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3 Benefits to using Himalayan salt Darrell Miller 4/3/19
Brewer's yeast, a potential probiotic? Darrell Miller 9/7/18
Are you stressed or anxious? Try this simple and effective recipe! Darrell Miller 9/9/17
Are You Magnesium Deficient? How to Know & What to Do About It | Natural Cures Darrell Miller 8/11/17
10 Healthy alternatives to toxic processed table salt you can start using today Darrell Miller 7/12/17
Difference between colloidal minerals and ionic minerals. Darrell Miller 12/23/13
Why Would You Want A Time Released Chromium Supplement? Darrell Miller 1/3/13
The Health benefits of P-5-P Darrell Miller 7/20/12
What does GABA Do in the Brain? Darrell Miller 11/2/11
How Does Grapefruit Seed Extract Help Fight Candida Yeast Infections? Darrell Miller 8/8/11
What Makes a Good Joint Complex or Formula? Darrell Miller 6/29/11
Potassium And Osteoporosis - What They Have In Common! Darrell Miller 1/19/11
Fight Free Radical Damage From Toxins With Vitamins And Herbs Darrell Miller 7/28/10
Freez Dried Nettle Leaf Darrell Miller 8/15/09
Sarsparilla Darrell Miller 7/31/09
Natural Sweeteners Vs. Artificial Sweeteners Darrell Miller 4/30/09
GABA Darrell Miller 8/26/08
Cetyl Myristoleate Darrell Miller 5/8/08
Mag Active Darrell Miller 4/23/08
Trace Mineral Concentrate (Ionic Charge) Darrell Miller 1/8/07
How to deal with Stress and Cortisol... Darrell Miller 8/30/06
Oxy Boost – Oxygenate your Life! Darrell Miller 7/6/06
JOINT HEALTH Darrell Miller 12/22/05
AHCC® Fact Sheet - from Now Foods. Darrell Miller 12/8/05
TMG Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/7/05
Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/7/05
Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application Darrell Miller 11/22/05
Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral Darrell Miller 11/20/05
The wellness Revolution - 90% Of Americans Carry Chemical Stew in their Bodies. Darrell Miller 10/1/05
MIGRAINE BLOCKER - Homeopathic Remedy for Headache and Migraine Relief Darrell Miller 9/30/05
PepZin GI™ helps relieve occasional discomfort. Darrell Miller 9/20/05
Curcumin - Turmeric Extract Darrell Miller 8/19/05
CARBON TETRACHLORIDE TESTING AND SILYMARIN Darrell Miller 7/12/05
THE DEADLY DEATHCAP MUSHROOM, SILYMARIN, AND LIVER DAMAGE Darrell Miller 7/12/05
MILK THISTLE (Silybum marianum) Darrell Miller 7/12/05
New* Improved formula - Cholest-Response Lower Cholesterol Darrell Miller 7/8/05
THE HEALTH AND NUTRITIONAL USES OF CHI-TOSAN Darrell Miller 6/25/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Are Standardized Herbs Better? Darrell Miller 6/17/05
Homeopathic Essentials Darrell Miller 6/11/05
The Science of Healthy Hair Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Cross Training Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Cholestrex - Lower Cholesterol with Source Naturals Supplements Darrell Miller 6/1/05
Glycerylphosphorylcholine Darrell Miller 5/24/05



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3 Benefits to using Himalayan salt
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Date: April 03, 2019 10:05 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 3 Benefits to using Himalayan salt





Many enjoy salt, but too much of it can be damaging to your health. Himalayan pink salt, on the other hand, can provide many nutritional benefits that regular table salt cannot. First, Himalayan pink salt contains more than 80 minerals to help keep you healthy, and contains overall less sodium chloride than regular table salt. Himalayan pink salt also goes through less chemical processing, which is why it is tinted pink in color. It also does not contain any food additives, unlike its table salt counterpart. Finally, many claim that Himalayan pink salt contains a saltier and bolder flavor, which is an added bonus for cooking because those who use it consume less of an amount. In sum, if you want to reduce your sodium intake, Himalayan pink salt is a great alternative.

Key Takeaways:

  • Pink Himalayan salt does not undergo as much chemical processing as white table salt.
  • Himalayan salt lacks the food additives that are present in regular table salt, such as ferrocyanide.
  • Some people find that Himalayan salt has a more pronounced salty taste than regular table salt.

"If you want to cut down on your sodium intake, you might want to consider switching over to Himalayan pink salt as a healthier natural salt alternative for your body’s salt needs."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-02-05-3-benefits-to-using-himalayan-salt.html

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Brewer's yeast, a potential probiotic?
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Date: September 07, 2018 10:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Brewer's yeast, a potential probiotic?





Brewer's yeast, a potential probiotic?

Probiotic is current trend amongst consumers and are increasingly popular for their health benefits.brewers yeast is an essential commodity for making bread and beer.A study reveals brewers yeast tolerant to various temperatures high concentration of bile salt and sodium chloride gastric juice, intestinal environment, alpha-amylase, trypsin, and lysozyme,it produces organic acids and exhibits resistance against drugs.brewers yeast can absorb cholestrol and can also produce killer toxins and also demonstrated better antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria than gram-positive.brewers yeast also produces enzymes that enhance nutrient utilisation in the gut.

Key Takeaways:

  • A study concluded that brewer’s yeast can be considered a probiotic of which yoghurt and kimchi are one.
  • Brewer’s yeast can produce organic acids, killer toxins and absorb cholesterol. It has the ability to produce enzymes such as amylase for gut nutrient utilization.
  • Some of the health benefits of brewer’s yeast which is used in beer and bread are that it improves blood sugar and fights against cancer.

"Ingestion of brewer’s yeast was also considered safe as it did not cause any toxic side effects based on the results of toxicity tests."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-08-11-brewers-yeast-a-potential-probiotic.html

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Are you stressed or anxious? Try this simple and effective recipe!
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Date: September 09, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Are you stressed or anxious? Try this simple and effective recipe!





This video speaks about Magnesium Chloride and how it is used to treat bone disease and osteoporosis. If someone is lacking magnesium Chloride, there are many diseases that a person could encounter or affected by. Magnesium Chloride is also able to balance the body's chemicals and nerves. A magnesium Chloride recipe is discussed, which helps to decrease anxiety. The instructions make it easy for anyone to make. The recipe calls for lemon, water, ice, honey and 10 grams of magnesium Chloride.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NByqb8hzvM&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • This compound, which is a combination of magnesium and Chloride, can direct the calcium that collects in different regions of the body to the bones, specifically.
  • By directing accumulations of calcium away from the muscles, the muscles are able to better relax and the calcium is put to good use in the skeletal structure.
  • Because of Magnesium Chloride's ability to navigate calcium in the body, it is often used to treat bone diseases, such as arthritis and osteoporosis.

"Recently, some studies have pointed out that the regular consumption of Magnesium Chloride lessens the risk of rectal cancer."

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Are You Magnesium Deficient? How to Know & What to Do About It | Natural Cures
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Date: August 11, 2017 05:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Are You Magnesium Deficient? How to Know & What to Do About It | Natural Cures





You may have magnesium deficiency if you are stressed or having difficulty sleeping. You can also feel muscle stiffness and stress as a result of magnesium deficiency. Magnesium performs many bodily functions including relaxing muscles in the body. Lack of magnesium can lead to many troubling problems including irritability, insomnia and migraine to name just a few. If you feel you are lacking in magnesium the best way to combat the deficiency is to take supplements. You can also make diet changes, including eating foods rich in magnesium such as corn, rice, dates, kale or tofu, among others. Magensium glycenate, magnesium Chloride or magnesium sulfate are some of the more effective magnesium supplements. Always speak with your doctor before taking supplements.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eze7ria2Gy0&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • The proper dosage of magnesium for an adult female is between 310mg and 320mg daily.
  • When a person is suffering from a Magnesium deficiency they might be more irritable than normal, have a higher level of anxiety, or have difficulty staying asleep.
  • For people who do not want to take a supplement but instead want to reduce losing the magnesium their body natural produces, they can reduce their salt sugar and coffee intake.

"Before you ask your doctor for something to help you sleep, try adding magnesium to your diet."

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10 Healthy alternatives to toxic processed table salt you can start using today
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Date: July 12, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 10 Healthy alternatives to toxic processed table salt you can start using today





Salt is generally not good for your body. White table salt especially is not good for you and has no health benefits. If you're going to use a salt try and go for a natural version. Pink salts or Sea salts are really great and even help keep your body's pH level good. The iodized table salt has a ton of chemicals in it and it's also bleached. The other natural salts have great benefits.

Key Takeaways:

  • It is no secret that while commercial table salts help flavor dishes, they are extremely detrimental to the body’s overall health
  • Commercial table salts are 99 percent sodium chloride, are bleached during the production process and may contain harmful substances such as stabilizers that make them practically toxic in nature.
  • Commercial table salts are also found to promote acid formation, which in turn may pose a significant threat to the body’s overall well being

"Unlike commercial salts, naturally extracted salts like sea salts promote alkaline formation and help maintain a balanced body pH."

Read more: http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-07-09-8-healthy-alternatives-to-your-toxic-table-salt-you-can-start-using-today.html

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Difference between colloidal minerals and ionic minerals.
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Date: December 23, 2013 02:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Difference between colloidal minerals and ionic minerals.

Minerals are generally divided into two forms.

Colloids Mineral

Colloids are one form of minerals, where minerals are in stable form. In colloidal form, minerals are evenly distributed in the medium. Minerals in this form will remain in large and organized pattern, and thereby remain in suspension without settling down. These types of minerals are not directly absorbed by the body since they don’t have that electric charge like other minerals. The size of these minerals is also one of the reasons for this. So we can define colloids as, it is a substance, which will not diffuse easily when it is suspended in a liquid medium. Though the colloidal minerals are more dispersed in the body, the absorption is not influenced by that. In order to absorb colloidal minerals, body needs to break down these minerals into smaller units.

Ionic Mineral

On the other hand, ionic minerals can be easily absorbed through the human cell membranes. The main reason for this is, ionic minerals are charged and so the body needs to apply less amount of energy to get them absorbed. The colloidal minerals need to break down into smaller units to attain electric charge and thereby to get absorbed. The electric charge of ionic minerals helps them to travel from a region of higher concentration to a region of lower concentration. Atoms or group of atoms together forms the ionic minerals. They have got charge either positive or negative. During the time of absorption, the body charges the ions and makes absorption easier. Ionic minerals are more easily absorbed by the body than the colloidal minerals, since they have to go through all those process. Even after the different steps of absorption of colloidal minerals, all of them are not utilized by the body. Sodium Chloride and Potassium Chloride are 2 examples for ionic minerals.

References:

  1. //www.transformyourhealth.com/webnewsletters/dec06/mineralsvstraceminerals.htm
  2. //goaskalice.columbia.edu/whats-difference-between-ionic-and-colloidal-minerals

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Why Would You Want A Time Released Chromium Supplement?
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Date: January 03, 2013 04:34 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Why Would You Want A Time Released Chromium Supplement?

Chromium is an important trace mineral for carbohydrates and fats processing by the human body. With the recent eating habits of refined foods, it's generally naturally deficient to many people. It's recommended to consume at least 50 micrograms of it each day. Similarly, the eating habits of today expose majority of people to diabetes. Chromium plays a major role in helping the body cells respond to insulin.

In addition, a sufficient level of the mineral availability to the body leads to lower insulin necessity. On the other hand, its deficiency in the body has been associated with diabetes. It helps prevent diabetes by aiding insulin in glucose metabolism as well as preventing insulin resistance for victims already using insulin shots. It's generally low in the blood but it plays a major role of enhancing insulin efficiency thereby helps control blood sugar levels.

Food Sources:

You can get chromium from foods like broccoli, green beans, grape juice, potatoes, bananas, beef, orange juice and apples. There are also supplements that come in various forms and strengths. For instance, there are chromium picolinate, chromium Chloride, chromium polynicotinate, chromium GTF and many others. These supplements differ in their absorption rates but have been proven in several studies to lower blood sugar as well as cholesterol. Some supplements are also safe to take alongside other medications. However, such a decision should always be taken with the consent of a medical doctor.

Victims of type 2 diabetes have usually been found to have low levels of chromium in their bodies. Due to this reason, supplements have greatly assisted such individuals tackle diabetes. Similarly, women suffering from gestational diabetes have had their blood sugar levels drop after using chromium picolinate. The dosage to use varies but many doctors prescribe 1000 mcg every day for victims already suffering from diabetes. Vitamin C has been found to hinder the uptake of chromium. It's, therefore, essential to watch out what you are consuming if you will be taking the supplements.

Sustained release chromium will help keep blood levels high with this important mineral and help one manage their blood sugar better.

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The Health benefits of P-5-P
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Date: July 20, 2012 07:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Health benefits of P-5-P

P-5-P or Pyridoxal-5-phosphate

P-5-P or the most commonly called Pyridoxal-5-phosphate is known to be the most active form of the Vitamin B6. This is known to be converted from organic compounds pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine. The Vitamin P-5-P is a coenzyme which support several other enzymes in the body which play a important role in biosynthesis. This also makes optimum use of the vitamin B6 by improving the body metabolism and many other biological process as well. The vitamin B6 traditionally comes in the form of pyridoxine hydroChloride which the body finds difficult to synthesize in its existing state. Hence, this pyridoxine hydroChloride is processed and is formed as Pyridoxal-5-phosphate to help the body to use the vitamin B6 effectively.

There are a lot of benefits of the vitamin P-5-P

Let us have a look at some of them.

Pyridoxal-5-phosphate uses the information from the genes ad helps to produce proteins.P-5-P is also helpful in the formation of hemoglobin, histamine and neurotransmitters and is also helpful in the metabolism of amino acids, fats and glucose.Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also helps in the conversion of dopa which is a useful substance used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Dopa is converted to dopamine which is a neurotransmitter which is produced in the brain and is released by the hypothalamus.

Food Source

The P5P is also helpful in the utilization of the food sources for the formation of energy and also helps in the easy release of glycogen which is the stored energy.P5P also converts glutamate into GABA which is gamma amino butyric acid which is again a neurotransmitter which is known to be found in the mammals. This is found in their central nervous system.The Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also helpful in the process of decarboxylation which is the conversion of histidine to histamine.

This also converts SAM-e to propylamine which is known to be a precursor of polyamines.The Vitamin P5P is also responsible to lower the homocystenie levels which are caused by the intake of high amounts of methionine.The Vitamin Pyridoxal-5-phosphate helps in the treatment of irregular heartbeat , which is a condition termed as arrhythmia.This plays a important role in the treatment of myocardial infections. This prevents the blood platelets from sticking to each other which usually causes blood clots.The enzymes produced by the Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also helps in the formation of different kinds of amino acid reactions which keeps the carbon ions stable. This process is very important in the metabolism of the cells.The P5P also helps in the metabolism of the amino acids.

Here it helps in converting methionine to cysteine and also converts tryptophan to niacin.Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also plays a vital role in the formation of glucose. This process is known as gluconeogenesis.This also acts a important co-enzyme in the process of glycogenolysis which happens in the liver and muscles and this is known to be a reaction which occurs due to presence of glycogen.The P5P also helps in the formation of antibodies and also assists in the process of hemoglobin synthesis as well.

To keep it simpler, the vitamin P5P performs many functions which is very beneficial to the whole human body. The P5P deficiency can also happen in many individuals and even such symptoms are hard to identify. Any person suffering from the P5P deficiency will have symptoms like muscle weakness, irritability or depression. Consulting a physician and taking necessary supplements will help to overcome the P5P deficiency.

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What does GABA Do in the Brain?
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Date: November 02, 2011 07:41 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What does GABA Do in the Brain?

GABA

GABA or Gamma Amino Butyric Acid is a neurotransmitter of the brain. It is considered to be the main inhibitory brain chemical among mammals. In ordinary terms, it significantly regulates the firing of impulses by the neurons. This chemical is naturally produced by the brain and generally acts as a balancer together with other neurotransmitters. This neurotransmitter has a key role in the regulation of nerve excitability all throughout the nervous system. It effectively maintains the equilibrium of the body and the brain in excitation status. Chemically speaking, GABA is classified as an amino acid. However, GABA is not a building block of protein like the other amino acids. This is the reason why in the medical field, GABA is rarely considered as an amino acid.

Moreover, GABA is the prime brain chemical responsible for the regulation of muscle tone among humans. In a disorder called Spastic Diplegia, the absorption of GABA into the muscles is weakened because of damage nervous tissues and cells. This would significantly lead to hypertonic muscles in which the muscles will experience spasms and can not anymore recognize and process the neurotransmitter GABA. On the other hand, GABA in insects acts as both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter.

The Brain

As mentioned above, GABA is an inhibitory neurochemical. It functions at the inhibitory synapses of the brain by attaching to receptor sites in the plasma membrane of both pre – and post – synaptic nerves. Once GABA has bind with the receptor sites, it will cause the ion channels to open and permit either the entry of Chloride ion which has a negative charge or exit of potassium ion which has a positive charge. Potassium is the main electrolyte inside the cell. This opening of ion channels will then cause the cell to be either hyperpolarized or re – polarized.

During brain development, GABA also plays a significant role. It significantly controls the proliferation of brain progenitor cells and development of synapses as well as the differentiation and maturation of neurites. Furthermore, GABA is also responsible for the growth and development of embryonic and nerve stem cells. It also activates GABA receptors which lead to the halting of cell cycling in the S – phase. As a result, this will limit the growth of cell thus preventing abnormal growth and even malignancies.

If GABA is in inadequate level, muscle tone is disturbed making it always tensed and the mind will keep on working and working because there is no brain chemical to stop it. Therefore, GABA must be importantly maintained within normal limits.

GABA is naturally produced by nerve cells. However, GABA supplement is now available so that adequate amount of such brain chemical will be administered to the body as needed. GABA supplements can enhance the sleep onset and quality. It can also provide a relaxing feeling and reduce stress and muscle over – activity. Other theories also state that it can regulate mood and behavior thus promoting the total well – being of the person. Ongoing studies are being conducted to show more evidence on GABA’s effect with Human Growth Hormones.

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How Does Grapefruit Seed Extract Help Fight Candida Yeast Infections?
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Date: August 08, 2011 06:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Does Grapefruit Seed Extract Help Fight Candida Yeast Infections?

Grapefruit seed extract is processed from the seeds, pulp, and vesicles of the sour citrus fruit known as grapefruit. Nutrition experts have attributed several medicinal properties to the plant. In addition, practitioners of herbal medicine make use of the seeds and membranes of the fruit in health tonics. It has long been linked to the treatment of earache, sore throat, digestive problems, and yeast infections.

Citrus x paradisi is a hybrid species of pomelo and orange. Its fruits are much larger than oranges but smaller than pomelos, growing up to 15 centimeters in diameter on average. It is widely known as a naturally occurring hybrid, like sweet orange. The juice of popular varieties of the fruit comes in colors red and pink in respect to its ripeness. Some cultivars are sweet, but most are sour at the same time.

Many organic compounds isolated from grapefruit have long been observed to show pharmacological activity. For one, consumptions of the fruit itself have been reported to interact with numerous drugs. It either enhances the potency of drugs or inhibits their pharmacological activities. Researchers have enumerated a long list of drugs whose bioavailability increase in the presence of grapefruit extracts.

Proponents of grapefruit seed extract believe that it possesses antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. They began promoting its medicinal uses at the turn of the 20th century. At that time, physicians took note of the many benefits tied to grapefruit in the earlier century. Furthermore, they produced the first extracts from the seeds and white membranes of the fruit mixed with glycerin.

Grapefruit seed extract is an all natural remedy for Candidiasis. As its name suggests, Candida yeast infections are caused by different species of fungi that belong to the genus Candida. These fungi are part of the normal flora of the human body that comprises bacteria and other microorganism. While they are not harmful in general, they are capable of producing harm and spurring inflammation.

Oral thrush is one form of Candidiasis that infects mucus membranes located in the mouth cavity. Populations of yeast build up in the surface of the mouth and bring on inflammatory responses. The infection often appears as cream-colored deposits or slightly raised red patches. Candidiasis of the skin, sex organs, and other parts of the body look similar as they are all inflammatory in nature.

The effectiveness of grapefruit seed extract in the treatment of Candidiasis yeast infections has been compared to conventional medications. Its use is supported by anecdotal evidence that is largely positive. While the results of studies are conflicting at best, researchers have compared the extract to benzethonium Chloride, a chemical compound that displays strong antibacterial and antifungal activity.

Grapefruit seed extract is a viable remedy for Candidiasis yeast infections. In fact, it may be used as a therapeutic prophylactic for infections caused not only by fungi but also viruses and bacteria. Due to its putative effect, it is added as an active ingredient to many personal care products.

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What Makes a Good Joint Complex or Formula?
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Date: June 29, 2011 11:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Makes a Good Joint Complex or Formula?

Glucosamine/Chondroitin/MSM

Joint pain is a common medical condition that afflicts billions of people worldwide. It is brought on by many different factors, though most of the cases have been tied to arthritis. The joints are especially susceptible to inflammation in old age partly due to the fact that cartilage health becomes impaired as we age. The good news is that certain organic compounds replenish the cartilage content of joints.

Medications and remedies formulated to alleviate joint pain have been extensively studied in the past few decades. Analgesics remain the mainstay of treatment for arthritis to this day, but alternative medicine has also made advances. Proponents of nutritional supplements believe that a good joint formula does not only provide relief from pain but also supplies the proteins necessary for joint health.

Glucosamine

Joint cartilage comprises a group of complex carbohydrates called polysaccharides or oligosaccharides that are attached to proteins. In a process called glycosylation, enzymes add long unbranched chains of carbohydrates to core proteins and form proteoglycans, which nourish the extracellular matrix found in cartilages. In the case of osteoarthritis, the proteoglycan content of joints dwindle with age.

