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Red ginseng is a natural cure for acne Darrell Miller 4/30/19
HIV-1 people can boost their immune system with Korean red ginseng Darrell Miller 2/11/19
Why Chinese ginseng is good for your heart Darrell Miller 12/10/18
Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants havebeen found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication VitaNet, LLC Staff 10/21/18
Adaptogens: Herbs That Can Help In Fighting Stress Darrell Miller 9/6/15
Korean Ginseng Root Extract Darrell Miller 12/14/12
What Is The Difference Between American Ginseng And Korean Ginseng? Darrell Miller 12/28/11
What Are The Different Types Of Ginseng And What Is Ginseng Good For? Darrell Miller 12/16/11
Can Ginseng Boost Your Energy Safely? Darrell Miller 10/5/11
Panax Ginseng Darrell Miller 9/22/08
Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens Darrell Miller 10/18/07
Supplements for Sexual health! Darrell Miller 4/17/07
Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells Darrell Miller 12/20/05
ELEUTHERO Darrell Miller 12/17/05
KOREAN GINSENG Darrell Miller 12/17/05
AMERICAN GINSENG Darrell Miller 12/17/05
B-Complex 50mg Energy Darrell Miller 11/18/05
Male Response - Male Libido Symptoms - Source Naturals Darrell Miller 7/9/05
Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles Darrell Miller 6/30/05
TRADITIONAL USES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GINSENG and Stress Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Adaptogen Properties Darrell Miller 6/25/05
HISTORY Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Ginseng Varieties Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus) Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Alzheimer’s Disease and Ginkgo Darrell Miller 6/25/05
What is the difference between the types of Ginseng? Darrell Miller 6/17/05
Breathe Easy Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Pep Up and Go! Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Energize Your Life! Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Breathe Easy - Don't underestimate the danger of asthma. Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Acupuncture nutrient Connection Darrell Miller 6/12/05
The Blood Sugar Blues - help lower blood sugar Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Herbs in Perspective Darrell Miller 6/10/05
MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT™ - Herbal-Nutrient Nervous System Support! Darrell Miller 6/4/05
Male Response - Re-align your body systems ... Darrell Miller 6/3/05
Intimate Response - The Freedom to Change. Boost intimacy Darrell Miller 6/2/05
Fibro Response - Feel your Vitality ... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
Re: Boost Male Libido with Source Naturals Products Darrell Miller 5/20/05



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Red ginseng is a natural cure for acne
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Date: April 30, 2019 04:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Red ginseng is a natural cure for acne





According to a South Korean study published in Phytotherapy Research, red ginseng can be an effective treatment for acne in place of traditional medications with potential negative side effects. In fact, red ginseng performed as good or better than benzoyl peroxide in terms of its effectiveness against fighting acne. Specifically, redness symptoms were significantly reduced with the use of red ginseng. The study concluded that the participants acne improved because of panaxynol and panaxydol, the active ingredients in red ginseng.

Key Takeaways:

  • Red ginseng with the scientific name Panax ginseng has been found by some South Korean researchers to be effective against acne.
  • In the study which the researchers published in the journal Phytotherapy Research, they compared the antimicrobial activity of ginseng and identified its active ingredients.
  • Acne is a condition that is caused by chronic inflammation of the skin due to the growth of bacteria in hair follicles.

"They recruited 20 participants and treated them with cream that contains 3 milligrams per gram (mg/g) of red ginseng ethanol extract for four weeks."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-12-red-ginseng-is-a-natural-cure-for-acne.html

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HIV-1 people can boost their immune system with Korean red ginseng
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Date: February 11, 2019 11:11 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HIV-1 people can boost their immune system with Korean red ginseng





Korean red ginseng may have critically important for people infected by HIV. HIV, which weakens the immune system by targeting T helper cells, can be controlled by antiretrovirals, but these can grow less effective over time. Patients who consumed Korean red ginseng had slower annual loss of T helper cells, and these patients had a longer survival duration as a result. Dosage levels had no real impact, but taking Korean red ginseng for longer periods of time enhanced the benefits.

Key Takeaways:

  • Korean red ginseng, which is also called Panax ginseng, has a long history of use as a supplement for longevity.
  • HIV targets the the body's T cells, causing an ongoing drop in the supply, which ultimately weakens and destabilizes the immune system.
  • Research revealed that HIV-infected study subjects given Panax ginseng experienced a smaller loss of T helper cells.

"The herb displays anti-inflammatory activity and helps manage the immune system. It also contains saponins that exert adjuvant actions against inflammatory disease."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-05-hiv-1-people-can-boost-their-immune-system-with-korean-red-ginseng.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6015)


Why Chinese ginseng is good for your heart
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Date: December 10, 2018 09:13 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Why Chinese ginseng is good for your heart





The Chinese are so good at mixing natural herbs with their foods and making it taste naturally. Some people love it while other people find it to be a little bit unnecessary. Ginseng is one of those things that has been proven to help people in a variety of different ways. Ginseng is popular but many people do not know what its potential benefits are. It is a great way to boost your mood and treat cancer for some.

Key Takeaways:

  • Having a good diet should be an essential part of everyone's life in the modern world.
  • There are so many different studies that have been done that show why this ginseng is good for you.
  • The Chinese are very good at using natural herbs in their food to spice it up.

"Chinese ginseng (Panax notoginseng), also known simply as notoginseng, is good for your heart and there are scientific studies to prove it."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-11-30-why-chinese-ginseng-is-good-for-your-heart.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5888)


Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants havebeen found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication
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Date: October 21, 2018 12:52 PM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants havebeen found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication





Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants have been found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication

Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, but common medicinal treatments can come with negative and unpleasant side effects. Osteoporosis means "porous bone" and refers to reduced bone density resulting in weakness. Recent research has identified a number of medicinal plants that appear to improve bone health, including black cohosh, Veld grape, Siberian ginseng, horny goat weed, soybean, Panax ginseng, Kwao Krua, and red sage. These treatments have shown promise in aiding bone formation and accelerating bone healing.

Key Takeaways:

  • It is incredible to think about the potential use cases there are of things in nature.
  • There is no way to determine as to why some of these things actually do have a medicinal affect.
  • Having the ability to slow down the deterioration of the body can be so useful.

"The medicinal plants that have been included in clinical studies showed potential in promoting bone formation and acceleration of bone healing in osteoporosis."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-09-23-natural-remedies-for-osteoporosis-medicinal-plants.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5798)


Adaptogens: Herbs That Can Help In Fighting Stress
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Date: September 06, 2015 09:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Adaptogens: Herbs That Can Help In Fighting Stress

It has been proven through various researches that cortisol hormone in your body can cause stress by effecting its physiological system like adrenal glands or thyroid, etc.  The anxiety and irritation caused by the elevation of cortisol can cause a number of health problems including diabetes, weight gain, depletion of energy level and risk of heart problems etc. Most researchers have found adaptogenic herbs as the best and effective natural source of fighting stress caused by the elevation of cortisol in the body. 

A group of plants that can be used for fighting stress caused by the increase of cortisol hormone in the body are known as Adaptogens. They can help in protecting and restoring the body by balancing its hormonal growth. Some of the popular herbs used for this purpose may include Ashwagandha, American Ginseng, Astragalus, Asian Ginseng, Eleuthero, Cordyceps, Maca, Holy Basil, Schisandra and Rhodiola.  


Here's a brief description about these herbs:

Ashwaganda: It is also known as Indian ginseng as Ayurvedic medicine science uses it since thousands of years not only for fighting stress but also for regulating your immune system by lowering the level of cortisol hormone.

Ashwagandha

American Ginseng: This adaptogenic herb is also known as Panax Ginseng as it belongs to the botanical family of Panax. Normally two types of Ginseng are used for relieving stress including American and Asian ginseng.

Asian Ginseng: Researches have proved it to be one of the most popular adaptogens that can help in improving your ability to handle stress along with your mental performance due to its antidepressant and antioxidant properties which can lower the levels of your blood sugar and blood pressure. Though American and Asian ginsengs belong to the same medicinal group, their healing properties are different from each other.

Astragalus: The root of this herb is used in various Chinese medicine to reduce the effect of stress along with boosting your immunity level. It can reduce the receptor binding ability of cortisol, a stress causing hormone.

Astragalus

Eleuthero: It reduces the symptoms of adrenal fatigue due to its Panax Ginseng like properties. It soothes the stimulated adrenal glands producing stress causing hormones cortisol and adrenaline.


Cordycep: It is a kind of fungus which has antioxidant properties to help you in fighting stress along with boosting your immune system.

Cordyceps

Maca: It is a root vegetable that is used to reduce the risk of various health problems like arthritis and diabetes etc. caused due to increased stress along with increasing your libido. Along with wide variety of nutrients, it also provides healthy fiber to your body.

Maca

Holy basil: Tulsi is another popular name of this adaptogenic herb. Along with boosting your immune system it also helps you in fighting stress and regulating blood pressure.

Schizandra: The berries of this adaptogenic herb are used for making various stress relieving medicines and general tonics in China.

Rhodiola: According to various health experts it helps in reducing physical fatigue along with stress related problems like mental stress etc. due to its antioxidant properties.


References

//www.natural-health-and-healing-4u.com/adaptogenic-herbs.html

//draxe.com/7-adaptogen-herbs-to-lower-cortisol

//bottomlinehealth.com/maca-the-super-food-that-helps-with-everything-from-fatigue-to-sex-drive


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Korean Ginseng Root Extract
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Date: December 14, 2012 12:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Korean Ginseng Root Extract

Korean ginseng is a perennial herb that has been long renowned for its medicinal properties in curing various health disorders. Extracts of the root of this plant are made by dilution of one part of ginseng root with one part of water and alcohol.

The Korean ginseng root has been a staple ingredient in traditional Chinese medicines for more than 2000 years. This herb was considered a miracle drug by them, and the theory of its beneficial properties has been passed down through the ages. People still recognize the miraculous powers of this root, and use it as a natural antidote for various ailments. The ginseng root is generally, powdered only after six years of its growth and is made available in the form of extracts at stores all over the world. The Korean root is believed to comprise of various phytochemicals which are the main cause of all beneficial properties.

  • Ginsenosides, possessing steroid-like properties, increase the brain activity and act as a stress-buster.
  • Panaxans, have the similar structure as anabolic steroids, and can strengthen and build body muscles.
  • Polysaccharides, with a carbohydrate structure can boost mood, maintain blood sugar levels and promote cardiovascular health.

Benefits of Korean ginseng root extract

General health tonic

Ginseng is classified as an adaptogen, which acts as a complete health tonic. This extract can help the body rebound from fatigue, arising from various kinds of stress. It also aids in improving energy and physical endurance, thereby, contributing to the overall well-being of an individual.

Improves cardiovascular function

- This root extract can prevent organ and tissue prolapse, and improve blood circulation for improved cardiovascular function. It lowers the bad cholesterol levels and increases HDL cholesterol in the human body.

Improves functioning of the nervous system

The plant nutrients found in the herb extract can enhance the cognitive abilities and act as memory boosters. They can cure problems related to poor concentration, memory, insomnia and anxiety.

Diabetes control

The ginseng extract holds great promises for people with type-2 diabetes as it can result in greater glucose and insulin resistance.

Prevents cancer

Ginseng extract has also been proved to act as a preventive remedy for several kinds of cancer.

Immunity support

The extracts of this herb act as a stimulant for boosting the immunity and effectively prevent all kinds of flu and cold.

Korean ginseng root extract has worked miracles on improving the general well-being of a person. The numerous benefits of ginseng extract might seem compelling but it is advisable to exercise caution, as with other herbal supplements. Consult your physician before consuming ginseng to explore probable side-effects with existing medication.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2750)


What Is The Difference Between American Ginseng And Korean Ginseng?
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Date: December 28, 2011 07:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is The Difference Between American Ginseng And Korean Ginseng?

Ginseng is a perennial plant which belongs to the genus of Panax, specifically in the family of Araliaceae. It is native in many places such as in North America and East Asia. It can also be abundantly found in other areas of the world which have a cool climate. Ginseng is a broad genus of plant. It has many subtypes in which plant description as well as health benefits may have similarities and differences. Despite their variations, all ginseng plant contains the active ingredient which is called ginsenosides.

One type of ginseng is the Panax quinquefolius or commonly called American ginseng. Despite its name, this kind of ginseng is widely used in the Chinese traditional medicine. This kind of ginseng originated in Northern America. However, cultivation is more abundant in China. Like many other ginseng plant, this is a perennial herb which contains ginsenosides.

Another type of ginseng which is popularly used in many alternative medicines is the Korean ginseng, also known as Asian ginseng. This kind of ginseng has a similar chemical structure with American ginseng. Like the American ginseng, this kind of ginseng also has many health benefits to human body because of its ginsenosides content. The scientific name for Korean ginseng is Panax ginseng.

Clinical studies have revealed that American ginseng has been found to have an effect more on the immune system of the person. It effectively boosts the immune system thus protecting the body from harmful microorganisms which can cause diseases and infections. Other studies have shown that American ginseng can potentially have a therapeutic effect against inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, Korean ginseng is more on as a tonic herb. It significantly helps the nervous system relax and stabilize mood and behavior. In fact, ongoing studies are being conducted to help develop the brain and the other parts of the nervous system to its maximum.

Other differences of the two beneficial ginseng plants are that American ginseng has a cooling effect therefore; it is best used during humid weather conditions. On the other hand, Korean ginseng is a little bit warm in nature. Hence, the latter is great in times of cool climates. Also, American ginseng is found to have a tranquilizing and sedative effect, while Korean ginseng has revitalizing and energizing properties.

Another difference is that, American ginseng is rich in a type of ginsenosides called Rb1 while Korean ginseng is abundant in Rg1 type of ginsenosides. The former is great for increasing the yin energy while the latter is effective in boosting the level of yang energy.

Ginseng herbs can be taken fresh. Many people prefer the roots while some like the leaves more. Nowadays, supplements are already formulated. It is available in the form of tablets, teas or extracts. Topical use is also common therefore ointments and creams are also manufactured. If you are planning to have ginseng supplements, it would be best that you should consult your doctor first. This would greatly help in the prevention of untoward effects of the supplement. Though ginseng is relatively safe, side effects may still occur. However, these effects are non – life threatening.

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What Are The Different Types Of Ginseng And What Is Ginseng Good For?
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Date: December 16, 2011 06:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Different Types Of Ginseng And What Is Ginseng Good For?

Ginseng is a considered to be a perennial plant which is a member of the Panax genus under the family of Araliaceae. It is abundantly found in North America, East Asia and other places which have a cool climate. There are many types of ginseng. Though different in kind, all these species of ginseng contains the active ingredient known as ginsenosides. This chemical substance is the one responsible for the many health benefits of ginseng.

The types of Ginseng are:

1. Panax GINSENG. This type of ginseng is also known as Asian ginseng. It is very rich in ginsenosides which proves that it is included among the types of true ginseng.

2. Panax QUINQUEFOLIUS. This ginseng has an effective adaptogenic property. It is otherwise known as American ginseng. This herb is also considered as a true ginseng.

3. ELEUTHEROCOCCUS SENTICOSUS. The other name for this herb is Siberian ginseng. However, it is not considered as a true ginseng because it does not contain ginsenosides but eleutherosides. Also, ginseng has a fleshy root while this herb has a woody one. Despite their differences, Siberian ginseng also has similar effects to true ginseng herbs. It has an adaptogenic property which can effectively improve the overall health of the individual.

As mentioned above, ginseng has many benefits to human health. These include:

1. IMMUNE SYSTEM BOOSTER. Ginseng contains several vitamins and minerals which can be helpful in improving the immune system as well as the overall health of the individual. Studies have shown that ginseng has an ample amount of Vitamin C which can help maintain the health and strength of the body’s immune system. As a result, ginseng can effectively improve health especially those who are one the recovery phase of an illness.

2. LOWERS BLOOD GLUCOSE. Asian ginseng is noted for its potential ability to help regulate blood sugar levels. This is made possible because of its action in the stomach and intestine to control the absorption of glucose from the diet. In this connection, health experts highly recommend that individuals under diabetic therapy must use ginseng with extra care because it might cause hypoglycemia or low level of sugar in the blood.

3. AFFECTS BLOOD PRESSURE. Ginseng can produce an effect to the blood pressure of the individual, either high or low blood pressure. Depending on the dosage and the person’s response, ginseng can effectively maintain blood pressure within it normal limits.

4. IMPROVES THE OVERALL STATE OF HEALTH. Many ginseng consumers have reported that they experience an increased sense of well – being with their regular use of such helpful herb. It is also commonly used for the improvement of one’s stamina and endurance in performing many mental and physical tasks.

Ginseng can be consumed raw. Others use dried roots of this herb. Supplements are also available in the form of tablets, extracts and teas. Ointments and creams are also formulated for topical administration. If you plan to use ginseng for a particular health indication, make sure to talk to your doctor first since ginseng can have significant effect to the body as mentioned above. This will greatly prevent adverse effects and interactions with other medications you are taking.

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Can Ginseng Boost Your Energy Safely?
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Date: October 05, 2011 04:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Ginseng Boost Your Energy Safely?

Ginseng is a slow - growing perennial plant in which its roots are fleshy which are commonly used as dietary supplement and beverage. This plant is a member of the genus known as Panax of the family of Araliaceae. It grows abundantly in the eastern part of Asia where the climate is cool specifically in Korea, northern China and east region of Siberia. There are many species of ginseng in which they are named according to where they are discovered. What is common among these ginseng species is its property as an adaptogen.

Ginseng is an herb which is considered as an adaptogen. This classification of chemicals improves the body’s resistance to physical exhaustion and external stress. In fact, for almost twenty centuries, Ginseng has been commonly used as a natural dietary supplement to boost vitality and endurance. The mechanism is that cellular energy is produced in the cell’s powerhouse called mitochondria which turn nutrients into usable energy called Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) and Creatine Phosphate (CP). However, when we are under stressful situations, the body produces hormones which can alter the ability of the mitochondria to produce ATP and CP. Thus, energy levels are also reduced. Eventually, adaptogenic substances plays a critical role in improving the cell’s production of ATP and CP by allowing the body to deliver more oxygen to cells while greatly reducing oxidative damage affecting the mitochondria of the cells.

