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What Cellular Mitochondria Does in the Body Darrell Miller 4/28/22
If Your Kid Is Depressed Or Anxious, This Could Be Why Darrell Miller 12/31/17
Moringa is the newest superfood you should definitely know about Darrell Miller 12/21/17
Environment's Effect on Health Darrell Miller 4/27/17
You Really Need to Join a Gym Darrell Miller 3/16/17
Boost your memory now, avoid dementia later Darrell Miller 2/17/17
UV Light May Lead Way to New Treatment for MS and Inflammation Darrell Miller 12/10/16
Top 10 foods to eat if you sit all day at work or school Darrell Miller 12/9/16
10 health concerns you can detect through your eyes Darrell Miller 11/26/16
The health benefits of citronella oil Darrell Miller 2/14/14
Ways to Keep Weight Off With Natural Sugar Regulators Darrell Miller 7/13/13
If You Are Having Trouble With Night Driving, Bilberry Extract Could Help Darrell Miller 2/2/11
Phytoestrogen Darrell Miller 3/27/09
The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, D-Ribose, L-Carnitine, and Magnesium Darrell Miller 5/18/07
Anabol Naturals Metabolic Fat Burners Darrell Miller 1/7/06
Vision Quest - help fight eye problems. Darrell Miller 6/18/05
Breast Cancer Darrell Miller 6/10/05
The Natural Man Darrell Miller 6/10/05




What Cellular Mitochondria Does in the Body
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Date: April 28, 2022 04:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Cellular Mitochondria Does in the Body

If you want to stay healthy, it's important that you know what cellular mitochondria does in the body. Mitochondria are organelles found in the cytoplasm of cells. They are responsible for producing energy for the cell. Without them, the cell would not be able to function properly. We will discuss the role of mitochondria in the body, and how they impact our health.

What are mitochondria and what do they do in the body

Mitochondria are organelles that play an important role in the energy metabolism of cells. Most of the oxygen we breathe is used by mitochondria to convert glucose from the food we eat into ATP, the energy molecule used by our cells. Therefore, mitochondria are often referred to as the "powerhouses" of the cell. In addition to producing ATP, mitochondria also have other important functions, such as regulating cell growth and death, as well as calcium homeostasis. Mitochondria are unique in that they have their own DNA separate from the DNA in the cell nucleus. This mitochondrial DNA is passed down from mother to child, which is why defects in mitochondrial function can lead to diseases that are inherited in a maternal lineage. Although most of our cells contain only a single nucleus, they may contain hundreds or even thousands of mitochondria. This allows them to produce enough ATP to meet the energy needs of the cell.

How mitochondrial dysfunction can lead to health problems

Mitochondria are integral to many essential physiological processes in the body. Not only do they produce energy for cells, but they also play a key role in maintaining cellular structures and initiating cell division. Therefore, any disruption of normal mitochondrial function can have far-reaching consequences for overall health and well-being. Maladaptive responses to environmental stressors, such as chemical exposure or radiation, are among the most common causes of mitochondrial dysfunction. These stressors result in damage to mitochondrial DNA and can cause problems with cell division and abnormal growth patterns, which can lead to a range of disorders and chronic diseases. For example, mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to conditions like Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the role that mitochondria play in maintaining healthy functioning bodies and take proactive steps to prevent or reverse damage from maladaptive responses to environmental stressors.

Mitochondria and Longevity

Mitochondria are specialized organelles found within our cells that perform many critical functions, including generating energy to support cellular processes and maintaining healthy cell function. These organelles are the site of many important chemical reactions, often referred to as oxidative phosphorylation or metabolism. Studies have shown that Proper functioning of these organelles is essential for healthy aging, and may be a key factor in determining how long we live. By promoting mitochondria health and making lifestyle changes that help to promote healthy mitochondria, we can take an important step towards optimizing our longevity potential. This includes eating a nutrient-rich diet with a focus on foods high in antioxidants, managing stress levels through regular exercise and relaxation techniques, and avoiding environmental toxins that can damage mitochondria health. Through such strategies, we can give ourselves the best chance at living a long, full life.