Glucosamine is a precursor to polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. In particular, it is utilized by enzymes to form glycosaminoglycans, which are in turn added to proteoglycans. As a treatment for joint pain, it comes in the form of glucosamine sulfate and glucosamine hydroChloride. It is one of the most promising of all complementary therapies for arthritis as studies have reported positive results.

Chondroitin

Therapeutic remedies that contain glucosamine often come with chondroitin. The sulfated form of chondroitin is a major constituent of proteoglycans, and as such it is generally found in large amounts in joint cartilage in humans. For decades, chondroitin has been used as a therapeutic remedy for arthritis in conjunction with glucosamine as they are believed to enhance the efficacy of each other.

Proponents believe that chondroitin and glucosamine supply the body with healthy quantities of glycosaminoglycans for use by enzymes in the synthesis of proteoglycans. There is consensus in the scientific community that its long term use for the sole purpose of treating osteoarthritis is safe. In addition, recent studies and clinical trials in the past few years have been very encouraging.

MSM

Methylsulfonylmethane, often abbreviated as MSM, is a compound listen as an ingredient in joint formulas. Nutraceutical experts believe that the best joint formula currently available contains all three: glucosamine, chondroitin, and methylsulfonylmethane. While glucosamine and chondroitin provides nutrition for cartilage tissue, MSM counteracts inflammatory mediators that cause joint pain.

Alternative remedies have been the subject of most studies on arthritis in recent years. While analgesics remain commonly used, dietary supplements are becoming increasingly popular among people suffering from joint pain. Glucosamine, chondroitin, and MSM are the most studied of all supplements formulated for joint pain, the reason why health care providers recommend them first.

Grab yourself a joint formula complex and feel the difference!

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Potassium And Osteoporosis - What They Have In Common!
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Date: January 19, 2011 01:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Potassium And Osteoporosis - What They Have In Common!

Potassium is a mineral, in the same column of the Periodic Table as sodium that it resembles. The various solutions of your body are very carefully controlled in the concentration of the electrolytes it contains, and potassium helps to maintain the electrolytic balance in your body cells. NOW - POTASSIUM GLUCONATE 99mg  100 TABS 1

To take an example, menopausal women can tend to secrete calcium and end up suffering osteoporosis, as can older people that are not careful about their diet. That is because most people tend to use too much salt in their diet - salt is sodium Chloride, and an excess of sodium over its ideal proportion to potassium can cause loss of certain electrolytes, of which calcium is one.

Simply by increasing the amount of potassium in your diet, you can prevent or even reverse this trend. Potassium and magnesium both help calcium to be incorporated into your bone structure. Vitamin D also helps, but sodium tends to force calcium out. So by maintaining a good level of potassium in your diet you can help to prevent this condition that leads to many problems as you age.

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Fight Free Radical Damage From Toxins With Vitamins And Herbs
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Date: July 28, 2010 11:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fight Free Radical Damage From Toxins With Vitamins And Herbs

There are many things that destroy the immune system. Each day we are bombarded with them in many forms. The following are some of the most common ones that are encountered.

Agene, also known as Nitrogen TriChloride, is used to bleach flour and give it a white appearance. Unfortunately, it can cause epileptic-like fits along with failure of muscle coordination. Excessive use of alcohol also severely impairs the immune system. It increases susceptibility to infection and weakens the central nervous system. Alcohol promotes chronic lung disease, malignancies of the neck and head, intestinal problems, hypoglycemia, diabetes, liver disease, and a whole variety of other problems. B vitamins, folic acid, niacin, vitamin E, magnesium, zinc, and protein are depleted by alcohol. All of these nutrients play a huge role in immune health. Aspartame breaks down in the digestive tract into a toxic material known as methanol. In order to prevent methanol from metabolizing into formaldehyde, a poison, a person needs to take another poison, ethanol.

Glutamic acid is a substance that is found in monosodium glutamate, a flavor enhancer. It affects the central nervous system and can trigger depression, gloomy fantasies, and rage for as long as two weeks following the ingestion of monosodium glutamate. High-diet fat intake increases the levels of bile acids in the colon. This breaks down into deoxycholic and lithocholic acids, both of which are cancer-causing elements. This can cause cancer of both the colon and the rectum. A diet that is high in animal protein and fat can cause cancer of the pancreas, breast, gallbladder, ovaries, uterus, prostate, and leukemia. Junk food such as sweets, white flour, and white sugar products, put a double amount of stress on the body. When too much junk food is eaten, the appetite for good, wholesome food is dulled.

Caffeine decreases immunity in the body, with fibrocystic breast disease being connected with the consumption of foods that contain caffeine. It is often caused by the chemicals methylxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine, which are found in coffee, black tea, cola drinks, chocolate, and other soft drinks. These elements act on hormones that cause breast tissue to develop fibrocystic lumps. Caffeine takes away the body’s own use of iron and inositol, and is often suspected of causing cancer in the pancreas.

Food dyes and flavorings are the culprits in behavioral problems that occur in children and adults, with some of these problems being learning disabilities and hyperactivity. Sodium nitrate is a preservative that is often found in cured meats like hot dogs, bologna, and ham. It has the potential to produce permanent epileptic changes in brain activity and damage the central nervous system.

High protein diets can deplete calcium in the body, especially when the source of protein is an animal product. There are concentrated doses of hormones and antibiotics that are found in beef which suppress the immune system and promote tumor growth. Poly-unsaturated fats undergo a process that produces rancidity in oils. This process releases dangerous free radicals, which eventually lead to cancer.

Heavy metals like lead and mercury can cause serious damage to the nervous system, with even small amounts being considered toxic. Lastly, the wide use of vaccinations and antibiotics is considered to be one of the main causes of immune system disorders.

Our bodies are under constant attack by our toxic environment. Fortunately, with regular vitamin and herb use, one can help the body restore its immune system to proper function so we can live a happier healthier life.

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Freez Dried Nettle Leaf
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Date: August 15, 2009 02:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Freez Dried Nettle Leaf

The nettle plant is native to Europe and can be found throughout the United States and into Canada. This herb was cultivated in Scotland for use in making a durable cloth. The nettle plant is so rich in chlorophyll that it was used by the English to make a green dye for camouflage paint. This camouflage paint was used during World War II.

Nettle is one of the most useful of all plants. It contains alkaloids that neutralize uric acid. By decreasing uric acid, one can help to reduce symptoms of conditions like gout and rheumatism. Additionally, the astringent activity of nettle helps to decrease bleeding. The nettle plant is rich in iron, which is extremely vital to good circulation. It helps to reduce high blood pressure. Tannins that are found in the nettle root have been used as part of an astringent enema. This is used to shrink hemorrhoids and reduce excess menstrual flow. This herb became popular because of its use in irritating the skin of an inflamed area and increasing the flow of blood to reduce inflammation. The stinging action of nettle can be attributed to the histamine reaction that is caused by the formic acid in the hairs. Nettle has a reputation for use in cases of asthma and other respiratory conditions.

The use of nettle root extract was recommended by German physicians for treating urinary retention that is caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy. This recommendation was based upon evidence from clinical studies. Additional studies have determined that nettle root can increase the excretion of Chlorides and urea from the urine. The diuretic activity produced by nettle root ahs been confirmed in animal studies. The diuretic properties can be attributed to the high potassium content. However, this has not been verified. A study that was conducted at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon found evidence of nettle for treating hay fever. In this study, freeze-dried capsules of 300 mg were used. The results showed significant relief from hay fever symptoms in the participants.

The leaves and roots of the nettle plant are used to provide alterative, antiseptic, astringent, blood purifier, diuretic, expectorant, galactagogue, hemostatic, and nutritive properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, chlorophyll, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, potassium, protein, silicon, sodium, sulfur, vitamins A, C, D, E, F, and P, and zinc. Primarily, nettle is extremely beneficial in dealing with external and internal bleeding, blood impurities, bronchitis, high blood pressure, rheumatism, and diarrhea. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating anemia, asthma, poor circulation, eczema, hay fever, hemorrhoids, hives, inflamed kidneys, excess menstruation, mouth sores, nosebleeds, skin disorders, and vaginitis.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by nettle, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Nettle is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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Sarsparilla
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Date: July 31, 2009 12:03 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sarsparilla

Sarsaparilla can be found natively growing in the Pacific regions of Mexico, along the coast to Peru. The root is commonly used to make root beer. The sarsaparilla plant is mostly a find. It can primarily be found in Mexico, Central America and South America. The root of the plant is the most valued portion. It has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries, much like ginseng or licorice root. Sarsaparilla root is very bitter. Because of this, it was a common practice for pharmacists to distill the useful chemicals from this herb and mix them with sugar water. From this, a very popular beverage called sarsaparilla was born. This was years before other chemists would invent other medicinal drinks like the original Pepsi and 7-Up.

The sarsaparilla plant was most definitely used as a medicinal tonic, but it was often served as a sweetened beverage. Some formulas substituted sarsaparilla root with a combination of birch oil and sassafras, which is a treat that is found in the western United States. Some believe that the informal name of the drink, sasparilla, indicates the use of sassafras extract, while others say the name is a corruption of the original sarsaparilla. Unfortunately, the modern beverage is closer to a birch oil/sassafras mixture than the more bitter sarsaparilla extract. The roots of the sarsaparilla plant can be purchased in certain grocery or health food stores. The beverage called sarsaparilla is a little more difficult to find. Smaller bottling companies may produce a version for local consumption, but that national interest in root beer, sarsaparilla’s cousin, has made it much harder to come by.

Often, sarsaparilla is used in glandular balance formulas. This is because components in sarsaparilla help with the production of testosterone and progesterone. The herb also stimulates the metabolism, aids digestion, and improves the appetite. It has been used to help with gas and edema, along with other related conditions. Additionally, studies have shown that this herb contains diuretic activity and also increased the elimination of Chlorides and uric acid. Sarsaparilla is beneficial for many skin ailments. Among these are psoriasis, eczema, and leprosy. This has been found to be true in various studies. The herb also works as an anti-inflammatory by increasing circulation to rheumatic joints. It also helps to relieve arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. This herb also stimulates breathing when congestion occurs. It even helps to purify the blood.

The root of the sarsaparilla plant are used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, aromatic, blood purifier, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, febrifuge, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are copper, iodine, iron, manganese, silicon, sodium, vitamins A, B-complex, and C, and zinc. Primarily, sarsaparilla is extremely beneficial in treating joint aches and pains, arthritis, blood impurities, eczema, gas, glandular problems, hormone imbalance, inflammation, psoriasis, skin diseases, and syphilis.

Additionally, the herb is very helpful in dealing with age spots, appetite loss, cods, congestion, edema, sore eyes, fevers, gout, impotence, leprosy, menopausal symptoms, metabolism disorders, skin parasites, chronic rheumatism, ringworms, primary tuberculosis, and sores. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen to prevent prescription drug interaction. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by sarsaparilla, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

Sarsaparilla root is available in capsule and tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. It is recommended that you look for name brands like Solaray, Natures Way, and Natures Plus to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

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Natural Sweeteners Vs. Artificial Sweeteners
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Date: April 30, 2009 10:16 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Sweeteners Vs. Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners are food additives intended to replace the sweetness of sugar without the calorie intake. There are also natural sweeteners that can replace sugar, so which should you choose? Natural sweeteners such as sugar, honey and grape juice are well known, although there are also the less well known, but much more effective, sucanat and stevia.

Sucanat is dried unrefined cane sugar, and unlike refined sugar retains the molasses. Stevia, on the other hand, is a shrub, native to Paraguay, the leaf of which contains a non-sucrose sweetener, 300 times the sweetness of sugar, and which is not absorbed by the body. It is a sweetener pure and simple, with no proven health issues. It is also Japan's most popular sugar substitute.

Artificial sweeteners have been known for many years, the first and best known being benzoic sulfanide, known to you as saccharin. The health risks of saccharin have been the subject of debate for over 100 years and have yet to be resolved. Studies had shown it to cause cancer in rats, and it was placed on a list of known or suspected carcinogens.

It has been banned for use in the USA, but that was lifted by the FDA in 1991, and in 2000 saccharin has no longer required a health warning label. The issue appears to have been resolved by rats metabolizing saccharin in a way not possible in humans. However, many are still suspicious of it, and if you don't trust a food additive then do not voluntarily consume it.

The top two artificial sweeteners in the USA are sucralose and aspartame. Sucralose, discovered in the UK in 1976, is the less emotive of the two, and is chemically the chlorocarbon trichlorogalactosucrose, produced by chlorination of sucrose and 600 times as sweet. It should be stressed that a chlorocarbon is totally different to a chlorinated hydrocarbon. It is generally considered safe to use, although it is very slow rate of degradation in waste water has raised concerns that concentrations could increase with increasing popularity of the sweetener.

According to' Sweet Deception', the book states sucralose to be discovered during the search for an insecticide, and is produced when sugar is treated with acetic anhydride, hydrogen Chloride and trityl Chloride among others in the presence of toluene, MIBK and dimethyl formamide among other solvents. Although marketed as coming from a natural source, it is anything but natural.

Aspartame was developed by G.D. Searle, and its approval by the FDA has been a matter of concern for many years. Promoted by Donald Rumsfeld, then CEO of Searle, he "called in his markers" to have the substance approved, which was not one of the more glorious moments in America's history.

It is used in over 6,000 products, most household names, yet was based on "inconclusive and incompetent science" according to detractors. In 1981, on the day of his inauguration, Ronald Regan suspended the powers of the FDA on aspartame, and then a month later appointed a new FDA head, Arthur Hayes, who immediately licensed the substance. Donald Rumsfeld was on President Regan's team.

There is a strong body of evidence that aspartame is toxic to humans, although the official evidence has discredit such studies. Recent evidence that linked aspartame to cancer has been stated as irrelevant to humans. In spite of the concerns, the substance has been approved, not only in the USA but also by the European Union. This might call into question the relevance of studies to humans, but many still believe that commercial considerations are behind these decisions.

In fact, an extensive study carried out by the Italian European Ramazzini Foundation, showed that aspartame can cause a significant increase in cancers and leukemias in rats at well below the doses allowed by the EU or the US. This substance required further study by bodies with no vested interest in the outcome.

Those that believe so point to the stevia situation. This natural sweetener is banned for use as a food additive in the EU, and cannot be sold as sweetener due to the FDA not recognizing it as such. It has also been banned in Hong Kong, even though it is the sweetener of choice in Japan, with no apparent side-effects becoming endemic in that country. The USA might not approve stevia as a sweetener, but it is considering lifting its ban on cyclamate.

Cyclamate was banned by the FDA due to tests on rats indicating a possibly carcinogenic effect, but no more positive than those on aspartame. Cyclamate is permitted in Canada, where saccharin is not, and also in the UK, but not throughout the EU.

It is obvious, then, looking at the various claims and counter-claims, and the conflicting legislation between civilized countries, that the artificial sweetener industry is wrought with uncertainty. In the past, it is almost certain that commercial considerations have come before the health of the nation, and that does not engender confidence.

In fact, the only sane approach to take at this time would be to avoid artificial sweeteners altogether, and stay natural. That is not to claim that natural products are safe to eat - far from it! Many of the most virulent poisons are natural, but the well-used natural sweeteners appear to be safer at this time than any of those artificially manufactured.

There might be objections to this where diabetes is concerned, and Canada, while banning saccharin for normal use, still allows it for use by diabetics. This is the one of the two major bodies that promotes the use of artificial sweeteners: the diabetic lobby and the weight loss lobby.

It is difficult to question the obesity and weight problem that America has while at the same time arguing against the use of artificial sweeteners. However, don't forget that stevia is widely used in Japan with no reported health problems, and stevia is a natural sweetener that is permitted for use as a food additive, and that is not absorbed by the body.

However, there is also a recent 2005 study that has indicated that diet drinks containing artificial sweeteners might fool your body into believing that the sweet taste is promising energy, and when it doesn't materialize, you feel hungry and eat more. This has been supported by animal studies.

These have shown convincingly that the sensation of sweetness induces the production of insulin with resulting hypoglycemia because there is no actual increase in blood sugar. This induces increased food intake. This has been proved with rats, and also proved was the fact that the natural response of eating less at the next meal, after sugary food, was gradually diminished in animals fed non-calorific sweeteners.

The choice is yours, but it would seem advisable to stick to natural sweeteners for the time being, at least until the studies carried out are in concurrence as opposed to offering conflicting results depending upon who is doing the testing.



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GABA
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Date: August 26, 2008 04:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: GABA

GABA is gama amino butyric acid, and is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is essential for the proper function of your brain and the central nervous system, and has the effect of reducing excessive brain activity and promoting a state of calm.

For many people, the rush of daily life, with its problems, worries and external stimuli, can over-stimulate the brain to the extent that it can all seem too much for them. They feel anxious and overwhelmed, and wish that they could just go into a quiet corner to get away from it all. Most people have felt like that at some time, but the demands of life do not allow them that luxury. They just have to bear it and get on with life.

That is where GABA can come in. It can be used to bring your nervous system back to base, and make you feel more relaxed, calmer and more able to meet these challenges that life often throws at you. When you feel that you just can’t relax or concentrate on what you are doing, GABA can help you. If you look around you and everybody else seems OK, without apparently feeling the stress and irritability that you feel, and then perhaps your problem is due to a GABA deficiency. GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in your brain, and a deficiency would certainly give you the symptoms that you are feeling. Let me explain why.

As your brain becomes excited, it can run out of control and needs some form of modification or inhibition to keep it acting as normal. Without this you would become increasingly more restless and irritable, and ultimately have seizures. GABA is not only the main inhibitor in your brain, but also helps in the production of endorphins that provide you with a sense of well being. That sense of calm you feel when endorphins are produced, for example during exercise or sexual intercourse, is commonly referred to as the ‘endorphin effect’.

GABA is at its highest concentration in specific areas of the brain, including the hypothalamus, the hippocampus and the central brain area, and is present in up to 40% of all synapses, the small gaps between neurons across which brain cells can communicate with each other.

It is produced during the Krebs or Citric Acid Cycle that is responsible for cell respiration or the production of energy from carbohydrates. It is synthesized from alpha-keto glutarate, which is produced just before the Succinyl Co-A stage of the Krebs Cycle in the brain. Vitamin B6 in involved in its metabolism, and a Vitamin B6 deficiency can lead to a deficiency in GABA that might result in seizures.

Basically GABA works by inhibiting the firing of neurons in your brain, and thus reducing general brain activity. The GABA receptor allows more Chloride ion to enter the brain cell, thus helping to maintain the electrical charge within the cells. Bezodiazepines (e.g. diazepam) work by increasing the effectiveness of GABA in opening the Chloride ion cells to allow more Chloride ion to enter the neurons, and caffeine does the opposite, and inhibits this property of GABA. Thus diazepam works as a minor tranquilizer and caffeine as a stimulant.

Alcohol has a similar effect to the benzodiazepines, increasing the release of Chloride into the neurons, and is the major way in which alcohol affects the brain. In fact, tolerance to drugs and withdrawal symptoms can be explained by the receptors adapting to the drug. They may increase in number, which means that more of the drug is needed to work on them, and they can become hypoactive in the event of the drug being withdrawn, that enhances the symptoms that the drug was intended to treat.

So basically, that is the way that GABA works. In simple terms it increases the flow of Chloride electrolyte to the brain, and in so doing affects our mood. This effect is enhanced by prescription drugs such as Valium and Ativan, which are used by those that suffer the effects of a GABA deficiency. However, these drugs have side effects, not the least of which is dependency due to the GABA receptors becoming modified to suit the drug. There is a more natural way to overcome many stress problems and symptoms of mood swings.

Knowing what causes these symptoms, it makes sense to eat foods that stimulate the creation of neurotransmitters to replace those that are deficient. Since GABA is produced in the Krebs Cycle and complex carbohydrates produce glutamine that is an important part of that Cycle, and is also the precursor to GABA, then the consumption of such foods should in theory produce more GABA. In this case the theory works, and you should eat foods rich in complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, brown rice and oats as part of your diet.

Other foods that are high in glutamine or its precursors, glutamic acid and glutamate, include citrus fruits, beef liver, broccoli, halibut and lentils. A useful supplement to take is L-theanine, an amino acid found in green tea, and available in supplement form. L-theanine can calm your nerves while maintaining clarity of thought. In other words it calms you down, but doesn’t make you drowsy and allows you to enjoy your day with anxiety.

Your doctor can determine whether or not you have a neurotransmitter deficiency through a simple urine test, and might also test your saliva for hormone content. A GABA supplement might be indicated, and if so it other beneficial effects on your body other than its effect on your brain cells.

It improves your sleep cycles and promotes vivid dreaming, and can also have a positive effect on your blood pressure. It is also an effective pain killer, and can provide relief from such conditions as back pain and arthritis. Its stimulating effect on the anterior pituitary gland to secrete Human Growth Hormone might also be regarded as a benefit by many. Increasing the level of HGH in your blood can lead to fat loss and improved anabolic activity (increase in muscle tissue). This can be of benefit to older people whose level of HGH secretion has dropped off, and who find it more difficult to lose fat.

GABA is a substance that has many known benefits and no known side effects other than a slight tingling and increase in heart rate when the supplement is first used. It has a definite benefit for people to whom the world seems too hectic and overwhelming.



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Cetyl Myristoleate
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Date: May 08, 2008 03:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cetyl Myristoleate

Cetyl myristoleate is a fatty acid ester used largely as a dietary supplement to support joint mobility and the immune system. Chemically it is a natural hexadecyl ester of cis-9-tetradecanoic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid commonly known as myristoleic acid.