Not to mention, ginseng also has ginsenosides which are considered to effectively control the release of stress hormones such us cortisol and noradrenalin, thus, preventing chronic stress which can greatly affect one’s energy level. Studies show that ginseng also relaxes the blood vessels thereby improving circulation and delivery of oxygen to the cells of the body. Clinical research reveals that ginseng has the high potential to improve performance of athletes. It can boost stamina.

Other benefits of Ginseng are that it can serve as a nourishing stimulant to improve depression and as adjunct treatment for Diabetes Mellitus Type II. It can also be employed as a support agent for the improvement of sexual dysfunction among men.

The fleshy root of Ginseng is available in the market in dried form which may be whole, sliced, minced or semi – granule form. These ginseng products are often found in many energy drinks, teas, health drinks, food additives and energy – boosting supplements. Other commercial products which contain ginseng are also common such as shampoos, conditioners, skin moisturizers, soaps and even cosmetic items. This is for the reason that ginseng can effectively delay the ageing process and improve the health of the cells and tissues. Ginseng also has the ability to enhance memory, reduce mental fatigue and improve the health of the immune system. To note, ginseng combined with Gingko biloba can considerably stimulate memory among middle – aged individuals.

Ginseng is generally safe to use for any ages. In fact, this herb is widely used as day – to – day beverage among many people in Asia especially in Korea. However, if you are planning to undergo supplementation, it would be best that you should seek medical advice first.

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Panax Ginseng
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Date: September 22, 2008 09:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Panax Ginseng

Panax is a type of perennial plant with fleshy roots, and grows in Eastern Asia. Ginsengs contain ginsenosides that are triterpene saponins, steroidal compounds that are found only in Panax ginseng. The effects of these saponins are difficult to establish, but they are believed to be behind the properties of ginseng.

Panax ginseng is found predominantly in Korea, China and Siberia, although a genus has also been found in Vietnam. Panax are adaptogenic herbs that help promote resistance to anxiety, fatigue and stress, and are said to adapt the body to resist a number of different stressors. It has been proposed that adaptogenic herbs can balance the endocrine hormones of the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal axis.

They also normalize the immune system, and increase the activity of phagocytes, the killer cells. Additionally, they not only help to maintain homeostasis, but are believed to go further and act as allostatic agents, adapting response to maintain system stability in a more dynamic fashion, by changing interactive functions as opposed to the individual adaption’s made in homeostasis.

Not all ginsengs are the same, and although Siberian ginseng is an adaptogen, it is not a true ginseng. Its roots are woody rather than fleshy, and it contains eleutherosides as opposed to ginsenosides. These also are triterpenoid saponins, but of a different adaptogen. The herb is actually Eleutherococcus senticosus as opposed to Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius, both true ginsengs. Siberian ginseng was misnamed as a marketing ploy.

American ginseng is Panax quinquefolius, sometimes referred to by the Chinese as Huaqishen. It, too, is an adaptogen and a true ginseng, containing ginsenosides. However, it contains much less ginsenonide Rg1 than Panax. This ginsenonide appears to possess estrogen-like activity and improves spatial learning. The other forms of ginesonide found in Panax ginseng are:

Ginsenoside Rb1: This appears in greatest concentration in American ginseng, and appears to have an effect on the reproductive system. It not only has an effect on the testicles, but is believed to increase testosterone production through its stimulating effect on luteinizing hormone. It also helps to rdeduce the incidence of angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels from old, and also a stage in the development of malignant tumors from dormant ones.

Ginsenoside Rc: this possesses sedative properties, and in a study on breast cancer was found to have an effect in inhibiting the growth of these particular cancer cells. Ginsenoside Rc might therefore have use in the treatment or prevention of breast cancer. Studies have also suggested that this ginsenoside could increase the motility of sperm: the motiliy of sperm was found to increase significantly in a solution of ginsenoside Rc.

Ginsenoside Rf: this is present only in Panax ginseng, and studies have indicate that it has an inhibitory effect on the Ca2+ neural channels in the brain, and so cokld have an analgesic effect. Studies have as yet failed to explain this effect that is seen in animal tests, but are continuing on this ginsenoside.

Ginsenoside Re: this ginsenoside has strong antioxidant effects and has a significant antidiabetic effect in that is reduces insulin resistance, which is likely why ginseng is taken to treat Type 2 diabetes. Studies are ongoing into the properties of this ginsenoside, and also on the other 10 or more that are known to be present in Panax ginseng. The effects of ginseng are difficult to establish with certainity because they work through so many different pathways and it is difficult to isolate one. More than one ginsenoside, for example, affects the calcium channels in the brain, and it is difficult to determine which does what.

There are fewer ginsenosides in Panax quinquefoilius, and in the USA it is only the Panax version that can be traded as simply ‘ginseng’. One of the main problems with all ginsengs is that although it is one of the most studied plants, the majority of the studies have been on animals, and due to this, and the difficulties caused by the multiple pathways described earlier, many of the postulations have not been proved in humans.

However, if the theory as it is know today is taken into consideration along with the traditional uses of ginseng in traditional Indian (ayurvedic), Chinese and Native American medicine, it would be fairly accurate to say that ginseng is useful in helping your body to recover after illness or surgery, and to help you to deal with stress. It has also been proved to lower your blood glucose (sugar) levels, and help in the treatment of Type II diabetes, as already mentioned. There is evidence that it helps to boost your mental performance, memory and might help to slow down the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Ginseng can also give a boost to your energy levels, and it is genarally accepted that Panax ginseng is more effective than the American version. In traditional medicine, Asian ginseng is said to be warming, and the American variery cooling. Thus Panax ginseng is useful for people recovering from illness and trying to recover their strength, acts as a tonic, stimulant and supports the immune system. In other words it helps the body to get whole again after being depleted.

It should not be used if you get very hot and red, such as with heat stroke, unless you use it in combination with the American version, because these are conditions of high yang and this type of ginseng will increase the yang even further.

American ginseng, on the other hand, is good for those with fevers, hypertension (high blood pressure), and suffereing the effcts of heat. It helps build the yin and reduce the yang, so if you always feel flushed and hot or are hyperactive then go for the American, and if you easily get chilled or find your hands and feet get cold very easily, reach for the Asian ginseng to increase your yang.

You often find ginseng as an ingredient in soft drinks, but the concentration is so low that it has no metabolic or pharmacological effect. The dose to be taken should be as stated on the pack, since there is no specific standardization. It has been noted that the effects can be lost if an excess of ginseng is taken, but generally the herb is safe and if you feel a bit down or lacking in energy, ginseng can work wonders for you.




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Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens
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Date: October 18, 2007 11:13 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens

Life today places a number of different types of stresses upon us. There are the normal stresses of living, of facing problems at work, financial worries and family stresses. Schedules are becoming busier as we try to pack more and more into each day, and relaxation time is cut to a minimum. For many of us, the stress starts when we waken and rush through breakfast, if we have time for one, to catch the bus or train to work, or to slip into the morning traffic rush that takes us an hour to travel 10 miles or less.

Once at work we have problems to deal with that continue throughout a rushed lunch period, and then back to the stress of trying to return home in the evening to open the bills and check if we have enough in the bank to pay them. However, that is not all.

Our environment is continually changing, and our bodies are subject to the stresses of pollution from the planes, trains and automobiles, not to mention the pesticides, preservatives plastics and harsh lighting. The noise of air conditioning and the continual musak of the stores and shopping malls and everything else that goes to completely stress us out, weekdays and weekends.

That is ignoring the smog, the disappearing ozone layer and increased UV radiation, the greenhouse effect and global warming, El Nino and everything else that causes worry or affects the delicate balance of the body’s biochemistry. Rather than adapting to our environment we are continually striving to adapt the environment to suit our needs. We should develop a flexibility of mind and body so that we can survive these modern-day stresses, and this is where the substances known as adaptogens are important.

Adaptogens help us to adapt to the environment and withstand the stresses of modern life. The term was first used by Russian N.V. Lazarev in 1947 who defined an adaptogen as a substance meeting three specific criteria: it should cause a minimal disruption to the normal physiological function of the body, it must work by means of a range of chemical, physical and biochemical factors rather than through one specific action and must have an overall effect of normalization, so that no condition is aggravated to improve another.

There are a large number of identified adaptogens, among them several forms of ginseng: Panax, American, Siberian and Japanese; licorice, schizandra berries, rhodiola and others. These adaptogens tend to work in the body by improving the body’s availability and use of energy, improving the efficiency of removal of the metabolic waste and by-products, supporting the adrenal function so that the effects of stress are reduced or countered, improving the utilization of oxygen and helping to build up body tissue. In general the body works more efficiently in generating and using energy, muscle tissue and counteracting the effects of modern day stress, both environmental and psychological.

Of the ginsengs, Panax is very expensive for regular use, although many people prefer it. However, studies have shown that Siberian, or eleuthero ginseng, is a stronger adaptogen that Panax which is also called Korean or Chinese ginseng. In fact the other forms, including American and Japanese, tend to over-stimulate the body, and can also cause unwanted side effects such as constipation and over-excitement. The Siberian ginseng tends not to show these symptoms.

Siberian ginseng contains seven active substances known as eleutherosides A – F which are not present in the other ginsengs. These substances appear to have several properties that have been clinically proven. For example, they relieve insomnia, one of the symptoms of stress, high and low blood pressure, bronchitis, various forms of neuroses and, it is claimed, also some types of cancer. Siberian ginseng also allows humans to withstand noise, heat and extra stresses caused by severe workloads. It improves athletic performance and allows people to improve their work output under a variety of stresses. Athletes can train harder and recover quicker.

Another adaptogen is schizandra berries (also called schizandra chinensis and magnolia vine). Chinese herbalists class medicinal herbs by the five different flavors, sour, bitter, salty, acrid and sweet. Schizandra berries possess all five, and are therefore considered by the Chinese to balance all the systems of the body.

It is used in the West as a stress reducing adaptogen and is also included in sports and weight loss formulae. It helps insomnia and improves endurance and mental coordination. Schizandra is believed to be a good tonic for the liver and is often used in combination with Siberian ginseng (eleuthero) and licorice. The latter is another popular herb in China that is said to be a good tonic for the spleen. Licorice itself is a known anti-inflammatory since it contains flavanoids and saponins that promote the immune system. Licorice is thought be a useful supplement for HIV patients due to its effect on the immune system. It also increases corticosteroid levels by inhibiting the liver’s ability to break down adrenal hormone. However, people with high blood pressure should be careful with licorice since it can cause sodium retention. Like any other medication, you should seek your physician’s advice if you have any existing conditions.

Rhodiola, also referred as roseroot, is used for improved memory and enhanced vitality and it can also be used as a mood modifier. It is used by athletes of all types for increased strength and endurance, and improved cardiovascular and muscle recovery time. The Russians call it ‘Golden Root’ and it is a safe and effective adaptogen.

More and more people are turning to adaptogens to help them cope with the hustle and bustle of their daily lives, and they are becoming increasingly available from ordinary health stores. If you are finding it difficult to stay energetic and active then try them out. Not all work with every individual, but there is a large variety to choose from and most people are able to find an adaptogen that suits them and enables them to adapt to the stresses of daily life.



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Supplements for Sexual health!
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Date: April 17, 2007 02:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Supplements for Sexual health!

Improving Sexual Performance Naturally

Sex. It’s everywhere. It’s on TV (a lot!). It’s in the books we read and the movies we watch. Even the radio seems a veritable hot bed of sex. (what would hard rock, soft jazz, or Motown classics be without songs about sex?) Magazines are full of sex and it’s not just the “naughty” ones with glossy centerfolds. From Sports Illustrated to Good Housekeeping, sex makes for titillating headlines and cover stories. In fact, 21st Century America seems to be awash in sex, except where it counts – in the bedrooms and love lives of married Americans.

No one really knows for sure how many of the 113 million married Americans are living as couples with DINS (dual income, no sex). Estimates range from 15 to 50 percent. Even couples who have sex fairly often feel like they’re not having enough sex or that it’s not as enjoyable as it was in the past, or both. And while women are stereotyped as the sex refusers and avoiders, surveys show that both women and men decline spousal advances fairly equally.

What’s really interesting about this lack of sexual activity in America, is that the very same thing is happening to husbands and wives residing in Paris and London, as well as Lisbon and Madrid. Research has shown that married couples who reside within Western civilized countries are much more likely to have unhappy sex lives than their counterparts living elsewhere in the world. That’s because the married couples residing in the rainforests of Brazil, the streets of Beijing, and the mountains of Tibet have access to powerful plant medicines that keep their sexual relationships healthy and happy. In fact, in China and India alone, over one billion men and women routinely incorporate plant medicines for healthy and satisfying sex.

As a medicine hunter, I have discovered effective plants and herbs al over the planet that really do improve orgasms in women and erections in men. Now it’s your turn. I’m going to teach you how to enhance your sexuality and introduce you to an entire arsenal of libido lifting plants to help make sex fun, vibrant, and satisfying for both you and your partner.

 

Q. These plants sound too good to be true. Do they really work?

A. Yes, they do. Part of their success is their ability to work with your body’s innate mechanisms for healthy sex. Good sex is much more than just stimulated body parts. But it’s a good place to start!

A man needs an erect penis that remains firm past foreplay and on into intercourse. He also needs to sustain that erection and experience forceful and pleasurable ejaculation when he and his partner are both ready for his orgasm. A woman needs to feel desire and feel desired for her nipples to be aroused, her clitoris stimulated, and her vagina lubricated – the basics leading to her orgasm.

Plants that enhance sex can help men and women obtain these bare necessities of sex. And unlike other supplements, you’ll know if the medicinal plant you’ve purchased is actually doing what it promised to do. You can’t really tell if the calcium supplement you take each day is making your bones stronger. But you will be able to tell pretty soon if Catuaba, for example, is increasing your sexual desire.

Q. Night after night, my husband falls asleep on the sofa. And the honest to goodness truth is that I’m too tired for sex, too. I love my husband and once upon a time I loved sex. But my job, the kids, those never-ending errands, and trying to keep up with the laundry are too exhausting. Is there a plant that can rev us up?

A. Many women are in the same sexless boat you’re sailing around in and they don’t like it any more than you do. In fact, women all over the world put their family’s needs before their own, leading to some very tired moms and wives.

Life’s demands can also impair sexual performance in men. Work stressors, family demands, and home maintenance result in fatigue and lack of energy. Men find that they have no energy left to devote to to sex at the end of the day.

But, over 80 percent of married couples in the world have at their disposal a health care system that integrates sex into their personal health and well being. For centuries, millennia actually, practitioners of traditional medicine have prescribed Maca and Rhodiola to reduce “sexual fatigue” in women and men who are just too tired to make love.

 

Sex Enhancing Plants for Men and Women

How They Work

Maca (Lepidum meyenii)

For the past several years in Peru, where the Maca plant grows, physicians have prescribed extracts from this plant to men with low libido and diminished erectile function, which excellent results. Recently researchers studying Maca have discovered two compounds they think are responsible for improved sexual stamina, namely the macamides and macaenes. It is these same compounds that help men and women obtain more frequent and more powerful orgasms.

Rhodiola Rosea

This hardy plant grows high in the mountains of Europe and Asia, enduring cold and snow and lack of sunlight for much of the year. Hoping to gain some of Rhodiola’s energy and stamina for themselves, early Siberians used extracts of the plants to boost strength and stamina. Not only did they have more energy, they discovered they had more sexual stamina, too.

 

Rhodiola is an adaptogen, a plant that helps us adapt to changes in life and the stresses of everyday life. When we’re stressed, our bodies shift into high gear causing a cascade of hormones to prevent and reduce harm. In cases of trauma (like car accident or surgery (or simply nature at work (such as childbirth), these hormones are necessary. However, when we experience stress that’s caused by work (your boss), or family (your teen-aged children), or personal struggles (your weight), this hormonal cascade can do more harm than good –causing fatigue, added weight gain, poor metabolism, and impaired sexual function.

 

Rhodiola helps make sure the hormonal cascade occurs when it’s needed, to protect our health, not harm it. The result is better energy, better vitality, and better sex!

 

Q. Since I had a baby four months ago, I have no desire for sex. This is making my husband pretty frustrated and me too, actually. I’d love to want sex again.

A. A married woman with a baby and a toddler or two can feel that her body isn’t really hers. So much for feeling sexy! While this fact can be a source of great pride and joy, it can also drain desire.

As women enter perimenopause – those years when they are still menstruating despite fluctuating estrogen levels – they often have no desire for sex. Since estrogen is the engine that drives women’s reproductive function, when it starts to go, sex goes too. Women who have reached menopause may find their minds wandering during sex. Pondering the car’s need for an oil change or if the milk in the refrigerator has reached its expiration date makes for pretty blah sex. It also makes it nearly impossible to achieve orgasm.

Once more, traditional medicine has some answers:

Sex Plants for Women

How They Work

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

Just like Rhodiola, Ashwagandha is an adaptogen, possessing powerful sex-enhancing powers. And just like Rhodiola, Ashwagandha has been helping women boost their desire for sex. Long considered India’s most potent sex-enhancing plant, the country’s women have used Ashwagandha for years to rev up their sex drives.

Catuaba (Erythroxylum Catuaba)

Catuaba is a tree that grows in the dense, lush Brazilian Amazon, the largest tropical rainforest on Earth. For hundreds and hundreds of years, tribal peoples have used Catuaba bark to stimulate sexual desire. According to folk legend, the Tupi Indians discovered Catuaba bark’s sex-enhancing effects and passed the knowledge on to other rainforest tribes. Today, Catuaba is used worldwide by women desiring passionate sex.

Eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) extract

Sometimes called Siberian ginseng, Eleuthero is actually not a ginseng at all, only a distant cousin. This leafy shrub is native to Eastern Russia and the mountains of China and has been used by tribal peoples for over 2,000 years to eliminate sexual fatigue. Eleuthero is another adaptogen, invigorating sexual function and restoring balance to all body functions.

