the leaves to make medicine for external as well as internal use, and for all kinds of ailments, such as coughs, boils, diseases of the skin, and cuts.15

    decoctions to stimulate delayed menst ruation.

  • • Noni was frequently utilized for its antiparasitic activity.
  • • Respiratory ailments, coughs, and colds were treated with noni.
  • • A juice made from pounding noni leaves, roots and fruit mixed with water was administered for diarrhea.
  • • Dried and powdered forms of the bark mixed with water and administ ered with a spoon treated infant diarrhea.
  • • Small pieces of fruit and root infused with water were given to kill intestinal parasites.
  • • Boiled bark decoctions were given as a drink for stomach ailments.
  • • Coughs were treated with grated bark.
  • • Charred unripe fruit was used with salt on diseased gums.
  • • Pounded fruit combined with kava and sugar cane was used to treat tuberculosis.
  • • Babies were rubbed with fresh, crushed leaves for serious chest colds accompanied by fever.
  • • Eye washes were made from decoctions for eye complaint s from flower extracts.
  • • Leaf Infusions were traditionally taken to treat adult fevers.
  • • A mouthwash consisting of crushed ripe fruit and juice was used for inflamed gums in young boys.
  • • Pounded leaf juice was used for adult gingivitis.
  • • Sore throats were treated by chewing the leaves and swallowing the juice.
  • • Skin abscesses and boils were covered with leaf poultices.
  • • Swelling was controlled with leaf macerations.
  • • Heated leaves were often used for arthritic joins and for ringworm.16

    XERONINE: THE SECRET OF NONI?

    One informed professional on the subject of noni is Dr. Ralph Heinicke, a biochemist who has researched the active compounds of noni fruit for a number of years. He discovered that the Hawaiin noni fruit contains an alkaloid precursor to a very vital compound called xeronine. Wit hout xeronine, life would cease. In Dr. Heinicke’s view, noni fruit provides a safe and effective way to increase xeronine levels, which exert a crucial influence on cell health and protction. His research suggests that the juice from the M. citrifolia fruit contains what could technically be considered a precursor of xeronine—proxeronine. This compound initiates the release of xeronine in the intestinal tract after it comes in contact with a specific enzyme which is also contained in the fruit .

    Because proteins and enzymes have so many varied roles within cell processes, the normalization of these proteins with noni supplemenation could initiate avery wide variety of body responses and treat many disease condit ions. Proteins are the most important catalysts found in the body. The beauty of obtaining a precursor to xeronine from the noni fruit is that the body naturally decides how much of this precursor to convert to xeronine. Disease, stress, anger, trauma and injury can lower xeronine levels in the body, thus creat ing a xeronine deficit . Supplementing the body with noni fruit is considered an excellent way to safely and naturally raise xeronine levels. It is the research and theories of Dr. Heinicke which have made the juice of the Hawaiin noni fruit a viable medicinal substance. He writes: Xeronine is analkaloid, a substance the body produces in order to activate enzymes so they can function properly. It also energizes and regulates the body. This par-ticular alkaloid has never been found because the body makes it, immediately uses it, and then breaks it down. At no time is there an appreciable, isolable amount in the blood. But xeronine is so basic to the functioning of proteins, we would die without it . Its absence can cause many kinds of illness.17 Because so many diseases result from an enzyme malfunction, Dr. Heinicke believes that using the noni fruit can result in an impressive array of curative applications. Interestingly, he believes that we manufacture proxeronine while we are sleeping. He proposes t hat if we could constantly supply our bodies wit h proxeronine from other sources, our need to sleep would diminish.18

    NONI PROCESSING

    How an herb is processed is crucial to how beneficial it is: this is especially true of noni, with its unique enzymes and alkaloids. Morinda citrifolia should be picked when the fruit is turning from its dark green immature color to its lighter green color, and certainly before it ripens to its white, almost translucent color. Once picked, noni, like aloe, will denature extremely quickly due to its very active enzymes. After harvesting, it should swiftly be flash frozen. This is similar to what is done to fish caught at sea to keep them f esh. This stops it from losing its potency while not damaging any of its constituents. To process noni, freeze-drying is recommended. This removes only the water without damaging any of this miracle plant’s vital enzymes and other phytonutrients like xeronine and proxeronine. This pure high-quality noni fruit juice powder is then encapsu-has a very harsh taste and an extremely foul smell, similar to the fruit it self . Other methods of processing include thermal processing, dehydrat ion and air drying. Thermal processing is generally found in liquids, while the dehydrat ed noni is then milled and encapsulated. Unfortunately both methods utilize high heat (110+°F) , which can deactivate many of the vital compounds that make noni so import ant . Air-drying is effect ive without using damaging heat but has serious quality control problems for commercial production.

    MODERN APPLICATIONS OF NONI

    Overview

    Noni possesses a wide variety of medicinal properties which originat e from its differing plant component s. The fruit and leaves of the shrub exert antibacterial activities. Its roots promote the expulsion of mucus and the shrinkage of swollen membranes making it an ideal therapeutic for nasal congest ion, lung infect ions, and hemorrhoids. Noni root compounds have also shown natural sedative properties as well as the ability to lower blood pressure.