The acid is found naturally in fish and whale oils, and also in butter and kombo butter from the kombo nut. The ester is of a buttery consistency at normal room temperatures, and turns waxy when cooled, and it has no known uses other than as a health supplement, particularly for the treatment of arthritis and other inflammatory and immune system problems.

The substances appear to have similar therapeutic characteristics to unsaturated essential fatty acids, but with a stronger and more long lasting effect. It also appears to work in three distinctly different ways in that it acts as a joint lubricant, supports the immune system and functions in the same way as essential fatty acids.

Arthritis is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and it is estimated that more than 50 million Americans are affected by it. Until recently it was believed to be a disease of the aged, or associated with physical injury, but is now known to be more complex than that, with many manifestations and causes. Because of this, no single treatment is effective with all forms of arthritis, but cetyl myristoleate is the new kid on the block that is believe to make a significant contribution to the treatment of non-infective forms of the disease.

However, it was not always known, and a search in the textbooks for cetyl myristoleate prior to 1977 would have yielded nothing. Why 1977? It started with Harry W Diehl, a sugar chemist with an interest in the treatment of arthritis. While carrying out research on arthritis in mice, he was working on thin layer chromatographic analysis of a methylene Chloride extract of macerated mice. He noticed a separation that was unknown to him, which was subsequently identified as cetyl myristoleate.

He had been unable to induce arthritis in mice, and believed that if he found out how to do that, then he should also be able to establish what made the mice immune to the disease, and so establish a cure. He soon established that it was this cetyl myristoleate circulating in the blood that protected the mice, and then found a way of synthesizing it in the lab by esterifying myristoleic acid.

Since the compound was unknown at that time Diehl patented it in 1977, hence the date. Apart from in mice, it has subsequently been found only in whale oil and in one of the glands of the male beaver, with no other known sources at the time of writing. There have been several studies that have supported the effect of cetyl myristoleate on arthritis, the first human study being in 1995 when 46 out of 48 arthritis patients showed significant improvement in articular mobility and reduction in pain. Others since have demonstrated similar results.

So how does it work? What is the mechanism by which this hitherto unknown substance helps to relieve the symptoms of osteo and rheumatoid arthritis? Being a fatty acid ester, cetyl myristoleate possesses lubricant properties, and one of its properties is to supplement the synovial fluid that lubricates the joints and tendons. This helps to keep the joints moving freely, and reduces their tendency to grind when the connective tissue wears. It also lubricates entire muscle groups, allowing them to slide over each other more freely, and also over bones allowing a smoother movement of the joints.

The second way, in which it operates, by supporting the immune system, is particularly appropriate to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis which is caused by the immune system attacking the body’s own joint and connective tissue. In this respect, cetyl myristoleate has also been found effective in treating other immune system conditions such as multiple sclerosis and lupus erythematosus.

Finally, it also possesses the mediation effect on the inflammatory reaction possessed by other essential fatty acids. This helps to reduce the effect of inflammation that causes much of the swelling and pain of arthritic conditions, although it occurs much faster than with other fatty acids. When taken together, all of these effects have a powerful effect in reducing the unpleasant symptoms of both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Swelling is reduced, mobility is improved and pain is alleviated. Improvements have been reported by sufferers of both types of arthritis, and in fact it is reported that Harry Diehl successfully treated his own arthritis with the substance before any other human tests had been carried out.

Cetyl Myristoleate is now used word-wide in significant quantities, and there have as yet been no confirmed reports of adverse side effects. However, as with many otherwise safe supplements, it is recommended not to be taken by pregnant or lactating women until it has been proved to definitely have no side effects on the fetus or young babies.

Although there is no definitive scientific evidence of the effectiveness of the substance in relieving the symptoms of arthritis, there is an overwhelming body of evidence from those that have used it world wide. The accepted treatment is by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and with over 16,0000 NSAID-related deaths in the USA alone each year, cetyl myristoleate is certainly worth considering as an alternative for arthritis sufferers. Not only that but there is a very significant price differential, with NSAIDs costing 5 – 10 times that of cetyl myristoleate.

Among the other benefits that people using the substance have reported are beneficial effects on psoriasis, hepatitis, high blood pressure, eczema, allergies, headaches and many more. Although many of these might be coincidence or psychosomatic, it cannot just be coincidence that many of them, such as psoriasis and allergies, are related to the immune system.

However, anybody with asthma or a history of severe allergic reactions should consult their physician before using the substance. That aside, there is more than enough popular evidence to indicate that cetyl myristoleate is effective in the treatment of arthritis in all its forms, and also good for your general state of health and wellness.



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Mag Active
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Date: April 23, 2008 10:20 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Mag Active

Quick Absorption Magnesium

Source Naturals - Mag Active

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body, but an estimated 75% of Americans are magnesium deficient. This ionic, low sodium form of magnesium and trace minerals is highly absorbable, enabling the minerals to transfer easily across the intestinal wall. Increased absorption means more minerals are available for your body’s needs. These minerals are a vital part of a healthy body, enabling all of the vitamins, enzymes and other nutrients in your diet to work effectively.

  • Contains ionically charged magnesium and 70 trace minerals for total body needs
  • Supports healthy heart, bones, muscles, neurotransmitters
  • May decrease stress and calm the nervous system
  • Magnesium assists in 300 enzyme functions, supporting the conversion of sugars and fats into energy, and the synthesis of DNA and RNA
  • Natural minerals have been concentrated and virtually all the natural sodium removed; this product may be used by people on sodium-restricted diets

1/2 Teaspoon (approx 2.5 ml) contains: Sodium (naturally occurring) 5 mg
Magnesium (naturally occurring) 246 mg
Sulfate (naturally occurring) 36 mg

Also contains trace amounts of the following: Chloride, Potassium, Lithium, Boron, Calcium, Carbonate, Bromide, Iodine, Rubidium, Scandium, Phosphorus, Nickel, Manganese, Chromium, Strontium, Cobalt, Zinc, Lanthanum, Cerium, Barium, Copper, Iron, Silicon, Yttrium, Molybdenum, Tin, Gallium, Gold, Silver, Cesium, Beryllium, Selenium, Vanadium, Dysprosium, Holmium, Terbium, Praseodymium, Lutetium, Gadolinium, Samarium, Bismuth, Ytterbium, Erbium, Europium, Neodymium. Other minerals found in seawater.

Suggested use: ¼ to ½ teaspoon in 8 oz juice, twice daily.



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Trace Mineral Concentrate (Ionic Charge)
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Date: January 08, 2007 03:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Trace Mineral Concentrate (Ionic Charge)

Ionic Charge: Trace Mineral Concentrate

  • Minerals enable every biochemical process in the body. They are the catalysts that make enzymes function and when ionized, they are the conductors of the body’s electrical current.
  • Source Naturals Ion Charge is a convenient liquid—pure and potent, and including all of the trace minerals commonly overlooked in many multivitamins or supplements.
  • Natural minerals have been concentrated and virtually all the natural sodium removed; this product may be used by people on sodium-restricted diets.
  • Ionic forms of minerals offer the highest absorption of any mineral form. Modern Americans do not obtain the minerals necessary for optimum health. Because of soil depletion and food processing, we do not get the trace minerals from our diets that we received even a generation ago. Ion Charge minerals are a vital part of a healthy body, enabling all of the vitamins, enzymes and other nutrients in your diet to work effectively.

1/2 teaspoon contains:

Sodium (naturally occurring) 5 mg

Magnesium (naturally occurring) 246 mg

Sulfate (naturally occurring) 36 mg

Also contains trace amounts of the following: Chloride, Potassium, Lithium, Boron, Calcium, Carbonate, Bromide, Iodine, Rubidium, Scandium, Phosphorus, Nickel, Manganese, Chromium, Strontium, Cobalt, Zinc, Lanthanum, Cerium, Barium, Copper, Iron, Silicon, Yttrium, Molybdenum, Tin, Gallium, Gold, Silver, Cesium, Beryllium, Selenium, Vanadium, Dysprosium, Holmium, Terbium, Praseodymium, Lutetium, Gadolinium



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How to deal with Stress and Cortisol...
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Date: August 30, 2006 09:36 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to deal with Stress and Cortisol...

Beating the Aging Odds

All of us grow older, but aging is a choice. You have it in your power to retain much of the health, vitality and beauty of your youth. It boils down to a simple fact – retard oxidative stress and you’ll retard the aging process. The 70 million people who make up the “boomer” generation and are getting ready for an active retirement welcome this news.

Stress and Cortisol

The early twentieth century “stress doctor” Hans Selye, M.D. was renowned for his work on the human adaptive response and the effects of stress on aging. He taught that every stress leanves an indelible scar, and the organism pays for its survival after a stressful situation by becoming a little older. That’s because stress raises levels of the adrenal hormone cortisol. It increases internal generation of free radicals, disrupts normal metabolism and leads to aging conditions. Because of this, cortisol has been dubbed the age-accelerating hormone.

The more stressful our lifestyle and the level of environmental hazards we are exposed to, the higher cortisol levels will climb in an effort to jump-start our adaptive response. Coupled with a poor diet, this is a recipe for pre-mature aging. At least eleven major aging factors are related to high cortisol levels:

  • Breakdown of collagen and elastin in muscles, joints, and bone
  • Memory loss and reduced cognitive function
  • Increased cardiovascular risk
  • Hypertension and fluid retention
  • Disordered lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL to LDL ratio)
  • Decreased immune function
  • Increased inflammation (vascular network, allergies, asthma, acne and hair loss)
  • Hormone imbalances
  • Disordered sugar metabolism
  • Skin problems (wrinkling, psoriasis, seborrhea, acne and hair loss)
  • Nerve system damage

So, there you have it. Now let’s see how to tame cortisol and reduce oxidative stress.

Reducing Cortisol and Oxidative Stress

Be in the moment – stress reducing techniques such as meditation, prayer, visualization, yoga, chi gong, and listening to inspirational tapes induce calmness and a sense of balance.

Eat right for your genes – as we get older, we don’t digest animal protein as efficiently as when younger. Shifting to plant source proteins that are easier to digest and contain the full complement of vitamins and minerals is most desirable. We are accustomed to thinking of dairy, meat, poultry, and fish as “protein.” All vegetables are good sources of protein. Along with legumes, whole grains, and nuts, daily protein needs are easily fulfilled. Meals that combine a variety of tastes from plant foods also require less salt for flavor enhancement and this helps keep hypertension at bay. So, explore just how good meals can be that either do not contain meat or use it as a condiment. If you do need some salt, try substituting table salt with NOW Vitamins Potassium Chloride crystals.

Enzymes Increase Digestion

Use digestive enzymes such as Optimal Digestive System to insure that you are absorbing all the nutrients in your food. This product has been clinically tested for its digestive effectiveness helping to digest fats, carbs, proteins and even gas producing beans and cruciferous vegetables. Other enzymes, Serrazimes is a systemic enzyme that will help keep lymphatic’s clear of debris, support immune function, and boost your adaptive response to stress.

Tame Cortisol

As many people reach middle age they have a tendency to gain weight around the navel. High stress amps up levels of cortisol that results in increased girth. Middle body fat is considered a significant risk factor for impaired glucose metabolism and cardiovascular disease. Check your waist to hip ratio by dividing your waist measurement in inches by your hip measurement. If you have a ratio of 0.85 or below, you have lower risk of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. This measurement is one of the best indicators of cortisol induced metabolic syndrome and weight gain.

Super cortisol support with Relora is an herbal, vitamin and mineral formula that’s designed to fight mid-body fat by taming cortisol. Its key ingredient is Relora which is a blend of the herbal extract of Phellodendron amurense and Magnolia officinalis. A small double blind clinical trial found that pre-menopausal obese women – half of whom took Relora – lost a significant amount of weight. These were women who eat in response to stress. Thus the researchers proposed that Relora appeared to reduce cortisol and perceived stress, resulting in weight loss. Super cortisol support also contains Ashwagandha and Rhodiola, herbs traditionally use for increasing adaptive response and reducing stress. You can read about these herbs and other nutritional products in the book 7-syndrome healing: supplement essentials for mind and body. Written by myself and coauthor Jayson Kroner. This book can be ordered from Now Foods.

Additionally, Chinese scientists found that the active components in Relora called honokiol and magnolol delayed gastric emptying, which would make you feel full longer. An additional anti-aging benefit was observed by another group of Chinese scientists. They reported that honokiol is a potent arterial thrombosis inhibitor because it inhibits prostacyclin release; a promoter of platelet adhesion. Platelet stickiness increases stroke risk. Phellodendron and Magnolia have been used in Chinese medicine for centuries.

Quell Free Radicals

Health and longevity essentially rests on the body balance between free radical load and antioxidant reserves. Toxic exposure depletes some of your antioxidant reserves. Eating a diet rich in antioxidant fruits, vegetables, legumes and grains, helps you rebound. Continued toxic exposure will challenge your antioxidant status and may overwhelm your reserves. VitaBerry Plus+ is a powerful antioxidant formula that contains a range of high ORAC fruits that naturally augment the diet. ORAC stands for oxygen radical absorbance capacity. It is a measure of the ability of a food to quell oxygen free radicals, the most dangerous kind. VitaBerry Plus+ is a product after my own heart. In my book The Anti-Aging Solution, I wrote about how different color foods protect DNA and prevent aging. VitaBerry Plus+ contains the important colors described in my bood. You can order your copy from Now Vitamins.

True-E Bio Complex rounds out the antioxidant colors. It contains all eight tocopherols and eight tocotrienols in the natural ratio found in “tan” foods such as whole grains and legumes. It is the only natural vitamin E that is produced from soy that has not been genetically modified.

The best anti-aging advice I can pass on is from my friend and food columnist Joan Jackson. “Take Pleasure in Your Life TODAY and Enjoy What You Eat”



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Oxy Boost – Oxygenate your Life!
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Date: July 06, 2006 02:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Oxy Boost – Oxygenate your Life!

Oxygen is the basis of all life and is found in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Increasing oxygen levels can have very positive effects, including improved mental clarity, endurance, immunity, better digestion and increased energy.

Oxygen is the key to a healthy immune system as well as every metabolic function in our bodies. Trillion of cells use oxygen to create energy every second of every day of our lives. Atmospheric pollution and deforestation play an important role in terms of the quality of air we breathe.

Oxy boost is all natural. It contains distilled water, sodium Chloride (from sea salt), bioavailable oxygen, and essential and trace minerals. Oxy boost is the world’s premier stabilized oxygen supplement, containing one of the highest concentrations of activated oxygen available today. It is pH balanced (approximately 7.4—a perfect pH for internal and external use). This is why Oxy Boost is so unique in the field of oxygen supplements.

Oxy boost has been proven in independent laboratory studies to be completely non-toxic in any concentration and at any amount. Oxy boost is safe to use both orally (sublingually or in water) and topically. Oxy boost does not depend on the digestive process to be absorbed.

The body’s first line of defense

A lack of sufficient oxygen in the blood stream reduces the body’s first line of defense. This has been clearly established in medical literature. Oxy boost safely increases the available oxygen levels in the bloodstream.

Works with other nutrients

Oxy boost can be taken with other nutritional supplements in fact; it may be safe to assume that oxy boost can even increase the efficacy of such supplements. Oxy boost works hand in hand with all other nutrients including amino acids, minerals and vitamins. These all require oxygen to be assimilated by the body and for utilization in the metabolic processes. The higher the oxygen saturation level in the blood and tissues, the more efficient and effective are the metabolic processes involving these nutrients.

We recommend that Oxy boost be taken on an empty stomach, preferably 30 min before eating or two hours after eating, to get the greatest physiological benefits from the product. Oxy boost is available in regular and therapeutic (2.5 times the concentration of regular Oxy boost) strengths.



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JOINT HEALTH
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Date: December 22, 2005 09:37 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: JOINT HEALTH

Glucosamine & Chondroitin - JOINT HEALTH

Everyone old enough to walk appreciates the value of fl exibility and ease of movement. Unfortunately many of us take such good things for granted. A famous folksinger sang, “You don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.” That’s certainly true for millions of Americans who live with stiff and uncomfortable joints.

Fortunately there are a number of nutrients available that provide the vital components of healthy joint structure and function and ease of mobility. These nutrients are referred to as “chondroprotective agents,” and include glucosamine and chondroitin, which supply the raw material necessary to produce new cartilage, and may even help rebuild worn cartilage. Other chondroprotective nutrients and herbs, like Cetyl Myristoleate, MSM, and Boswellin, work synergistically with glucosamine and chondroitin and further support normal joint function To understand how chondroprotective agents work, one must fi rst understand how joints work. The key element in human joints is articular cartilage, the shock-absorbing tissue that connects two bones together and allows pain-free movement. Articular cartilage is comprised of two different molecules, collagen and proteoglycans, with the remainder composed primarily of water (65-85%). Collagen, a protein that binds tissue together, provides elasticity. Proteoglycans, composed of sugars and protein, absorb water, which provides lubrication and resiliency, nature’s shock absorber for your joints. Both compounds are produced by chondrocytes, caretaker cells responsible for the formation and maintenance of cartilage. A defi ciency in any one of the above constituents will increase the likelihood of wear and tear on articular cartilage, which can eventually lead to compromised joint function.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are safe, natural and effective nutrients that support healthy joint function by supplying the materials needed to produce collagen and proteoglycans.

GLUCOSAMINE

Glucosamine is composed of glucose (a sugar) and glutamine (an amino acid). It is utilized by chondrocytes to form glycosaminoglycans (GSG) and proteoglycans (PG). Both of these constituents attract and bind water into cartilage, increasing resiliency. Research indicates that glucosamine may actually help your body repair damaged or eroded cartilage. A number of studies have been conducted on glucosamine sulfate and glucosamine hydroChloride, with a preponderance of positive results. Glucosamine sulfate is considered the more effective of the two. One study from the University of Liege in Liege, Belgium studied the effects of glucosamine sulfate on 212 patients with knee osteoarthritis. Participants took either 1,500 mg glucosamine or a placebo once daily for three years. The study compared joint-space width at enrollment, one year, and at the study’s conclusion.

The 106 patients on placebo had a progressive jointspace narrowing, while participants taking glucosamine experienced no significant joint-space loss, indicating glucosamine may benefi cially modify cartilage structure.3 A study published in the journal Osteoarthritis and Cartilage in 1998 investigated the in vitro effects of glucosamine sulfate on proteoglycan and collagen production by chondrocytes taken from osteoarthritic articular cartilage. The results showed “a statistically signifi cant stimulation of PG production by chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage cultured for up to 12 days in 3-dimensional cultures.” 4 Another study from Italy enrolled eighty inpatients with established OA. They received either 1,500 mg of glucosamine sulfate or placebo daily for 30 days. The patients treated with glucosamine sulfate experienced a reduction in symptoms almost twice as large and twice as fast as those receiving placebo. Researchers also used electron microscopy of patient’s articular cartilage to support this hypothesis. Patients who received glucosamine sulfate showed a picture more similar to healthy cartilage. The researchers concluded that glucosamine sulfate tends to rebuild damaged articular cartilage and restore articular function.5

CHONDROITIN

Chondroitin is classifi ed as a glycosaminoglycan. It bonds with collagen to form the basis of connective tissue. Chondroitin helps attract fl uid into proteoglycans, thereby bringing nutrients into cartilage and providing shock absorption. While glucosamine helps manufacture and maintain cartilage, chondroitin keeps cartilage from becoming malnourished. Chondroitin works synergistically with glucosamine, and these two nutrients form the basis of most joint health supplements on the market today. A 6-month randomized, multi-center, double-blind, doubledummy study published in 1996 compared the effectiveness of chondroitin versus a popular non-steroidal anti-infl ammatory drug (NSAID) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred and forty-six patients with knee OA were recruited and separated into two groups; an NSAID group and a chondroitin sulfate (CS) group. The NSAID group was given the NSAID and a placebo for the fi rst month, then placebo alone for months 2-3. The CS group was given the NSAID and CS for the fi rst month, and then CS alone for months 2-3. Both groups were then given 1200mg of CS for months 4-6. “Patients treated with the NSAID showed prompt and plain reduction of clinical symptoms, which, however, reappeared after the end of treatment; in the CS group, the therapeutic response appeared later in time but lasted for up to 3 months after the end of treatment. CS seems to have slow but gradually increasing clinical activity in OA; these benefi ts last for a long period after the end of treatment.”6

NOW® Foods is your source for natural joint support products. Our Extra Strength Glucosamine & Chondroitin is one of our best-selling products, and we also have combination supplements that include MSM, Concentrace® minerals, and more. We also carry both glucosamine and chondroitin as separate products, as well as in powder and lotion forms.

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AHCC® Fact Sheet - from Now Foods.
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Date: December 08, 2005 10:20 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: AHCC® Fact Sheet - from Now Foods.

AHCC® Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 6/30/05

LIKELY USERS: People needing increased activity of their Natural Killer cells; People seeking improved immune system response; People with a need for tissue repair; People with oxidative challenges; People seeking to increase liver function People defying aging or with a need to improve cellular integrity.

KEY INGREDIENTS: AHCC® (Active Hexose Correlated Compound)

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: AHCC® is a proprietary extract produced from specially cultivated and hybridized mushrooms. According to extensive research in humans, as well as numerous non-clinical studies, AHCC®supports immune system function through its effects on macrophages and NK (Natural Killer) Cells. NK cells and the intercellular mediators they produce are critical for the maintenance of healthy cell cycle function. AHCCR® has also been shown possess antioxidant properties, and supports healthy liver function.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: AHCC® (Active Hexose Correlated Compound) is a patented ingredient that has been the subject of research studies. It is supported by the scientific staff in the laboratories of both NOW Foods and the raw material supplier, both of which have a mutual interest in protecting the integrity and efficacy of this product.