Q. My husband has a desire for sex, but sometimes it’s not enough. Even if we’re both in the mood, he can’t maintain his erection very long. It’s very frustrating for us both.

A. For men it’s often their equipment that lets them down. As men age, they find they can’t get an erection hard enough or keep an erection long enough to satisfy their partners and themselves.

While women can fake an orgasm if they’re tired, men have to perform every single time they have sex. Luckily, Mother Nature can help:

Sex Plants for Men

How They Work

Horny Goat Weed (Epimedium species)

This aptly named sex plant has been in use for over two thousand years, restoring sexual fire, treating impotence, and increasing production of semen. The green leaves of Horny Goat Weed are filled with numerous natural compounds, responsible for these sexual effects. Research shows that horny goat weed has activities very similar to the androgens, sex hormones that stimulate desire in men.

Yohimbe (Pausinystalia yohimbe)

Yohimbe is nature’s Viagra – it helps men attain firm erections. Not surprisingly, Yohimbe has been used for a long time as a fold medicine aphrodisiac. The bark contains Yohimbine, a compound known to stimulate engorged vessels within the penis and nerves of the lower spine. It’s no wonder Yohimbe has the well-deserved reputation as a superior sexual stimulant.

Panax ginseng

One of the most highly regarded plants in traditional Chinese medicine, Ginseng stimulates the central nervous system, invigorates the brain, increases resistance to stress and fatigue, and sharpens the mind. Ginseng is also used by millions of men to enhance libido and sexual vitality. In an erectile dysfunction study, men who took Ginseng had a 42% improvement in erectile function compared to placebo. Researchers theorize that ginseng increases nitric oxide in the penis, dilating the vessels of the corpus cavernosum - the very same mechanism that makes Viagra work.

Q. There are hundreds of supplements that claim to make men hard and women weak with desire. I’ve tried some of these, and they don’t do anything. When should I believe that the herbs and plan medicines you have discovered are nay better?

A. There are a lot of “snake oil” companies out there pitching products that promise to improve our sex lives but do absolutely nothing. One reason for this glut of useless supplements is simple demand. Men and women trying to make their sex lives better, are willing to give most products the benefit of the doubt and buy one or two. Sex sells – and even products that are purchased one time only will make big profits.

To get the most for your money, make sure the sexual supplement you are considering is from a well-respected manufacturer. Ask store staff, surf the Internet, and do some searching for the best nutraceutical companies. Make sure the herbs are standardized and that the extracts are concentrated fro optimal benefit.

Q. Are these sex-enhancing plants safe?

A. Despite years of use by practitioners of traditional medicine, significant adverse effects have not been reported for most sex-enhancing plants. However, men who have already been diagnosed with certain health conditions such as high blood pressure, thyroid disease, prostate problems, or other illnesses should use caution when selecting any health supplement. The same advice applies to women, especially women who are pregnant or nursing. And always remember to keep your doctor informed about the supplements you are using, especially if you are also taking prescription drugs. But the sex-enhancing plants have been traveling on planet Earth for a long, long time. And hopefully they’ll be here for lot longer, continuing to work effectively and go about their business of safely improving orgasms and erections and making sex great for men and women all over the world.

Q. OK, exactly how did early native healers figure out which plants improve sex? Was it just simple trial and error?

A. It does seem pretty remarkable that tribal peoples have discovered the right plants to treat diseases and improve health without modern day scientific advances.

From my many years as a “medicine hunter” in rainforests and grasslands and marshes and mountains, I’ve learned that healing plants exist for virtually every health need. It’s up to the medicine man or women to put the plant into practice. These healers have been able to do this successfully for thousands of people, by intensively studying and working with the plants. By putting themselves into the plant’s world, becoming part of the world around them, native healers have intuitively discovered which plant helps which disease. It wasn’t mere luck that brought all those plants and all those healers together. It was the natural and spiritual connection existing between the two.

Q. Are there other “natural” remedies we can use to improve our sex lives?

A. The easiest way to naturally enhance your sex life is to practice, practice, practice! Because if you don’t use it, you might lose it. Studies have shown that couples in the Amazon rainforest as well as couples in the concrete jungle of New York City have better sex lives if thy make sex a priority. All the sex-enhancing plants in the world are useless if the men and women taking them don’t put them to the test.

Men who smoke need to quit. Research has shown that cigarettes send men’s sex lives up in smoke. Men who smoke more than 20 cigarettes daily have a 60 percent higher risk of erectile dysfunction compared to men who never smoked. That’s because smoking decreases blood flow making it difficult for men to obtain an erection.

And finally, since sex is a visual and tactile endeavor, there are quite natural and creative ways to give it a boost. Visually stimulating images can arouse even the tiredest of the tired. Premiere Magazine recently compiled a list of the most erotic movie sex scenes ever. You don’t have to feel embarrassed when renting these movies (as you might with pornography) at the video store and they are guaranteed to light up your life:

1.      Diane Lane and Oliver Martinez making love in UNFAITHFUL (2002)

2.      Hilary Swank pleasuring Chloe Sevigny in BOYS DON’T CRY (1999)

3.      Brad Pitt and Claire Forlani making love in MEET JOE BLACK (1998)

4.      Leonardo DiCaprio drawing Kate Winslet in the nude in TITANIC (1997)

5.      Sharon Stone uncrossing her legs while she is being interrogated in a room full of en in BASIC INSTINCT (1992)

6.      Patrick Swazye and Demi Moore in the pottery secene early on in GHOST (1990)

7.      Michael Douglas and Glenn Close having sex in an elevator in FATAL A TTRACTION (1987)

8.      Mickey Rourke caressing Kim Basinger’s body with an ice cube in 9 1.2 WEEKS (1986)

9.      William Hurt and Kathleen Turner having sex in BODY HET (1981)

10.  Julie Christine and Donald Sutherland making love in DON’T LOOK NOW (1973)

11.  Rita Hayworth flipping back her hair and singing “Put The Blame on Mame” in FILDA (1946)

One Important Last Point

Sex always has consequences. And improving your sex life does not eliminate the requirement to practice it responsibly. Sexually transmitted diseases, hepatitis, and HIV/AIDS must be prevented, pregnancy must be considered and consent between partners must exist.

Conclusion

Sexual activity keeps us connected – both tangibly and spiritually to our heart’s desire. It helps us feel secure and well loved and adds to our self esteem. In other words, good sex is important to good life.

But all of us need a little help now and then. Sex-enhancing plants that have been used for thousands of years by millions of people provide that help. You can have actual sexual healing with effective sexual supplements and maybe find out what you’ve been missing.

After all, 80 percent of the world’s married couples can’t be wrong!



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Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells
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Date: December 20, 2005 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells

Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells

The differences between aging and growing old are poles apart. Sure, they may sound similar in nature. But when you think about it, the two are as different as night and day. Growing old is about retirement and travel and enjoying what you’ve worked an entire life for. Aging, on the other hand, summons images of wrinkled skin, brittle joints, cloudy minds and medicine cabinets full of prescriptions. It’s safe to assume that the majority of us want to look, live, and feel better as we grow old. Not the opposite. Many of us are on the right track - committed to a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and a well-balanced diet. And yes, these do serve as a solid foundation for good health during our golden years. It is our cells, however, that ultimately determine who grows old, and who just ages.

Still, slowing the proverbial hands of time is not all about health clubs and organic produce. If you want to grow old gracefully, you must nurture the ten trillion cells that defi ne you physically. Why? Because these cells are constantly under attack by free radicals - unstable molecules that either lack, or have an unpaired number of electrons. They scour the body in search of stable cells, and do whatever they can to rob them of their electrons, a process more formally known as oxidation. Considering that it’s environmentally impossible to completely avoid contact with the billions of airborne toxins that cause free radicals, the only other option is to safeguard your healthy cells. Making the commitment to a healthy lifestyle is the fi rst step in the process, and can be accomplished by eating healthier foods, exercising on a regular basis, and paying close attention to what you are exposed to environmentally.

The next step is to nourish and protect your cells. The best way to do this is to consume foods that are rich in antioxidants and other cell-friendly nutrients. Unfortunately, this task is often much easier said than done. Today’s average adult is busier than ever, making it far more diffi cult to consume fresh, unprocessed meals 100% of the time. This does not, however, imply that all hope is lost. Over the years, the nutritional sciences have made stunning advances that afford you the opportunity to live your life while still safeguarding the integrity of your most basic building blocks. Here are a few of the best.

Antioxidants

Antioxidants work at the cellular level to paralyze the free radicals that cause oxidation throughout the body. Some of today’s most popular nutrients and dietary supplements fall into this category. They include vitamins A, E, and C, Selenium, Zinc, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Lycopene, Lutein, CoQ10, in addition to a host of others. And though similar in function, each of these free radical fi ghters has a unique role within the body.

Take CoQ10 for example. It’s present in every cell of the body, and is especially important for cardiovascular support. Lutein has been used extensively to prevent oxidation in the macular regions of the eyes. Zinc is a powerful immune system booster that has become extremely popular during cold and fl u season. Alpha Lipoic Acid is both fat and water soluble, and is commonly referred to as the “universal” antioxidant based on its ability to quench free radicals anywhere in the body.

Immune Boosting Herbs

Herbs such as Astragalus, Olive Leaf, Rhodiola, Echinacea, Panax Ginseng and Ashwaganda have been used for centuries to help support healthy cells and strong, responsive immune systems. They’ve also been shown to exhibit natural synergistic effects when used together. Today, they remain one of the most popular ways to naturally promote all-around wellbeing. When it comes to supporting healthy cells, NOW is pleased to offer one of the best selections of antioxidants, herbs and immune support formulas. Be sure to look for these and other great products at fi ne health food retailers, nationwide.*

OPCs

OPCs (proanthocyanidins) are high-powered polyphenol antioxidants that belong to the fl avonoid family. Grape seed extract, pine bark extracts such as pycnogenol and enzogenol, bilberry, gingko biloba, resveratrol and others all fall into this category. Research continues to suggest that OPCs work in the same manner that traditional antioxidants do, however their ability to eradicate free radicals is much greater and more versatile. Equally appealing, OPCs can easily cross the blood barrier of the brain to help protect brain and neural tissues from the damage caused by oxidative stress.

Mushroom Extracts

Throughout history, many civilizations have relied on organic mushroom extracts to encourage wellness. What we know now is that mushrooms such as Shiitake, Maitake, Reishi and others are rich in 1,3 Beta-glucans - soluble fi ber compounds that help support both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition, the active compounds in some mushrooms have been shown to stimulate the production of microphages, T cells, and other natural killer cells. These biological warriors serve at the front line when it comes to responding to bacterial attacks. They are of immeasurable value to the immune system, though drastically lacking in today’s average diet. In just the past few years, more and more healthconscious individuals have learned fi rst-hand how benefi cial they can be in the preservation of healthy cells.



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ELEUTHERO
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Date: December 17, 2005 01:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ELEUTHERO

ELEUTHERO

Eleuthero- Eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is a hardy herb indigenous to the Taiga region of the Far East, which includes southeastern Russia, northern China, Japan and Korea. The use of this popular herb can be traced back over 2,000 years in ancient Chinese medical texts, where it is indicated for the treatment of a wide variety of ailments. Although it is a cousin of the Panax ginseng family (Korean, Chinese and American) it’s considered distinctly different. The term Panax is derived from the Greek words pan (all) and akos (cure), which means “cure-all”. In addition to its adaptogenic properties, which seem to stem from its ability to regulate the activity of the adrenal cortex in response to stress, Eleuthero has some unique benefits. It stimulates the immune system, especially during times of strenuous physical exertion and stress, and seems especially beneficial for supporting a healthy mood and mental alertness. Eleuthero is also extremely beneficial as a training aid for athletes.



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KOREAN GINSENG
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Date: December 17, 2005 01:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: KOREAN GINSENG

KOREAN GINSENG

Korean Ginseng- A ginseng of the Panax genus, Korean ginseng is very similar to American and Chinese ginseng. It grows on shaded mountainsides in China, Korea and Russia and, like other types of ginseng, has been used for thousands of years in traditional Chinese medicine. Historical references indicate that Korean ginseng was one of the most expensive herbs in the ancient Orient, and wars were even fought over the regions where Korean ginseng grew wild. Like all ginseng, Korean ginseng is also considered an adaptogen and is generally recommended to support physical and mental energy, helping one to maintain focus and stave off fatigue. It’s also an excellent herb for immune system support and it possesses potent antioxidant properties.



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AMERICAN GINSENG
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Date: December 17, 2005 12:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: AMERICAN GINSENG

AMERICAN GINSENG

American Ginseng - American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium) is grown primarily in Wisconsin and is considered a “cooler” alternative to Korean Ginseng. Asian cultures classify a particular ginseng as either “hot” or “cold” depending on its effects on body functions. American Ginseng is mainly used for additional energy and to support cognitive function and physical stamina. This type of ginseng also seems to support healthy cardiovascular function. And, as with most types ginseng, it has adaptogenic properties that aid the body in dealing with different types of stress, support immune system function, and hasten recovery from stressful occurrences.



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B-Complex 50mg Energy
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Date: November 18, 2005 10:21 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: B-Complex 50mg Energy

Complete List of Nature's Life Vitamins here!


Master the Art of Energy!

With Nature's Life B-complex 50 Energy

This product has a comprehensive B-vitamin and herb combination, B-complex vitamins are intended to provide nutritive support for many aspects of health, including but not limited to: metabolism, energy, nervous system, homocysteine levels, muscle tone, skin and hair.

also added, Green tea, Korean Ginseng and Gota kola as anti-fatigue herbal support.

Suitable for Vegetarians

One tablet daily.

Supplement Facts:

  • Thiamine (as Thiamine HCL) (B-1) - 50mg
  • Riboflavin (B-2) - 50mg
  • Niacin (as Niacinamide)(B-3) - 50mg
  • Vitamin B-6 (as Pyridoxine HCL) - 50mg
  • Folic Acid (Folate) - 500mcg
  • Vitamin B-12 (as Cyanocobalamin) - 50mg
  • Choline Bitartrate - 50mg
  • Inositol - 50mg
  • L-Taurine - 50mg
  • Korean Ginseng (Panax Ginseng)(Root extract) (Supplying 12.5mg Ginsenosides) - 250mg
  • Gota Kola (Centella asiatica)(Aerial) - 50mg
  • Green Tea (Camellia sinensis)(leaf extract)(Supplying 49mg Polyphenols, 40mg Catechins, 25mg EGCG [Epigallocatechin Gallate])

Boost your energy with Natures life B-Complex 50 Energy!







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Male Response - Male Libido Symptoms - Source Naturals
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Date: July 09, 2005 01:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Male Response - Male Libido Symptoms - Source Naturals

Read artical on Male Response...

Male Response is a Bio-Aligned Formula™

Multi-System Support: for Sexual Vigor Hormonal Function Nettle, Panax Ginseng, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Zinc, Vitamin B-5

Energy Generation: Ashwagandha, Damiana, Maca, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Siberian Ginseng, Zinc, Vitamins B-5 & B-6

Circulation: Ginger, Ginkgo Biloba, Panax Ginseng, Yohimbe, Vitamin E

Brain and Nervous System: Libido: Ashwagandha, Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Muira Puama, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Tribulus, Yohimbe, Copper, Vitamins B-5 & B-6

Prostate Gland: Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Nettle, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Selenium, Zinc, Vitamin E

M A L E R E S P O N S E™ Virility Complex - Healthy male response is more complicated than many people realize. There are a range of interrelated body systems that affect m a l e sexual function. M A L E R E S P O N S E helps support balance in these systems: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.
Hormonal Function Energy Generation Circulation Brain & Nervous System: Libido Prostate Gland
Action Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the m a l e sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. Fatigue and poor energy can take a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. This formula combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and invigorate the sexual r e s p o n s e. Proper circulation of blood is vital for the m a l e sexual r e s p o n s e. This formula contains several herbs traditionally used for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, reportedly stimulates selected portions of the nervous system and increases blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. In addition to providing supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, this formula contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and rejuvenating properties. A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support m a l e reproductive health and are essential for the proper functioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production.
CONTENT Nettle, Panax Ginseng, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Zinc, Vitamin B-5 Ashwagandha, Damiana, Maca, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Siberian Ginseng, Zinc, Vitamins B-5 & B-6 Ginger, Ginkgo Biloba, Panax Ginseng, Yohimbe, Vitamin E Ashwagandha, Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Muira Puama, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Tribulus, Yohimbe, Copper, Vitamins B-5 & B-6 Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Nettle, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Selenium, Zinc, Vitamin E



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Vitanet ®

Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles
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Date: June 30, 2005 09:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles

Ginsengs By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt

Different Ginsengs

What's the difference between Chinese (white root), Chinese (red root), Eleuthero and American Ginsengs? Which one is best for me? There are actually many different "ginsengs." We will discuss those mentioned above since they are the most widely available. All of these Ginsengs are considered to be potent adaptogens, which means that they are: 1) harmless to the body 2) non-specific in their actions 3) have balancing or normalizing effects. An adaptogen helps the body adapt to stress - both mental and physical. It is in this area that ginseng excels.

Chinese Ginseng (Panax ginseng) is what most of us think of when Ginseng is mentioned. It is indigenous to the forests of northeast China, Manchuria and Korea. Red Ginseng is often referred to as "Korean" Ginseng. In traditional Chinese Medicine Ginseng is used to tonify the "Chi" (vital energy or life energy force). Modern scientific studies indicate Panax Ginseng stimulates the immune system, has antifatigue, antistress, antitumor, anticancer and anti-aging properties, balances blood sugar levels, enhances mental performance and memory, lowers cholesterol, strengthens the heart muscle and protects against radiation damage. Panax ginseng has had a notorious reputation as a sexual rejuvenator which studies give some credence to; albeit not to the degree of its reputation. Ginseng "overuse syndrome", although rare, is characterized by irritability, insomnia and rapid heart beat, and is associated with using too much Chinese Ginseng, especially by healthy, active men.