    Leaf extracts are able to inhibit excessive blood flow or to inhibit the formation of blood clots. Noni is particularly useful for its ability to treat painful joint conditions and to resolve skin inflammations. Many people drink noni fruit extracts in juice form for hypert ension, painful menstruation, arthritis, gastric ulcers, diabetes, and depression. Recent studies suggest that its anticancer activit y should also be considered. Concerning the therapeutic potential of the Hawaiin noni fruit, Dr. Heinicke writes: I have seen the compound found in noni work wonders. When I was still investigating its possibilities, I had a friend who was a medical research scientist administer the proxeronine to a woman who had been comatose for three months. Two hour safter receiving the compound, she sat up in bed and asked where she was. . . . Noni is probably the best source of proxeronine that we have today.19 Studies and surveys combined support the ability of noni to act as an immunost imulant, inhibit the growth of certain tumors, enhance and normalize cellular function and boost tissue regeneration. It is considered a powerful blood purifier and contributor to overall homeostasis.

    xeronine, which appears to be able to regulate the shape and integrity of cert in proteins that individually contribute to specific cellular activities. Interestingly, this effect seems to occur after ingestion, inferring that the most active compound of noni may not be present in uneaten forms of the fruit or other plant parts. Some practitioners believe that xeronine is best obtained from a noni fruit juice precursor compound. The enzymatic reactions that occur with taking the juice on an empty stomach are what Dr. Heinicke believes set cellular repair intomotion.

    Cancer

    A study conducted in 1994 cited the anticancer activity of Morinda citrifolia against lung cancer. A team of scientists from the University of Hawaii used live laboratory mice to test the medicinal properties of the fruit against Lewis lung carcinomas which were artificially transferred to lung tissue. The mice that were left untreated died in nine to twelve days. However, giving noni juice in consistent daily doses significantly prolonged their life span. Almost half of these mice lived for more than fifty days.20 Research conclusions state that the chemical constituents of the juice acted indirectly by enhancing the ability of the immune system to deal with the invading malig-nancy by boosting macrophage or lymphocyte activit y. Furt her evaluation theorizes that the unique chemical constituents of Morinda citrifolia initiate enhanced T-cell activity, a reaction that may explain noni’s ability to treat a variety of infectious diseases. 21

    In Japan, similar studies on tropical plant extracts found that damnacanthol, a compound found in Morinda citrifolia, is able to inhibit the function of KRAS- NRK cells, which are considered precursors to certain types of malignancies.22 The experiment involved adding noni plant extract to RAS cells and incubating them for a number of days. Observation disclosed that noni was able to significantly inhibit RAS cellular function. Among 500 plant extracts, Morinda citrifolia was determined to contain the most effective compounds against RAS cells. Its damnacanthol content was clinically described in 1993 as “a new inhibit or of RAS function.” 2 3 The xeronine fact or is also involved in that xeronine helps to normalize the way malignant cells behave. While they are still technically cancer cells, they no longer function as cells with unchecked growth. In time, the body’s immune system may be able to eradicate these cells.

    Arthritis

    with arthritic disease. One link to arthritic pain may be the inability to properly or completely digest proteins which can then form crystal-like deposits in the joints. The ability of noni fruit to enhance protein digestion through enhanced enzymatic function may help to eliminate this particular phenomenon. In addition, the alkaloid compounds and plant met abolites of noni may be linked to its apparent anti-inflammatory action. Plant sterols can assist in inhibiting the inflammatory response which causes swelling and pain. In addition, the antioxidant effect of noni may help to decrease free radical damage in joint cells, which can exacerbate discomfort and degeneration.

    Immune System

    The alkaloid and other chemical compounds found in noni have proven themselves to effectively control or kill over six types of infectious bacterial strains including: Escherichia coli, salmonellatyphi (and other types) , shigella paradysenteriae, and staphylo - coccus aureaus.25 In addition, damnacanthol, was able to inhibitt he early antigen stage of the Epstein- Barr virus.

    The bioactive components of the whole plant, combined or in separate portions, have demonst rat - ed the ability to inhibit several different strains of bacteria. Anecdotal reports support this action in that noni seems particularly effective in shortening the duration of certain types of infection. This may explain why noni is commonly used to treat colds and flu. The chemical constituents found in noni and the possibility that they stimulate xeronine production— as well as initiate alkaloid therapy—may explain noni’s reputation for having immuno-stimulatory properties. Alkaloids have been able to boost phagocytosis which is the process in which certain white blood cells called macrophages attack and literally digest infectious organisms. Interestingly, the ant it umoraction of noni has been ascribed to an immune system response which involves stimulating T-cells. tropical regions during World War II learned of the fruit’s ability to boost endurance and stamina. Native cultures in Samoa, Tahiti, Raratonga and Australia used the fruit in cooked and raw forms. M. citrifolia is considered a tonic and is especially recommended for debilitated conditions.