AHCC® is a rich source of polysaccharides such as beta glucan 1,3 and activated hemicellulose produced by enzymatic modification of organic medicinal mushrooms, including shiitake. It also has been shown to support normal levels of macrophages and cytokines, further strengthening the immune system.

This formula is suitable for vegetarians and is offered in Vcaps.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: As a dietary supplement, take 2 Vcaps® 3 times daily, preferably on an empty stomach.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Antioxidants, Astragalus, Colostrum, Dr. Verghese Liver Formula, Immune Renew, Indole-3-Carbinol (I3C), Inositol Hexaphosphate (IP-6),

CAUTIONS: None.

PRODUCT SPECIFIC: None

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. When taking any new supplement, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time to avoid any potential problems. Packages may contain moisture or oxygen controlling packets or canisters that are not intended for consumption. In order to maintain maximum freshness, please do not remove these from your bottle (until the bottle is empty). Please recycle your container.

DISCLAIMER: Information given here may vary from what is shown on the product label because this represents my own professional knowledge and understanding of the science underlying the formula and ingredients. The information in this review should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

Aviles H, Belay T, Fountain K, Vance M, Sun B, Sonnenfeld G. (2003) Active hexose correlated compound enhances resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae infectin in mice in the hindlimb-unloading model of spaceflight conditions. J Appl Physiol 95:491-496.

Burikhanov RB, Wakame K, Igarashi Y, Wang S, Matsuzaki S (2000) Suppressive Effect of Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC®) on Thymic Apoptosis Induced by Dexamethasone in the Rat. Endocrine Regulations 34:181-188. Matsui Y, et al. (2002) Improved prognosis of postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma patients when treated with functional foods: a prospective cohort study. J Hepatol. 2002 Jul;37(1):78-86. PMID: 12076865 Matsushita K, et al. (1998) Combination therapy of active hexose correlated compound plus UFT significantly reduces the metastasis of rat mammary adenocarcinoma. Anti-Cancer Drugs 9:343-350. Sun B, Wakame K, Mukoda T, Toyoshima A. Kanazawa T, Kosuna K (1997) Preventive Effects of AHCC® on Carbon TetraChloride Induced Liver Injury in Mice. Nat Med 51(4):310-315.

Ye SF, Ichimura K, Wakame K, Ohe M. Suppressive effects of Active Hexose Correlated Compound on the increased activity of hepatic and renal ornithine decarboxylase induced by oxidative stress. Life Sci. 2003 Dec 19;74(5):593-602. PMID: 14623030 Ye SF, Wakame K, Ichura K, Matsuzaki S (2004) Amelioration by active hexose correlated compound of endocrine disturbances induced by oxidative stress in the rat. Endocr Regul 38(1):7-13.



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TMG Fact Sheet
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Date: December 07, 2005 02:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: TMG Fact Sheet

TMG Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 03/07/05

LIKELY USERS: People with high homocysteine levels; People with risks of developing Alzheimer’s Disease; People needing greater metabolism of fats; People with liver detoxification challenges; People consuming alcohol KEY INGREDIENTS: TMG is composed of three methyl groups attached to a glycine atom. It can “donate” methyl groups.

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: TMG is a metabolite of the B vitamin family product called Choline. Choline has 4 methyl groups, TMG has 3 and DMG has 2. These substances plus Folic acid, Vitamin B-12 and SAM-e are all methyl donors. Methyl donors can contribute methyl groups to biological processes such as liver function, detoxification and cellular replication (production of new cells). Methylation protects the kidneys and stimulates production of the fat-transporting molecule l-carnitine.

TMG helps the liver metabolize fats, preventing the accumulation of fats in the liver. It also helps to detoxify chemicals in the liver, while protecting the liver from being damaged by those chemicals.

Methylation with TMG helps to convert the dangerous, inflammatory chemical homocysteine into the amino acid methionine. TMG may lower homocysteine when B-6, B-12 and folic acid cannot.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT INFORMATION: TMG is also known as Betaine and is a component of Betaine hydroChloride (Betaine HCl), a stomach acid supplement that is very acidic. But Betaine HCl is not used in the same way as TMG. TMG is not highly acidic and will not supplement low stomach acid.

TMG may be useful for autistic children, along with B-6 and magnesium. It may also be useful in strengthening the body’s immune response against pathogenic bacteria. There is very preliminary evidence that TMG and methyl donors may help against some forms of seizures.

DMG has been used as a sports supplement. TMG is 50% more effective than DMG in any application where the methyl groups are useful. Otherwise, they can used interchangeably.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: One serving per day, or up to 6,000 mg., as needed.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: SAM-e, Milk Thistle (Silymarin), Dr. Verghese’s Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator, Antioxidants, NAC, Homocysteine Regulators, D-Flame, Detox Support

CAUTIONS: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement.

People with Parkinson’s or taking L-dopa should not use methyl donors like TMG without a physician’s specific approval and supervision. There are no other known drug interactions with TMG.

This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. This is not an official publication by any company, nor has this information been screened or approved by the FDA or any private company.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. REFERENCES:

General:

Craig SA. Betaine in human nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):539-49. Review. PMID: 15321791

Methylation:

Barak AJ, Tuma DJ. Betaine, metabolic by-product or vital methylating agent? Life Sci 1983;32:771-4 [review].

Benson R, Crowell B, Hill B, et al. The effects of L-dopa on the activity of methionine adenosyltransferase: relevance to L-dopa therapy and tolerance. Neurochem Res 1993;18:325–30.

Chambers ST. Betaines: their significance for bacteria and the renal tract. Clin Sci 1995;88:25-7 [review].

Charlton CG, Crowell B Jr. Parkinson’s disease-like effects of S-adenosyl-L-methionine: effects of L-dopa. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1992;43:423–31.

Charlton CG, Mack J. Substantia nigra degeneration and tyrosine hydroxylase depletion caused by excess S-adenosylmethionine in the rat brain. Support for an excess methylation hypothesis for parkinsonism. Mol Neurobiol 1994;9:149–61.

Cheng H, Gomes-Trolin C, Aquilonius SM, et al. Levels of L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase activity in erythrocytes and concentrations of S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine in whole blood of patients with Parkinson’s disease. Exp Neurol 1997;145:580–5.

Crowell BG Jr, Benson R, Shockley D, Charlton CG. S-adenosyl-L-methionine decreases motor activity in the rat: similarity to Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms. Behav Neural Biol 1993;59:186–93.

Selhub J. Homocysteine metabolism. Annu Rev Nutr 1999;19:217-46 [review].

Homocysteine:

Brosnan JT, Jacobs RL, Stead LM, Brosnan ME. Methylation demand: a key determinant of homocysteine metabolism. Acta Biochim Pol. 2004;51(2):405-13. Review. PMID: 15218538 Gahl WA, Bernardini I, Chen S, et al. The effect of oral betaine on vertebral body bone density in pyridoxine-non-responsive homocystinuria. J Inherit Metab Dis 1988;11:291-8.

Olthof MR, van Vliet T, Boelsma E, Verhoef P. Low dose betaine supplementation leads to immediate and long term lowering of plasma homocysteine in healthy men and women. J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4135-8. PMID: 14652361

Olthof MR, Verhoef P. Effects of betaine intake on plasma homocysteine concentrations and consequences for health. Curr Drug Metab. 2005 Feb;6(1):15-22. PMID: 15720203

Schwab U, Torronen A, Toppinen L, Alfthan G, Saarinen M, Aro A, Uusitupa M. Betaine supplementation decreases plasma homocysteine concentrations but does not affect body weight, body composition, or resting energy expenditure in human subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Nov;76(5):961-7. PMID: 12399266

Selhub J. Homocysteine metabolism. Annu Rev Nutr 1999;19:217-46 [review].

van Guldener C, Janssen MJ, de Meer K, et al. Effect of folic acid and betaine on fasting and postmethionine-loading plasma homocysteine and methionine levels in chronic haemodialysis patients. J Intern Med 1999;245:175-83.

Wendel U, Bremer HJ. Betaine in the treatment of homocystinuria due to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency. Eur J Pediatr 1984;142:147-50.

Wilcken DE, Wilcken B, Dudman NP, Tyrrell PA. Homocystinuria—the effects of betaine in the treatment of patients not responsive to pyridoxine. N Engl J Med 1983;309:448-53.

Wilcken DE, Dudman NP, Tyrrell PA. Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency--the effects of betaine treatment in pyridoxine-responsive patients. Metabolism. 1985 Dec;34(12):1115-21. PMID: 3934499

Liver function:

Babucke G, Sarre B. Clinical experience with betain citrate. Med Klin 1973;68:1109-13 [in German].

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Badakhsh S, Tuma DJ. The effect of betaine in reversing alcoholic steatosis. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1997;21:1100-2.

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Matti J, Tuma DJ. Dietary betaine promotes generation of hepatic S-adenosylmethioine and protects the liver from ethanol-induced fatty infiltration. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1993;17:552-5.

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Tuma DJ. Betaine, ethanol, and the liver: a review. Alcohol 1996;13:395-8 [review]. PMID: 8836329

Freed WJ. Prevention of strychnine-induced seizures and death by the N-methylated glycine derivatives betaine, dimethylglycine and sarcosine. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1985 Apr;22(4):641-3. PMID: 2581277

Junnila M, Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Rahko T. Betaine reduces hepatic lipidosis induced by carbon tetraChloride in Sprague-Dawley rats. Vet Hum Toxicol 1998;40:263-6.

Ji C, Kaplowitz N. Betaine decreases hyperhomocysteinemia, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and liver injury in alcohol-fed mice. Gastroenterology. 2003 May;124(5):1488-99. PMID: 12730887

Kettunen H, Tiihonen K, Peuranen S, Saarinen MT, Remus JC. Dietary betaine accumulates in the liver and intestinal tissue and stabilizes the intestinal epithelial structure in healthy and coccidia-infected broiler chicks. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2001 Nov;130(4):759-69. PMID: 11691612

Kim SK, Kim YC, Kim YC. Effects of singly administered betaine on hepatotoxicity of chloroform in mice. Food Chem Toxicol 1998;36:655-61.

McCarty MF. Co-administration of equimolar doses of betaine may alleviate the hepatotoxic risk associated with niacin therapy. Med Hypotheses. 2000 Sep;55(3):189-94. PMID: 10985907

Murakami T, Nagamura Y, Hirano K. The recovering effect of betaine on carbon tetraChloride-induced liver injury. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol 1998;44:249-55.

Poschl G, Stickel F, Wang XD, Seitz HK. Alcohol and cancer: genetic and nutritional aspects. Proc Nutr Soc. 2004 Feb;63(1):65-71. Review. PMID: 15070439

Semmler F. Treatment of liver diseases, especially of fatty liver with betaine citrate. Ther Ggw 1977;116:2113-24 [in German].

Zapadniuk VI, Panteleimonova TN. [Cholagogic effect of trimethylglycine in normal animals of different ages and in experimental atherosclerosis] Biull Eksp Biol Med. 1987 Jul;104(7):30-2. Russian. PMID: 3620644

Autism & Seizures:

Rimland B. Seizures, Vitamin B6, DMG, and Sudden Speech. Autism Research Review International. 1996;10(2):1.

Roach ES, Carlin L. N,N-dimethylglycine for epilepsy. N Engl J Med. 1982;307:1081-82.

Vitamin B6/DMG. Letters to the Editor, Autism Research Interview International. 1994;8(2):6.

Immunity:

Reap EA, Lawson JW. Stimulation of the immune response by dimethylglycine, a nontoxic metabolite. J Lab Clin Med. Apr1990;115(4):481-6.

Safety:

Hoorn AJ. Dimethylglycine and chemically related amines tested for mutagenicity under potential nitrosation conditions. Mutat Res. 1989 Apr;222(4):343-50. PMID: 2468082



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Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet
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Date: December 07, 2005 12:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet

Dr. Verghese, M.D. Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator Fact Sheet Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 02/10/05

LIKELY USERS: People with exposure to toxins that stimulate liver activity; People with exposure to infections that may have damaged liver tissue

KEY INGREDIENT (S): Milk Thistle extract (Silymarin), Glutathione, NAC, Bupleurum extract, Grape Seed Extract, Dandelion Root extract, Artichoke Leaf, Schisandra and about a dozen additional herbs, along with synergistic ingredients

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: This formula was developed by a physician based on his clinical experience.

Artichoke leaf has antioxidant properties and restores healthy growth to liver cells.

Bupleurum may promote normal cell growth, immune function and is a staple of Chinese liver formulas. Dandelion Root may serve as a natural down-regulator of inflammatory chemicals in the body. NAC supports liver Glutathionestores (antioxidant, detoxifier, heavy metal chelator). Schisandra protects liver cells from toxins and may help to regenerate damaged cells. Milk thistle’s antioxidant Silymarin improves liver function tests and protects liver cells against oxidative damage. It also protects liver cells by blocking and removing toxins from the liver. Silymarin aids in regenerating injured liver cells and blocks fibrosis.

OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES: Samuel Verghese, M.D. (AM), Ph.D., BCIA-EEG, DAAPM, holds a degree in Alternative Medicine and specializes in Nutritional, Ayurvedic and other Alternative Health Solutions. He is certified as a BCIA-EEG Associate Fellow.

AMOUNT TO USE: Three or more capsules a day, preferably with meals.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Antioxidants (supports liver detoxification), Alpha Lipoic Acid, EGCg Green Tea Extract, Astragalus, medicinal mushrooms (shiitake, reishi), SAM-e (may improve bile flow and promotes methylation to detoxify chemicals), TMG, lecithin, thymus glandular extract, Cordyceps.

AVOID: acetaminophen, alcohol, iron supplements (also red meat, fortified flour)

CAUTIONS: This formula should not be used by pregnant women, nursing mothers children or those with liver problems unless recommended under the supervision of a healthcare professional. Please notify your physician about your supplement use if you are using any drugs! Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

1. Salmi HA, Sarna S. Effect of silymarin on chemical, functional and morphological alterations of the liver. A double-blind controlled study. Scand J Gastroenterol 1982;17:517–21.
2. Feher J, Deak G, Muzes G, et al. Liver-protective action of silymarin therapy in chronic alcoholic liver diseases. Orv Hetil 1989;130:2723–7 [in Hungarian].
3. Muzes G, Deak G, Lang I, et al. Effect of silymarin (Legalon) therapy on the antioxidant defense mechanism and lipid peroxidation in alcoholic liver disease (double blind protocol.) Orv Hetil 1990:131:863–6 [in Hungarian].
4. Velussi M, Cernigoi AM, De Monte A, et al. Long-term (12 months) treatment with an anti-oxidant drug (silymarin) is effective on hyperinsulinemia, exogenous insulin need and malondialdehyde levels in cirrhotic diabetic patients. J Hepatol 1997;26:871–9.
5. Lieber CS. Nutrition in liver disorders. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M, Ross AC (eds). Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 9th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins, 1999, 1179–80.
6. Rodriguez-Moreno F, Gonzalez-Reimers E, Santolaria-Fernandez F, et al. Zinc, copper, manganese, and iron in chronic alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol 1997;14:39–44.
7. Gibbs K, Walshe JM. Studies with radioactive copper (64 Cu and 67 Cu); the incorporation of radioactive copper into caeruloplasmin in Wilson’s disease and in primary biliary cirrhosis. Clin Sci 1971;41:189–202.
8. Lieber CS. Nutrition in liver disorders. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M, Ross AC (eds). Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 9th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins, 1999:1179–80.
9. Halsted CH. Alcohol: medical and nutritional effects. In Ziegler EE, Filer LJ (eds). Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 7th ed. ILSI Press, Washington, DC, 1996, 553.
10. Blum AL, Doelle W, Kortum K, et al. Treatment of acute viral hepatitis with (+)-cyanidanol-3. Lancet 1977;2:1153–5.
11. Suzuki H, Yamamoto S, Hirayama C, et al. Cianidanol therapy for HBs-antigen-positive chronic hepatitis: a multicentre, double-blind study. Liver 1986;6:35–44.
12. Tang W, Eisenbrand G. Chinese Drugs of Plant Origin. Berlin: Springer Verlag, 1992. (Astragalus)
13. Hobbs, C. Medicinal Mushrooms. Santa Cruz, CA: Botanica Press, 1995, 96–107.
14. Harada T, Kanetaka T, Suzuki H, Suzuki K. Therapeutic effect of LEM (extract of cultured Lentinus edodes mycelia) against HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B. Gastroenterol Int 1988;1(suppl 1):abstract 719. 15. Kelly GS. Clinical applications of N-acetylcysteine. Altern Med Rev. Apr1998;3(2):114-27.
16. Montanini S, et al. Use of acetylcysteine as the life-saving antidote in Amanita phalloides (death cap) poisoning. Case report on 11 patients. Arzneimittelforschung. Dec1999;49(12):1044-7.
17. Buckley NA, et al. Oral or intravenous N-acetylcysteine: which is the treatment of choice for acetaminophen (paracetamol) poisoning? J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1999;37(6):759-67. 18. Girardi G, Elias MM. Effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine in protecting against mercuric Chloride-induced nephrotoxicity. Toxicology. Apr1991;67(2):155-64.
19. Berkson MB. Alpha-Lipoic Acid (Thioctic Acid): My Experience With This Outstanding Therapeutic Agent. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine. 1998;13(1):44-48.
20. Breithaupt-Grogler K, et al. Dose-proportionality of oral thioctic acid--coincidence of assessments via pooled plasma and individual data. Eur J Pharm Sci. Apr1999;8(1):57-65.
21. Gebhardt R. Antioxidative and Protective Properties of Extracts from Leaves of the Artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) Against Hydroperoxide-induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. Jun1997;144(2):279-86.
22. Adzet T, et al. Hepatoprotective Activity of Polyphenolic Compounds From Cynara scolymus Against CCl4 Toxicity in Isolated Rat Hepatocytes. J Nat Prod. Jul1987;50(4):612-17.
23. Gebhardt R. Antioxidative and protective properties of extracts from leaves of the artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) against hydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress in cultured rat hepatocytes. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. Jun1997;144(2):279-86.
24. Khadzhai I, et al. Effect of Artichoke Extracts on the Liver. Farmakol Toksikol. Nov1971;34(6):685-87.
25. Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicine: A Guide for Health-Care Professionals. Cambridge: Pharmaceutical Press; 1996:36-37.
27. Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press;1996:96-97.
28. Bradley PR, ed. British Herbal Compendium. Vol.1. Bournemouth: British Herbal Medicine Association;1992:73-74.
29. Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press;1996:96-97.



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Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application
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Date: November 22, 2005 09:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application

Minerals provide a bounty of healing properties that have scientifically validated their use for topical applications. These applications have been shown to have powerful local and systemic effects. The health of ones skin and hair reflects inner health. Indeed, we judge the health of animals and humans alike by their outward appearance of fur or skin, respectively. The human skin is the largest organ of the body and is highly involved in the detoxification and maintenance processes of health. Skin not only excretes and eliminates toxins; it also has a tremendous capacity to absorb health supportive substances. The pharmaceutical industry frequently takes advantage of the skin’s absorptive capacity with drug therapies. Such therapies include the transdermal delivery of drugs like nicotine, hormone patches, progesterone creams and so forth. Thus, it is apparent that natural therapies can have pronounced and powerful health effects.

Clinical researchers have continued to document the clinical findings that have been observed for decades when it comes to the healing properties of topical minerals. Many of the studies on therapeutic baths have used minerals from the Dead Sea, an ancient inland sea. However, a similar and impressive array of minerals occurs in the other inland sea, the Great Salt Lake. Indeed, the high presence of magnesium from both inland seas appears to be the foremost active mineral. A comparison chart below clearly reflects the mineral analysis and similarity (see chart below). The following survey of medical research reflects a few of the many therapeutic roles for mineral salt baths. Of particular interest are the powerful effects of magnesium salts that are prevalent to both Utah’s Inland Sea and the Dead Sea that exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory disease. Arthritis:

103 patients with arthritic symptoms were treated for 1-2 weeks. They received various bath treatments with the ionic trace minerals. The study showed that the higher concentration baths offered the most impressive results. Those with the greatest physical limitation had the most pronounced improvement. Over 80 percent of the patients reported having less pain, 70 percent reported improved mobility and 60 percent were able to decrease analgesic use (i). In a different double-blind study, the use of warm mineral baths with Dead Sea salt demonstrated a lasting effect for patients suffering from degenerative arthritis. (ii)

Skin:

In a clinical trial conducted by a leading research university in Germany, patients with atopic (eczema) skin disorders immersed their arms in a magnesium Chloride rich bath. The participants immersed one arm in tap water the other in the therapeutic magnesium rich bath. The findings showed that skin hydration was improved and skin roughness and inflammation was reduced. The researchers stated “magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation and enhance barrier repair.” (iii) Another study showed that magnesium salts when exposed to both psoriatic and healthy skin cells provided an important anti-proliferative effect (iv). Yet another study showed that the effects of mineral baths from the Dead Sea had lasting effects for upwards of a month after treatment. (v) Head to Head Comparison (vi) (vii)

Utah’s Inland Sea Composition Dead Sea Composition
Magnesium Chloride 1.04% 4.03%
Potassium Chloride 0.64% 0.72%
Sodium Chloride 9% 3.87%
Calcium Chloride 0.08% 1.64%
Chloride 15.12% 21.11%
Sulfates (SO4) 2.13% 0.03%

By: Dr. Chris Meletis N. D.