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium) is indigenous to the eastern woodlands ranging from Georgia to Quebec and was used by many Native Americans. Jesuit Priests were reported to be trading American Ginseng to the Chinese as early as 1718. Ironically, American Ginseng is highly sought after in China, while Americans chase after Chinese ginseng. While having much the same adaptogenic qualities of Chinese Ginseng, American Ginseng is believed to have a more "yin" or cooler nature. What this means is that American Ginseng is excellent for the high-paced, stressed, not enough time culture that we live in. While still energizing the body, American Ginseng calms the central nervous system, quiets the brain and lowers blood pressure. Also, because of its more "yin" nature, it is generally better to use on a day-to-day, long term basis than Chinese Ginseng. American Ginseng is one of the best tonics for all-around health and vitality, particularly well suited for the hectic world we've created.

Eleutherococcus senticosus (known as Siberian Ginseng in Herbs of Commerce) is native to Siberia, Japan, Korea and China. Although not a "true ginseng", this variety is most highly prized. Eleuthero was traditionally used to promote longevity and general health. Many herbalists prefer Eluthero for helping with women's health issues. It is particularly useful with depression associated with PMS and menopause. Research, mostly from Russia, confirms this herb's ability to increase mental and physical performance, stimulate the immune system, increase phagocytosis (movement of white blood cells) promote circulation and enhance the benefits of medical radiation treatments while lessening its negative side-effects. (The dosage used in one Russian study was 4 milliliters in the morning and 2 milliliters at night.)

Which Ginseng is Right For Me Here's a simple guide for deciding which Ginseng to use. Chinese Ginseng is best suited as a tonic 1)for the fragile and weak 2) during convalescence, and/or 3) to support the immune system. American Ginseng is for regular daily use, specially suited for energetic personality types. Eleuthero is excellent for endurance and stamina, and well suited for athletes as well as for women's issues. If you're still confused, try Balanced Ginseng™ (alcohol-free) a high-powered liquid herbal extract supplement that blends several varieties of Ginsengs together to assure balanced tonic action.

It is important in purchasing Ginseng products to buy from a company you trust and one that has the technical capabilities to test and guarantee quality and activity. Unfortunately, the Ginseng market is prone to both adulteration and poor activity levels. Nature's Answer®, with its full pharmaceutical level in-house laboratory and years of experience, is proud to offer a variety of the finest quality of Ginseng formulations available in either liquid (alcohol-free or organic alcohol) or encapsulated (standardized or single) forms. The company also offers the herb in unique, proprietary blends. All products are Unconditionally Guaranteed.



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Vitanet ®

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TRADITIONAL USES
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Date: June 25, 2005 01:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: TRADITIONAL USES

TRADITIONAL USES

Folk tales and myths surround the ginseng plant in all its varieties. It was thought to be the ultimate herb for strength, vigor and a long life. The Asian ginseng used throughout China was thought of as the ultimate cure-all. It has been highly esteemed and used for thousands of years.

Ginseng is stimulating on the entire body to help overcome stress, increase longevity, fatigue, weakness, mental fatigue, improve brain cell function, and benefit the heart and circulation. It is also used to normalize blood pressure, reduce cholesterol levels, and to prevent artherioslcerosis. It is used to help protect the body against radiation and as an antidote to drugs and toxic chemicals. Ginseng is often given alone or in combination with other herbs to restore balance in the body.

Folk medicine recommends ginseng for many ailments such as amnesia, cancer, atherosclerosis, asthma, diabetes, coughs, heart, fear, fever, epilepsy, hypertension, malaria, impotence, insomnia, longevity, swelling, sores and vertigo. It is probably safe to say that ginseng is one of the most popular and most prescribed natural remedies for just about anything.

Ginseng has been used to rejuvenate the body and maintain health. It is used to promote regeneration at times of stress on the body. It also helps when the body has undergone illness or surgery. It is also thought to help increase longevity and keep the body looking young with less signs of aging. It is not only promoted for physical longevity but also for mental function.

Ginseng is often used to help strengthen the male reproductive systems. It is thought to be especially healing on the prostate gland. It is also used as an aphrodisiac. Ginseng is also thought to produce some testosterone in women, and for this reason, is not recommended for long periods of time. Panax ginseng is thought to increase male hormone production.

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GINSENG and Stress
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Date: June 25, 2005 01:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: GINSENG and Stress

Stress

Re s e a rchers became interested in studying the Siberian ginseng after finding beneficial activity in the Panax ginseng. It was first found to contain adaptogenic properties. One study conducted during the 1960s in the former Soviet Union consisted of 2,100 adults, some normal and some considered to be under high stress. No adverse side effects were found and the results were positive with improvement in the stressed individuals.25 Stress is a condition that causes a disturbance in the body, whether it is from a physical or mental source.

Asian ginseng helps to modify the effects of environmental and internal stresses from different forms such as chemical pollutants, toxins, radiation, weather, temperature changes, poor diet, physical trauma, exercise and emotional stress. Because of its adaptogenic properties, ginseng is able to adjust and balance the body functions when under stress.26 Ginseng can help to balance the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by normalizing the metabolic systems in the body when stress occurs.27

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Adaptogen Properties
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Date: June 25, 2005 01:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Adaptogen Properties

Adaptogen Properties

Research on the Panax ginseng was first done to determine the adaptogen properties. Siberian ginseng does possess adaptogenic qualities, but its action is thought to be milder than Asian ginseng. The American ginseng has not been well studied or documented as to its adaptogenic properties, but it is known to have adaptogenic activity. Each of the ginseng varieties are thought to work as a general tonic on the body, increase energy and increase mental and physical abilities. Ginseng has often been referred to as an adaptogenic herb. When taken for extended periods of time, it helps the body adapt to stress and brings the body into balance.

It helps normalize and adjust the body’s restoring and regulating natural immune response.14 The word adaptogen is derived from the Greek work adapto, to adjust, and the suffix gen, producing. It helps to produce adjustments as needed in the body. This function is done without side effects or harm to the body.15 Ginseng, as an adaptogen, has been used to help normalize blood pressure whether high or low. It helps to increase or slow output to restore equilibrium. Adaptogens help to modify the effects of environmental and internal stresses from different forms such as chemical pollutants, radiation, weather, temperature changes, poor diet, exercise and emotional stress. It is used for many ailments in the body and even thought of as a universal cure-all.

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HISTORY
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Date: June 25, 2005 12:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HISTORY

HISTORY

Ginseng is one of the oldest and most beneficial herbs in the world. It is probably the most popular adaptogenic herb used in traditional medicine. Shen- Nung’s Pharmacopoeia (A.D. 206-220) rated it the highest and most potent of herbs. People in northern China began using ginseng thousands of years ago. In fact, in 1904, it was suggested that all of the 400 million individuals who lived in China were familiar with and used ginseng to some degree.6 It was used to restore the “yang” quality in the body to heal disorders such as t u b e rculosis, coughs, diabetes, diarrhea, indigestion, nausea, kidney problems, rheumatism, gout, infected sores, insomnia, leprosy, and impotence. It was often used, and is still today, as a tonic to rejuvenate the body after an illness or prolonged stress.

Early herbalists recognized the shape of ginseng as resembling a human figure. They felt this was a sign that the root was valuable for healing the entire body.7 It is often referred to as the “man root” and is the subject of many legends and folk history. Proponents of the “Doctrine of Signatures” felt that because of the roots shape, it could heal any disorder in the body.8 The Chinese were so enthralled with the ginseng root that they even fought wars over the land used for growing it.

The Native Americans also enjoyed the healing, tonic benefits of the American ginseng plant. It was valued by the natives long before the arrival of the Europeans. Many tribes knew well the therapeutic powers of ginseng. They used it to relieve nausea, indigestion, vomiting, stomach problems, bronchitis, earaches, bleeding, asthma, headaches and as an aphrodisiac. The Cherokees referred to ginseng as “The Plant of Life” and used it to help relieve female problems such as menstrual cramps and excessive bleeding. The Mohawks were familiar with the value of ginseng and used it to help relieve fevers accompanying illness.9 The Seneca tribe was known to use ginseng to help elderly individuals prevent difficulties associated with the aging process.10 The Native Americans saw nature as a friend and looked for healing agents within the plant kingdom. American ginseng was used and valued for its medicinal properties. Folklore and customs are now being investigated in this world of modern medicine to rediscover the natural approach in healing and health.

Father Jurtoux has been credited with discovering the American ginseng. He was a French priest transferred from China to Canada around 1709. He collected some of the root near Montreal because they resembled the Panax ginseng. He shipped some back to China where it had a favorable reception. The French soon began employing some of the Native Americans to collect and then exported the American ginseng to China. Word of this fabulous and profitable ginseng spread to the United States. Soon the American ginseng was gathered and exported to China by Americans. Ginseng was a popular item in the early frontier days. It was used not only for trade but for consumption locally. George Washington mentioned ginseng in his personal journal, and famous frontiersmen such as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett were known to have been involved in the exporting of ginseng.

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Ginseng Varieties
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Date: June 25, 2005 12:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ginseng Varieties

Ginseng Varieties

This valued plant known as ginseng can be purchased in different forms. White ginseng is what the root is called before any processing occurs. White is the natural color of the root after it is harvested and washed. When dried, the root becomes a light brown color. When the ginseng root is processed using steam and heat, it becomes red. This procedure is done in order to preserve the plant and its constituents. The heat process is thought to help stimulate the active properties in ginseng and some herbalists believe that the red ginseng is more stimulating than the white.2 There are a variety of types as well as grades of ginseng and ginseng products.

This is due in part to differences in age, source, part of the root used and the preparation. The old wild plants are the most desirable because of their nutritional content which is believed to increase with age. The western world often treats the different ginseng varieties the same. But in traditional Chinese medicine, the various types are thought to possess distinct properties. They are each valued for their differences and used for divergent purposes.

The Asian variety of ginseng (Panax ginseng) grows principally in Korea, Japan and China. Centuries ago the ginseng plant grew wild and was abundant. But because of the claims of its healthy properties, it has been depleted in its natural state almost to the point of extinction. Now it is grown commercially for export and local medicinal use. The Asian ginseng is often exported to the western world. It is unfortunate but most of the ginseng grown now is cultivated using pesticides to promote mass production. The Asian plant has similar composition to the American variety with some variations. It contains ginsenosides, the active ingredients, between one and three percent. There are at least thirteen of these different triterpenoid saponins, referred to as ginsenosides. The Asian contains Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Re, and Rg1.3

The Wild American variety of ginseng is still found in its natural state. This variety grows naturally and organically but is hard to find. There is an increasing amount of American ginseng being cultivated and grown for commercial use. Fertilizers and pesticides along with modern farming equipment aid in the production and high yield of this variety of ginseng. The American ginseng is thought to be less stimulating than the Asian variety. The American ginseng contains primarily the ginsenosides Rb1 and Re and does not contain Rb2, Rf and sometimes not Rg1.4 Generally, the American ginseng is thought to possess more of a sedative effect than the Asian ginseng. Differences in the chemical structures of the ginseng roots makes the identification process between the varieties easier. Siberian ginseng, though not considered a “true ginseng,” contains similar properties to the other varieties.

It was discovered in Siberia but is now cultivated around the world. Some of the saponins found in this variety are not the same as the Asian and American. But is known to have the same tonic and stimulant effect as the “true ginseng.”5 It is believed to be less potent than either the American or Asian ginsengs. Research has documented may of its valuable adaptogenic capabilities.

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GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus)
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Date: June 25, 2005 12:54 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus)

GINSENG

  • Asian or Korean (Panax ginseng)
  • American (Panax quinquefolium)
  • Siberian (Eleutherococcus senticosus)

    Ginseng and ginseng products are increasing in popularity. They have been highly valued for thousands of years in many different cultures for their medicinal properties. Ginseng is probably the most highly regarded tonic and adaptogenic herb in the world. There are many different varieties of the ginseng plant grown throughout the world that are used for traditional medicine. All of the most common species of plants known as ginseng have similar reactions in the body. Ginseng is often used to maintain and support health as a tonic rather than treating a particular disease in the body. Panax ginseng, also known as Asian, Korean or Chinese ginseng, is the type most often studied and the most abundant. The genus name for Asian ginseng is Panax ginseng from the Greek word meaning “all healing.” The Wild American variety, Panax quinquefolium, is thought to have properties similar to the Asian plant. Most consider it to be less stimulating than the Asian root. The Siberian ginseng, Eleutherococcus senticosus, grown in Russia originally and now throughout the world, is not considered to be “true ginseng,” though scientists have reported common pharmacological features to the Panax. The compounds in the Siberian variety, eueutherosides, are not the same as the ginsenosides found in the American and Asian, but they do have similar chemical activity. The American, Asian and Siberian ginsengs are all considered to be superior adaptogens.1

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    Alzheimer’s Disease and Ginkgo
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    Date: June 25, 2005 11:26 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Alzheimer’s Disease and Ginkgo

    Alzheimer’s Disease and Ginkgo

    Concerning Alzheimer’s disease, ginkgo has been shown to normalize the acetylcholine receptors in the brain of aged animals which results in an increased transmission of nerve impulses. Alzheimer patients experience a decrease in these very functions.

    Clearly, test results have repeatedly shown that ginkgo has a positive effect in geriatric patients who have already experienced a deterioration of their mental performance. For this reason, it should be considered a viable treatment option in cases of Alzheimer’s disease and senile dementia. It is important to realize that it appears the ginkgo works more effectively in delaying the mental demise that occurs in the initial stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Once the disease is well established, the effects of ginkgo are minimized. On the other hand, if mental deterioration is due to a circulatory insufficiency, ginkgo therapy can help to reverse the condition.

    Laboratory tests performed on aged rats showed that ginkgo extract works to protect neuronal membranes in the brain. In addition, these tests also showed that the herb has a restorative effect which can help to pre vent the decrease in cerebral receptors that occurs with aging.7

    Double-blind studies on groups of elderly subjects have confirmed that using ginkgo before presenting tests which required mental p rocessing significantly shortened the time required to process the material, which facilitated a speedier transference of information. Combining ginkgo with Panax ginseng had similar results. Tests showed that this combination has a favorable effect on both learning and memory in aged individuals.

    Perhaps the most exciting biological potential ginkgo has is the possibility that it may pre vent the onset of certain age-re lated disorders if taken early enough. Research suggests that it may offer significant protection agains t the development of mental deterioration and strokes. In other words, the diminished mental function which routinely accompanies aging could be significantly prevented with ginkgo therapy.

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    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?
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    Date: June 17, 2005 12:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    Ginseng has been used for thousands of years by the Chinese and Native Americans. The Chinese name, Ren Shen means "Man-Root" because it is shaped like a human. There have been over 3,000 scientific studies published on Ginseng. Studies have examined the anti-tumor, anti-infective, nervous system, lipid lowering, and anti-fatigue activity of ginseng. Experimental research indicates that Ginseng helps the body adapt to stress, protects the body against radiation, and increases sperm count, and stabilizes blood sugar levels.

    Ginseng can differ depending upon the species, the way it is prepared, and of course the dose administered. There are two main kinds of Ginseng: American and Asian. American Ginseng, Panax quinquefolium, grows wild in many states although it is cultivated mainly in Wisconsin. American Ginseng generates body fluids and is said to clear heat. Those who can benefit most from American Ginseng are individuals that are under stress, athletes, and people who feel hot and thirsty. They may also have coughing, or coughing up blood, which indicates heat according to traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Asian Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, is usually imported to the US from either China or Korea. It is traditionally used to treat cold syndromes, which include cold limbs, weak pulse, exhaustion, and shortness of breath. White Ginseng usually refers to untreated ginseng, and is said to be less warm than red Ginseng. Typically red Ginseng is steamed and cured with other herbs giving it a dark red appearance; most Korean Ginseng is red.

    A common substitute for Ginseng in the US and China is Codonopsis, known botanically as Codonopsis pilosula. It has similar effects to Asian Ginseng: it is not as strong and not nearly as expensive. Eleuthero Ginseng, sometimes referred to as Siberian Ginseng, is really not ginseng at all but is in fact a distant cousin. It belongs in a different botanical species: Eleutherococcus Senticosus. Eleuthero Ginseng grows in northern China and Russia. Although it is used to help the body adapt to stress, it is less specific as a medicinal herb than Asian or American Ginseng.

    Traditional herbalists rarely use ginseng by itself. Herbs are usually combined with other ingredients in order to increase clinical benefits and reduce negative reactions. For example, Generate Pulse Powder (Sheng Mai San) is a traditional combination, which often combines America Ginseng with herbs to moisten the lungs; therefore it can be used for chronic cough that is difficult to expectorate, and shortness of breathe. Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan is an ancient formula that has been used for at least one thousand years to treat patients who are exhausted, feel cold, and may have weak limbs and/or chronic loose stools. In this ancient formula, Ginseng is combined with Astragalus and other harmonizing herbs, which help the body assimilate ginseng. Modern formulas with Ginseng or Codonopsis, have been used to help people overcome serious conditions such as impotence, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and fibromyalgia. Modern Ginseng formulas have also been used in conjunction with western medical approaches to treating patients with HIV, and patients undergoing chemo and radiotherapy.

    Asian Ginseng is considered a "big gun" and should not be indiscriminately used especially by itself. Headache, elevated body temperature, digestive upset, rash, fever, irritability, and insomnia are possible signs that Ginseng is not appropriate. It should not be taken at the same time as caffeine or other stimulants. Good quality Ginseng is expensive. Superior grade Ginseng can run several thousand dollars per pound. For this reason, it makes no sense to shop for the cheapest Ginseng or Ginseng products.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Breathe Easy
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    Date: June 14, 2005 06:19 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Breathe Easy

    Breathe Easy

    by Edward Bullard, III Energy Times, March 1, 1998

    Don't underestimate the danger of asthma. When an asthmatic attack chokes the passageways to your lungs, cutting off your air supply, the consequences can prove frightening and disastrous.

    Although asthma is the leading chronic illness among children, most sufferers are adults. The condition ranks as the 7th most common chronic affliction nationwide affecting 14 to 20 million people; about 11 million of these are over the age of 18.