Ways to protect your mitochondria and keep them healthy with PQQ

PQQ, or pyrroloquinoline quinone, is an important molecule for the functioning of mitochondria in the human body. This compound plays a crucial role in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, the fundamental energy currency of biological systems. By Driving cellular processes that release energy for metabolic use, PQQ plays a key role in maintaining mitochondrial health and efficiency. Additionally, PQQ has been shown to exhibit powerful antioxidant properties, which help to mitigate the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondria and other critical cells in the body. Overall, PQQ is an essential component of healthy mitochondrial function and a crucial nutrient for energy production and overall metabolic health.

D-ribose, the Mitochondria, and Energy

D-ribose is a naturally occurring sugar that plays an important role in cellular metabolism and energy production. This nutrient is especially important for cells that rely on a lot of energy, such as those found in the heart and muscles. D-ribose helps these cells to generate adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, which is the main energy currency used by cells to drive chemical reactions. Additionally, research has suggested that d-ribose can help to improve physical endurance and reduce the pain and stiffness associated with exercise, making it an important part of a healthy, active lifestyle.

Also, D-ribose is a simple sugar that plays an important role in the structure and function of mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. In addition to supplying energy to the cells, mitochondria also help to regulate cell growth and death. D-ribose is essential for the proper function of mitochondria, and it plays a key role in energy production. Studies have shown that D-ribose can help to improve mitochondrial function and reduce fatigue. In addition, D-ribose supplements have been shown to improve exercise performance and increase energy levels. These effects are likely due to the ability of D-ribose to help the body produce more ATP, the energy currency of the cell. For these reasons, D-ribose is an important nutrient for maintaining healthy mitochondria and supporting cellular energy production.

Another important nutrient for the mitochondria is CoQ10

The process of producing energy is called oxidative phosphorylation, and it involves the transfer of electrons from nutrients to oxygen. This reaction creates a proton gradient across the mitochondrial membrane, which is used to generate ATP, the energy currency of the cell. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an important component of this process. It acts as an electron carrier, shuttling electrons between enzymes in the respiratory chain. It also helps to maintain the proton gradient, allowing the mitochondria to continue generating ATP. Without CoQ10, oxidative phosphorylation would grind to a halt, and cells would quickly run out of energy. Consequently, CoQ10 plays a vital role in energy production and cellular metabolism.

The bottom line is that both D-ribose and CoQ10 are important nutrients the body needs to maintain optimal energy levels. If you’re feeling run down, low on energy, or just generally not your best, consider taking a supplement containing these two nutrients. You may be surprised at how much better you feel once you start including them in your diet. What’s stopping you from giving them a try?

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6395)


If Your Kid Is Depressed Or Anxious, This Could Be Why
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Date: December 31, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: If Your Kid Is Depressed Or Anxious, This Could Be Why





A lot more children in this day and age are experiencing more mental disorders that were previously only diagnosed to adults, such as depression. Many factors can be causing this. Social media is much too image focused. Academic pressures are higher than ever before. Prepackaged junk foods and fast food are causing children to have poor diets. As adults we have to be aware of all these issues and bolster children's confidence while counterattacking negative influences.

Key Takeaways:

  • Many children, ranging in age from toddlers to teenagers, are suffering from mental distress than ever before.
  • Many factors are driving these mental health issues, including social media, academic pressures and poor diet.
  • Several steps can help, including emphasizing effort rather than achievement, ensuring adequate rest and nutrition and bolstering the child's identity.

"Instagram and Snapchat can have a detrimental impact on the mental health of young people."