References:
• (i) Dead Sea Balneoptherapy is Osteoarthritis, Dr. Machety (Hasharon Hospital, Petach-Tikva, Israel). Published in Proceedings of International Seminar on Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases. John Wright-PSG ,1932.
• (ii) Sukenik S, Mayo A, Neumann L et al., Dead Sea bath salts for osteoarthritis of the knee, Harefuah 1995; 129(3-4):100-3, 159, 158.
• (iii) Proksch E, Nissen HP et al., Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin. Int J Dermatol 2005; 44(2):151-7.
• (iv) Levi-Schaffer F, Shani J, Politi Y et al., Inhibition of proliferation of psoriatic and healthy fibroblasts in cell culture by selected Dead –sea salts. Pharmacology 1996; 52(5):321-8.
• (v) Sukenik S, Neumann L, Buskila D et al., Dead Sea bath salts for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Exp Rheumatol 1990; 8(4):353-7.
• (vi) The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Public Information Series #8, 1990.
• (vii) Gwynn, J. Wallace, The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological Public Information Series 51, 1997.

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Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral
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Date: November 20, 2005 07:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride is an “essential” mineral for humans. It is abundant in ionic trace mineral preparations. It is a major mineral nutrient that occurs primarily in body fluids. Chloride is a prominent negatively charged ion of the blood, where it represents 70% of the body’s total negative ion content. On average, an adult human body contains approximately 115 grams of Chloride, making up about 0.15% of total body weight.1 The suggested amount of Chloride intake ranges from 750 to 900 milligrams per day, based on the fact that total obligatory loss of Chloride in the average person is close to 530 milligrams per day. As the principle negatively charged ion in the body, Chloride serves as one of the main electrolytes of the body. Chloride, in addition to potassium and sodium, assist in the conduction of electrical impulses when dissolved in bodily water. Potassium and sodium become positive ions as they lose an electron when dissolved and Chloride becomes a negative ion as it gains an electron when dissolved. A positive ion is always accompanied by a negative ion, hence the close relationship between sodium, potassium and Chloride. The electrolytes are distributed throughout all body fluids including the blood, lymph, and the fluid inside and outside cells.2 The negative charge of Chloride balances against the positive charges of sodium and potassium ions in order to maintain serum osmolarity.

Pivotal Roles of Chloride in the Body

In addition to its functions as an electrolyte, Chloride combines with hydrogen in the stomach to make hydrochloric acid, a powerful digestive enzyme that is responsible for the break down of proteins, absorption of other metallic minerals, and activation of intrinsic factor, which in turn absorbs vitamin B12. Chloride is specially transported into the gastric lumen, in exchange for another negatively charged electrolyte (bicarbonate), in order to maintain electrical neutrality across the stomach membrane. After utilization in hydrochloric acid, some Chloride is reabsorbed by the intestine, back into the blood stream where it is required for maintenance of extracellular fluid volume. Chloride is both actively and passively absorbed by the body, depending on the current metabolic demands. A constant exchange of Chloride and bicarbonate, between red blood cells and the plasma helps to govern the pH balance and transport of carbon dioxide, a waste product of respiration, from the body. With sodium and potassium, Chloride works in the nervous system to aid in the transport of electrical impulses throughout the body, as movement of negatively charged Chloride into the cell propagates the nervous electrical potential.

Deficiency of Chloride

Deficiency of Chloride is rare. However, when it does occur, it results in a life threatening condition known as alkalosis, in which the blood becomes overly alkaline. A tedious balance between alkalinity and acidity is in constant flux, and must be vigilantly maintained throughout the entire body. Alkalosis may occur as a result of excessive loss of sodium, such as heavy sweating during endurance exercise, and in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms include muscle weakness, loss of appetite, irritability, dehydration, and profound lethargy. Hypochloremia may result from water overload, wasting conditions, and extensive bodily burns with sequestration of extracellular fluids. In a situation in which infants were inadvertently fed Chloride-deficient formula, many experienced failure to thrive, anorexia, and weakness in their first year of life.3

Excess Intake?

Excessive intakes of dietary Chloride only occur with the ingestion of large amounts of salt and potassium Chloride. The toxic effects of such diets, such as fluid retention and high blood pressure, are attributed to the high sodium and potassium levels.4 Chloride toxicity has not been observed in humans except in the special case of impaired sodium Chloride metabolism, e.g. in congestive heart failure.5 Healthy individuals can tolerate the intake of large quantities of Chloride provided that there is a concomitant intake of fresh water. Other situations in which increased blood levels of Chloride are seen include diseases of improper waste elimination that occur in kidney diseases. Excess Chloride is normally excreted in the urine, sweat, and bowels. In fact, excess urinary excretion of Chloride occurs in high salt diets. Excessive intakes of Chloride can occur in a person with compromised health in addition to an unhealthy diet. However, those that follow a healthy diet and lead an active lifestyle may need to consider supplementing their diet with this important mineral.

Chloride vs. Chlorine

The mineral supplement Chloride is very different from the gas chlorine. While elemental chlorine is a dangerous gas that does not exist in the free elemental state in nature because of its reactivity, although it is widely distributed in combination with other elements. Chloride is related to chlorine however, as one of the most common chlorine compounds is common salt, NaCl. Chloride is a by-product of the reaction between chlorine and an electrolyte, such as potassium, magnesium, or sodium, which are essential for human metabolism. Chloride salts are essential for sustaining human metabolism and have none of the effects of isolated chlorine gas.

Sources of Chloride

Chloride occurs naturally in foods at levels normally less than 0.36 milligrams per gram of food. The average intake of Chloride during a salt-free diet is approximately 100 milligrams per day. Unfortunately, Chloride is found commonly combined with undesirable dietary sources. The most common of these negative sources is table salt. Table salt is made from a combination of sodium and Chloride ions. Other unhealthful sources include yeast extracts, processed lunchmeats, and cheeses. Healthier sources of Chloride include kelp (seaweed), ionic trace minerals, olives, rye, tomatoes, lettuce, and celery, although not in large enough amounts to supply the needs of an active adult.6 In its original form, however, Chloride is leached from various rocks into soil and water by years of weathering processes. The Chloride ion is highly mobile and is transported to closed basins, such as the Great Salt Lake, or oceans.7

Summary

Chloride is a highly important, vital mineral required for both human and animal life. Without Chloride, the human body would be unable to maintain fluids in blood vessels, conduct nerve transmissions, move muscles, or maintain proper kidney function. As a major electrolyte mineral of the body, Chloride performs many roles, and is rapidly excreted from the body. Active adults that eat a healthy diet devoid of salt and illnesses in which vomiting and/or diarrhea are profuse warrant the supplementation of additional Chloride. Replacement of Chloride is essential on a daily basis to maintain regular metabolic function. Chloride is safely utilized by the body, without negative health effects. Of the negative health effects that have been associated with diets high in Chloride, these are mainly attributable to the accompanying sodium and potassium, two other electrolyte minerals to which Chloride is often attached

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Wesson LG. Physiology of the human kidney. New York, NY, Grune and Stratton, 1969: 591

2 Weast RC, ed. CRC handbook of chemistry and physics, 67th ed. Boca Raton, FL, CRC Press, 1986.

3 Kaleita TA. Neurologic/behavioral syndrome associated with ingestion of Chloride-deficient infant formula. Pediatrics 1986 Oct;78(4):714-5

4 Beard TC. A salt-hypertension hypothesis. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 1990;16 Suppl 7:S35-8

5 Seelig M. Cardiovascular consequences of magnesium deficiency and loss: pathogenesis, prevalence and manifestations--magnesium and Chloride loss in refractory potassium repletion. Am J Cardiol 1989 Apr 18;63(14):4G-21G

6 Altschul AM, Grommet JK. Food choices for lowering sodium intake. Hypertension 1982 Sep-Oct;4(5 Pt 2):III116-20

7 Gelb SB, Anderson MP. Sources of Chloride and sulfate in ground water beneath an urbanized area in Southeastern Wisconsin (Report WIS01 NTIS). Chemical abstracts, 1981, 96(2):11366g.



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The wellness Revolution - 90% Of Americans Carry Chemical Stew in their Bodies.
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Date: October 01, 2005 01:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The wellness Revolution - 90% Of Americans Carry Chemical Stew in their Bodies.

The Wellness Revolution

90% of Americans Carry Chemical Stew in their Bodies

The third national report on human exposure to Environmental Chemicals, issued this summer, shows that most people in the U.S., and especially children, carry a dangerous mixture of chemicals in their bodies. Nevertheless, the Center for Disease Control (CDC), authors of the report, issued a press release focusing on progress made in a few areas—and most media looked no further than the optimistic press release.

The CDC sampled the blood and urine of thousands of subjects across the country for 148 environmental chemicals. This study found a significant decline since previous reports in exposure to secondhand smoke and in lead levels in children’s blood.

Despite the positive headlines, however, the study documented the presence in human bodies of dozens of pesticides and toxic compounds used in consumer products. Among the findings:

  • About 1 – 18 women of child-bearing age have levels of mercury at or above the safe level set by the environmental protection agency (EPA).
  • More than 1 in 20 Americans carry dangerous levels of cadmium, primarily from exposure to tobacoo smoke. Recent studies link cadmium to kidney injury and low bone mineral density.
  • Chlorpyrifos, a pesticide that damages the nervous system, we found in more than half the samples, and was more highly concentrated in children ages 6 to 11. Primary exposure occurs through food.
  • Phthalates—chemicals found in cosmetics and soft plastics, which affect hormonal and genital development in fetuses and infants—were concentrated more highly in children’s bodies. They were found at four times the EPA’s safe levels.
  • OrganoChlorides such as DDT, which have been banned for decades, were found in the blood of subjects. These pesticides can be passed from mother to child in the womb and through breastfeeding.

    Body Burden and the wellness Revolution

    This Study—the latest indication that all of us carry a “body burden” caused by widespread chemical use in our society—shows the need for a system that relies on organic agriculture and alternative pest controls. The constant exposure to toxics we experience today is a major cause of chronic illness, including cancer, birth defects or abnormal development, brain or nervous system damage, hormonal and reproductive imbalances, and impaired immunity, to name just a few.

    Meanwhile, individuals should take advantage of the organic products available in health food stores, and the herbs and nutrients that support detoxification and the liver, the main organ of detoxification, as well as immunity—for example, silymarin, N-acetyl cysteine, calcium d-glucarate, folic acid, Reishi and shiitake mushroom, and turmeric. A healthy lifestyle and appropriate supplementation can offer some protection from societal pollution.

    Sources: Third National Report on Human Exposure to environmental Chemicals, 2005, available at www.cdc.gov. Los Angeles Times, 7/22/05. A Brief Companion to CDC’s 2005 National Exposure Report, Physicians for Social Responsibility, www.psr.org. Pesticide action network, www.panna.org.



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    MIGRAINE BLOCKER - Homeopathic Remedy for Headache and Migraine Relief
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    Date: September 30, 2005 09:41 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: MIGRAINE BLOCKER - Homeopathic Remedy for Headache and Migraine Relief

    NEW PRODUCT ANNOUNCEMENT

    MIGRAINE BLOCKER - Homeopathic Remedy for Headache and Migraine Relief

  • Safe and natural treatment for temporary relief of migraine headache pain, pressure and throbbing.
  • Caffeine, Aspirin, Ibuprofen, and Acetaminophen-Free
  • Fast and Gentle
  • No drowsiness

    One tablet contains:
    Ingredients: Active: Chamomilla (Chamomile) 4X, Bryonia alba (White Bryony) 6X, Iris versicolor (Blue Flag) 6X, Juglans cinerea (Butternut) 6X, Pulsatilla nigircans (Wind Flower) 6X, Sanguinaria canadensis (Blood Root) 6X, Natrum Muriaticum (Sodium Chloride) 10X, Magnesia Muriatica (Magnesium Chloride) 10X, Phosphorus (Phosphorus) 10X, Silicea (Silica) 10X, Zincum Metallicum (Zinc) 10X, Belladonna (Deadly Nightshade) 12X, Gelsemium sempervirens (Yellow Jessamine) 12X, Ignatia amara (St. Ignatius Bean) 12X, Scutellaria (Skullcap) 12X. Inactive: lactose and magnesium stearate.

    Suggested Use:
    For best results, begin taking at the first sign of symptoms. Chew tablet slightly and allow to dissolve in the mouth. Adults: Take 2 tablets initially, then 1 tablet every two hours as needed. Children: 6-12 years, use one half of the adult dosage. For children under the age of 6 years, consult with your licensed health care professional. Do not exceed 12 tablets per day.



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    PepZin GI™ helps relieve occasional discomfort.
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    Date: September 20, 2005 05:40 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: PepZin GI™ helps relieve occasional discomfort.

    PepZin GI™ helps relieve occasional discomfort.* CLINICAL TRIALS

    In a randomized, multi-center, placebo-controlled double blind study, 299 patients suffering with symptoms of gastric discomfort were randomly allocated to receive either a zinc-L-carnosine complex or a placebo, or a control drug or its placebo for 8 weeks. Improvement ratings for a range of symptoms were taken at various points during the trial and compared with before treatment data. Of the 258 people who completed the trial, 136 were in the zinc-Lcarnosine group. Of the group, 92% of the participants were rated as “moderately improved” or better on an improvement scale across the category of symptoms including heartburn, tenderness, epigastric pain, diarrhea and constipation after 8 weeks.3

    In another study, 28 patients with gastric discomfort were given a zinc-L-carnosine compound and monitored for 8 weeks. Improvement was rated on a scale of subjective and objective symptoms. After 4 weeks, the rate of those cases that were considered to be “significantly improved” was 68.4%. After eight weeks, the “significantly improved” number was 68.8%. Over 60% of these patients remained in the “significantly improved” category well after discontinuation of the treatment, suggesting a lasting effect of the zinc-L-carnosine compound beyond the time it is taken.4

    Maintains a healthy GI environment.*

    The mineral zinc in PepZin GI™ is a critical component to a number of physiological processes in our bodies. Some of these functions include growth and metabolism of cells, healing of wounds,and maintenance of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism.2

    PepZin GI™ may also be able to favorably maintain the bacterial balance of the stomach and GI tract. Studies suggest that the zinc-L-carnosine co m pound may have effects on certain strains of harmful bacteria and, therefore, may be able to help maintain a GI environment that is favorable to health.1 By supporting the bacterial balance in the stomach, PepZin GI™ can help maintain a healthy mucosal lining.

    Supports the health of gastric cells.*

    PepZin GI™ has been studied for its ability to prevent free radical damage to gastric cells. In one such study, rat gastric cells were exposed to ethanol and hydrogen peroxide, two substances known to cause free radical damage to living cells. Cells were bathed in hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, zinc-L-carnosine, or a combination of zinc-L-carnosine with either ethanol or hydrogen peroxide. While the cells bathed in ethanol and hydrogen peroxide solutions all exhibited signs of damage due to free radical production, the cells that were bathed in zinc-L-carnosine were largely protected from the effects of free radical damage. The authors concluded that the zinc compound directly protected gastric mucosal cells from oxidant stress and alcohol induced damage.5

    Additional research further confirms the gastro-protective effects of PepZin GI™. In another rat study, stomach lesions were induced by administration of the chemical monochloramine, a known pro-oxidant (producer of free radicals). One of the groups of rats was fed the zinc-Lcarnosine compound prior to being exposed to monochloramine. The researchers found that the size of the lesions in the group pre-treated with zinc-L-carnosine was significantly less than the lesions in the control group. The authors concluded that the zinc compound exerted a beneficial protective effect against monochloramine-induced stomach lesions.6

    The zinc-L-carnosine in PepZin GI™ has also been shown to slow the development of aspirin induced stomach damage in rats. The researchers measurably detected lower levels of TNF-alpha in rats given zinc-L-carnosine as compared to the control rats. TNF-alpha is an inflammatory cytokine that is known to be released in response to gastric damage.7 These results may suggest a role for PepZin GI™ in protecting gastric cells by occasionally reducing the levels of certain cytokines in minor inflammation of the stomach.

    Scientific References

    1. Kuwayama H, et al. Polaprezinc. Nippon Rinsho 2002 Feb; 60 Suppl 2:717-720. 2.Matsukura T,Tanaka H. Applicability of zinc complex of l-carnosine for medical use. Biochemistry (Moscow) 2000;65(7):817-823. 3.Miyoshi A, et al. Clinical evaluation of Z-103 on gastric ulcer - a multicenter double-blind comparative study with cetraxate hydroChloride. Jpn PharmTher 1992;20(1):199-223. 4.Misawa T, et al. Clinical study of Z-103 - clinical effects on gastric ulcer and influence on endocrine function. Jpn PharmTher 1992; 20(1):245-254. 5. Hiraishi H, et al. Polaprezinc protects gastric mucosal cells from noxious agents through antioxidant properties in vitro. Aliment Pharmacl Ther 1999;13:261-269. 6. Kato S, Nishiwaki H, et al. Mucosal ulcerogenic action of monochloramine in rat stomachs: effects of polaprezinc and sucralfate. Dig Dis Sci 1997;42(10):2156-2163. 7.Naito Y, et al. Effects of polaprezinc on lipid peroxidation, neutrophil accumulation, and TNF-alpha expression in rats with aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury. Dig Dis Sci 2001;46(4):845-851.



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    Curcumin - Turmeric Extract
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    Date: August 19, 2005 12:47 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Curcumin - Turmeric Extract

    Curcumin

    Turmeric- History and Traditional Usage

    Native to Southeast Asia, Curcuma longa is a tall
    tropical shrub with large oblong leaves and pale yellow flowers.
    The genus “Curcuma” belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, which
    includes ginger.1 The plant possesses a large root structure
    with fleshy, bulbous underground parts called “rhizomes.” These
    rhizomes, known as turmeric root, are harvested at maturity,
    dried and cured for commercial use. Chemical analysis shows that
    dried turmeric contains essential and volatile oils, with a
    curcuminoid content of 2.5 to 5.0 %.2

    In addition to its
    popularity as a spice, turmeric is used as a dye for cloth and
    coloring agent in foods and cosmetics, thanks to its rich yellow
    color. Turmeric also serves as a preservative, probably owing to
    the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of curcumin.
    Extracts of Curcuma longa have demonstrated in vitro
    antibacterial and anti-fungal effects.3

    Turmeric is named in
    ancient Ayurvedic and Chinese herbal texts as a traditional folk
    remedy. Historically, turmeric was used externally for wounds,
    and sprains, and internally for digestive complaints,
    rheumatism, liver disorders, coughs and colds.4
    Benefits

    Protects cells and tissues by fighting free radicals.*

    Supports joint function*

    The numerous beneficial
    effects attributed to turmeric stem in large measure from the
    antioxidant properties of curcumin. Antioxidants neutralize free
    radicals, which are highly unstable molecules that can damage
    cellular structures through abnormal oxidative reactions.
    Curcumin is a potent “scavenger” of the superoxide radical, a
    free radical that initiates potentially harmful oxidative
    processes such as lipid peroxidation.5 Through this activity,
    curcumin has been shown to protect skin cells from the injurious
    effect of nitroblue tetrazolium, a toxin that generates
    superoxide radicals. Curcumin also increases survival of cells
    exposed in vitro to the enzyme hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase,
    which stimulates superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production.
    Curcumin itself is not toxic to cells, even at high
    concentrations. Pure curcumin was shown to be less protective
    than a mixture of curcuminoids, indicating a possible synergism
    among curcuminoids.6 Because free radicals are involved in aging
    and exert harmful effects on skin, these results suggest
    curcumin may help slow skin aging.

    Curcumin demonstrates
    several other in vitro effects linked to free radical
    scavenging. Curcumin scavenges nitric oxide, a compound
    associated with the body’s inflammatory response.7 Pure curcumin
    and turmeric extracts protect red blood cells from lipid
    peroxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide.8 Curcumin has been
    shown to protect DNA from oxidative damage, inhibit binding of
    toxic metabolites to DNA, and reduce DNA mutations in the Ames’
    test.9 Although additional studies suggest an anticarcinogenic
    effect of curcumin, through protection of DNA,10 one in vitro
    study found that curcumin induced DNA damage in human gastric
    mucosal cells.11 It is speculated that curcumin may act as a
    pro-oxidant in the presence of transition metal ions such as
    copper and iron. (This is true for other antioxidants, including
    vitamin C.) Curcumin also demonstrates in vitro inhibition of
    COX-I and COX-II enzymes, which are involved in the inflammatory
    reaction.12 Together these results strongly suggest that
    curcumin is a potent bioprotectant with a potentially wide range
    of therapeutic applications.

    Animal studies- In vivo protective effects

    Through its free radical scavenging
    properties, curcumin has shown bioprotective effects in animals.
    In one study, rats were treated with isoproterenol, a chemical
    that causes cardiac hypertrophy (enlargement of the heart) due
    to abnormal collagen metabolism. Co-treatment with curcumin
    reversed the degradation of collagen and cardiac hypertrophy
    induced by isoproterenol.13 Curcumin protects mice from
    detrimental effects of radiation, by stabilizing the glyoxalase
    system, a biological system that regulates cell division.14
    Curcumin protects livers of rats from the damaging effects of
    carbon tetraChloride (CCl4), a potent hepatoxin that injures the
    liver via its free radical metabolite, CCl3.15,16 Curcumin
    protected rats from alcohol-induced brain damage, in a study in
    which oral administration of curcumin reversed lipid
    peroxidation, reduced levels of free-radical metabolites and
    increased levels of glutathione, a major physiologic
    antioxidant.17 Curcuma longa extracts have shown
    anti-inflammatory effects in rats.18

    Human Trials

    Curcumin exhibits free-radical scavenging ability when
    administered to humans. In an open trial (uncontrolled), 18
    healthy individuals ranging in age from 27 to 67 years consumed
    a Curcuma longa extract, at a dose supplying 20 mg curcuminoids,
    for 45 days. Before and after blood tests showed a statistically
    significant decrease in lipid peroxides.19 Preliminary trials
    have tested the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin, with
    results that verify the traditional use of turmeric as an
    anti-rheumatic herb. In a short-term double-blind, cross-over,
    comparative study, 18 people received curcumin (1200 mg daily)
    or phenylbutazone for two week periods. Both curcumin and
    phenylbutazone produced measurable improvements in joint
    flexibility and walking time. The subjects reported results only
    with phenylbutazone, which may be explained by the short
    duration of the trial.20 In a small placebo-controlled trial
    comparing curcumin to phenylbutazone, 45 patients with
    post-operative inflammation received curcumin, phenylbutazone or
    placebo. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin and
    phenylbutazone were comparable and superior to placebo.21
    Curcumin has not been found to produce an analgesic (pain
    relieving) effect.