    The American Lung Association estimates that between 1982 and 1992 the total number of asthma cases jumped by more than 57%. Researchers can't pinpoint the reasons for this rise, but they have found that urban dwellers suffer a higher asthma risk.

    Despite the gloomy statistics, those who suffer asthma can take reassurance from the progressive development of complementary and conventional treatments that control this condition. Anyone who suffers asthma should consult with a knowledgeable health practitioner.

    How does asthma start? This airway problem may originate with allergies and sinus or bronchial infections (the bronchi are the tubes leading to the lungs). Some experts believe that air pollution, dust mites, cockroach remains and other environmental toxins may exacerbate the condition.

    A family history of allergies and asthma also increases your asthmatic vulnerability since your genes may make you more prone to the airway inflammation that leads to breathing constraints.

    Allergic reactions to food have been implicated in causing restricted breathing. Food found to most frequently instigate immediate lung difficulties include nuts, peanuts (which are, technically, legumes not nuts), eggs, shellfish and fish. Foods that do not cause immediate wheezing but may produce a delayed respiratory effect include artificial food colorings, wheat, citrus fruits, milk, chocolate and wheat products.

    Since an allergic reaction to particular foods can apparently play a role in asthma, some people find relief by systematically eliminating foods from their diets, identifying troublesome items and then permanently avoiding those foods.

    Asthma's Nutrition Gap

    According to Richard N. Firshein, D.O., director of the Firshein Center for Comprehensive Medicine in New York City, asthma stems from cells' "disordered metabolism." In these circumstances, the body's immune system often mistakes allergens (normally benign substances) for infectious agents. In strenuously defending itself against allergens, the body goes on "red alert," says Dr. Firshein in his book Reversing Asthma (Warner), "exhausting itself in the process." This creates a need for extra vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Too often, he believes, this nutritional need is not met and asthma ensues.

    In the presence of asthma, magnesium can help restore free breathing. Dr. Firshein reports that about 50 years ago, medical researchers discovered that treating asthma victims with magnesium sulfate opened up breathing passageways. Although magnesium by itself does not completely alleviate asthma attacks, many emergency room doctors still use it in conjunction with other treatments to restore breathing.

    In explaining magnesium's usefulness in alleviating asthma, Dr. Firshein notes that magnesium competes with calcium in each cell to influence asthmatic reactions. For instance, calcium stimulates mast cells (reactive immune cells) to release histamine, a chemical that foments allergic reactions that hinder breathing. Conversely, magnesium "stabilizes" mast cells, quieting their activity so that they retain their histamine instead of flooding breathing passages.

    In addition, calcium takes part in muscle contractions that can constrict breathing tube muscles. Magnesium can help relax those same muscles.

    Although intravenous treatment with magnesium for acute asthma attacks must be carried out by a trained health professional, taking magnesium supplements over a period of time, may gradually help assuage asthma's wheezes.

    How do you tell if you're short of magnesium? Standard blood tests of magnesium levels may be inadequate. As Dr. Firshein points out, normal blood tests only examine the amount of magnesium floating in the blood's plasma. That level can apparently appear sufficient even if red blood cells are magnesium-deficient. (Dr. Firshein recommends asking your health practitioner for a special red blood cell test.)

    Ephedra for Asthma

    Ever since about 3,000 BC, Chinese health practitioners have been giving the herb ma huang (Ephedra sinica) to asthma sufferers. In the 1920s, western medical researchers extracted a chemical called ephedrine from ma huang and soon synthesized this substance for use as a pharmaceutical. However, herbal experts believe that there are other beneficial substances in ma huang besides ephedrine that can ease breathing.

    Although ephedra has been used successfully to ward off the allergies of hayfever as well as mild asthma, when this herb is taken over a long period its benefits may lessen. The reason: eventually the herb's ephedrine weakens the adrenal glands, according to Michael Murray, ND, and Joseph Pizzorno, ND, in the Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (Prima). To offset this effect, they recommend supporting the use of ephedra with licorice (Glycerrhiza glabra) as well as ginseng (Panax ginseng) which support the adrenals. In addition, vitamins C and B6 and zinc and magnesium plus pantothenic acid also boost adrenal function.

    Licking Asthma with Licorice

    Since much of asthma's deleterious effects on health stem from the fact it inflames breathing passageways, licorice root, which acts to squelch inflammation and which calms allergies, can be helpful in restoring normal breathing. Licorice, according to Drs. Murray and Pizzorno, promulgates the persistence of cortisol in our body, a hormone that acts as an anti-inflammatory agent.

    As an extra benefit, licorice can also forestall the side effects of cortisone, one of the most widely prescribed medicines for asthma. Licorice also boosts cortisone's desirable anti-inflammatory action while inhibiting the action of enzymes that would otherwise increase unwanted inflammation.

    Onions + Garlic = Better Breath

    Despite their reputation for giving you bad breath, both onion and garlic can improve the breath of those afflicted with asthma. The reason: both of these plants restrict the action of an enzyme with the tongue twisting name of lipoxygenase, a chemical that helps produce inflammation.

    Studies with animals showed that when they were fed onion extract, their induced asthmatic problems decreased. Part of onion's benefit may be due to its quercetin content. (Quercetin is a bioflavonoid available as a supplement.) Onion also contains mustard oils, which are believed to slow the body's production of leukotrienes (substances that also increase inflammation).

    Vitamin C

    Vitamin C, the most abundant antioxidant nutrient in the lungs' inner lining, apparently protects against respiratory problems. Studies of people with asthma show that they possess less vitamin C both in their circulating blood and in white blood cells. When researchers induced bronchial constriction in people who volunteered for respiratory studies, they found that those given vitamin C didn't have as hard a time breathing. Experts recommend healthy doses of vitamin C plus other antioxidant nutrients such as vitamin E, carotenoids and selenium to lower the risk of allergic reactions and ease breathing. Antioxidant nutrients restrict the action of free radicals, molecules that attack the lungs and other parts of the cardiovascular system.

    Chinese skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) also effectively fights inflammation without causing serious side effects. Experts believe its bioflavonoids stop the body from making biochemicals that inflame tissues. Aside from restricting inflammation, these bioflavonoids also act as antioxidants.

    Strength in Numbers

    Asthma support organizations can provide vital information: Organizations American Lung Association 1740 Broadway, New York, NY 10019-43741 (800) LUNG-USA llergy & Asthma Network/Mothers of Asthmatics Inc., 3554 Chain Bridge Road, Suite 200, Fairfax, VA 22030 (703) 385-4403, (800) 878-4403 th/aanma Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America,1125 15th Street, N.W., Suite 502 Washington, DC 20005 (800) 727-8462

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    Pep Up and Go!
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    Date: June 14, 2005 05:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Pep Up and Go!

    Pep Up and Go!

    by Harris Parker Energy Times, February 2, 2000

    Feel your energy flagging?

    You've lost count of the number of phone calls you fielded all afternoon-the last was from your son, who missed the late bus home from school-and colleagues needing your decision are lined up outside your office. Your husband has invited clients home for dinner. You wilt like a new hairdo on a damp August day and pray for a miracle to jump-start your engine.

    Your pep quotient depends on three essential ingredients: nutrients you consume through your diet and supplements, how much you exercise and your sleep schedule.(Of course, if you're troubled by any kind of disabling, ceaseless fatigue accompanied by mental fuzziness, joint pain, sore throat, swollen glands, headaches and other chronic distress, consult your health practitioner.)

    Vitamins and Energy

    Certain nutrients are called vitamins because scientists consider them to be crucial for vitality. They generally function as coenzymes, partnering with the enzymes that are catalysts for the chemical reactions constantly taking place in our bodies. Our need to replenish our store of vitamins, which may merge with cell, muscle, enzyme, hormone, blood and bone structure once they have been absorbed, depends on their rate of utilization, according to The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery) by Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning.

    While a low-fat diet rich in raw fruits and vegetables helps supply important nutrients, a B complex supplement and a balanced multivitamin can guarantee daily vitamin levels.

    Be Energetic with B Vitamins

    Vitamins, especially the B vitamins, play extremely important roles in producing cellular energy. The chart on page 39 lists the key vitamins and describes their effects as well as the consequences of not getting enough of them. Their benefit is felt most profoundly in the energy producing process known as the Krebs cycle (which we'll explain in a moment).

    Vitamins B2 and B3, for example, supply the major building blocks for substances that are called flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and FADH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD and NADH), which are critical elements of energy production in the Krebs cycle as well as a process called oxidative phosphorylation.

    Hundreds of Reactions

    Even though you may never have heard of NAD and NADH, these molecules are found in very many places throughout your body; they play a role in hundreds of biochemical reactions in all kinds of cells. B vitamins also combine with other materials to build coenzymes, chemicals which help form other chemicals necessary for cellular energy. B vitamins are crucial: miss out on one or more and you may break these metabolic chains necessary for peak energy.

    Energy to Spend

    The main energy currency of every cell single cell is ATP: a chemical called adenosine triphosphate. This material is used by cells for every imaginable task including reproduction, growth, movement and metabolism. Specialized metabolic cycles within the cell are designed to generate ATP.

    Consequently, the more ATP our cells create, the more energy can be generated. The raw materials used to make cellular energy are glucose (blood sugar) and "free" fatty acids. The best way to supply your cells with the sugar they need is to consume complex carbohydrates which also supply fiber and other nutrients. When you eat carbohydrates, they are made into glucose which is stored as a starch called glycogen in muscles and the liver. Your body can rapidly turn glycogen into glucose for extra energy. (The process of making energy from glycogen yields carbon dioxide and water as well as ATP.)

    Making Energy

    The first step in making glucose into energy is called glycolysis. This complicated process requires nine different steps. During these steps, glucose is made into a substance called pyruvate. The process of glycolysis requires ATP, but yields twice as much ATP as is present when it starts.

    From here, the process gets a little more complicated as pyruvate enters into a complex chain of events in tiny cellular structures called mitochondria. (Many metabolic events take place in the mitochondria.) The pyruvate molecules are converted to a molecule known as acetyl coenzyme A and eventually made into carbon dioxide, water and more ATP.

    This process is known as the Krebs cycle or citric acid cycle. It also involves a series of events known as oxidative phosphorylation in which NADH formed during the Krebs cycle is oxidized to form ATP.

    Why is fat such a concentrated source of energy? Free fatty acids enter the Krebs cycle to help generate ATP much more efficiently than glucose - producing roughly six times more energy per gram than glucose.

    And Don't Overlook. . . . . .other supplements that may aid energy production: • Alpha Lipoic Acid, an antioxidant that works in the fatty tissues of cell membranes and in cells' watery interiors • Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone as it exists everywhere in the body, acts like a vitamin because it stimulates some reactions. CoQ10 protects cell membranes, especially of the heart, against oxidation and toxins.

    Ginsengs: Energy Generators

    With their legendary and slightly mysterious characteristics, the ginsengs are greatly respected natural energy boosters. " Perhaps no herb has excited so much interest in medical circles as ginseng, and yet, strangely, it does not actually 'cure' any one particular ailment," reports Michael Hallowell, the author of Herbal Healing (Avery) and a frequent lecturer on botanic medicine. "Rather, its virtue lies in its tremendous power as a tonic and invigorator. Russian athletes are prescribed large amounts of ginseng because researchers in Moscow have shown that it not only improves stamina, but also increases the efficiency with which blood is pumped to the muscles."

    What are the physiological mechanisms that allow ginseng to bolster your get up and go? In order to unravel the legend and lore of ginseng, the first step is understanding the intricacies of the three types: • Asian (Panax ginseng), which produces the strongest and most profound stimulation; • American (Panax quinquefolium), which soothes at a more subtle level; • Siberian (Eleutherococcus senticosus), a stamina booster embraced by a wide range of athletes. All three varieties are treasured for their ability to help people adjust to stress.

    Biologically Active

    The ginsengs are adaptogens, "biologically active substances found in certain herbs and plants that help the body and mind adapt to the changes and stress of life," says Stephen Fulder, MD, author of The Book of Ginseng and Other Chinese Herbs for Vitality (Inner Traditions). "Stress is not an illness in itself. Stress is change, our ability to adapt to all the changes that occur in life, emotional or physical, from exercise, work, chemicals, drugs, food, radiation, bacteria, disease, temperature, or simply too many late nights or too much fun."

    The body reacts to stress by producing the hormone adrenaline, which throws the whole body into a state of alert. Metabolism, blood pressure and circulation accelerate; immunity and resistance drastically decline; performance suffers.

    Top-Notch Tonics

    Enter the ginsengs, with their varied, subtle tonic qualities. The Greek name for this herb, "Panax," means "panacea" or cure-all. But the Chinese, who first referred to it 2,000 years ago, more literally called it "ren shen" or "person root," in reference to its physical resemblance to a miniature human form.

    " Most exhibit medicinal properties, but each species has a different chemical makeup and has a unique application in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)," says Kim Derek Pritts, author of Ginseng: How to Find, Grow and Use America's Forest Gold (Stackpole). "In general, all true ginseng contains biologically active saponins (chemicals similar to human hormones), essential oils, carbohydrates, sugars, organic acids, nitrogenous substances, amino acids, peptides, vitamins and minerals."

    Building Vital Energy

    All the ginsengs strengthen, nourish and build Qi, the TCM concept describing basic vital energy circulating through our bodies. Every physical and mental function, from breathing, thinking, nutrition and circulation, is regulated by Qi. Although many of the Native American tribes used the abundant, indigenous Panax quinquefolium ginseng extensively, particularly to increase mental acuity and boost fertility, the herb never has been as popular in North America as it is in Asia. American ginseng traditionally has been a lucrative export crop to China, where the wild native variety suffers from overharvesting. Even today, according to Paul Bergner in The Healing Power of Ginseng & the Tonic Herbs (Prima), 95% of the American ginseng crop is exported to China, where XiYang Shen, or "western sea root," as it is called, is immensely valued and costs double what it does here.

    Energy Boost

    Jacques MoraMarco, author of The Complete Ginseng Handbook: A Practical Guide for Energy, Health and Longevity (Contemporary), as well as a licensed acupuncturist and doctor of Eastern medicine, suggests American ginseng for a slight energy boost. The moderate effect of American ginseng is considered a more appropriate tonic to the intensity of our pace and diet.

    Variations on a Theme

    In TCM terms, American ginseng cools and moistens, as well as lubricates and strengthens the body. It is reputed to reduce fevers and night sweats and alleviate hot, dry lung problems like smoker's cough. With its emollient qualities, American ginseng is considered to treat dry, wrinkled skin effectively.

    The Bolder Energizer

    Asian ginseng, which includes red Korean Panax, is a bolder energizer taken by those who feel depleted from anemia, blood loss, cardiovascular weakness, injury, shock or trauma, as well as the disabling effects of age. In general, Asian ginseng is warming and stimulating, urging the body to run faster.

    Siberian ginseng, though botanically not a true ginseng, still acts similarly to Asian ginseng in its reputed power to control stress, boost energy, support the immune system, enhance performance and increase longevity. Called Wu Cha Seng in Chinese, Siberian ginseng is perceived by natural practitioners as an ideal herb for the healthy who want to lift both stamina and endurance. Experts believe it counteracts the effects of cortisol, the stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands in response to injury, pain or emotional turmoil.

    Natural Energy Boosters

    The herbal pharmacopeia includes several other natural energy boosters available in various forms-shakes and bars for those on the run-loaded with nutrition absent from commercial snacks. Some choices: • Ginkgo biloba-used in Chinese medicine to heat the body and increase sexual energy. Ginkgo enthusiasts take this herb to increase the supply of oxygen to the brain and generally increase circulation. • Gotu kola-may stimulate the central nervous system and help eliminate excess fluid, thereby reducing fatigue. • Astragalus-a Chinese herb that enhances energy and builds the immune system. It is credited with strengthening digestion, improving metabolism, increasing appetite, combating diarrhea and healing sores. • Schisandra-also a Chinese herb, treats respiratory illness, insomnia and irritability and rejuvenates sexual energy. Its mild adaptogens help the body to handle stress. • Licorice-is a favored endocrine toner in Chinese medicine. It is reputed to support the adrenals, the pair of small glands directly above the kidneys that secrete steroidal hormones, norepinephrine and epinephrine, the "fight or flight" hormones. People with high blood pressure or edema, or pregnant women, should avoid it. • Ashwagandha-an Ayurvedic herb used for thousands of years in the traditional healing of India as a potent strength builder for men and women.

    Experienced herbal practitioners acquire an impressive and fascinating store of knowledge and experience-you'll find it helpful to visit one as you begin your course of ginseng or other energy-boosting herbs.

    TCM Visitation

    When you visit a TCM practitioner, you'll notice that she evaluates your body's condition through an extremely careful examination of all the different systems: Several pulse points are felt in order to ferret out and detect troubling abnormalities. The condition and color of the tongue is observed to decipher digestive disorders. In addition, your urine may be examined to determine other imbalances and specific health problems.

    In many cases, your TCM practitioner will recommend ginseng as an adaptogen that can give you an overall boost. When taking ginseng, follow the directions on the package. Note: in some cases, you may want to consume a little bit less if you suffer headaches, insomnia or high blood pressure. Consult your health practitioner if you are afflicted with either acute inflammatory disease or bronchitis.

    Then take comfort in the eternal soothing wisdom of Chinese Traditional Medicine. In the first century A.D., the Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing (The Divine Husbandman's Classic of the Materia Medica) effusively described ginseng and the tonic herbs in this beguiling and intriguing manner: "The first class of drugs...are considered to perform the work of sovereigns. They support human life and they resemble heaven. They are not poisonous regardless of the quality and duration of administration."



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    Energize Your Life!
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    Date: June 14, 2005 05:06 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Energize Your Life!

    Energize Your Life!

    by Laura Weiss Energy Times, December 1, 2003

    If every fatigued day leaves you wondering where your energy went, you need a personal energy makeover.

    "Energy, some special kind of energy, just leaks out and I am left lacking the confidence even to cross the street," Diane Arbus, the photographer, once complained. And while Ms. Arbus tried to overcome her energetic and spiritual ups and downs with her art, you can use lifestyle changes as well as self-expression to revive your vigor.