Read more: https://www.thealternativedaily.com/what-is-driving-the-epidemic-of-anxiety-and-depression-in-school-age-kids/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5466)


Moringa is the newest superfood you should definitely know about
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Date: December 21, 2017 10:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Moringa is the newest superfood you should definitely know about





Moringa is the latest trend to his the shelves. It is a tree grown across Africa and Asia, known as the Drumstick Tree. It is also known as the horseradish tree due to its taste. The leaves are what is driving the craze. It is ground into a fine powder, resembling matcha or spirulina and added to drinks. This powder is a perfect pick me up due to its high amount of iron. It also contains good amounts of vitamin E & C.

Key Takeaways:

  • This plant comes from Africa and Asia and is known as the drumstick tree
  • The leaves are powderized and put into smoothies and drinks, much like matcha or spirolina.
  • The powder is high in iron, Vitamin C & E, giving you a good boost in your daily nutrition.

"It’s unusually rich in protein – in fact, it contains all nine of the essential amino acids"

Read more: https://www.breakingnews.ie/discover/moringa-is-the-newest-superfood-you-should-definitely-know-about-819200.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5447)


Environment's Effect on Health
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Date: April 27, 2017 10:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Environment's Effect on Health





The environment can take a toll on a persons health. It can disturb a persons well being and cause health concerns. The World Health Organization defines environment, as it relates to health, as "all the physical, chemical, and biological factors external to a person and all the related behaviors." The pollutants in the environment can contribute to heart disease and stroke. Some of the most dangerous pollutants are carbon monoxide, nitrates, sulfur dioxide, lead, and secondhand tobacco smoke. Things that you can do to limit your output of pollutants would be to walk to places instead of driving when possible, not buy bottled water and instead use a reusable one. You could also use fewer chemicals in household cleaning.

Read more: Environment's Effect on Health

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4492)


You Really Need to Join a Gym
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Date: March 16, 2017 11:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: You Really Need to Join a Gym





There are those people that love the gym…I bet you’ve even got a picture of them in your minds eye right now. And then, there are those of us who cannot stand it. So much grunting and weight dropping. No thanks. However, according to a new study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, club members have a benefit over the rest of us when it comes to getting regular exercise. (Maybe this article will even convince you to join that gym you’ve been Driving by every day since January 1st!)

Key Takeaways:

  • Iowa State University scientists recruited 405 relatively healthy adults; half had already belonged to a gym for at least 30 days and half hadn’t been members for at least three months.
  • The team analyzed all the participants responses to figure out which of them met the national recommended guidelines for physical activity.
  • The current recommendation is 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity each week and at least two days of weight lifting

"However, according to a new study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, club members have a benefit over the rest of us when it comes to getting regular exercise."



Reference:

//www.healthnutnews.com/really-need-join-gym/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4176)


Boost your memory now, avoid dementia later
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Date: February 17, 2017 05:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Boost your memory now, avoid dementia later





My father played tennis and basketball during his youth, then shifted to golf in his mid- 40s. He didn’t smoke or drink except occasionally, during special occasions. He shunned rich foods and had a simple diet of fish, lean meat, fruits, and vegetables. He is, to this day, still Driving his car and playing golf at age 96! He is the chairman emeritus of the Senior Citizens Golfers and leads the group to attend golf tournaments abroad once a year.

Boost your memory now, avoid dementia later

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3958)


UV Light May Lead Way to New Treatment for MS and Inflammation
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Date: December 10, 2016 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: UV Light May Lead Way to New Treatment for MS and Inflammation





HDACs are molecules Driving inflammation and controlling a range of other processes. To get around the problem, researchers at Cornell University designed a molecule that can activate an HDAC blocker using UV light. The team used an existing blocker and covered the part of the drug that interacts with HDAC with an additional molecule. We can control when and where we turn off the HDACs using light.

Key Takeaways:

  • Researchers have found a way to harness inflammation with the help of ultraviolet (UV) light.
  • If this approach can be developed for clinical treatment, it likely will have a large impact on the lives of people with multiple sclerosis and other inflammatory conditions.
  • To get around the problem, researchers at Cornell University designed a molecule that can activate a HDAC blocker using UV light.