    Bioperine-Nature’s Absorption Enhancer
    Boosts Curcumin Absorption*

    Traditional Ayurvedic herbal
    formulas often include black pepper and long pepper as
    synergistic herbs. The active ingredient in both black pepper
    and long pepper is the alkaloid, piperine. Experiments carried
    out to evaluate the scientific basis for the use of peppers have
    shown that piperine significantly enhances bioavailability when
    consumed with other substances.22 Several double-blind clinical
    studies have confirmed that Bioperine® increases absorption of
    nutrients.23

    Curcumin is poorly absorbed in the intestinal
    tract, limiting its therapeutic effectiveness. Oral doses are
    largely excreted in feces, and only trace amounts appear in the
    blood. Concomitant administration of 20 mg of piperine with 2
    grams of curcumin increases the bioavailability of curcumin by
    2000%.24

    Scientific References


    1. Majeed, M., Badmaev,
    V., Shivakumar, U., Rajendran, R. Curcuminoids. 1995.
    Piscataway, NJ: NutriScience Publishers.
    2. Srimal, R.C.
    Turmeric: a brief review of its medicinal properties.
    Fitoterapia 1997;68(6):483-93.
    3. Ammon, H.P.T., Wahl, M.A.
    Pharmacology of Curcuma longa. Planta Medica 1991;57:1-7.
    4.
    Snow, J.M. Herbal Monograph: Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae).
    The Protocol Journal of Botanical Medicine, Autumn
    1995:43-46.
    5. Rao, N.S., Rao, M.N.A. Free radical scavenging
    activity of curcuminoids. Arzneim.-Forsch./Drug Res.
    1996;46(2):169-171.
    6. Bonté. F. et al. Protective effect of
    curcuminoids on epidermal skin cells under free oxygen radical
    stress. Planta Medica 1997;63:265-66.
    7. Rao, S., Rao, M.N.A.
    Nitric oxide scavenging by curcuminoids. J Pharm. Pharmacol.
    1997;49:105-7.
    8. Lalitha, S., Selvam, R. Prevention of
    H2Os-induced red blood cell lipid peroxidation by aqueous
    extracted turmeric. Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr
    1999;8(2):113-14.
    9. Deshpande, S.S., Maru, G.B. Effects of
    curcumin on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene derived DNA adducts
    in vitro. Cancer Letters 1995;96:71-80.
    10. Subramanian, M., et
    al. Diminution of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage by curcumin
    and related antioxidants. Mutation Research
    1994;311:249-55.
    11. Blasiak, J., Trzeciak, A., Kowalik, J.
    Curcumin damages DNA in human gastric mucosa cells and
    lymphocytes. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and
    Oncology 1999;18(4):271-76.
    12. Ramsewak, R.S., DeWitt, D.L.,
    Nair, M.G. Cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory
    activities of Curcumins I-III from Curcuma longa. Phytomedicine
    2000;7(4):303-308.
    13. Nirmala, C. Anand, S., Puvanakrishnan,
    R. Curcumin treatment modulates collagen metabolism in
    isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Molecular and
    Cellular Biochemistry 1999;197:31-37.
    14. Choudhary, D.,
    Chandra, D. Kale, R.K. Modulation of radioresponse of glyoxalase
    system by curcumin. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
    1999;64:1-7.
    15. Park, E-J. et al. Protective effect of
    curcumin in rat liver injury induced by carbon tetraChloride. J
    Pharm. Pharmacol. 2000;52:437-40.
    16. Deshpande, U.R. et al.
    Protective effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract on
    carbon tetraChloride-induced liver damage in rats. Indian
    Journal of Experimental Biology 1998;36:573-77.
    17.
    Rajakrishnan, V. et al. Neuroprotective role of curcumin from
    Curcuma longa on ethanol-induced brain damage. Phytotherapy
    Research 1999;13:571-74.
    18. Arora, R.B. Basu, N., Kapoor, V.,
    Jain, A.P. Anti-inflammatory studies on Curcuma longa
    (Turmeric). Indian J Med Res 1971;59(8):1289-95.
    19.
    Ramirez-Bosca, A. et al. Antioxidant curcuma extracts decrease
    the blood peroxide levels of human subjects. Age
    1995;18:167-69.
    20. Deodhar, S.D., Sethi, R. Srimal. R.C.
    Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin
    (diferoyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.
    21.
    Satoskar, R.R., Shah, S J. Shenoy, S.G. Evaluation of
    anti-inflammatory property of curcumin (diferoyl methane) in
    patients with postoperative inflammation. International Journal
    of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy and Toxicolgy
    1986;24(12):651-54.
    22. Atal, C., Zutshi, U., Rao, P.
    Scientific evidence on the role of Ayurvedic herbals on
    bioavailability of drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
    1981;4:229-232.
    23. Bioperine®–Nature's Bioavailability
    Enhancing Thermonutrient. Executive Summary. 1996; Sabinsa
    Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.
    24. Shoba, G., et al. Influence
    of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and
    human volunteers. Planta Medica 1998;64(4):353-6.

    © 2002
    Doctor's Best, Inc. Revised 8/13/02

    *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.



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    CARBON TETRACHLORIDE TESTING AND SILYMARIN
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 12, 2005 09:59 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: CARBON TETRAChloride TESTING AND SILYMARIN

    CARBON TETRAChloride TESTING AND SILYMARIN

    Carbon tetraChloride is used in laboratory tests to assess the ability of a substance to actually protect the liver from any potentially damaging compound. Increasing the dosages of carbon tetraChloride takes the liver through fatty infiltration, fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis. During these tests, administering Milk Thistle extract resulted in effective protection of liver tissue from the toxic effects of the chemical.

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    THE DEADLY DEATHCAP MUSHROOM, SILYMARIN, AND LIVER DAMAGE
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 12, 2005 09:58 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: THE DEADLY DEATHCAP MUSHROOM, SILYMARIN, AND LIVER DAMAGE

    THE DEADLY DEATHCAP MUSHROOM AND SILYMARIN

    The protective action of Silymarin in the liver has been confirmed through several experimental and clinical studies. Animals who have had their livers exposed to toxic chemicals such as carbon tetraChloride, amanita toxin (deadly mushroom) and galactosamine were protected from damage by Milk Thistle.3 Animals who had their livers partially removed experienced some organ regeneration when treated with Milk Thistle.

    In the 1970’s, additional research on the ability of Milk Thistle to de-toxify liver cells of deadly mushro o m poisoning was conducted. The poison of this mushroom is extremely toxic and usually results in death within two to five hours. Amantine causes severe hemorrhagic liver dystrophy and inevitable death. Even when the studies were undertaken, scientists did not expect Milk Thistle to offer any significant protection against such a volatile and deadly toxin. The two peptides which comprise the poison are the most potent liver damaging substances currently known. Sixty patients who had severe amanita poisoning in Europe were treated with Milk Thistle. The results were impressive.

    In experiments where silymarin was given before the amanita toxin was ingested, it was 100 percent effective in preventing liver toxicity.4 If given within ten minutes, it still neutralized the poison. Even after 24 hours, it was found to prevent death and liver damage.5

    Not only did Milk Thistle protect the liver fro m amantine damage, it also helped to prevent the loss of weight normally seen in animals that have ingested the poison. The impressive results of these tests resulted in stepped up production of Milk Thistle extract, which has made it much more available now.

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    MILK THISTLE (Silybum marianum)
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 12, 2005 09:45 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: MILK THISTLE (Silybum marianum)

    MILK THISTLE (Silybum marianum)

    COMMON NAMES: Christ’s Crown, Holy Thistle, Venus Thistle, Heal Thistle, Wand of God’s Grace PLANT PARTS: ripe seeds, or extract from the shell

    ACTIVE COMPOUNDS: Seed extract contains a complex of three flavanolignans which are collectively referred to as silymarin. These flavonoid-like compounds are silibin, silychristin and silydianin.

    PHARMACOLOGY: The flavonoids contained in Milk Thistle have a strong liver protective action and have been extensively used in Europe as pharmaceutical p reparations for liver disorders. These include: silibin, silydianin and silychristin, which all combine to create silymarin. Clinical trials have shown that silymarin can protect the liver by counteracting a number of toxic substances including alcohol, acetaminophen, carbon tetraChloride and the Amanita mushroom poison.

    Apparently, silymarin actually alters liver cell membranes which prevent toxins from passing through the cell. It inhibits the release or the synthesis of certain enzymes which are toxic to liver tissue. In addition, these compounds stimulate cellular growth and reproduction by boosting protein synthesis. Milk Thistle seeds are also high in betaine hydroChloride, which may contribute to the hepato-protective properties of the plant.

    Silymarin has also exhibited significant antioxidant capabilities and can help reduce inflammation by inhibiting certain enzymes. The seeds of the plants appear to have the highest concentration of silymarin.

    VITAMIN AND MINERAL CONTENT: rich in bioflavonoids CHARACTER: hepato-tonic, alterative, demulcent and protective BODY SYSTEMS TARGETED: liver, gallbladder, pancreas and stomach.

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    New* Improved formula - Cholest-Response Lower Cholesterol
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 08, 2005 09:27 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: New* Improved formula - Cholest-Response Lower Cholesterol

    New & Improved Formula!

    Cholest-Response™

  • ? Now with Sytrinol™, gamma E, policosanol, L-arginine, and selenium.
  • ? A Cholesterol Rescue™ product: helps maintain cholesterol levels already in the normal range.
  • ? Bio-Aligned Formula™: supports multiple body systems including the heart, blood vessels, nervous system, thyroid, liver and gastrointestinal tract.

    Serving Size:

    4 tablets contain:
    Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 600 mg
    Vitamin E 16 IU
    (from gamma-vitamin E complex)
    Niacin (as inositol hexanicotinate) 500 mg
    Iodine (from kelp) 150 mcg
    Selenium (as L-selenomethionine [SelenoPure™] & sodium selenite) 100 mcg
    Chromium (as chromium polynicotinate [ChromeMate®] & chromium picolinate) 100 mcg
    Phytosterol Complex 40% 750 mg
    Yielding 300 mg beta-sitosterol
    Garlic Powder Extract 600 mg
    (standardized to 8,000 ppm allicin)
    Turmeric Extract 526 mg
    Yielding 500 mg curcumin
    gamma-Vitamin E Complex 500 mg
    Inositol 350 mg
    (as inositol and inositol hexanicotinate)
    Red Yeast Rice 350 mg
    Yielding 1.5% mevinolinic acid monacolins
    Artichoke Extract 250 mg
    (standardized to 2.5% cynarins)
    L-Arginine (as L-arginine HCl) 240 mg
    Methylmethioninesulfonium Chloride 200 mg
    (vitamin U)
    Green Tea Extract 105 mg
    Yielding 100 mg polyphenols, 36 mg EGCG
    Sytrinol™ 100 mg
    (proprietary blend of citrus polymethoxylated
    flavones and palm tocotrienols)
    Soy Bean Concentrate 100 mg
    Yielding 40 mg total isoflavones
    Ginkgo Leaf 24% (50:1 Extract) 60 mg
    Guggul Extract (10% guggulsterones) 50 mg
    Dandelion Root Extract (4:1) 50 mg
    Hawthorne Berry Extract (4:1) 50 mg
    Myricetin 30 mg
    Policosanol 10 mg
    Coenzyme Q10 5 mg

    Suggested Use: Take 4 tablets each night or as recommended by your health care professional.

    CodeSize Retail UPC Code
    SN127130 tabs $12.50021078012719
    SN127260 tabs $23.50021078012726
    SN1880120 tabs $44.98021078018803

    We offer Source Naturals at 46% OFF Man. Suggested Retail



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    THE HEALTH AND NUTRITIONAL USES OF CHI-TOSAN
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 08:15 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: THE HEALTH AND NUTRITIONAL USES OF CHI-TOSAN

    THE HEALTH AND NUTRITIONAL USES OF CHI-TOSAN

    1 . Chitosan Is A Natural Antacid Studies have shown that Chitosan is an effective and highly safe antacid.97 A U.S. patent has also been issued in this area.107

    2 . Antihypert ensive Some clinical studies have found that Chitosan worked as an antihypertensive agent. It lowered blood pressure in male subjects which were fed a high salt diet.99 It also has the ability to decrease blood levels of Chloride, which decreases the activity of an angiotensin converting enzyme. Angiotensin is vital to the maintenance of normal blood pressure.100

    3 . Antibact erial/ Anticandida/ Antiviral Properties Of Chitosan. a) Chitosan has been effectively used to treat acne. It is able to inhibit certain bacteria which cause the inflammation associated with acne.91 b) Chitosan has exhibited the ability to kill candida in clinical tests involving mice due to its effect on protease action.92 c) When used as a food preservative, Chitosan exhibited stronger bactericidal activity than lactic acid.93 d) In some tests, Chitosan even demonstrated a dramatic anti- parasitic action.94 e) Chitosan very impressively reduced the amount of bacterial translocation which can occur after a burn injury. It is believed that by reducing the bacterial population of the colon, the potential for a life threatening infection to set in after a trauma is decreased.95 f) Chitosan has demonstrated the ability to kill certain viruses.96

    4 . Wound And Ulcer Healing And Chitosan. Tests using topical applications of Chitosan found that it promoted faster healing of wounds or abscesses that had become infected with staph infection.88 Topical applications of Chitosan decreased coagulation time which is vital to the healing of wounds like bleeding ulcers.89

    5 . Anti-Plaque Action Of Chitosan In The Mouth. Because of its antacid action, Chitosan increases the pH in the mouth. Chitosan also binds bacteria that cause dental plaque and subsequent tooth decay.98

    6 . Chitosan, Calcium Absorption And Bone Health. Clinical tests have found that Chitosan enhances the bioavailability of calcium. When Chitosan is added to the diet more of the dietary calcium is absorbed.105 The more calcium is available, the better bone quality will be. The prevention of osteoporosis depends on continual supplies of “absorbable” calcium. Chitosan has been used as a supplementary food for osteoporosis.



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    REFERENCES
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 08:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: REFERENCES