    To Sleep, Perchance to Energize

    When you're looking for a boost in personal energy, you've got to get enough sleep, insists Jacob Tietelbaum, MD, author of From Fatigued to Fantastic! (Avery). Dr. Teitelbaum emphasizes that unless you "give your body eight to nine hours of sleep per night," your personal energy will never be adequate.

    Studies show that getting less than six hours sleep a night hurts your mental performance and drains your energy (Sleep 3/15/03). As your sleep debt builds up, your energy drops down.

    "[Our studies show] the importance of sleep as a necessity for health and well-being. Even relatively moderate sleep restriction, if it is sustained night after night, can seriously impair our neurobiological functioning," says Hans P.A. Van Dongen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Sleep and Chronobiology at Penn State.

    A recent poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that Americans, on average, are getting less than seven hours of shuteye a night. That sleep deficit drains energy.

    Watered Down Energy

    Added to that sleep requirement, Dr. Teitelbaum stressed in an interview with Energy Times, a lack of water can deplete your personal energy.

    "The number one problem is often dehydration," he says. "Make sure you stay hydrated. Although I think it's a bad idea to [obsessively] count glasses of water, you should carry a bottle of water with you, check your lips and if they feel dry drink more water." Overall, your body is about 60% water and 70% of your muscles consist of water. If you let your water levels dip too low, your muscles suffer and your energy levels dip as well. Research shows that as your body dries out, your mental processes can slow down. And the hotter the temperature, the more fluid you may lose (AIHAJ 2002; 63(2):190-8).

    B Vitamins for Energy

    Also important for keeping your energy up "is getting enough of the B vitamins and magnesium." And even though Dr. Teitelbaum advocates the necessity of a well-rounded multiple vitamin and mineral supplement plus an adequate diet and amino acids to get all the nutrients you need, he recommends "taking a high-level B complex. The RDAs (the government's Recommended Daily Amounts) are inadequate."

    In the body, B vitamins are used for the production of energy on a cellular level. For instance, vitamin B1 (thiamine) is crucial for burning carbohydrates effectively. And vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is necessary for the body's ability to properly use B1. At the same time, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required for proper nerve function. The need for B12 may necessitate a supplement: Up to 30% of everyone over the age of 50 may have trouble absorbing B12 from their food (Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci 1996; 33:247). Plus, since vegetables contain very little absorbable B12, vegetarians of all ages may also require B12 supplements.

    Dr. Teitelbaum also believes that taking malic acid, a nutrient derived from apples, can help. Along with the B vitamins, malic acid is used by the body in the production of energy. When taken with magnesium, malic acid has been shown to ease the pain of fibromyalgia (J Rheum 1995; 22(5):953-7), a condition characterized by fatigue and lack of energy accompanied by painful muscles and joints.

    Ginseng Boost

    Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) represents a potential tool for controlling blood sugar and improving stamina.

    According to Dr. Teitelbaum, "...Asian ginseng enhances energy, raises blood pressure and improves adrenal function...Asian ginseng has such a wide mix of health benefits that its name, Panax, comes from the Greek roots of pan (meaning 'all') and akos (meaning 'cure')-that is, 'cure all.'"

    Research on people with diabetes shows that this herb may help control blood sugar levels. People who suffer what is called type 2 diabetes often eat small meals to keep their blood sugar from varying too much. (Rising and falling blood sugar can drain you of energy as well as make diabetic problems worse.)

    An investigation of how another form of ginseng, American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), affects blood sugar after eating found that it tempered changes by up to 20% (Arch of Internal Med 4/00). These scientists found that folks with diabetes did best when they took the herb within two hours of a meal.

    Ready to re-energize? Time to stop skimping on sleep and rushing through inadequate meals. For all of us, slowing down and giving our bodies a chance to regenerate its zip can make the big energy difference.



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    Breathe Easy - Don't underestimate the danger of asthma.
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    Date: June 12, 2005 05:57 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Breathe Easy - Don't underestimate the danger of asthma.

    Breathe Easy by Edward Bullard, III Energy Times, March 1, 1998

    Don't underestimate the danger of asthma. When an asthmatic attack chokes the passageways to your lungs, cutting off your air supply, the consequences can prove frightening and disastrous.

    Although asthma is the leading chronic illness among children, most sufferers are adults. The condition ranks as the 7th most common chronic affliction nationwide affecting 14 to 20 million people; about 11 million of these are over the age of 18.

    The American Lung Association estimates that between 1982 and 1992 the total number of asthma cases jumped by more than 57%. Researchers can't pinpoint the reasons for this rise, but they have found that urban dwellers suffer a higher asthma risk.

    Despite the gloomy statistics, those who suffer asthma can take reassurance from the progressive development of complementary and conventional treatments that control this condition. Anyone who suffers asthma should consult with a knowledgeable health practitioner.

    How does asthma start? This airway problem may originate with allergies and sinus or bronchial infections (the bronchi are the tubes leading to the lungs). Some experts believe that air pollution, dust mites, cockroach remains and other environmental toxins may exacerbate the condition.

    A family history of allergies and asthma also increases your asthmatic vulnerability since your genes may make you more prone to the airway inflammation that leads to breathing constraints.

    Allergic reactions to food have been implicated in causing restricted breathing. Food found to most frequently instigate immediate lung difficulties include nuts, peanuts (which are, technically, legumes not nuts), eggs, shellfish and fish. Foods that do not cause immediate wheezing but may produce a delayed respiratory effect include artificial food colorings, wheat, citrus fruits, milk, chocolate and wheat products.

    Since an allergic reaction to particular foods can apparently play a role in asthma, some people find relief by systematically eliminating foods from their diets, identifying troublesome items and then permanently avoiding those foods.

    Asthma's Nutrition Gap

    According to Richard N. Firshein, D.O., director of the Firshein Center for Comprehensive Medicine in New York City, asthma stems from cells' "disordered metabolism." In these circumstances, the body's immune system often mistakes allergens (normally benign substances) for infectious agents. In strenuously defending itself against allergens, the body goes on "red alert," says Dr. Firshein in his book Reversing Asthma (Warner), "exhausting itself in the process." This creates a need for extra vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Too often, he believes, this nutritional need is not met and asthma ensues.

    In the presence of asthma, magnesium can help restore free breathing. Dr. Firshein reports that about 50 years ago, medical researchers discovered that treating asthma victims with magnesium sulfate opened up breathing passageways. Although magnesium by itself does not completely alleviate asthma attacks, many emergency room doctors still use it in conjunction with other treatments to restore breathing.

    In explaining magnesium's usefulness in alleviating asthma, Dr. Firshein notes that magnesium competes with calcium in each cell to influence asthmatic reactions. For instance, calcium stimulates mast cells (reactive immune cells) to release histamine, a chemical that foments allergic reactions that hinder breathing. Conversely, magnesium "stabilizes" mast cells, quieting their activity so that they retain their histamine instead of flooding breathing passages.

    In addition, calcium takes part in muscle contractions that can constrict breathing tube muscles. Magnesium can help relax those same muscles.

    Although intravenous treatment with magnesium for acute asthma attacks must be carried out by a trained health professional, taking magnesium supplements over a period of time, may gradually help assuage asthma's wheezes.

    How do you tell if you're short of magnesium? Standard blood tests of magnesium levels may be inadequate. As Dr. Firshein points out, normal blood tests only examine the amount of magnesium floating in the blood's plasma. That level can apparently appear sufficient even if red blood cells are magnesium-deficient. (Dr. Firshein recommends asking your health practitioner for a special red blood cell test.)

    Ephedra for Asthma

    Ever since about 3,000 BC, Chinese health practitioners have been giving the herb ma huang (Ephedra sinica) to asthma sufferers. In the 1920s, western medical researchers extracted a chemical called ephedrine from ma huang and soon synthesized this substance for use as a pharmaceutical. However, herbal experts believe that there are other beneficial substances in ma huang besides ephedrine that can ease breathing.

    Although ephedra has been used successfully to ward off the allergies of hayfever as well as mild asthma, when this herb is taken over a long period its benefits may lessen. The reason: eventually the herb's ephedrine weakens the adrenal glands, according to Michael Murray, ND, and Joseph Pizzorno, ND, in the Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (Prima). To offset this effect, they recommend supporting the use of ephedra with licorice (Glycerrhiza glabra) as well as ginseng (Panax ginseng) which support the adrenals. In addition, vitamins C and B6 and zinc and magnesium plus pantothenic acid also boost adrenal function.

    Licking Asthma with Licorice

    Since much of asthma's deleterious effects on health stem from the fact it inflames breathing passageways, licorice root, which acts to squelch inflammation and which calms allergies, can be helpful in restoring normal breathing. Licorice, according to Drs. Murray and Pizzorno, promulgates the persistence of cortisol in our body, a hormone that acts as an anti-inflammatory agent.

    As an extra benefit, licorice can also forestall the side effects of cortisone, one of the most widely prescribed medicines for asthma. Licorice also boosts cortisone's desirable anti-inflammatory action while inhibiting the action of enzymes that would otherwise increase unwanted inflammation.

    Onions + Garlic = Better Breath

    Despite their reputation for giving you bad breath, both onion and garlic can improve the breath of those afflicted with asthma. The reason: both of these plants restrict the action of an enzyme with the tongue twisting name of lipoxygenase, a chemical that helps produce inflammation.

    Studies with animals showed that when they were fed onion extract, their induced asthmatic problems decreased. Part of onion's benefit may be due to its quercetin content. (Quercetin is a bioflavonoid available as a supplement.) Onion also contains mustard oils, which are believed to slow the body's production of leukotrienes (substances that also increase inflammation).

    Vitamin C

    Vitamin C, the most abundant antioxidant nutrient in the lungs' inner lining, apparently protects against respiratory problems. Studies of people with asthma show that they possess less vitamin C both in their circulating blood and in white blood cells. When researchers induced bronchial constriction in people who volunteered for respiratory studies, they found that those given vitamin C didn't have as hard a time breathing. Experts recommend healthy doses of vitamin C plus other antioxidant nutrients such as vitamin E, carotenoids and selenium to lower the risk of allergic reactions and ease breathing. Antioxidant nutrients restrict the action of free radicals, molecules that attack the lungs and other parts of the cardiovascular system.

    Chinese skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) also effectively fights inflammation without causing serious side effects. Experts believe its bioflavonoids stop the body from making biochemicals that inflame tissues. Aside from restricting inflammation, these bioflavonoids also act as antioxidants.



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    Acupuncture nutrient Connection
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    Date: June 12, 2005 05:53 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Acupuncture nutrient Connection

    Acupuncture nutrient Connection by Robert Gluck Energy Times, November 1, 1998

    The theory behind the practice of acupuncture confounds western science. This therapy, originating in Asia, is based on the concept that currents of energy called meridians flow through your body. However, no one has ever been able to conclusively demonstrate the existence of these meridians.

    Despite the evasiveness of these energy streams, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) holds that alterations in these energy flows can disrupt health and cause pain. Consequently, an acupuncturist punctures your skin with specialized needles to redirect the body's vital energy.

    Alleviating Illness

    Despite the fact that western scientists have not been able to find satisfactory evidence of the existence of these energetic meridians, studies show that acupuncture works and is especially effective at relieving pain. This therapy has been used to alleviate a variety of conditions including chronic pain, nausea and even mental illness. In addition, some practitioners apply it to those trying to shake off the chains of drug addiction. (More recently, many practitioners now also successfully use acupuncture to relieve physical problems in animals.)

    Of course, no matter what your perspective on this therapy, acupuncture's no panacea. While you might use acupuncture to relieve the discomforts of chemotherapy, you wouldn't use this technique as your primary weapon against a dangerous disease like cancer. Still, this reliable therapy occupies a welcome spot as an adjunct to many mainstream therapies. Consequently, many mainstream practitioners accept the validity of using acupuncture and many managed care companies reimburse this therapy. Some HMOs even keep a list of approved acupuncturists that they make available to enrollees.

    Acupuncture East and West

    The practice of acupuncture dates back at least 2200 years ago in Asia. Only during the last forty years has it become well-known and widely available in the United States. Today, 29 accredited acupuncture schools train practitioners in North America. In addition, traditional healers in Belize (south of Mexico) have been found to use a form of acupuncture derived from traditional Mayan medicine.

    Is the use of acupuncture by Mayan shamans coincidence? Or further evidence that acupuncture meridians really exist? No one knows for sure, although some experts believe the Mayan use of this therapy supports the notion that the original ancestors of the Mayans migrated from Asia.

    Needle Relief

    Acupuncturists insert needles into the body to relieve pain or enhance bodily functions. TCM holds that acupuncture, and the manipulation of these tiny needles, moves and manipulates qi (pronounced chee), the body's energy force.

    "Acupuncture is a method of balancing the body's energy," says Carol Alexander, an acupuncturist at the North Jersey Health and Pain Relief Center in Hackettstown, New Jersey. "Disease occurs because of an imbalance...Insertion of the acupuncture needles into meridians will bring about the balance of qi." Alexander has practiced acupuncture for 10 years and studied at the Tri-State School of Traditional Acupuncture in Stanford Connecticut.

    Alexander says patients sometimes suffer a blockage of qi or display too much or too little qi. The manipulation and placement of the acupuncture needles vary according to the need for adjusting meridian energy flow.

    Acupuncture can be used to prevent disease and, if disease is already rampant, it can be used to help the body correct the problem.

    In conjunction with her use of acupuncture needles, Alexander rarely prescribes single herbs but uses combinations of whole herbs that are very specific for different diseases and disease patterns. "Certain herbs, such as ginseng, are very prized in Chinese medicine," Alexander notes.

    "Astragalus is an herb used in China and around the world to tonify the qi and increase qi energy as well as stimulate the immune system."

    Licorice Root

    Alexander uses licorice root for assisting digestion and for helping women with menopausal discomforts. On the other hand, she recommends whole food concentrates like bee pollen granules for enhancing the immune system, peppermint for treating gastro-intestinal problems plus fiber supplements as well as the antioxidant/antihistamine quercetin, coenzyme Q10 and melatonin.

    "In terms of classes of nutrients, I use a lot of whole food concentrates: the green concentrates like barley greens, wheat grass powder, spirulina and blue-green algae," Alexander says. "These are high in minerals, antioxidants, nutrients and fatty acids. I also use some soy products because the isoflavone concentrates are very much anti-cancer."

    The Fine Points of Acupuncture

    Acupuncture needles are very fine, as thin as hairs. They are available in a variety of diameters and lengths. When an acupuncturist inserts these needles, the sensation is that of mild pinpricks. (The needles enter the body at depths of only 1/8th inch to two inches.) In many cases people experience mild pleasure during needle manipulation.

    "From a Western point of view it's important to explain that there is a distinct function of acupuncture treatment and that is to increase circulation," Alexander says. "We do stimulate nerves and we know that with the stimulation of nerves many neurochemicals and neurotransmitters are released. They move through the nerves and find receptor sights, some in the brain, some in other parts of the body."

    By stimulating nerves, acupuncturists can calm inflammation and deaden pain. These effects are believed to be linked to the release of endorphins and dinorphins, powerful painkillers and anti-inflammatories that the body produces for itself. Most acupuncturists use this therapy as part of an overall, multi-faceted treatment plan.

    Unique Energy

    "Qi is what makes you different from a sack of chemicals," points out David Molony, an acupuncturist at the Lehigh Valley Acupuncture Center in Catasaqua, Pennsylvania who studied at the Nanjing Traditional Medicine Hospital in China and has lectured at Cornell University.

    What You Need

    "You can manipulate qi with acupuncture, herbs and diet. Because people's bodies work differently, there are different approaches. When you ask the question what nutrients and herbs are effective at enhancing acupuncture, it depends on what the person needs, according to an Oriental Medicine diagnosis."

    An Oriental Medical examination, Molony says, begins with a long list of health questions designed to reveal factors that contribute to disease. A practitioner measures your pulse in several different places along your arm, inspects your tongue, may press on your stomach, sniff your general odor and closely examine your nails and skin for signs of problems.

    "You take in everything you can," adds Molony, a board member of the Acupuncture Society of Pennsylvania and former board member of the American Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. "This gives you clues that you need in order to make your diagnosis."

    Acupuncturists use nutrients and herbs that complement the treatment, as well as dietary and lifestyle counseling. Some acupuncturists don't specialize in herbal remedies, so these practitioners might go to a specialist like David Winston for advice. Winston, an herb expert skilled in Cherokee, Chinese and Western eclectic herbal medicine, works as an instructor, lecturer and consultant.

    "In China, acupuncture is considered a complementary therapy; you generally don't go for treatment and get purely acupuncture," says Winston who is working on a book about saw palmetto. "Herbal medicine, diet and qi gong are important therapies in their own right and acupuncture is one of those therapies. Qi gong is a form of martial arts that focuses on unique breathing and visualization methods. Qi is not exactly energy, it's energy in movement; it's what makes the blood move."

    Open Blockages

    Acupuncture is used to open blockages that sometimes build up in what TCM practitioners characterize as excessive heat or cold. These hot and cold spots do not always literally refer to the temperature of the body but are meant to depict changes in the character of the body's vital energy.

    Chinese acupuncturists don't necessarily treat diseases, but target clusters of physical discomforts. Winston says, "Herbal formulas change depending on the 'symptom pictures.' Somebody could have acute appendicitis but the symptom picture could vary. Usually Chinese acupuncturists use herbs like isatis (a very cold, drying herb that's a powerful anti-bacterial agent) and coptis (a powerful anti-bacterial herb)."

    Americans often visit acupuncturists complaining of back pain or some type of musculoskeletal problem-a wrenched knee, a ligament that hasn't healed properly or perhaps a torn rotator cuff. "If the injury is hot to the touch, it's red, it's inflammatory-that's a condition where there's excessive heat and in that condition the acupuncturist would give herbs that are cooling and anti-inflammatory such as the root of large leaf gentian."