    Antioxidant

    The process of aging bombards the body with free radicals which can cause all kinds of degenerative diseases. The xeronine theory promoted by Dr. Heinicke submit s t hat as our bodies age, we lose our ability to synthesize xeronine. To make matters worse, the presence of many environment altoxins actually blocks the production of xeronine as well. He believes that the proxeronine content of Hawaiin noni fruit juice can help to block these actions, thereby working as an antiaging compound.26 The phytonutrients found in noni assist in promot - ing cell nourishment and prot ect ion from free radicals created by exposure to pollution and other potentially damaging agents. In addition, Morinda citrifolia contains selenium, which is considered one of the best antioxidant compounds available.

    Diabetes

    While scientific studies are lacking in this particular application of noni, Hawaiians used various parts of the plant and its fruit to treat blood sugar disorders. Anecdotal surveys have found t hat noni is current ly recommended for anyone with diabetes.

    Pain Killer

    A 1990 study found that extracts derived from the Morinda citrifolia root have the ability to kill pain in animal experiments.27 Interest ingly, it was during this study that the natural sedative action of the root was also noted. This study involved a French team of scientists who noted a significant central analgesic activity in laboratory mice.28 Dr. Heinicke has stated, “Xeronine also acts as a pain reliever. A man wit h very advanced int est inal cancer was given three months to live. He began taking the proxeronine and lived for a whole year, pain-free.” 29

    Skin Healing Agent

    One of the most prevalent hist rical uses of noni was in poultice form for cuts, wounds, abrasions, burns and bruises. Using its fruit extract for very serious burns has resulted in some extraordinary healing. Because skin is comprised of protein, it immediately responds to the presence of xeronine.

    burn site throught he direct application of a noni poultice is considered quite effective by Dr. Heinicke and his colleagues, who have studied enzymatic therapy. Concerning burns, he has written: I believe that each tissue has cells which contain proteins which have receptor sites for the absorption of xeronine. Certain of these proteins are the inert for ms of enzymes which require absorbed xeronine to become active. This xeronine, by converting the body’s procol- langenase system into a specific protease, quickly and safely removes the dead tissue from burns.30

    Drug Addiction

    The xeronine link to treat ing drug addiction is based on the notion that flooding t he brain with extra xeronine can reverse the neurochemical basis for addiction. This natural alkaloid is thought to normalize brain receptors which subsequent ly results in the cessation of physiological dependence on a certain chemical like nicotine.3 1 The potential of Hawaiin noni as a natural stimulat or for t he production of xeronine may have profound implications in treating various types of addictions.

    Complementary Agents of Noni

  • cat’s claw papaya
  • kava kava
  • pau d’arco
  • bioflavonoids
  • selenium
  • germanium
  • grapeseed extract
  • echinacea
  • proteolytic enzymes
  • aloe vera
  • glucosamine
  • shark
  • cartilage

    PrimaryApplications of Noni

  • abrasions
  • arthritis
  • atherosclerosis
  • bladder infections
  • boils bowel disorders
  • burns cancer
  • chronicfatigue syndrome
  • circulatory weakness
  • colds congest ion
  • cold sores constipation
  • depression diabetes
  • eye inf lammations fever
  • fract ures gastric ulcers
  • gingivit is headaches
  • high blood pressure immune
  • weakness
  • indigestion intestinal parasites
  • kidney disease menstrual



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=570)


    All Calories Are Not Created Equal
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 07:49 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: All Calories Are Not Created Equal

    All Calories Are Not Created Equal

    When we eat more than our daily energy requirements (and most of us do), the extra energy is stored as fat. The human body is designed to stockpile fat very easily. This tendency is related to innate mechanisms intended to protect us against starvation or the threat of a diminished food supply. Fat cells provide extra fuel which can be utilized if necessary to sustain life. Those survival fat pounds settle on the hips, waist, thighs, upper arms and back, not to mention around organs, like the heart and kidney. Some ethnic groups, whose ancestors repeatedly suffered from famines, are especially efficient in energy storage. These include the Pima tribe48 in the United States, the Aborigines of Australia,49 and many of those of African descent.41

    Fats are very readily converted to pounds. Carbohydrates and proteins require more complicated digestive processes to convert and store their energy than fat does. Calories from carbohydrates and proteins are usually burned and thrown off as heat (thermogenesis). Naturally, overeating proteins and carbohydrates can result in weight gain, however the body has to work harder to convert these nutrients to fat stores. It takes 20 to 25 percent of the energy in carbohydrate and protein to convert them into body fat. It only takes about 5 percent of the energy content of dietary fat to store it as body fat. Fat is also twice as energy dense (9 calories per gram) as carbohydrates or proteins (4 calories per gram) making fat at least twice as dangerous from a weight gain standpoint.50 Blood taken from an individual soon after they have eaten a double cheeseburger, french fries and a thick milk shake will often be a milky pink color due to the Infusion of fat from the digestive system. This fat circulates throughout the system until it is either burned or stored.