    REFERENCES

    1 a. The Surgeon General’s “Nutrition and Health Report.” b. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES III)” c. The National Academy of Science’s. Diet and Health Report: Health Promotion and Disease Objectives (DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 91-50213, Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1990). e. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 2 Rolls BJ. Carbohydrates, fats, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr 1995; 61(4 Suppl):960S-967S. 3 McDowell MA, Briefel RR, Alaimo K, et al. Energy and macronutrient intakes of persons ages 2 months and over in the United States: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Phase 1:1988-91. Advance data from vital and health statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; No. 255. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics; 1994. 4 Center for Science in the Public Interest and McDonald’s Nutrition and You—A guide to Healthy Eating at McDonald’s: McDonald’s Corp,1991. 5 Bray GA. Appetite Control in Adults. In: Fernstrom JD, Miller GD eds. Appetite and Body Weight Regulation. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1994:1-92. 6 Michnovicz JJ. How to Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer. New York: Warner Book Inc. 1994:54. 7 Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet. National Research Council Report, National Academy of Sciences, 15 Feb. 1996. 8 Van Tallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979:32: 2723-33. 9 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:273. 10 Swaneck GE, Fishman J. Covalent binding of the endogenous estrogen 16A-hydroxyestrone to estradiol in human breast concer cells: characterization and intranuclear localization. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988:85;7831-5. 11 Colditz GA. Epidemiology of breast cancer. Findings from the nurses’ health study. Cancer1993;714:1480-9. 12 Hennen WJ. Breast Cancer Risk Reduction. The effects of supplementation with dietary indoles. Unpublished report 1992. 13 Deslypere BJ. Obesity and cancer. Metabolism 1995;44(93):24-7. 14 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:281. 15 Whittemore AS, Kolonel LN, John M. Prostate cancer in relation to diet, physical activity, and body size in blacks, whites, and Asians in the United States and Canada. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995;87(9):629-31. 16 Key T. Risk factors for prostate cancer. Cancer Survivor 1995;23:63- 77. 17 Kondo Y, Homma Y, Aso Y, Kakizoe T. Promotional effects of twogeneration exposure to a high-fat diet on prostate carcinogenisis in ACI/Seg mice. Cancer Res 1994;54(23):6129-32. 18 Wang Y, Corr JG, Taler HT, Tao Y, Fair WR, Heston WD. Decreased growth of established human prostate LNCaP tumors in nude mice fed a low-fat diet. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995;87(19):1456-62. 19 Nixon DW. Cancer prevention clinical trials. In-Vivo 1994;8(5):713-6. 20 Key T. Micronutrients and cancer aetiology: the epidmiological evidence. Proceed Nutr Soc 1994;53(3):605-14. 21 Gorbach SL, Goldin BR. The intestinal microflora and the colon cancer connection. Reviews of Infectious Diseases 1990;12(Suppl 2):S252-61. 22 Shrapnel WS, Calvert GD, Nestel PJ, Truswell AS. Diet and coronary heart disease. The National Heart Foundation of Australia. Med J Australia. 1995;156(Suppl):S9-S16. 23 Ellis JL, Campos-Outcalt D. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in native Americans: a literature review. Am. J. Preventive Med 1994;10(5):295-307. 24 DiBianco R. The changing syndrome of heart failure: an annotated review as we approach the 21st century. J. Hypertension 1994; 12(4 Suppl):S73- S87. 25 Van Itallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979;32(suppl):2723-33. 26 Kestin M, Moss R, Clifton PM, Nestel PJ. Comparative effects of three cereal brans on plasma lipids, blood pressure and glucose metabolism in mildly hyper-cholesterolemic men. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;52(4):661-6. 27 Story JA. Dietary fiber and lipid metabolism. In: Spiller GA, Kay RM. eds. Medical Aspects of Dietary Fiber. Penun Medical; New York, 1980, p.138. 28 Stein PP, Black HR. The role of diet in the genesis and treatment of hypertension. Med. Clin. North America. 1993;77(4):831-47. 29 Olin JW. Antihypertensive treatment in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Cleve. Clin. J. Medicine. 1994;61(5):337-44. 30 Tinker LF. Diabetes Mellitus—a priority health care issue for women. J. Am. Dietetic Association. 1994;94(9):976-85. 31 Gaspard UJ, Gottal JM, van den Brule FA. Postmenopausal changes of lipid and glucose metabolism: a review of their main aspects. Maturitas. 1995;21(3):71-8. 32 Coordt MC, Ruhe RC, McDonald RB. Aging and insulin secretion. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biology and Medicine. 1995;209(3):213-22. 33 Felber JP. From Obesity to Diabetes. Pathophysiological Considerations. Int. Journal of Obesity 1992;16:937-952. 34 Gillum RF. The association of body fat distribution with hypertension, hypertensive heart disease, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors in men and women age 18-79. J Chronic Diseases 1987;40:421-8. 35 Haffner SM, Stern MP, Hazuda HP, et al. Role of obesity and fat distribution in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellits in Mexican Americans and non- Hispanic whites. Diabetes Care 1986;9:153-61. 36 Bonadonna RC, deFronzo RA. Glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and Metabolism. 1991;17(1 Pt. 2):12-35. 37 Shoemaker JK, Bonen A. Vascular actions of insulin in health and disease. Canadian J. of Applied Physiology. 1995;20(2):127-54. 38 Resnick LM. Ionic Basis of Hypertension, Insulin Resistaince, Vascular Disease, and Related Disorders. The Mechanism of ‘Syndrome X’. Am. J. Hypertension. 1993;6(suppl):123S-134S. 39 Trautwein EA. Dietetic influences on the formation and prevention of cholesterol gallstones. Z. Ernahrugswiss. 1994;33(1):2-15. 40 Cicuttini FM, Spector TD. Osteoarthritis in the aged. Epidemiological issues and optimal management. Drugs and Aging. 1995;6(5):409-20. 41 Melnyk MG, Wienstein E. Preventing obesity in black women by targeting adolescents: a literature review. J Am. Diet. Association. 1994;94(4):536-40. 42 Robinson BE, Gjerdingen Dk, Houge DR. Obesity: a move from traditional to more patient-oriented management. J. Am. Board of Family Practice. 1995;8(2):99-108. 43 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. Reversal of Obesity in the Genetically Obese fa/fa Zucker Rat with an Ehpedrine/Methylxanthines Thermogenic Mixture. J. Nutrition. 1987;117:383-9. 44 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of ephedrin/methylxanthine mixtures: animal studies. Am J Clinical Nutr. 1986;43:388-394. 45 Richelsen B. Health risks of obesity. Significance of the regional distri-bution of adipose tissue. Ugeskr. Laeger. 1991;153(13):908-13. 46 Lissner L, Heitmann BL. Dietary fat and obesity: Evidence from epidemiology. European J. Clinical Nutrition. 1995;49(2):79-90. 47 Lissner L, Heitmann BL. The dietary fat: Carbohydrate ratio in relation to body weight, Current Opinion in Lipidology. 1995;6(1):8-13. 48 Ravussin E. Energy metabolism in obesity. Studies in the Pima Indians. Diabetes Care. 1993;16(1):232-8. 49 O’Dea K. Westernisation, insulin resistance and diabetes in Australian aborigines. Med J. Australia. 1991;155(4):258-64. 50 Bailey C. Fit or Fat . Houghton Mifflen, Boston, 1991. 51 McCarty MF. Optimizing Exercise for Fat Loss. Unpublished report. 52 Weinsier RL, Schutz Y, Bracco D. Reexamination of the relationship of resting metabolic rate and fat-free mass and the the metabolically active components of fat-free mass in humans. Am. J. Clinical Nutrition. 1992;55(4):790-4. 53 Evans WJ. Exercise, nutrition and aging. J. Nutrition. 1992;122(3 suppl):796-801. 54 Schlicker SA, Borra ST, Regan C. The weight and fitness status of United States children. Nutrition Reviews. 1994;52(1):11-7. 55 Raben A, Jensen ND, Marckmann P, Sandstrom B and Astrup A. Spontaeous weight loss during 11 weeks’ ad libitum intake of a low fat/high fiber diet in young, normal weight subjects. Stockholm Press. 1995;916-23. 56 Blundell JE, Cotton JR, Delargy H, Green S, Greenough A, King NA, Lawton, CL. The fat paradox: fat-induced satiety signals versus high fat overconsumption. Short Communication 1995:832-835. 57 Reinhold RB. Late results of gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13(4):307-8. 58 McCredie M, Coates M Grulich A. Cancer incidence in migrants to New South Wales (Australia) from the Middle East, 1972-1991. Cancer Causes Control 1994:5(5):414-21. 59 Schiff ER, Dietschy JM. Steatorrhea Associated with Disordered Bile Acid Metabolism. Am. J. Digestive Diseases. 1969;14(6) 60 Nauss JL , Thompson JL and Nagyvary J. The binding of micellar lipids to Chitosan. Lipids. 1983;18(10):714-19. 61 Braconnot H, Sue la natrue ces champignons. Ann Chim Phys 1811;79:265. 62 Odier A. Memoire sur la composition chemique des parties cornees des insectes. Mem Soc Hist Nat Paris 1823;1:29. 63 Johnson EL, Peniston QP. Utilization of shellfish waste for chitin and Chitosan production. Chp 19 In: Chemistry and Biochemistry of Marine Food Products. Martin RE, Flick GJ, Hebard CE and Ward DR (eds.) 1982. p.415-. AVI Publishing Co., Westport, CT. 64 Shahram H. Seafood waste: the potential for industrial use. Kem Kemi 1992;19(3),256-8. 65 Rouget C. Des substances amylacees dans le tissue des animux, specialement les Articules (Chitine). Compt Rend 1859;48:792. Commission on Natural Health Products. 1995 67 Peniston QP and Johnson EL. Method for Treating an Aqueous Medium with Chitosan and Derivatives of Chitin to Remove an Impurity. US Patent 3,533,940. Oct. 30:1970. 68 Poly-D-Glucosamine (Chitosan); Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance. Federal Register. 1995;60(75):19523-4. Rules and Regulations. Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Part 180. April, 19, 1995. 69 Arul J. “Use of Chitosan films to retard post-harvest spoilage of fruits and vegetables,” Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 70 Karlsen J, Skaugrud O. “Excipient properties of Chitosan,” Manufacturing Chemist. 1991;62:18-9. 71 Winterowd JG, Sandford PA. Chitin and Chitosan. In: Food Polysaccharides and their Applications. Ed: Stephen AM. Marcel Dekker 1995. 72 Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 73 Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 74 Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 75 Zikakis, JP. Chitin, Chitosan and Related Enzymes. Academic Press, Inc. 1984. 76 Abelin J and Lassus A. Fat binder as a weight reducer in patients with moderate obesity. ARS Medicina, Helsinki, Aug- October, 1994. 77 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Increasing effect of a Chitosan and ascorbic acid mixture on fecal dietary fat excretion. Biosci Biotech Biochem 1994;58(9):1617-20. 78 Maezaki Y, Tsuji K, Nakagawa Y, et al. Hypocholesterolemic effect of Chitosan in adult males. Biosci Biotchnol Biochem1993;57(9):1439-44. 79 Kobayashi T, Otsuka S, Yugari Y. Effect of Chitosan on serum and liver cholesterol levels in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutritional Rep. Int., 1979;19(3):327-34. 80 Sugano M, Fujikawa T, Hiratsuji Y, Hasegawa Y. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Chitosan in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutr Rep. Int. 1978;18(5):531-7. 81 Vahouny G, Satchanandam S, Cassidy M, Lightfoot F, Furda I. Comparative effects of Chitosan and cholestryramine on lymphatic absorption of lipids in the rat. Am J Clin Nutr, 1983;38(2):278-84 82 Suzuki S, Suzuki M, Katayama H. Chitin and Chitosan oligomers as hypolipemics and formulations containing them. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 63 41,422 [88,422] 22 Feb1988. 83 Ikeda I, Tomari Y, Sugano M. Interrelated effects of dietary fiber on lymphatic cholesterol and triglyceride absorption in rats. J Nutr 1989;119(10):1383- 7. 84 LeHoux JG and Grondin F. Some effects of Chitosan on liver function in the rat. Endocrinology. 1993;132(3):1078-84. 85 Fradet G, Brister S, Mulder D, Lough J, Averbach BL. “Evaluation of Chitosan as a New Hemostatic Agent: In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 86 Malette W, Quigley H, Gaines R, Johnson N, Rainer WG. Chitosan A New Hemostatic. Annals of Thorasic Surgery. 1983;36:55. 87 Malette W, Quigley H, Adickes ED. Chitosan effect in Vascular Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday, Eds: Chitin in Nature and Technology. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 88 Okamoto Y, Tomita T, Minami S, et al. Effects of Chitosan on experimental abscess with Staphylococcus aureus in dogs. J. Vet. Med., 1995;57(4):765-7. 89 Klokkevold PR, Lew DS, Ellis DG, Bertolami CN. Effect of Chitosan on lingual hemostasis in rabbits. Journal of Oral-Maxillofac-Surg, 1991;Aug. 49(8):858-63. 89 Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 90 Hiroshi S, Makoto K, Shoji A, Yoshikazu S. Antibacterial fiber blended with Chitosan. Sixth International Conference on Chitin and Chitosan. Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland. August 1994;16-19. 91 Shimai Y, Tsukuda K, Seino H. Antiacne preparations containing chitin, Chitosan or their partial degradation products. Jpn. Kikai Tokkyo Koho JP 04,288,017 [92,288,017] 13 Oct 1992. 92 Suzuki K, Okawa Y, Suzuki S, Suzuki M. Candidacidal effect of peritoneal exudate cells in mice administered with chitin or Chitosan: the role of serine protease in the mechanism of oxygen-independent candidacidal effect. Microbiol Immunol. 1987;31(4):375-9. 93 Sawada G, Akaha Y, Naito H, Fujita M. Synergistic food preservatives containing organic acids, Chitosan and citrus seed extracts. Jpn, Kokai Kokkyo Koho JP 04 27,373 [92 27,373] 30 Jan 1992. 94 Min H-K, Hatai K, Bai S. Some inhibitory effects of Chitosan on fishpathogenic oomycete, Saprolegnia parasitic. Gyobyo Kenkyu, 1994;29(2):73-4. 95 Nelson JL, Alexander JW, Gianotti L, Chalk CL, Pyles T. The influence of dietary fiber on microbial growth in vitro and bacterial translocation after burn injury in mice. Nutr 1994;10(1):32-6. 96 Ochiai Y, Kanazawa Y. Chitosan as virucide. Jpn Kokai Tokkyo Koho 79 41,326. 97 Hillyard IW, Doczi J, Kiernan. Antacid and antiulcer properties of the polysaccharide Chitosan in the rat. Proc Soc Expl Biol Med 1964; 115:1108-1112. 98 Shibasaki K, Sano H, MatsukuboT, Takaesu Y. pH response of human dental plaque to chewing gum supplemented with low molecular Chitosan. Bull- Tokyo-Dent-Coll, 1994:35(2): 61-6. 99 Kato H, Okuda H. Chitosan as antihypertensive. Jpn. Kikoi Tokyo Koho JP 06 56,674 [94 56,674] 100 Kato H, Taguchi T. Mechanism of the rise in blood pressure by sodium Chloride and decrease effect of Chitosan on blood pressure. Baiosaiensu to Indasutori 1993;51(12):987-8. 101 Muzzarelli R, Biagini G, Pugnaoni A, Filippini O, Baldassarre V, Castaldini C, and Rizzoli C. Reconstruction of Periodontal Tissue with Chitosan. Biomaterials. 1989;10:598-603. 102 Sapelli P, Baldassarre V, Muzzarelli R, Emanuelli M. Chitosan in Dentistry. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 103 Borah G, Scott G, Wortham K. Bone induction by Chitosan in endochrondral bones of the extremities. In Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 104 Ito F. Role of Chitosan as a supplementary food for osteoporosis. Gekkan Fudo Kemikaru, 1995;11(2):39-44. 105 Nakamura S, Yoshioka T, hamada S, Kimura I. Chitosan for enhancement of bioavailability of calcium. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 07 194,316 [95 194,316] 01 Aug 1995. 106 Maekawa A, Wada M. Food Containing chitin or its derivatives for reduction of blood and urine uric acid. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 03 280,852 [91 280,852], 11 Dec 1991. 107 Weisberg M, Gubner R. Compositions for oral administration comprising Chitosan and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Antacid preparations for alleviating gastric hyperacidity. U.S. patent 3257275 108 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Mechanism for the inhibition of fat digestion by Chitosan and for the synergistic effect of ascorbate. Biosci Biotech Biochem1995;59(5):786-90. 109 McCausland CW. Fat Binding Properties of Chitosan as Compared to Other Dietary Fibers. Private communication. 24 Jan1995. 110 Deuchi K, Kanauchi O, Imasato Y, Kobayashi E. Biosci Biotech Biochem. 1994:58,1613-6. 111 Ebihara K, Schneeman BO. Interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, cholesterol and triglyceride with dietary fibers in the small intestine of rats. J Nutr 1989;119(8):1100-6. 112 Weil A, M.D. Natural Health Natural Medicine: Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1990:182. 113 Chen Y-H, Riby Y, Srivastava P, Bartholomew J, Denison M, Bjeldanes L. Regualtion of CYP1A1 by indolo[3,2-b]carbazole in murine hepatoma cells. J Biol Chem 1995;270(38):22548-55. 114 Intestinal Absorption of metal ions and chelates. Ashmead HD, Graff DJ, Ashmead HH. Charles C Thomas, Springfield, IL 1985. 115 Nutrient Interactions. Bodwell CE, Erdman JW Jr. Marcel Dekker New York 1988. 116 Heleniak EP, Aston B. Prostaglandins, Brown Fat and Weight Loss. Medical Hypotheses 1989;28:13-33. 117 Connor WE, DeFrancesco CA, Connor SL. N-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Effects on plasma lipoproteins and hypertriglyceridemic patients. Ann NY Acad Sci 1993;683:16-34. 118 Conte AA. A non-prescription alternative in weight reduction therapy. The Bariatrician Summer 1993:17-19. 119 McCarty MF. Inhibition of citrate lyase may aid aerobic endurance. Unpublished manuscript. 120 Bray GA. Weight homeostasis. Annual Rev Med 1991;42:205-216. 121 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of Ephedrin/Methylxanthine mixtures: Human studies. Intl J Obesity 986;10:467-481. 122 Arai K, Kinumaki T, Fujita, T. Bulletin Tokai Regional Fisheries Res Lab. 1968;No. 56. 123 Bough WA. Private communication. 124 Freidrich EJ, Gehan, EA, Rall DP, Schmidt LH, Skipper HE. Cancer Chemotherapy Reports 1966;50(4):219-244. 125 A Drovanti, AA Bignamini, AL Rovati. Therapeutic activity of oral glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis: A placebo-controlled double-blind investigation. Clinical Therapeutics 1980;3(4):260-272. 126 K Deuchi, O Kanauchi, M Shizukuishi, E Kobayashi. Continuous and massive intake of Chitosan affects mineral and fat-soluble vitamin status in rats fed on a high-fat diet. Biosci. Biotech. Biochemistry. 1995;59(7):1211-6. 127 . BesChitin W in Chitin Wound Healing (video), Unitika Corporation, April 1992.

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    Are Standardized Herbs Better?
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    Date: June 17, 2005 12:34 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Are Standardized Herbs Better?

    Are Standardized Herbs Better?

    Standardized is a term to mean that there is a guaranteed amount of a certain botanical constituent. For example St. John's Wort can be standardized to contain hypercin, Gingko can be standardized to contain flavones, Mahuang for ephedrine, and Milk Thistle for its silymarin content. Standardized does not necessarily mean stronger or better. Chemical solvents such as hexane benzene, acetone, and methyl Chloride are typically used in standardized extracts. Residues of the chemicals are found in the finished product. Furthermore they may be hazardous to the environment.

    The problem with obtaining an amount of a standard constituent is, a plant can contain hundreds of active constituents. By concentrating on one component, we may lose synergistic compounds, which may improve effectiveness and lessen adverse reactions. Often scientists do not fully understand which constituents are beneficial for the clinical results of an herb. For example scientists are unclear whether or not hypercerin, hyperiform, or the interaction of several constituents, that have antidepressant properties in St. John's Wort. Once it was thought that the immune effects of Echinacea were due to echinosides; now it is thought that polysaccharides and proteins may also be immune supporting. In the case of ginseng, ginsenosides are found in ginseng leaves and roots, however ginseng leaves do not have same properties as the roots. In the South Pacific, locals all use Kava Kava roots, however German pharmaceutical companies use the stems to make standardized Kava Kava. Another drawback of standardized herbs is the chemicals used to manufacture them.

    Advocates of standardized herbs are usually academics with little clinical experience with herbs, or researchers whose work is funded by companies that manufacture standardized products. Traditional herbalists seldom used standardized products for a variety of reasons. One, standardized extracts tend to be more expensive. Two, there is little evidence that they are more effective than the whole herb. For example, I have never seen studies comparing Gingko tea to standardized Gingko extracts; Ginseng standardized extracts have not been shown superior to whole ginseng root. Finally, many herbalists reject the pharmaceutical model of healthcare, which involves costly production techniques and capital investment to make a standardized extract.

    Standardized herbs play a role in the drug model of herbal medicine, however traditional herbalists will continue to recommend herbs in more natural state which may include water and alcohol extracts, teas and pills that have not been standardized. (Factors that influence products quality include weather, soil, the time of year the plant is harvested, the age of the plant, the part of the plant being used, and the DNA of the plant, storage and processing.) You can also blend various batches of herbs to achieve a consistent potency; this is commonly done in the wine making industry. Finally you can add an active compound (synthesized) to an herbal product and the DNA of the plant, storage and processing.) The purpose of this article is not to condemn standardized herbs. It may be a good idea to remember that this form of herbal preparation is just one of many forms.



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    Homeopathic Essentials
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    Date: June 11, 2005 05:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Homeopathic Essentials

    Homeopathic Essentials by Jane Lane Energy Times, February 1, 2000

    The principles of homeopathy are elegantly basic and, to some, maddeningly elusive. This system of medical treatment employs The Law of Similars or "like cures like," and calls on natural plant, animal and mineral substances that induce the body to heal itself.

    That homeopathy works is virtually incontrovertible. With its ancient roots and European practice spanning hundreds of years, homeopathy employs minute doses of diluted extracts to replicate symptoms of a malady, which then vanishes. But the very fact that it works puzzles many experts who have researched the phenomenon.

    Understanding The Tradition

    Homeopathy evolved from its earliest practice recorded by 10th-century BC Hindu sages to its codification by Hippocrates in 400 BC. " Through the like, disease is produced and through the application of the like, it is cured," he wrote, expressing the fundamental principle of homeopathy, according to Homeopathic Medicine at Home (Tarcher Perigee) by Maesimund B. Panos, MD, and Jane Heimlich. Samuel Christian Friedrich Hahnemann, the erudite and intellectually audacious German physician and chemist, seized upon the essentials of homeopathy in the early 1800s.

    Through Hahnemann's work, homeopathy developed into an intricately systematized science, veering into the arcane for the contemporary individual seeking relief for everyday ailments.

    Modern practitioners and manufacturers of homeopathic remedies benefit from Hahnemann's daring research (which included potentially lethal experiments on himself) and complex doctrines.

    They've streamlined and modernized Hahnemann's concepts to provide more relevance to modern ills and sensibilities.

    The Bold Experiments

    Hahnemann denounced the medical practices of the 18th century, which involved cauterizing, bleeding, blistering and purging patients to expel the pernicious fluids or humors believed to cause disease.

    He also reviled the kind of omnibus prescription drugs of the day, which loaded many substances into one compound. In 1790, Hahnemann conducted his groundbreaking experiment establishing the basis of homeopathy.

    The customary treatment for malaria at the time was Cinchona officinalis or Peruvian bark-quinine. Medical wisdom attributed its efficacy to its bitterness and astringency. Hahnemann rejected this explanation, noting that other botanicals are far more bitter and astringent, yet are powerless against malaria.

    To prove his theory, Hahnemann took some cinchona compound and promptly developed the symptoms of malaria. His deduction: Like cures like, or The Law of Similars. A substance that, in minute doses, induces certain symptoms in a healthy person cures a sick one.

    The Set of Laws

    A set of fairly complex laws developed from Hahnemann's initial Law of Similars.

    The Law of Proving refers to the process of ascertaining the effectiveness of a homeopathic therapy by administering a substance to a healthy person to record in minute detail its effects. Practitioners also use the standard double-blind method using a placebo or unmedicated tablet against a homeopathic compound.

    The first proving was performed in 1790 and the procedure endures today, using only humans, not laboratory animals, for greater accuracy. As homeopathic preparations are not toxic, proving has never produced lasting adverse reactions. Descriptions of provings are compiled into books called materia medicas, including Boericke's Materia Medica and Repertory and The Lectures of Homeopathic Materia by James Tyler Kent, used regularly in contemporary practice.

    The books are highly indexed collections of symptoms and the remedies that cure them called repertories. The most extensively used repertory is Kent's Repertory of the Homeopathic Materia Medica.

    In 1800, the third Law of Potentization was devised, regulating the processing of homeopathic remedies through successive dilutions and shaking.

    This law represents perhaps the profoundest mystery of homeopathy and demands the boldest leap of faith: The higher the dilution, the more intense the potency of the medicine. Substances that are inert in their natural state act as medicine. And as they are so dilute, homeopathic remedies do not act directly on the tissues, accounting for their non-toxicity. Adding to the inherent safety of homeopathic therapies is the discipline's adherence to the single remedy. Centuries ago, homeopaths seemed to have been prescient about current drug interaction troubles.

    (Historical information courtesy of Homeopathic Medicine at Home by Panos and Heimlich.)

    How It Works: The Vital Force Homeopathy embraces a philosophy centered on the concept of "vital force," an intelligent, dynamic life force within each individual responsible for maintaining one's life and balance on all levels. The vital force creates a defense mechanism similar to the immune system, but incorporates protection against imbalances on the emotional and mental planes as well.

    Homeopathy equates disease with imbalance. As the defense mechanism attempts to restore balance, symptoms appear: pain, swelling, rashes and fevers on the physical side; grief, jealousy, anxiety, anger, confusion and loss of memory on the emotional and mental end.

    Homeopaths regards these symptoms as evidence of the vital force's curative exertions, not merely annoyances to be eliminated. Symptoms guide the homeopath in his or her attempts to harmoniously augment the efforts of the vital force.

    Homeopathy Today

    Homeopathic remedies are prepared according to the standards of the United States Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia and are recognized by the US Food and Drug Administration. " Homeopathy respects the complexity and uniqueness of each individual," observes pharmacist and naturopathic doctor James LaValle (and his co-authors) in Smart Medicine for Healthier Living. "To identify the correct homeopathic remedy, you must carefully observe your unique-even quirky-behaviors and responses." Indeed the emphasis on the "unique, even quirky" may lead to the perception of homeopathy as a sketchy pseudo-science. Homeopathy simply does not fit the drug model of allopathic medicine.

    Its ability to help people, however, has been repeatedly evaluated through rigorous scientific research. A comprehensive review in the British Medical Journal (302, 1991: 316-323) of more than 100 clinical studies of homeopathy published during the last 30 years revealed that 77% of those studies produced positive results for the people involved. A host of additional studies provides clinical evidence:

  • • A fixed combination of three plant substances (Phytolacca americana, Guajacum officinale and Capsicum annuum) significantly decreased the symptoms of acute tonsillitis in 107 sufferers, who took no antibiotics. The anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and analgesic properties produced no side effects (Adv Ther 15, 1998: 362-71).
  • • An article in the Journal of Nurse Midwifery (44, 1999: 280-90) explains the use of 19 homeopathic remedies that aid breastfeeding.
  • • "The practice of (homeopathic) preventive antepartum care of pregnant women, adopted at the beginning of this century, has reduced perinatal mortality and the rates of low birth weights and preterm weights. . .Studies on homeopathic interventions in obstetrics report positive influence of homeopathic remedies on uterine contractility and the evolution of childbirth. The only study comparing homeopathic and conventional therapy in women with increased risk for contraction abnormalities found few differences between the treatments, except fewer hemorrhages and decreased abnormal contractions in patients treated with homeopathic remedies (Schweiz Med Wochenschr Suppl 62, 1994: 28-35).
  • • A homeopathic remedy proved as effective as prescription betahistine hydroChloride in treating folks with vertigo (Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 124, 1998: 879-85). n Single, individualized homeopathic remedies demonstrated potential efficacy in HIV infection during its symptomatic period (Br Homeopath J 88, 1999: 49-57). The remedies produced a "statistically significant" elevation in base line immune status.
  • • And, finally, a study in the prestigious international medical journal The Lancet (September 20, 1997) claimed that researchers' findings and conclusions "are not compatible with the hypothesis that the clinical effects of homeopathy are completely due to placebo" but called for more "rigorous. . .systematic" research on homeopathy.