    Pain that Moves

    If someone suffers pain that moves, pain that is sometimes exacerbated by damp or humid conditions, acupuncturists often prescribe clematis root, a wild variety of the garden plant that is an anti-spasmodic, or acanthoPanax, a relative of Siberian ginseng used for damp pain.

    "If there's pain with excessive dampness," Winston says, "acupuncturists might use duhuo, a drying herb that opens the meridians."

    Molony agrees with Winston that when it comes to choosing herbs to enhance acupuncture, accurate analysis of the root cause of the health problem is paramount to making the right decisions. For example, if a person is qi deficient and her tongue is thickly coated, she may not be processing her energy properly. Phlegm builds up, decreasing energy. "What you want to do is give them herbs that move phlegm, like citrus peel, and combine that with acupuncture points that move phlegm also," Molony says.

    For stimulating metabolism, Molony uses lactoferin-processed colostrum from cows. He uses ginseng and atractylodes as qi tonics and he adds herbs like magnolia bark or atractylodes alba.

    Helpful Antioxidants

    He believes antioxidants are helpful too, as preventive medicines, including vitamins C and E. These valuable nutrients disarm the harm that reactive molecules can wreak within the body.

    So how important are herbs and nutrition to enhance acupuncture's effectiveness? Acupuncturists seem to agree that healthy doses of antioxidants (such as vitamins C and E plus antioxidants from grapeseed extract) as well as specialized herbs, turn this therapy into a highly effective healing tool. Those wanting to benefit from this penetrating technique should stock up on nutrients. Then sit back, relax, kick off your shoes and let the acupuncturist do her stuff.



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    Vitanet ®

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    The Blood Sugar Blues - help lower blood sugar
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    Date: June 12, 2005 08:08 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: The Blood Sugar Blues - help lower blood sugar

    The Blood Sugar Blues by Carl Lowe Energy Times, July 10, 2003

    The cells in your body run on the sugar they get from blood. Normally, this energy distribution system functions efficiently. When things go awry, however, blood sugar fluctuations can cause serious problems.

    If your blood sugar stays too high, your pancreas, heart and other organs suffer. But stabilize your blood sugar and you can stabilize your health.

    Problems linked to too much blood sugar are widespread. Diabetes, in which the body becomes increasingly unable to regulate blood sugar levels, is one of the most serious and widespread conditions. Plus, researchers now know that elevated blood sugar, even if you don't suffer diabetes, elevates your risk of heart disease and pancreatic cancer (JAMA 5/17/00).

    Researchers at the Northwestern University Medical School have shown that with every bump up in your blood sugar levels, your chances of contracting pancreatic cancer rises significantly.

    "Because the prevalence of type 2 (adult onset) diabetes and obesity, including childhood obesity, is steadily increasing, identifying a potential causal association between hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and pancreatic cancer could have important preventive and prognosticative implications for this cancer," notes Susan M. Gapstur, MD, a professor at Northwestern.

    In other words, measuring your blood sugar can go a long way towards measuring the odds of developing this devastating condition. In the United States, pancreatic cancer is the fifth most deadly cancer. The disease is difficult to discover, and tumors in the pancreas usually remain hidden until the cancer has spread throughout the body.

    Blood Sugar and Heart Problems

    A collection of researchers now believes your blood sugar level so closely predicts your heart disease risk that blood sugar may be a more accurate heart disease predictor than cholesterol. According to a study in England (BMJ 2001; 322:15), the higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of heart disease and other serious health problems.

    In particular, a type of blood sugar called glycated hemoglobin may provide an indication of what kind of trouble your heart and arteries may face in the future.

    Glycated hemoglobin is blood glucose (sugar) that has latched onto your red blood cells. The levels of this type of attached sugar climbs when blood sugar levels consistently stay too high. After a while, this sugar not only sticks to blood cells, it also starts sticking to other tissues, an occurrence that can lead to cardiovascular disease.

    While about one in twenty people in their late 40s or older has diabetes, experts estimate that almost three out of four have at least some degree of elevated glycated hemoglobin.

    Higher and Higher

    Men and postmenopausal women are at highest risk for elevated blood sugar. Your blood sugar also generally increases:

  • * As you age

  • * When you gain weight around the middle

  • * When you eat a diet high in saturated fat (such as meats, butter and fried foods)

    You can lower your risk of forming glycated hemoglobin by taking the antioxidant vitamins C and E and drinking three or four alcoholic drinks a week (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2000: 71(5)). In addition, losing weight and exercising also drops your glycated hemoglobin.

    Helpful Chromium

    When glucose enters the bloodstream after a meal, it has a variety of possible destinations. It can be picked up by brain cells, which use glucose as their only source of fuel (this explains why low blood sugar can cause headaches, dizziness and shakiness). Glucose also can enter muscles, which can burn either glucose or fat for energy. Or glucose can enter fat cells for storage-not a desirable option for someone who is already overweight.

    One reason blood sugar may rise to unhealthy levels is a condition called glucose resistance or intolerance, which occurs when insulin, the hormone-like substance that shepherds glucose into the body's cells, can't do its job efficiently. That leads to blood which is too rich in both sugar and insulin.

    Researchers believe that the element chromium can help the body use insulin more effectively, which, when combined with adequate exercise, allows glucose to more easily enter muscle cells.

    "In experiments, chromium supplementation has actually been found to improve glucose tolerance in some diabetics and in people with impaired glucose tolerance," says nutrition researcher and teacher Shari Lieberman, PhD, in The Real Vitamin and Mineral Book (Avery/Penguin).

    In a number of investigations, chromium has not only helped improve glucose tolerance, but it has also decreased circulating insulin, glycated hemoglobin and cholesterol levels (Journal of the American College of Nutrition 1998; 17:548-55). (People with elevated glucose levels often suffer from elevations in cholesterol as well. In the search for ways to improve cholesterol levels, Germany's Commission E, an herbal authority respected around the world, has approved the use of garlic to help support healthy cholesterol.)

    Ginseng and Blood Sugar

    American ginseng, an herb known as an adaptogen (which means it helps the body cope with everyday stress) is another tool for controlling blood sugar. Research at St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Toronto shows that taking American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium) about 40 minutes before you eat can reduce your blood sugar (Archives of Internal Medicine 4/9/00).

    According to Vladimir Vuksan, MD, lead investigator for the research team, these findings may have important implications for the treatment and prevention of diabetes. "Although preliminary, these findings are encouraging and indicate that American ginseng's potential role in diabetes should be taken seriously and investigated further. Controlling after-meal blood sugar levels is recognized as a very important strategy in managing diabetes. It may also be important in the prevention of diabetes in those who have not yet developed the disease," says Dr. Vuksan.

    Fat vs Sugar

    Supplemental helpings of the fatty acid conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) have also been shown to control blood sugar and lower your risk of diabetes (Journal of Nutrition 1/03). "In previous work, we found that CLA delayed the onset of diabetes in rats," says Martha Belury, PhD, the senior author of the investigation and an associate professor of human nutrition at Ohio State University. "In (our latest) study, we found that it also helped improve the management of adult-onset diabetes in humans."

    Dr. Belury's research shows that CLA may help lower levels of leptin, a hormone believed to regulate fat levels. By reducing leptin, CLA may help reduce body fat, which, in turn, may lower the risk of diabetes and high blood sugar.

    Sweet Workouts

    A consistent, long-term exercise program is one of the single best ways to convince your body to temper blood sugar levels and lower your risk of developing diabetes (Clinical Exercise Physiology 2/15/02).

    "It now appears that there is...a long-term beneficial effect from regular exercise, most likely due to the fact that a significant amount of fat is lost," says exercise physiologist Cris Slentz, PhD. "Long-term exercise leads to loss of fat in the gut (stomach) region, which is especially beneficial since this fat is thought to be directly linked to increased risk of diabetes and heart disease."

    Dr, Slentz's study examined how exercise influences the way the body uses sugar in people who have a high risk of diabetes.

    In this research, five overweight individuals who had never exercised before engaged in an intensive workout program for nine months. Afterwards, they went back to their couch potato lives.

    Dr. Slentz and other investigators measured their blood sugar before they started the exercise program and then remeasured these levels at one day, five days and thirty days after the nine-month regimen ended.

    The researchers also looked at these people's insulin sensitivity, a measure of how well their bodies controlled blood sugar.

    "Insulin sensitivity, or its ability to stimulate glucose metabolism, was higher after nine months of exercise, and the fasting insulin levels were lower," Slentz said. "Just as importantly, 30 days after stopping exercise, insulin sensitivity was still 24% higher than pre-exercise levels, indicating that beneficial effects of exercise persisted."

    In this study, people pedaled exercise bikes, walked on treadmills and climbed stairs. By the end of the research, they were working out about an hour a day.

    So if you've put off devoting yourself to an exercise program and taking care of your blood sugar, you now have more reason to start as soon as possible. Paying attention to blood sugar pays off.



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    Herbs in Perspective
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    Date: June 10, 2005 10:25 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Herbs in Perspective

    Herbs in Perspective by Phyllis D. Light, RH-AHG Energy Times, June 16, 2004

    "I don't claim a cure...I just try to give people some ease," noted Tommie Bass, a traditional Southern herbalist whose life has been the topic of several books, including Mountain Medicine by Darryl Patton (Natural Reader Press) and Trying to Give Ease by John Crellin and Jane Philpott (Duke University Press). That philosophy reflects the perspective embraced by herbalists for eons.

    The traditional use of herbs is incorporated into all cultures. Herbs were the first medicine and the origin of what we now call modern medicine. These plants have not been prescribed to conquer specific illnesses but instead nourish the body and aid in building overall health.

    Traditional Knowledge

    Observation, psychological need and human instinct form the foundation of traditional herbal knowledge and use. This knowledge has been passed down through generations based on practice and experience. The result: a depth of information about the safe and effective use of herbs that spans thousands of years.

    The goal of a traditional herbalist is to bring the body into balance (homeostasis), prevent disease and support immune functioning. Unfortunately, any kind of therapeutic knowledge can be misused, and that has happened with some herbs, causing some people to question herbal medicine's safety.

    As more people turn to natural therapies, scientists have begun to perform evidence-based research into their safe and effective use. The good news is that much of this research has validated the effectiveness of herbs and supplements.

    Echinacea to the Rescue

    Do the sniffling sneezes that herald a cold have you reaching for your bottle of echinacea? If so, you are in good company. Echinacea (Echinacea spp) is one of the top-selling herbs.

    The colorful American prairie plant was extremely popular during the early 1900s, until the use of modern antibiotics relegated it to the back shelf. But a resurgence of interest in herbs propelled echinacea back into the mainstream in the second half of the twentieth century. And this herb boasts an impressive body of research and has an excellent record of safety.

    For instance, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy have found echinacea to be effective in supporting the body's defenses against upper respiratory tract infections and for reducing the duration of discomforts that accompany the common cold (Pharmacotherapy 2000; 20(6):690-7).

    Although studies have not confirmed its ability to prevent colds, echinacea is widely used by many folks for just that purpose. Researchers have found that echinacea's effectiveness may drop if you use it for eight straight weeks (Am J Health-Syst Pharm 1999; 56(2):121-2). So if you take it for a couple of months, take a couple of weeks off before using it again.

    Flower Power

    St. John's wort is another herb with ancient origins that has experienced a modern resurgence. Named after St. John the Baptist, St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is generally in bright yellow bloom around St. John's Day (June 26). According to herbalist Michael Tierra, author of The Way of Herbs (Pocket Books), St. John's wort affects the liver and the nervous system. In 1984, the German Commission E, a recognized herbal authority, approved St. John's for depressive disorders, and in topical form for acute injuries and first-degree burns.

    Modern research has reaffirmed the use of St. John's wort in the short-term treatment of mild to moderate depression (Cochrane Review Issue 2, 2004). It has also been found to be useful in premenstrual depression (Int J Psy Med 2003; 33(3):295-7). (Researchers have found that the herb may alter how the body processes some prescription medications, so check with your healthcare provider before using such medicines along with St. John's wort.)

    King of Herbs

    " Ginseng (Panax) received the lofty title, King of Herbs, due to its reputation as a tonic and its ability to stimulate the body into healing," notes herbalism writer Darryl Patton. This plant was once so popular in China that it was worth its weight in gold.

    In fact, ginseng is the popular name for two different types of ginseng, American and Korean (Panax quinquefolium and P. ginseng). Both are considered adaptogens, or substances that help the body deal with stress more effectively. And modern research has found that ginseng can be used to improve overall energy and vitality, and to help the body deal more effectively with chronic stress (J Pharm Sci 2003 Dec: 93(4):458-64).

    Researchers have found that ginseng helps boost the immune system (J Med Food 2004 Spring; 7(1):1-6). This ancient herb is also a powerful antioxidant that confers protection on the heart (Biochem Biophys Acta 2004 Feb 24; 1670(3):165-71). In other studies, ginseng has been found to reduce symptoms of menopause, improve endurance and lower blood sugar levels. To avoid overharvesting wild ginseng, most of the herb on the market is now grown on farms.

    Ode to Ginkgo

    Known as the Living Fossil, ginkgo is the oldest known plant in the world. A native of Asia, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) is now found in many US cities, where it has been planted as a quick-growing shade tree. Traditionally, ginkgo was used for disorders and diseases of the lungs and the kidneys, as a remedy for bronchitis and to improve circulation in older people.

    Ginkgo contains substances that act as potent antioxidants by scavenging cell-damaging free radicals, and it is thought to help reduce the risk of disease. By opening capillaries, ginkgo increases circulation, and enables nutrients and oxygen to move around the body, especially to the extremities.

    Indeed, recent research indicates that ginkgo may ease pain associated with arterial disease in the legs (Am J Med 2000; 108:276-81). Other studies support the use of ginkgo for acute stress (J Pharm Sci 2003 Dec; 93(4):458-64) and some cases of hearing loss (Acta Otolaryngol 2001; 121:579-84).

    In a UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute study on ginkgo, researchers found significant improvement in the verbal recall of people who had age-related memory problems. According to Dr. Linda Ercoli, lead author of the study, "Our findings suggest intriguing avenues for future study...with a larger sample to better measure and understand the impact of ginkgo on brain metabolism."

    Tasty Ginger

    Traditionally, fiery ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been used to aid digestion, reduce nausea, relieve gas, reduce symptoms of arthritis and strengthen the heart. Modern researchers have started to validate these traditional uses; ginger has reduced the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness in studies (Aust NZJ Obstet Gynaecol 2003 Apr; 4392:139-44).

    Meanwhile, researchers at the University of Minnesota have applied for a patent on a substance found in ginger, believing it to have anticancer activity. According to Ann Bode, "Plants of the ginger family have been credited with therapeutic and preventive powers and have been reported to have anticancer activity."

    Ginger can be found in natural food stores as fresh or dried root. It often appears in small amounts in herbal formulas as a carrier herb-one that helps move other herbs around the body.

    The best medicine combines the health support of herbs with the scientific rigor of conventional medicine. And as scientists continue to search for new medicine from ancient remedies, we can enjoy the best of both perspectives.



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    MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT™ - Herbal-Nutrient Nervous System Support!
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    Date: June 04, 2005 10:15 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT™ - Herbal-Nutrient Nervous System Support!

    Myelin Sheath Support

    Planetary Formulas is pleased to introduce MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT: a comprehensive formula designed to support the fat-like insulating sheath (myelin) that surrounds nerve tissues. Properly formed myelin is necessary for optimal nerve conduction. MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT is the first formula developed for Planetary Formulas by herbalist and Ayurvedic specialist Alan Tillotson. It consists of some of the most highly regarded tonifiers of Chinese and Ayurvedic herbalism, along with additional key botanicals and supporting nutrients used with success in his practice.

    Nervous System Support

    MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT is a broad-range herbal-nutrient formula that supports your nervous system with traditional Ayurvedic and Chinese botanicals as well as scientifically researched nutrients. Vitamin B-12 is key to the MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT formula. It plays two critical roles: 1) it is essential for normal health of blood; and 2) it may function as a coenzyme in the synthesis of either the protein or lipid part of myelin.

    Comprehensive Botanical - Nutrient Formula

    Ayurvedic botanicals: Ashwagandha has been widely used throughout India for 3,000-4,000 years. It is one of the most highly regarded tonics in the 6,000-year old Ayurvedic tradition. Bacopa has been reported by Ayurvedic scholar Charaka to promote mental ability. Yogaraj guggul is one of the most valued botanical compounds of Ayurveda. The boswellic acids in boswellia inhibit leukotriene synthesis. Shilajit, a mineral resin that oozes from steep rocks in the Himalayas, is used extensively in Ayurveda. Curcuma (turmeric) has been used both internally and externally in Ayurveda. Curcuma is included in a dosage clinically shown to inhibit a group of enzymes that influence metabolism of arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid is an unsaturated fatty acid found in most animal fats and is a precursor of prostaglandins. Chinese herbs: Included are the Chinese tonifiers Panax ginseng and tienchi ginseng, as well as licorice extract (which is also prominent in European herbalism). MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT delivers Panax ginseng in amounts clinically shown to have adaptogenic (anti-stress) effects. Nutrients: Vitamin B-12, central for supporting the nervous system and specifically the myelin sheath, is included in the form of methylcobalamin. While a few forms of B-12 have been used clinically, it has been shown that methylcobalamin is a highly assimilable form of B-12, leading to increased retention in tissues. MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT also includes zinc, copper, L-selenomethionine, boron, calcium, potassium, magnesium, chromium and pantothenic acid.

    New Formulator!

    Alan Tillotson is the newest member of the Planetary Formulas formulation team. He has been an ardent student of Ayurvedic herbalism, having engaged in an apprenticeship since 1976 with Ayurvedic scholar Mana Bajra Bajracharya, a practitioner whose family’s Ayurvedic lineage dates back 700 years. Planetary Formulas MYELIN SHEATH SUPPORT is available in bottles of 45, 90 and 180 tablets. Planetary Formulas: More than Herbs— Herbalism!