    A Winning Combination

    Most people would agree that exercise combined with a low-fat, high-fiber diet would be a winning combination for maintaining and improving health. Exercise is important in any health maintenance program. It is especially important in weight control since the amount of energy we expend in the resting state, our Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR), is a function of our muscle mass and tone.51,52 There is a tendency for us to lose muscle mass and gain fat pounds as we age. In part, this is due to life style changes. Instead of flying kites we fly desks! Nevertheless, our capacity to increase our muscle mass is undiminished with age.53 The lack of exercise rather than the abundance of candy is thought to be the primary cause of childhood obesity.54

    Eating a low-fat, high-fiber diet will produce some weight loss even in nor-mal weight subjects.55 The reason for this may well be the balance between fullness and satiety.56 It is a proven fact that we can easily eat an excess of fat before we feel full or satisfied. This is because fats are twice as energy dense (9 calories/ gram) as carbohydrates or proteins (4 calories/gram). By the time we are full, we have over eaten. Increasing our fiber intake helps us feel full. (Of course expensive gastric bypass surgery is another alternative.57) Eating a highfiber diet helps us to feel more than just full. Low-fat, high-fiber diets are found to lead to a general lowering of cancer rates.58 Though the above combination of exercise, low-fat, and high-fiber may work in theory; making the theory work in practice is quite another story.

    Technology works against us in some ways as evidenced by this comment a woman made about her husband’s physique: “He has added 20 pounds of lap since he got his lap-top [computer].” And just try to get a low calorie meal over your lunch hour. In Feburary 1996 McDonald’s, an international fast food franchise, announced that it would be dropping its five-year experiment with the low-fat McLean burger (12 grams of fat). Also gone from the menu will be the Chef’s salad and the side salad. The taste of the Big Mac (35 grams of fat) has apparently won out over its McLean competition. The salads seem to be a casualty of convenience. Eating a salad in the car after a quick pickup at the drivethrough can be a bit challenging.

    Fortunately, state-of-the-art research in the area of weight loss has discovered that through the addition of certain supplements and nutrients, the process of decreasing the amount of fat we process in the stomach and boosting the amount of fat we burn can be expedited. For those of us who suffer from a “fat imbalance” or a condition where we store more fat than we burn, it is often a matter of life or death to lose fat in order to protect our arteries and heart.

    The Secret t o Weight Loss . . . An Ounce of Prevent ion Most weight-reducing strategies have to confront the “after the fact” problem of burning already stored fat. Like most of our medical practices, we routinely become sick or fat and then go about the business of trying to remedy our ills. Despite Poor Richard’s advice that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” we continually eat high-fat diets, and wait until we have to pay the piper before most of us take serious action. It’s much easier to prevent a fat build-up than to reverse the damage that carrying extra fat stores can cause. Going on a diet is nothing less than torture and usually means giving up all the foods we like to eat. Yet dieting seldom gets to the root cause of our excess weight which most often is that we eat too much fat, when not dieting. The body begins to digest lipids in the stomach and intestines.

    The diagram in Figure 1 illustrates the steps involved in getting fat into our bloodstream.59 There are four steps in fat digestion: 1) acidolytic breakdown of food in the stomach; 2) enzymatic breakdown (lipolysis) of the fats (triglycerides, TGs) into fatty acids (FAs) and beta-monoglycerides (b-MGs); 3) formation of soluble mixed micelles with bile acids; and 4) absorption through the intestines. If we could tie up excess fat before it was absorbed, we could spare our physiological systems the stress of having to deal with that fat. Ideally then, what we need is a substance that prevents fat absorption.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=500)


    HISTORY
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 10:57 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: HISTORY

    HISTORY

    Ginkgo has achieved unprecedented popularity within the last decade and has become a familiar household term. Because interest in treating diseases like Alzheimer’s has escalated over the last decade, the biochemical capabilities of ginkgo in regard to brain function have been investigated and are still being researched. Ginkgo is one of those herbs that has become intrinsically connected with notions of herbal elixirs capable of pre s e rving youth and promoting longevity.

    Ginkgo comes from the oldest species of tree in the world dating back some 200 million years. Some ginkgo trees have been known to live well over an average of 1000 or more years. The ginkgo tree is also known as the “maidenhair tree” and would have probably become extinct if the trees had not been cultivated in Far Eastern temple gardens and nurtured by Oriental monks.

    Ginkgo is a deciduous conifer with separate male and female types. It resembles the pau d’arco tree and like pau d’arco, possesses an unusual immunity to insects and diseases. Ginkgo’s remarkable hardiness enabled it to survive the atomic blast at Hiroshima. Because of its unprecedented longevity, ginkgo biloba has sometimes been referred to as a living fossil.

    Ginkgo has been used in China for over 5000 years. The Chinese refer to the fruit of the ginkgo tree as pa-kwo. This fruit is sold in markets throughout China and resembles dried almonds. Ginkgo fruit is pleasant tasting when fresh, but can become quite disagreeable if allowed to get overly ripe. Asians have relied on extracts of the fan-shaped ginkgo leaf since 3,000 B.C. to heal a wide variety of ailments.