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    The Science of Healthy Hair
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    Date: June 10, 2005 03:44 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: The Science of Healthy Hair

    The Science of Healthy Hair

    by Susan Weiner Energy Times, January 5, 2002

    From the strength-giving mane of Sampson to the magically long locks of Rapunzel, hair has had the power to captivate since biblical times. Today, its lure is just as compelling and hair remains an important form of self-expression and self-image. A healthy head of hair is more than an asset to your appearance. A hairstyle can reflect a mood, an attitude or a personal style, while unkempt hair may reveal the status of one's emotional or physical health. Even a "good" hair day vs. a "bad" hair day can significantly determine how your frame of mind takes shape. We can't always control the frizz factor or the humid weather that makes our curls fall flat, but many natural approaches are available to allow us to put our best looking follicle forward. Whether your hair is sleek and stylish, long and slinky, spiky punk rock-hip or wash-and-wear, botanical-based products and proper nutrition can bring out the very best in your locks.

    Don't Fool Mother Nature

    No matter how often you cut, dye, perm or blow-dry your hair, Mother Nature, with the help of your DNA, has blessed you with a quite specific quality and quantity of hair. Styling may work to change the appearance of your hair, but nothing can change your genetics. Every hair on your body, from the soft down on your arms to the coarser, longer hairs on your head, grows from a cell-lined indentation called a follicle. The hair follicle consists of three cylinders; the central cylinder determines whether your hair is straight, wavy or curly. Each hair shaft alternately grows or goes into a dormant phase. "At any one time, approximately fifteen percent of the one hundred thousand or so hairs on the head are resting, while the rest are growing or lengthening," say Arthur Balin, MD, PhD, and Loretta Pratt Balin, MD (The Life of the Skin: What It Hides, What It Reveals, and How It Communicates, Bantam). Hair constantly comes and goes, falling out consistently even when it is healthy. Consequently, a normal head can shed up to one hundred resting-phase hairs a day. When hair is subjected to harsh chemicals and treatment, even more may fall out. If you're concerned with hair loss, gently pull on a small section of hair; if fewer than five hairs come out, hair loss is within normal range.

    What's Your Type?

    Normal hair is an elusive commodity in these stressed-out days of over-washed, over-dried and chemically treated hair. If your tresses look frizzy, tangle easily or generally lack moisture, they're probably dry. Dry hair lacks the proper oil content to maintain an ample sheen and is usually dull-looking. To gain back a natural shine, cut back on shampooing and use a natural conditioner formulated for dry hair. Look for essential oils such as jojoba, evening primrose, blue chamomile, and white camellia, and B vitamins (such as panthenol) and aloe vera, suggests Aubrey Hampton, founder of Aubrey Organics. Drinking plenty of water, eating a diet that's not ultra-low in fats and using a humidifier may also help improve dull-looking dry hair, points out David E. Bank, MD (Beautiful Skin: Every Woman's Guide to Looking Her Best at Any Age, Adams Media). (Excessively dry hair may be a significant sign of metabolic disease. If you don't notice a marked improvement in your scalp after taking measures to improve dry hair, or your hair is abnormally dry, consult your health practitioner to see if stronger cures should be implemented.)

    Too Much Oil

    Hair that appears greasy within 24 hours after shampooing is oily. In that case, try gentle shampoos and herbal rinses with essential oils including quillaya bark, amino acids mixed with saponins, non-coloring henna and peppermint. For an oily scalp and dry ends, condition only the ends. Styling products should be oil-free. For thin or flyaway hair, products with natural thickening agents such as panthenol can help pump up the volume. Color treated and damaged hair can benefit from sulfur-containing amino acids; check your natural foods store for hair care products that contain horsetail, coltsfoot and cysteine. Tea tree oil products are effective when you are trying to control dandruff and a problem scalp.

    The Must-To-Avoids

    If the label lists sodium lauryl sulfate, steer clear, warns Hampton. And, says Dr. Bank, sodium C-14-16 olefin sulfonate, a harsh chemical found in cheap shampoos, is the worst of the worst when it comes to offensive hair care ingredients. "You also need to watch out for sodium Chloride-table salt-in the ingredient list. It's a cheap ingredient to thicken shampoo and strips the hair of oils."

    Feed Your Head

    To optimize shine and fullness, improve your nutrition, says Bruce Miller, MD, author of The Nutrition Guarantee (Summit Publishing Group). "Good nutrition is as essential to healthy, attractive hair as it is to clear, glowing skin," notes Dr. Miller. "Your hair directly reflects your care and feeding of it." Your hair consists of about 97% protein, containing nineteen of the twenty-two amino acids that form protein, explains Dr. Miller. If you skimp on quality protein, your hair may reflect this amino acid imbalance by breaking, cracking and splitting. Hair follicles pass on the nutrients you consume, nourishing the new cells that form the growing hair shaft. As the hair gradually pushes upward, the shaft is continually lubricated by the busy sebaceous glands. For a smoother transition through the shaft and undamaged hair, lecithin provides a welcome dose of lubrication, as well as the important B vitamins choline and inositol, vital to healthy hair. In fact, the B vitamins are crucial to the growth of full bodied, healthy hair. The B complex strengthens, forms and smoothes the hair shafts, and helps maintain an even hair color, even warding off the beginning of gray hair. For thick and shiny hair, vitamin A works in conjunction with the B vitamins. Zinc can strengthen the hair shafts by thickening them. Thicker and stronger hair shafts increase your chances of holding on to your hair and suffering fewer lost hairs. When it comes to hair retention, genetics count. The more hair your parents retained, the greater your chance of keeping yours.

    Think Diet

    If you're interested in optimal hair health, think nutrition. Eating for the sake of your curls is a lot like eating for overall health: plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, healthy grains and lean sources of protein, including tofu and other soy-based foodstuffs. To support healthy hair, some experts advocate foods high in biotin, including brown rice, brewer's yeast, bulgur, green peas, lentils, oats, soybeans, sunflower seeds and walnuts. The natural phytochemicals in green tea may aid hair, while ginkgo biloba improves circulation to the scalp. Don't forget your daily vitamins and be sure to take an iron and B12 supplement.

    Chinese Treatment

    Herbs from China show great promise for helping hair. He Shou Wu, made from Polygoni multiflori (the eastern wild rose), is reputed by devotees to restore color, slow hair loss, and help hair grow back. In Chinese medicine, this botanical has been used as an adaptogen to boost overall health and longevity. Within the context of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), He Shou Wu is supposed to strengthen the liver and kidney meridians and support healthy blood. Many Asians use the herb to promote higher levels of qi, the TCM concept that encompasses your life's overall energy.

    Show a Little Tenderness

    Long-term exposure to sunlight and seawater can damage hair, as can combing or brushing wet hair. Treat your hair with kid gloves, use natural products that are gentle on hair, and avoid chemical treatments. If you're looking to lose weight, avoid crash diets; a sudden drop in nutrition can cause deficiencies and lead to hair damage and loss. Keeping a wonderful head of hair means staying ahead of the curve with proper nutrition, the right supplements and a continuous program of TLC. In that way, you can maintain the crowning head of hair you've always coveted.



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    Cross Training
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    Date: June 10, 2005 02:48 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Cross Training

    Cross Training

    by column Energy Times, April 1, 1999

    If you've ever felt burned out, bored and/or just plain tired of your exercise program, you may be in need of a taste of cross training. When your exercise routine becomes too routine, you run not only the risk of losing your motivation for physical activity, but you may also run an added chance of injury. The possible cause: overusing particular muscles that receive an excessive amount of stress as other muscles practically atrophy while waiting for a chance to show off their stuff.

    For instance, if you are a devoted runner who spends hours jogging, your upper body may wither unless you give it a reason not to. At the same time, your achilles, hamstrings, knees and lower back muscles may protest those miles after miles. As Frank Jobe, MD, Neal EllAttrache, MD, and Karen Mohr, PT, point out in Athletic Forever (Contemporary), "Dedicated runners are among the most injury-prone of all athletes. If running is your main form of exercise, you have a 37 to 56 percent chance of sustaining an injury each year and your chances for a recurrence of that injury are as high as 70 percent."

    Simple Principle

    The basic principle of cross training is simple: take part in various activities that supplement each other. Runners should lift some weights or at least shoot a few hoops to keep those arms and shoulders toned. Bikers should walk or run now and then to keep their bones healthy. (Bicycling, since it is not a weight bearing exercise, does little to promote bone strength.) Swimmers should find something to do on dry land so that their bones react to gravity and grow stronger. And, no matter what your sport, you should stay well-nourished and supplied with plenty of antioxidants.

    As Stephen T. Sinatra, MD, points out in Optimum Health (Bantam), while athletes may enjoy health benefits from exercise, "The vigorous training pursued by competitive athletes renders them more prone to catabolic stress-a situation in which tissues are constantly broken down."

    He goes on to point out that the low fat diet many athletes follow may be short of antioxidant nutrients. Unfortunately, that shortage can lead to injury. The metabolic acceleration caused by athletic activity may increase potentially harmful oxidative stress at the cellular level. Without antioxidant nutrients to help quell that stress... Well, the results may not be pretty. Potentially, that kind of oxidative damage may, theoretically, lead to cancer or heart disease. As Dr. Sinatra says, in those circumstances, "the supplemental use of glutathione, vitamins C and E, coenzyme Q10 and magnesium seems reasonable. Some athletes, such as menstruating women, may also need iron supplementation."

    In addition, water is crucial for athletes to stay adequately hydrated during activity. According to Daniel Gastelu and Fred Hatfield, PhD, in Dynamic Nutrition for Maximum Performance (Avery), when you run short of water "this can adversely affect performance and, in the long run, can cause peaks and valleys in the athlete's performance." In addition, they advise using sports drinks to stay adequately supplied with electrolytes. "The major electrolytes found in bodily fluids are Chloride, magnesium, potassium and sodium."

    Electrolytes serve a host of duties, including keeping the heart muscle functioning properly. Gastelu and Hatfield explain, "An electrolyte is an ion that is required by the body to regulate the electric charge and flow of water between the cells and the bloodstream."

    Getting Better All the Time

    Even if you cross train religiously and try to avoid overdoing one particular sport, sooner or later you may incur injury. If you do (or even before you hurt yourself), the trio of Stanley W. Jacob, MD, Ronald M. Lawrence, MD, PhD, and Martin Zucker, authors of The Miracle of MSM (Putnam), believe that methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) can provide reliable relief for pain and suffering.

    "Many people experience rapid relief after starting MSM," say this trio. They go on to claim that "this nutritional supplement has real potential to make a significant impact on the quality of life."

    "Your main enemy in the hours following an injury is inflammation," warns Athletic Forever. For injury, they recommend RICE: rest, ice, compression and elevation. In other words, put the injured body part in a firmly wrapped bandage (don't cut off the circulation!) Keep the injury cold but don't put ice directly on it (watch out for frost bite). Rest a while and keep the injury elevated. Then, don't exercise again until you've fully recovered.



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    Cholestrex - Lower Cholesterol with Source Naturals Supplements
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    Date: June 01, 2005 10:41 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Cholestrex - Lower Cholesterol with Source Naturals Supplements

    Cholestrex

    Our lives depend on an uninterrupted flow of blood throughout the 60,000 miles of arteries, veins, and capillaries that bring vital nourishment to our cells. Our bodies have complex chemical strategies to maintain and repair blood vessel walls. Cholesterol is an important part of the process. However, too much cholesterol in the bloodstream can have serious consequences for our well-being. By understanding how nutrition affects blood cholesterol, we can gain valuable control of our health. Source Naturals CHOLESTREX has been formulated to provide the nutritional support that we need to maintain healthy cholesterol levels.

    SINCE DOCTORS FIRST DISCOVERED that cholesterol was the primary ingredient in the sticky deposits that clogged their patients’ arteries, scientists have gained a thorough understanding of cholesterol’s role in our health. Essential to human and animal life, cholesterol is part of every cell in the body. Because cholesterol is so important, the liver synthesizes from 1 to 2 grams of it each day. In addition, we get about another 500 mg from the foods we eat. Problems occur when too much cholesterol gets into the bloodstream. Today, it’s estimated that over 50 million adults in the United States have cholesterol levels that are too high. The body’s processes to manage excess cholesterol depend upon a lifestyle that includes exercise, stress reduction and proper nutrition. Source Naturals Cholestrex is designed to deliver a comprehensive combination of nutrients known to support a healthy blood vessel system – and keep the life stream flowing.

    The nutrients in CHOLESTREX are known to support a healthy blood vessel system

    Cholesterol: What It Is Cholesterol is a solid waxy substance, technically classed as a “sterol.” Cholesterol enables our cell membranes to maintain their integrity. It is the basic raw material from which the body makes steroid hormones, which include the sex hormones. Cholesterol is the primary component of bile salts that the liver creates to help us assimilate fats, fat-soluble vitamins and essential fatty acids. The liver also uses bile to rid itself of stored toxins. Our skin contains large amounts of cholesterol, making it resistant to the absorption of water-soluble toxins. Even the brain is 7% cholesterol (dry weight).

    Blood vessel walls cover a surface area of half an acre and are under constant pressure

    Cholesterol in the Blood

    Because it’s not water-soluble, cholesterol must be attached to a carrier molecule in order to be transported in the bloodstream. The liver manufactures two types of carrier molecules for cholesterol, LDL and HDL. LDL (low density lipoprotein) molecules carry cholesterol from the liver out to cells of the body. One of its functions is to repair damaged cells, including those of the artery walls. LDL is primarily made up of saturated fats, (meat fats, butter, etc.). HDL (high density lipoprotein) molecules transport cholesterol and fatty acids from body tissues back to the liver for disposal. HDL helps remove excess fat and cholesterol from the bloodstream. HDL is composed of liquid fats (most vegetable oils). It’s crucial to have a proper balance between LDL and HDL cholesterol. High LDL – a sign that the body has too much fat – is a threat to the health of blood vessels, because excess LDL cholesterol may accumulate in damaged areas of vessel walls. These “fatty streaks” are the beginning stage of artery blockage.

    The oxidation of LDL cholestrol is at the heart of the problem

    Cholesterol and Artery Damage

    The walls of the blood vessels cover a surface area of half an acre and are under constant pressure. Of all the blood vessels in the body, the coronary arteries are under the greatest stress. Named for the Latin word for crown (corona), they sit directly on the heart muscle and must continually expand and contract with every heartbeat. That’s 100,000 times each day. This constant squeezing can cause small lesions in the artery wall. This triggers a repair process where LDL cholesterol comes in to patch up the damage. Recent research has found that the crux of the problem is the oxidation of LDL cholesterol. Rich in fatty acids, the LDL molecule becomes permanently altered when oxidized by free radicals (overreactive molecules that steal electrons from other molecules). These rancid, oxidized LDL molecules are no longer recognized by the body, so they’re attacked by immune system cells. These immune cells become bloated with the oxidized lipids, accumulate in artery lesions and create plaque in blood vessels. Why is LDL cholesterol being oxidized? First of all, there’s too much of it in the blood, while not enough HDL. Secondly, the blood doesn’t have enough antioxidants to neutralize free radicals. The ingredients in Source Naturals Cholestrex address these specific problems in several ways. Cholestrex also provides nutrients that protect and strengthen blood vessel walls.

    In the typical American diet, 95% of the cholesterol meant for removal is reabsorbed

    Cholestrex Has It All

    Vitamin C helps maintain the health of artery walls because it’s the key building block for collagen and elastin, the primary constituents of blood vessels. Copper is required by the enzyme that weaves together the fibers of collagen and elastin into the matrix that makes vessel walls both tough and flexible. As an antioxidant, vitamin C scavenges free radicals in the blood plasma and also regenerates vitamin E within the LDL molecule. Vitamin E has a critical role as the primary protector of LDL, preventing its oxidation. One molecule of vitamin E can protect 200 molecules of polyunsaturated fatty acids from free radical damage. GTF Chromium is involved in insulin activity and the normalization of blood sugar. Excess simple sugars are converted to triglycerides, the blood fats which can accumulate in artery walls. Lecithin is a component of HDL that emulsifies excess blood fat so it can be more readily transported in the bloodstream to the liver, where it’s metabolized. Vitamin B3 (niacin) assists in the metabolism of fats, and puts an electric charge on red blood cells so they repel each other, which prevents blood clumping. The amino acid, L-Arginine, works to lower serum cholesterol and triglycerides by inhibiting fat absorption.

    Beta sitosterol neutralizes incoming dietary cholesterol

    The Body’s Cholesterol Removal System

    HDL molecules carry cholesterol from tissues throughout the body back to the liver, where it is incorporated into bile salts. These bile salts are sent to the intestines, where they combine with fiber for excretion. One problem with the typical American low fiber diet is that 95% of the bile-bound cholesterol is reabsorbed. Since this is the body’s primary pathway for ridding itself of excess cholesterol, another strategy incorporated into Cholestrex is to maximize the production of bile salts and minimize their reabsorption by increasing levels of fiber. Fiber is a key element of Cholestrex. Its four types of soluble fiber bind with bile salts that are laden with cholesterol to ensure their excretion from the body. Oat Bran & Fiber, Grapefruit Pectin, Psyllium Seed Husks and Alfalfa Seeds also absorb cholesterol from our food, thereby lowering total blood cholesterol. Alfalfa seeds are considered a blood purifier. Beta sitosterol, a plant equivalent of cholesterol, binds to sites in the intestines that would otherwise absorb cholesterol. Cholestrex provides a daily total of 300 mg of beta sitosterol which may, by itself, neutralize 200 to 300 mg of incoming dietary cholesterol by preventing its absorption. Vitamin C, among its many other vital roles, is the key factor in activating an enzyme that will increase the liver’s conversion of cholesterol into bile salts. CHOLESTREX uses bioactive mineral ascorbate forms of vitamin C that will not irritate the digestive system. Working in conjunction with the fiber in CHOLESTREX, Calcium increases HDL, while lowering total serum cholesterol.

    Cholestrex–Intelligent Nutritional Support

    Our generation is fortunate to witness the remarkable progress made by modern science in understanding the body’s complex biochemical processes. As we realize the vital connection between nutrition and cholesterol levels, we are empowered to improve our health and vitality beyond previous standards of wellness. Source Naturals CHOLESTREX. For you and the ones you love.

    Reference:
    1. Drexel, H., et al. “Lowering Plasma Cholesterol with Beta Sitosterol and Diet.” The Lancet 1 (1981): 157.
    2. Grundy, S. M., et al. “Influence of Nicotinic Acid on Metabolism of Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Man.” Journal of Lipid Research 22 (1981): 24-36.
    3. Grundy, S. M. “Oxidized LDL and Atherogenesis: Relation to Risk Factors...” Clinical Cardiology Vol. 16 (Suppl. I), April 1993: 13-15.
    4. Hendler, S. S. “The Doctors’ Vitamin and Mineral Encyclopedia.” New York: Fireside, 1991.
    5 Jialal, I., and C. J. Fuller. “Oxidized LDL and Antioxidants.” Clinical Cardiology Vol. 16 (Suppl. I), April 1993: 16-19.
    6. Kay, R. M. and A. S. Truswell. “Effect of Citrus Pectin on Blood Lipids and Fecal Steroid Excretion.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 30.2 (1977): 171-75.
    7. Kirby, R. W., et al. “Oat Bran Intake Selectively Lowers Serum Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentrations of Hypercholesterolemic Men.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 34.5 (1981): 824-29.
    8. Malinow, M. R., et al. “Alfalfa.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1979: 1810-12.
    9. Mattson, Fred H., Scott M. Grundy, and John R. Crouse. “Optimizing the Effect of Plant Sterols on Cholesterol Absorption in Man” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 35 (April 1982): 697-700.
    10. Railes, R. and M. J. Albrink. “Effect of Chromium Chloride Supplementation on . . . Serum Lipids Including High Density Lipoprotein of Adult Men.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 34 (1981): 2670-78.
    11. Turley, S. D. and J. M. Dietschy. “The Metabolism and Excretion of Cholesterol by the Liver.” in The Liver: Biology and Pathobiology, I.M. Arias, et al. Raven Press, 1988.
    12. Turley, S. D., et al. “Role of Ascorbic Acid in the Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism and the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis.” Atherosclerosis 24 (1976): 1-18.



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    Glycerylphosphorylcholine
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    Date: May 24, 2005 10:05 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Glycerylphosphorylcholine

    Dietary supplement

    Abstract A dietary supplement for promoting healthy hormonal balance in adult human subjects, and especially in elderly subjects, that comprises a secretagogue for stimulating the release by the pituitary, and the conversion by to Insulin-Like G, in combination with 7-keto dehydroepiandosterone (7-keto DHEA). The dietary supplement also includes other interacting ingredients for delivering antioxidants for retarding damage at the cellular level caused by the presence of free radicals, and natural herbs for promoting physiological health.

    Other References Jamieson, J. et al., "The Role of Intermediates as an Alternative to High Injections," American College for Advancement in Medicine, (Oct. 30, 1997).

    Claims

    What is claimed is:

    L-lysine monohydroChloride, glycine, and gamma aminobutyric acid.

    L-dopa

    7-keto dehydroepiandrosterone

    resveratrol

    L-arginine

    acetyl-L-carnitine.

    L-glutathione.

    n-acetyl cysteine



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