    References
    Ammon, H.P.T. et al. 1993. Mechanism of antiinflammatory actions of curcumin and boswellic acids. J. Ethnopharmacology: 38:113. Bhattacharya, S.K. 1995. Activity of shilajit on alloxan-induced hyperglycaemia in rats. Fitoterapia LXVI, 4:328-332. Linder, M.C. 1991. Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism with Clinical Applications. 2nd ed. Norwalk: Appleton and Lange, 138-143.



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    Male Response - Re-align your body systems ...
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    Date: June 03, 2005 12:00 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Male Response - Re-align your body systems ...

    Male Response

    Between 10 and 15 million American men experience challenges to libido and sexual performance, according to the National Institutes of Health. Fatigue, stress, inactivity and an unhealthy diet can result in decreased vigor and desire. In addition, the normal aging process may result in a slowing of response, according to the National Institute on Aging. MALE RESPONSE is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ that helps bring alignment to a range of interrelated body systems that can negatively impact male sexual function: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.

    Bio-Aligned Formula™

    MALE RESPONSE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula that supports the multiple, interconnected systems involved with male sexual function.

    Hormonal Function

    Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the male sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. MALE RESPONSE contains herbs and nutrients that may support hormonal function, including nettles, Panax ginseng, saw palmetto, tribulus, zinc, and vitamin B-5.

    Energy Generation

    Fatigue and poor energy can takes a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. MALE RESPONSE combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and/or invigorate the sexual response. These include ashwagandha, Panax ginseng, Siberian ginseng, zinc, and vitamins B-5 and B-6.

    Circulation

    Proper circulation of blood is vital for male sexual response. MALE RESPONSE contains several herbs known for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbe contains yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, which can stimulate selected portions of the nervous system and increase blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Additional ingredients that support healthy circulation include ginger, ginkgo, and vitamin E.

    Brain and Nervous System: Libido Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. MALE RESPONSE provides supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, including copper, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. In addition, it contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and/or rejuvenating properties. These include ashwagandha, avena sativa (oats), Panax ginseng, tribulus, and yohimbe.

    Prostate Gland

    A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support male reproductive health and are essential for the proper functioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production. Additional support is provided by nettle, saw palmetto, and tribulus.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Male Response: A Strategy for WellnessSM

  • • Eat well: Diet is perhaps the most significant single factor in generating virility. A diet rich in whole foods, with adequate protein from sources such as fish, chicken, turkey, lean beef, tofu or legumes, is crucial. The prostate gland contains high amounts of zinc, which is needed for sperm production and healthy testosterone levels. Foods high in zinc include seafood, meat, root vegetables, legumes, pumpkin seeds, nuts and whole grains. It is also important to follow a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, since elevated cholesterol levels and the resulting buildup of plaque in blood vessels, can affect male reponse by impairing blood flow.
  • • Stop using tobacco. Nicotine, tobacco’s active ingredient, constricts the small blood vessels, interfering with healthy circulation.
  • • Use alcohol in moderation and avoid illicit drugs. Alcohol is a nervous system depressant, which can interfere with sexual function. Steady drinking can inhibit male response by inhibiting blood flow.
  • • Get moving. Moderate, but not extreme, amounts of exercise help you relax, boost your energy levels, increase your physical awareness and ultimately stimulate your sexuality. Regular exercise has an impact on vasocongestion, raising blood supply to the organs, while walking, stretching, swimming and resistance exercise help raise testoterone levels.
  • • Contact a counselor. Counseling can help reduce the anxiety often associated with male performance. It can also address issues at work or home that may be contributing factors.

    Male Response is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ Multi-System Support for Sexual Vigor

    References
    Comas, M. et al. Bromatological study of maca. (Lepidium meyenii). Alimentaria 1997, 35(286): 85-90. Dini, A. et al. Chemical composition of Lepidium meyenii. Food Chemistry 1994, 49(4):347-9. Kapoor, L.D. Tribulus—indications and use. CRC Handbook of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton: FIAC/FASP; 1990. Physicians’ Desk Reference, 52 ed. Montvale, N.J.:Medical Economics Co.; 1998. Physician’s Desk Reference Medical Dictionary. Baltimore:Williams & Wilkins; 1995.



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    Intimate Response - The Freedom to Change. Boost intimacy
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    Date: June 02, 2005 12:48 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Intimate Response - The Freedom to Change. Boost intimacy

    SENSUALITY AND MENOPAUSE. FOR MANY WOMEN THIS apprehensive milestone is foreshadowed by disquieting physiological changes. Its debut marks a transition period that can actually begin at age 40. Called pre-menopause, it usually lasts 3 to 6 years and is characterized by powerful hormonal changes with wide-ranging effects on a woman’s body. Her level of romantic passion is often influenced by these changes. Source Naturals is proud to announce ETERNAL WOMAN™ INTIMATE RESPONSE™. This herbal-safe, natural formulation may support a woman’s healthy vitality and vigor during pre-menopause.

    Healthy Circulation = Natural Vitality.

    Most women experience decreases in desire at one time or another. Activity levels, monthly hormonal changes, circulatory status, drugs such as oral contraceptives and anti-depressants, alcohol and emotional factors all may contribute to a woman’s passion. However, premenopause is something more. Hormones stimulate, affect and balance hundreds of processes during a woman’s monthly cycle. When their levels begin to fluctuate and decline during premenopause, the body’s internal balancing act is acutely influenced. The bloodstream is our “river of life” as it delivers oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. Maintaining adequate blood circulation is necessary to our health and vitality. INTIMATE RESPONSE contains these supportive herbs and nutrients: yohimbe, epimedium, Ginkgo biloba, Panax ginseng, and L-Arginine.

    The Nitric Oxide Connection.

    L-Arginine is the primary amino acid t hat the body uses to make nitric oxide. It is nitric oxide that helps the muscle tissues surrounding a blood vessel to relax, allowing more blood to flow to the organs. Panax ginseng is a highly valued botanical traditionally utilized as an energizing tonic. In use for thousands of years in China, its main active constituents are the ginsenosides. Ginkgo extract is traditionally the premier herb for supporting blood flow in the circulatory system. Pregnenolone is the starting point from which all sex hormones are produced internally. Yohimbe is an African herb that has traditionally been used for more than 100 years. It supports peripheral blood vessels. Epimedium and dong quai are highly valued blood tonic herbs in traditional Chinese medicine used to support circulation and “life essence.” Vitamin B6 and folic acid support proper blood flow and healthy arteries by reducing levels of homocysteine in the bloodstream.

    The Healthy, Herbal-Safe Response.

    INTIMATE RESPONSE is a remarkable combination of herbal-safe, gentle ingredients that may support healthy and normal circulation during pre-menopause. For the freedom to change™ naturally...choose INTIMATE RESPONSE by Source Naturals.

    References:
    Bush, P., et al. (1992). Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 186(1), 308-314. Chatterjee, S.S. in: Effect of Ginkgo Biloba on Organic Cerebral Impairment (Agnoli, A, Rapin J.R., Scapagnini, V., Weitbrecht, W.V., eds) John Libbey, London, pp. 5-14 (1985). Chen, X. (1996). Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol, 23(8), 728-32. Davis, S.R., & Burger, H.G. (1996). Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 81(8), 2759-2763. Franken, D.G., et al. (1994). Arterioscler Thromb., 14, 465-470. Huang, K.C. (1993). The Pharmacology of Chinese Herbs, CRC Press Inc: Boca Raton, 91-92. Marcocci, L., et al. (1994). Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communication, 201(2), 748-755. Paick, Jae-Seung, & Lee, J.H. (1996). The Journal of Urology, 156, 1876-1880. Riley, AJ. (1994, May/June). BJCP, 48(3), 133-136. Roberts, E. (1995). Biochemical Pharmacology, 49(1), 1-16. Stamler, J.S. et al. (1993). The Journal of Clinical Investigation, 91, 308-318. Zumoff, B., et al. (1995). Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 80(4), 1429-1430.



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    Fibro Response - Feel your Vitality ...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 02, 2005 09:56 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Fibro Response - Feel your Vitality ...

    Fibro Response

    Millions of Americans, the majority of them women, are looking for a product to soothe muscles, relieve joints, support energy, and assist the liver’s natural detoxification process. Source Naturals FIBRO-RESPONSE is based on recent research into the physiological mechanisms involved in muscular metabolism. This research has given new hope to millions of people.

    Fibro-Response: A Bio-Aligned Formulation™ FIBRO-RESPONSE is the latest in a series of formulas we refer to as Bio- Aligned Formulations. We evaluate the underlying causes of system imbalances, then design products that support alignment and harmony in your body’s interdependent systems and functions. These formulas provide targeted nutrition to help create Body Systems in Harmony™.

    FIBRO-RESPONSE was designed to help bring harmony to the interdependent systems and functions that influence joint and muscle health. Our muscles need energy and oxygen to prevent them from becoming fatigued. FIBRO-RESPONSE soothes muscles and joints by supporting oxygen supply and energy production, provides powerful antioxidants for healthy joints and connective tissue, assists healthy liver function, and supports the nervous system and circulation. The ingredients were carefully selected to influence a range of body systems. Some were included for their combined effects with other ingredients; some play important roles in more than one body system.

    Muscles and Energy Production: Our muscle cells are powered by adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a compound popularly referred to as “the energy molecule.” ATP supplies energy for all the body’s myriad physiological processes. To provide this chemical energy, the body generates and uses an amazing two to three pounds of ATP every day! ATP production occurs through a series of complex chemical reactions, including the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain—and these energy production systems in turn require sufficient nutrients. Malic acid, a natural fruit acid that is also produced in our cells, and the essential mineral magnesium, are critical components of the energy production cycle in muscle cells. FIBRO-RESPONSE supplies both in the amounts used in recent scientific research. Additional ingredients that support energy production include coenzyme Q10, a coenzyme in the energy- producing pathways; manganese, which activates many metabolic enzymes; and copper, an important component of energy-producing enzymes. Pantothenic acid, and alpha-lipoic acid help form coenzyme A, a primary starting material for ATP production (pantothenic acid also supports the adrenal glands). Vitamins B-1, B-2, niacin and B-6 are all required for energy production.

    Connective Tissue: Healthy connective tissue is essential for proper muscle function. MSM dietary sulfur supports the integrity of connective tissue and joints. MSM is included in FIBRO-RESPONSE in the amount used in recent joint health studies. Vitamins A and C, zinc, manganese, and copper all have important roles in supporting connective tissue. Liver Support: The liver is the largest and one of the most important body organs. Its vital functions include clearing the blood of toxins, and producing bile, which aids in fat digestion and carries waste products away from the liver. Liver detoxification is essential for muscle and joint comfort. Silymarin from milk thistle seeds is an important contributor to the support of healthy liver function. N-acetyl cysteine serves as a precursor to glutathione, a critical selenium-containing antioxidant produced in the liver, which binds to toxins to help remove them from the body. Alpha-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 play important roles in supporting liver health. This is partly because they are components of the body’s energy production process, and the liver demands a great deal of energy. FIBRORESPONSE also contains a classic Chinese herbal combination traditionally used to harmonize liver “chi” or “energy”: bupleurum, ginseng, pinellia, skullcap, ginger, cinnamon, and licorice. Their actions are complemented by the traditional Western herb dandelion.

    Antioxidant Support: Antioxidants protect tissues and joints from highly destructive molecules called free radicals. Alpha-lipoic acid, termed the “ideal antioxidant,” complements the antioxidant activity of beta carotene and coenzyme Q10. Nacetyl cysteine, best known for supporting the liver, is also highly valued as an antoxidant. Zinc, selenium and copper support our natural defenses. Together, they provide a full armory of powerful antioxidants for joints and connective tissue.

    Nervous System Support: Ginkgo biloba is renowned for promoting blood flow to the brain. This is crucial, since brain tissue is very metabolically active, accounting for 2% of our body weight, yet using 15% of our total energy supply. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that may regulate the nervous system and support clear focus. The herb skullcap, and vitamin B-6, add further support.

    Taking Back Your Life: A Strategy for WellnessSM

    Source Naturals’ expert formulators have created an experiential product that can make a difference in the way you feel. But supplementation is only part of the picture. Healthy lifestyle habits can redefine and empower your own strategy for wellness.

    Rest and Relaxation. Deep, uninterrupted sleep is essential for energy and a healthy nervous system. Sleep 8 to 10 hours nightly and aim to finish meals two hours before retiring.

    Exercise. Even if you feel exhausted and it hurts to move your muscles, you must keep moving. Start easy with nonimpact movement—yoga is an excellent beginning. Do some gentle stretches, followed by 5 to 10 minutes of blood-pumping activity (i.e. biking, stair-stepping, or dancing). Listen to your body: increase activity time only when it feels comfortable. Food and Nutrition. You’ve heard it before but now it’s time to pay attention: eat healthy. Avoid spicy, oily foods and choose light, mild alternatives. Go easy on sugar and incorporate whole grains into your diet. Enjoy steamed vegetables, alternate brown and white rice, and eat less red meat and more fish or soy. Reduce or eliminate milk products. Relax and take time to chew. And drink LOTS of water—it is essential for hydrating the body, flushing out wastes, and absorbing nutrients.

    Breathing. Many people hold their breath unintentionally, often as a result of stress or anxiety. This can become a habit, reducing blood oxygen, interrupting the pumping mechanism of the diaphragm that helps circulation, and causing muscles to become tense. Breathe deeply and feel your lungs expand and fill. Notice how different you feel.

    You have in your hand a powerful, comprehensive formula. Combined with a healthy lifestyle FIBRO-RESPONSE can help you make lasting changes that will empower you throughout life.

    FIBRO-RESPONSE is available in bottles of 45, 90 and 180 tablets.

    References Abraham, G. and J. Flechas. 1992. J. Nutritional Medicine (3): 49-59. American Medical Association, Encyclopedia of Medicine. New York: Random House, 1989. Garfinkel, L. and D. 1985. Magnesium (4): 60-72. Russell, I.J. et al. 1995. J. Rheumatology 22(5): 953-8.

    Targeted Nutrition Muscle Cell Metabolism Malic Acid, Magnesium, CoQ10, Vitamin B-1, (ATP Production) Vitamin B-2, Vitamin B-3, Vitamin B-6, Manganese, Pantothenic Acid, Copper, alpha-Lipoic Acid. Connective Tissue MSM, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Zinc, Manganese, Copper Liver Silymarin from Milk Thistle, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Ginkgo Biloba, Dandelion Root, Chinese Liver Blend (Bupleurum, Skullcap, Panax Ginseng, Pinellia Root, Ginger, Cinnamon, Licorice Root) Antioxidant Support N-Acetyl Cysteine, alpha-Lipoic Acid, Beta Carotene, CoQ10, Zinc, Selenium, Copper, Nervous System GABA, Skullcap, Ginkgo Biloba, Vitamin B-6.



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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 20, 2005 05:33 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    Between 10 and 15 million American men experience challenges to libido and sexual performance, according to the National Institutes of Health. Fatigue, stress, inactivity and an unhealthy diet can result in decreased vigor and desire. In addition, the normal aging process may result in a slowing of response, according to the National Institute on Aging. MALE RESPONSE is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ that helps bring alignment to a range of interrelated body systems that can negatively impact male sexual function: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.

    Bio-Aligned Formula™ MALE RESPONSE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula that supports the multiple, interconnected systems involved with male sexual function. Hormonal Function Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the male sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. MALE RESPONSE contains herbs and nutrients that may support hormonal function, including nettles, Panax ginseng, saw palmetto, tribulus, zinc, and vitamin B-5. Energy Generation Fatigue and poor energy can takes a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. Male Response combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and/or invigorate the sexual response. These include ashwagandha, Panax ginseng, Siberian ginseng, zinc, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. Circulation Proper circulation of blood is vital for male sexual response. MALE RESPONSE contains several herbs known for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbe contains yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, which can stimulate selected portions of the nervous system and increase blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Additional ingredients that support healthy circulation include ginger, ginkgo, and vitamin E. Brain and Nervous System: Libido Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. MALE RESPONSE provides supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, including copper, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. In addition, it contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and/or rejuvenating properties. These include ashwagandha, avena sativa (oats), Panax ginseng, tribulus, and yohimbe.

    Prostate Gland A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support male reproductive health and are essential for the properfunctioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production. Additional support is provided by nettle, saw palmetto, and tribulus. Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Male Response: A Strategy for WellnessSM • Eat well: Diet is perhaps the most significant single factor in generating virility. A diet rich in whole foods, with adequate protein from sources such as fish, chicken, turkey, lean beef, tofu or legumes, is crucial. The prostate gland contains high amounts of zinc, which is needed for sperm production and healthy testosterone levels. Foods high in zinc include seafood, meat, root vegetables, legumes, pumpkin seeds, nuts and whole grains. It is also important to follow a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, since elevated cholesterol levels and the resulting buildup of plaque in blood vessels, can affect male reponse by impairing blood flow. • Stop using tobacco. Nicotine, tobacco’s active ingredient, constricts the small blood vessels, interfering with healthy circulation. • Use alcohol in moderation and avoid illicit drugs. Alcohol is a nervous system depressant, which can interfere with sexual function. Steady drinking can inhibit male response by inhibiting blood flow. • Get moving. Moderate, but not extreme, amounts of exercise help you relax, boost your energy levels, increase your physical awareness and ultimately stimulate your sexuality. Regular exercise has an impact on vasocongestion, raising blood supply to the organs, while walking, stretching, swimming and resistance exercise help raise testoterone levels. • Contact a counselor. Counseling can help reduce the anxiety often associated with male performance. It can also address issues at work or home that may be contributing factors.

    References Comas, M. et al. Bromatological study of maca. (Lepidium meyenii). Alimentaria 1997, 35(286): 85-90. Dini, A. et al. Chemical composition of Lepidium meyenii. Food Chemistry 1994, 49(4):347-9. Kapoor, L.D. Tribulus—indications and use. CRC Handbook of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton: FIAC/FASP; 1990. Physicians’ Desk Reference, 52 ed. Montvale, N.J.:Medical Economics Co.; 1998. Physician’s Desk Reference Medical Dictionary. Baltimore:Williams & Wilkins; 1995.

  • Male Response 45 tab

  • Male REsponse 90ct



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