    The Chinese have been acquainted with the curative powers of ginkgo for centuries and have typically used the herb for ailments related to aging, such as circulatory disorders, mental confusion and memory loss. In China, ginkgo seeds, called baigou, are considered lung and kidney tonics and are used in conjunction with acupuncture. Ginkgo seeds also help to tonify the urinary system, so they are used in cases of incontinence and excessive urination.1

    Practitioners of Chinese medicine routinely use ginkgo leaves. Ginkgo was introduced into Eu rope in 1730 and was we l l received, not for its medicinal value, but for its ornamental appeal. It is used extensively in landscaping because of its lovely fern-like leaf. It was brought to America in 1784 to the garden of William Hamilton who lived in Pennsylvania.

    Decades passed before the healing properties of ginkgo we re investigated. Consequently, it has been part of the herbal repertoire only since the 1980s. During this time, it became technically feasible to isolate the essential components of ginkgo. Pharmacologically, there are two groups of substances which are significant compounds found in ginkgo: the flavonoids, which give ginkgo its antioxidant action, and the terpenes, which help to inhibit the formation of blood clots. The majority of scientific interest has focused on Ginkgo’s ability to improve the circulation of blood. O ver the past twenty years, scientific testing on the plant has dramatically escalated. Ha rva rd professor Elias J. Core y, Ph . D , synthesized ginkgo’s active ingredient, ginkgolide B, for the first time in the laboratory. Consequently, stepped-up research in this country and in Eu rope resulted. Ginkgo has been the subject of over 300 scientific studies and continues to intrigue scientists. Much modern research has confirmed ancient applications of ginkgo as well as discovered new ones.

    Ginkgolide, the active component of the herb, is what creates most of ginkgo’s biochemical attributes. Exactly how ginkgolide B functions is not yet known. One theory is that the compound somehow interferes with a chemical found in the body called PAF (platelet activating factor). PAF has been implicated in cases of graft rejection, asthma and other immune disorders. PAF antagonists have been identified from a variety of medicinal plants. These compounds help to explain the pharmacological basis of several traditional medicines and provide a valuable new class of therapeutic agents.

    Particular attention has been paid to ginkgo’s powerful actions on the cardiovascular system. Thousands of Europeans use this herb for peripheral circulatory disorders. As a circulation booster, ginkgo has accumulated some impressive credentials. Because proper circulation is vital to each and every body function, virtually all body systems can benefit from ginkgo therapy.

    Ginkgo’s relationship to brain function has also spawned considerable interest. In 1985, Rudolf Weiss said of ginkgo,

    “ Significant improvement in mental states, emotional lability, memory, and the tendency to tire easily, have been reported.”

    Ginkgo is currently planted in groves and used for a number of medicinal purposes. It is harvested in the summer and can be used in extract, tincture or Infusion forms. The therapeutic properties of ginkgo seem endless. Continuing re s e a rch promises to further uncover additional health benefits of this remarkable botanical. Ginkgo extracts are among the leading prescription medications in France and Germany. Currently, millions of prescriptions for ginkgo are written by physicians worldwide.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=447)


    Herbal Forms
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 10:52 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Herbal Forms

    Herbal Forms

    Extract: An extract made from ginkgo leaves is available in Europe and is used for cerebral arteriosclerosis in peripheral circulatory disorders of the elderly.

    Tincture: Ginkgo tincture is often combined with other herbs such as periwinkle and used for circulatory problems and venous disorders.

    Infusion: Infusions of ginkgo are used for arteriosclerosis, varicose veins and hemorrhoids.

    Capsules: Powd e red forms of ginkgo can be used to enhance brain function and memory.

    Storage: Keep in a dark container in a cool, dry environment.

    Regulatory Stauts:
    U.S.: none
    U.K.: none
    Canada: none
    France: over-the-counter drug status
    Germany: over-the counter drug status

    Recommended Usage: Ginkgo should be taken in normal dosages and, if possible, at the same times eve ry day. In the case of ginkgo, taking it consistently for 12 weeks is recommended. Although injections of Gingko have sometimes been used, oral ingestion of a tablet or capsule is therapeutically effective. More advanced p reparations of ginkgo make it possible to obtain higher concentrations of flavoglycosides in smaller amounts of extract.

    Safety: Ginkgo extracted from the leaves of the ginkgo tree is considered nontoxic and is virtually without side-effects. It can be safely used with other supplements without interaction and has no reported toxicity. In rare cases, some gastric upset or incidence of headache or skin rash have occurred, which may indicate that the individual is allergic to the substance. The fruit pulp of ginkgo can produce seve re contact dermatitis and other allergic reactions. The leaf extract of ginkgo is usually the only form that is available and is extremely safe.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=446)


    Vitali-Tea - Tea fits a healthy lifestyle to a T...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 13, 2005 09:45 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Vitali-Tea - Tea fits a healthy lifestyle to a T...

    Vitali-Tea by Leah Brinks Energy Times, October 9, 2003

    If the research is even only half right, tea fits a healthy lifestyle to a T. Whenever scientists look at a teapot's contents, they find striking health benefits: Heart protection. Reduced cancer risk. Better skin.

    All of these are apparently in the bag when you choose to drink tea. Tea green, tea black: Which to choose? Actually, both types come from the same plant, Camellia sinensis. Green tea is steamed and dried; black tea is fermented, which allows its darker color to develop. Some lesser-known types include white tea, which is actually green tea that undergoes the most minimal of handling. (Another rare white tea, white cantaloupe, is rich in antioxidants.) Oolong is a tea that falls between green and black in processing and flavor.

    One increasingly popular tea color, red, is not tea at all, but an herbal brew called rooibos (technically, herbal teas are known as tisanes). This South African plant yields a citrus-flavored beverage high in vitamin C. Other herbs known for yielding flavorful Infusions include chamomile, used to promote sound sleep; peppermint, a digestion easer; and rose hips, which, like rooibos, combines healthy vitamin C levels with a delightfully zesty taste.

    Toxin Blocker

    The evidence for tea's health benefits has practically boiled over. For instance, researchers at the University of Rochester have found that green tea substances inhibit the action of a molecule irritated by tobacco smoke, a toxin central to tobacco's cancer-causing danger. This action, say the scientists, may be the reasons that smokers who drink tea suffer less cancer (Chem Res Tox 7/21/03).

    The Rochester researchers found that tea helps protect a cellular molecule called the aryl hydrocarbon (AH) receptor. Ordinarily, AH is frequently disturbed by toxic substances that cause cancer and other illnesses. Tobacco smoke (as well as the pollutant dioxin) interacts with AH to initiate cancer and other problems.

    But at least two chemicals in green tea-epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) and epigallocatechin (EGC)-interfere with AH's harmful activity. These substances, flavonoids similar to healthful chemicals found in grapes, wine and cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, have been shown to lower cancer risk.

    "It's likely that the compounds in green tea act through many different pathways," says Thomas Gasiewicz, professor and chair of Environmental Medicine and director of Rochester's Environmental Health Science Center.

    In the Rochester study, Dr. Gasiewicz and his colleagues found that EGCG and EGC close down the AH receptor in cancerous animal cells and most likely produce the same benefit in human cells.

    Still to be made clear is how tea is metabolized when the body digests tea, but the Rochester scientists are still peering through their microscopes and teapots to find out.

    Tea Protection

    Scientists at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University have found that drinking green or white tea can significantly lower your risk of colon cancer as well the prescription drug sulindac, which has been shown effective for people at high tumor risk (Carcinogenesis 3/03).

    "Tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world, and recent upswings in the sales of green tea in the United States can be attributed to reports of potential health benefits against cancer and other chronic diseases," says Gayle Orner, an OSU research associate. "Teas exert significant protective effects in experimental animal models of skin, lung, esophageal, gastric, hepatic, small intestinal, pancreatic, colon, bladder and mammary cancer."

    While many people today take aspirin and similar drugs that have been shown to lower cancer risk, this study shows that drinking tea and taking low doses of these drugs, called NSAIDs, can reduce the risk even further. (High doses of NSAIDs, while protective against colon cancer, can cause internal bleeding.)

    "These are pretty exciting results," Orner says. "What's especially significant is that as far as we can tell consumption of tea has none of the side effects of NSAIDs, which can be severe, including bleeding, ulcers and even death."

    In this research on animals, use of tea dropped the risk of cancer by about two-thirds. According to the lab results, drinking about three large cups of tea a day should provide significant cancer protection. Based on research in Japan that looked at how green tea lowers the risk of stomach cancer, the Linus Pauling scientists urge plenty of tea drinking: "The more the better."

    Tea Surprise

    Studies show that nations of tea drinkers have less trouble with their hearts than residents of places where tea is hardly ever brewed. And now research is starting to zero in on the substances in tea that benefit heart health.

    A study of 240 Chinese men and women who have high cholesterol has found that chemicals in tea can significantly drop harmful cholesterol (Arch Int Med 6/23/03).

    "Personally, I was very surprised," says David J. Maron, MD, professor at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, lead author of the study. "I expected, if anything, a very slight cholesterol-lowering effect. But what we saw was a 16% reduction in low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol."

    LDL cholesterol is known as "bad" cholesterol because it can increase your risk of heart disease.

    The researchers in this study gave people extracts of green and black tea enhanced with theaflavin, an antioxidant also found in green tea.

    In the future, if past results are any indication, tea's rich supply of beneficial chemicals will continue to pleasantly surprise researchers with even more benefits.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=317)


    Better Bones
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 11, 2005 05:24 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Better Bones

    Better Bones by Deborah Daniels Energy Times, March 13, 2004

    As America ages, osteoporosis, a weakening of the bones, grows into an ever-expanding problem. Currently, it affects more than 44 million Americans.

    Women are in special danger; of those who suffer weak bones, about 35 million are women. This problem causes a huge amount of damage-physical, emotional and financial. The national bill for hospital and nursing care for osteoporosis victims tops $17 billion a year, about $47 million a day.

    Odds are, your bones need help. According to the National Institutes of Health, the bones of more than half of all Americans over age 50 are weak enough to put them at risk of osteoporosis. Weak bones linked to osteoporosis continue to present a serious risk to health. A study published in the British Medical Journal shows that fractures in older people are just as life-threatening today as they were two decades ago (2003; 327:771-5).

    When researchers looked at broken legs among more than 30,000 people over the age of 65, they found that just as many people die today after these kinds of bone breaks as they did during the 1980s.

    Their findings emphasize how important strong bones are to survival. This study showed that breaking your leg at age 65 or older increases your risk of death more than 12 times. And these high death rates, according to the researchers, reinforce the fact that preventing osteoporosis saves lives.

    Blowing Smoke Through Bones

    While many bone experts blame the high rate of osteoporosis on sedentary lifestyles and foods low in calcium, Australian research has turned up another bone-weakening villain: smoking. According to these scientists, smoking may be the most destructive lifestyle habit that destroys bone in older women. While other studies have pointed to smoking as a factor in bone loss, this most recent study purports to show that smoking may be one of the most important influences on weak bones (J Bone Min Res 9/03). " This will be an important step forward in the management of osteoporosis, since the results of this study can be used to improve current approaches to preventing bone loss," says researcher John Wark, PhD.

    Dr. Wark's study found that older smokers are particularly prone to weak bones. While smoking is always bad for bone strength, after menopause tobacco smoke seems to exert an even deadlier affect on your skeletal support.

    " [T]he damaging effects of cigarette smoking may well have been underestimated in the past," says Dr. Wark. When you inhale cigarette smoke, your lungs are exposed to about 500 harmful gases, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, benzene, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia. The Infusion of these gases cuts back on the available oxygen used for building bone and other tissues.

    Along with these gases, small particles containing chemicals like anatabine, anabase, nicotine, monicotine and other carcinogens also filter into the lungs. Studies (Acad Ortho Surg 2001; 9:9) indicate that bathing the body in these chemicals results in:

  • • Reduction in bone density
  • • Low back problems
  • • Increased chances of fractures
  • • Reduced chances of bone healing

    Bone Building

    While it's never too late to build more bone, the best time for laying down a dependable musculoskeletal foundation is before age 30. That way, as you get older, your strong bones can better resist the weakening effects of aging. Ipriflavone is a natural chemical that has been found to help protect bone. Researchers believe that this supplement can help bones strengthen by absorbing more calcium (Calc Tissue Int 2000; 67:225)

    Other ways to make bones stronger include:

  • • Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and getting plenty of calcium and vitamin D (vitamin D helps calcium go into bones)
  • • Performing weight-bearing exercise, such as walking or weight lifting
  • • Not drinking alcohol to excess
  • • Limiting coffee use; drinking three cups a day raises your osteoporosis risk (Am J Epid 10/90; 132(4):675)

    Weak bones can put a severe crimp in your lifestyle and put your life at risk. How can you tell what shape your bones are in? Health practitioners can help you get the appropriate bone density test. But the tone of your muscles are also a good indicator: Exercise to tone those muscles and chances are you're building your bones, too. All you have to do is get moving!



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray vitamins - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=297)


    Diet Phen - Dietary Supplement and weight Loss ...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 01, 2005 12:36 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Diet Phen - Dietary Supplement and weight Loss ...

    Diet Phen for weight Loss

    Getting slim, trim and fit is no easy task. To do it you need adequate Energy, Nutritional and Emotional Support, and a Positive Attitude. Source Naturals puts them all together in the DIET-PHEN Weight Loss Plan. The plan includes an herbal-safe nutrient formula that combines optimal amounts of St. John’s wort with synephrine and green tea extract, plus L-phenylalanine and chromium. Meet your weight loss goals the natural way. Try Source Naturals DIET-PHEN dietary supplement in conjunction with the Diet-Phen Weight Loss Plan.

    THE PLAN HELPS TO:

  • • Increase metabolic rate.
  • • Lose unwanted body fat.
  • • Boost energy levels.
  • • Build and tone muscle.
  • • Support a positive mental attitude.

    DIETING – It Starts in Your Head.

    Successful dieting depends on the right mind-set: you need a positive outlook and determination. When your head is in the right place, your body may follow. That’s why the DIET-PHEN Weight Loss Plan includes natural herbs and amino acids to help support a sense of active calm.

    ST. JOHN’S WORT – The CenterPeace of DIET-PHEN. In use since ancient times, Hypericum perforatum is a flowering herb highly valued for its positive influence on mental well-being. Known for its soothing effect, it seems to promote relaxation without drowsiness. Recent research has focused on the connection between hypericin (the principal phytochemical in St. John’s wort) and serotonin, a key neurotransmitter associated with mood. About 90% of your serotonin receptors are found in your brain’s emotional center, the limbic system.

    SYNEPHRINE, GREEN TEA AND L-PHENYLALANINE – Energize with an Attitude! Synephrine and green tea extract are added for that extra energy needed during dieting. The brain uses phenylalanine to manufacture dopamine and norepinephrine, two neurotransmitters that play an important role in drive and determination.

    ACETYL L-CARNITINE – Transporting Fat to the Furnace. Within each of your trillions of cells are thousands of tiny energy factories called mitochondria. They convert fats and sugars into metabolic energy. Acetyl L-carnitine supports this process by transporting fat molecules to the mitochondria.

    THE PLAN INCLUDES A DAILY SERVING OF 3 DIET-PHEN TABLETS TO PROVIDE:

  • • 900 mg of St. John’s wort, the traditional herb used to support a positive mood.
  • • 24 mg of synephrine and 300 mg of green tea extract, for energy.
  • • 500 mg of L-phenylalanine, an essential amino acid that acts as the building block for key brain neurotransmitters that support a positive mental attitude.
  • • 200 mcg of chromium, a trace element which may work closely with insulin to help facilitate the uptake of glucose into cells.
  • • 50 mg of acetyl L-carnitine, the bioactive form of this amino acid involved in cellular fat transport.
  • • 25 mg each of niacin and vitamin B-6, nutrients essential to the body’s production of serotonin.

    GET STARTED WITH THE PLAN ! Get DIET-PHEN dietary supplements and the Weight Loss Plan at VitaNet health food store.

    REFERENCES:

  • • Johnson, D., et al. (June 1992). TW Neurologie Psychiatrie, 6, 436-444.
  • • Johnson, D., et al. (1994). J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol, 7 (suppl 1), S44-S46.
  • • Pasquali, R. et al. (1987). International Journal of Obesity, 11, 163-168.
  • • Sabelli, H.C. (Feb 1986). J Clin Psychiatry, 47 (2), 66-70.
  • • Schulz, H. & Jobert, M. (1994). J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol, 7 (suppl 1), S39-S43.
  • • Stock, M.J. (1989). Infusionstherapie, 16, 282-284.



    --
    VitaNet ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=140)


    the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) ...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 26, 2005 10:37 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) ...

    Abstract Objectie :To investigate the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the compromised circulation of a stroke affected hemisphere using transcranial Doppler (TCD) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methods. Methods : 43 patients with ischemic stroke were randomized into vinpocetine (VP) and placebo group in a double blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of a single-dose i.v. Infusion of vinpocetine on cerebral blood perfusion and oxygenation. In the VP group 20 mg VP in 500 ml saline, in the placebo group 500 ml saline alone were administered. The concentrations of oxy-, reduced- and total hemoglobin were measured by NIRS frontolaterally on the side of lesion while the mean cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), the pulsatility index (PI) and Doppler spectral intensity (DSI) were monitored by TCD in the middle cerebral artery on the same side. Values were averaged for the first 5 min prior to the Infusion and for the last 5 min of Infusion and they were compared between groups. Results : The concentration of all three chromophores increased during Infusion in the VP group (mean dHbT=1.03, CI95=0.84, P=0.058; mean dHbO=0.92, CI95=0.91, P=0.071; mean dHb=0.10, CI95=0.21, P=0.297). The HbT and HbO showed a substantially smaller increase in the placebo group (mean dHbT=0.31, CI95=0.74, P=0.22; mean dHbO=0.57, CI95=0.80, P=0.094) while the Hb decreased (mean dHb=-0.26, CI95=0.29, P=0.05). Comparing to the placebo group Hb increased significantly in the VP group (P=0.027) while the increase of HbO and HbT did not reach the level of significance (P=0.29 and 0.11). DSI showed a significantly larger increase in the VP than in placebo group (dDSI=25.8 CI95=8.8 [VP]; dDSI=3.3, CI95=3.7 [Placebo], P0.005). The CBFV and PI did not differ significantly between groups. (dVm=5.02.98 cm/s [VP], dVm=4.12.57 cm/s [Placebo], P=0.28; dPI=0.08 [VP], dPI=0.09 [Placebo]; P=0.47). Conclusion :VP increases cerebral perfusion and parenchymal oxygen extraction as well. The increased perfusion was indicated by NIRS and by TCD measurement of DSI while conventional velocity and pulsatility measurements failed to detect theses effects. NIRS is a sensitive, www.elsevier.com/locate/ejultrasou Abbreiations :BP, blood pressure; CI, confidence interval; CBFV, cerebral blood flow velocity; CT, computer tomography; CytO, cytochrome-oxydase; DSI, Doppler spectral intensity; Hb, deoxyhaemoglobin; HbO, oxyhaemoglobin; HbT, total haemoglobin; HR, heart rate; MAP, mean arterial pressure; MCA, middle cerebral artery; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; NIRS, near infrared spectroscopy; PET, positron emission tomography; PI, pulsatility index; TCD, transcranial Doppler; US, ultrasonography; VP, vinpocetine.

  • Doppler spectral intensity (DSI) - scans the brain and you can see blood flow.
  • DSI increased in both groups during Infusion, however, the increase was significantly higher in the vinpocetine group (dDSI=25.8, CI95=8.8 [VP]; dDSI=3.3, CI95=3.7 [placebo] -- Significant increase in blood flow 25.8 (VP) vs. 3.3 (Placebo)
  • NIRS monitoring is feasible to detect changes of regional blood flow and tissue oxygenation.
  • The observation reported VP to enhance cerebral oxygen extraction and utilisation


  • --
    VitaNet®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=104)



    VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.