"Drugs that block HDACs are being investigated in conditions that include neurodegeneration and cancer, but their role in inflammation is only beginning to be explored."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com/2016/11/29/uv-light-use-may-lead-to-new-ms-treatment-that-controls-inflammation&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNGIX8iA2OXj82A4XkA3j9lH0d76wg

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3614)


Top 10 foods to eat if you sit all day at work or school
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Date: December 09, 2016 04:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Top 10 foods to eat if you sit all day at work or school





If you get up every day around six in the morning, make breakfasts and lunches, and then sit for about an hour in the car dropping them off to school and then Driving to work, where I sit for a few hours more.Not much different from when I was in school, where marathon sitting and studying was the norm. Get out there and exercise, too, at least 30 minutes a day, and if not, make sure you get up from your desk every 45 minutes of so and get the blood pumping and give your monitor-staring eyes a rest.

Key Takeaways:

  • Bright and beautiful, this yellow spice possesses anti-inflammatory effects that are good for the sedentary person.
  • Prepare your lunch foods with olive oil and reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease;
  • Almonds are an excellent anti-oxidant Vitamin E and contains a plant-based anti-inflammatory omega-3.

"After all, prolonged sitting has been associated with hunger pangs and obesity and decrease in concentration. Don't forget the water."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//blog.silive.com/gracelyns_chronicles/2016/11/do_you_sit_all_day_at_work_or.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFY6xCt9DGZwECT4OGblFU6xZctqw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3608)


10 health concerns you can detect through your eyes
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Date: November 26, 2016 06:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 10 health concerns you can detect through your eyes





While I was Driving the car in the city where traffic was bad, I found the brake override warning lamp illuminated on the combination meter sometimes. And then, when I accelerated the car while the light was illuminated, unexpectedly the engine did not have power.

Key Takeaways:

  • There are a number of eye conditions that can indicate cancer somewhere in the body, or even in the eye.
  • Lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women often spread to the eyes before a diagnosis is even made. Many doctors also first discover basal cell carcinoma
  • Autoimmune diseases like lupus, Chrohn’s disease or even some forms of arthritis can be diagnosed through the eye.

"When you meet someone new, the first thing you notice about them is probably their eyes—the shape, the color and sometimes their health"



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.connectstatesboro.com/news/article/11502/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNHRljvLWbGlXxN11ViztUgi_V48LA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3510)


The health benefits of citronella oil
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Date: February 14, 2014 10:23 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The health benefits of citronella oil

What is citronella

citronella grassCitronella is a grass that is grown in Asian countries as well as islands in the South Pacific and has a rich and crisp aroma. Citronella essential oil is extracted from the Ceylon and Java variety of the grass. This oil is known to have so many benefits and these include:

Insect repellant

Citronella oil is effective in repelling insects such as mosquitoes, fleas, ticks and black flies and thus prevents its bites. The oil can be used on human and their clothing in form of liquid, oil or patch. This makes it a natural and non-toxic alternative to chemical insect repellants. It is also available in products like insect repelling candles and cartridges.

Astringent

If used well, citronella oil can help with oily skin as it is an astringent. You should apply a drop or two on the skin to test if it will cause irritation. You should then apply 2 to 3 drops of the oil to a cotton ball and wipe out any excess sweat. You should then complete your regular facial routine.

Antibacterial

Citronella oil contains methyl isoeugenol that help in its antibacterial property. The oil can kill and even inhibit the growth of bacteria in the body. Therefore, the oil can be helpful in treating wound infections, as well as other infections in the urinary bladder, urethra, colon, stomach, urinary track, intestines, prostate and kidney.

Anti-inflammatory

Citronella oil can be helpful in sedating inflammation. This is particularly so in issues pertaining to the stomach, liver, intestines and other parts of the digestive system. The oil can be used to soothe inflammation caused by drug and alcohol use.

Deodorant

Citronella essential oil has a crisp and rich lemon aroma that is effective in Driving away body odors. Therefore, it is used for body sprays and deodorants but in very small quantities as it can cause skin irritations if used in high quantities.

Source:

  1. //citronella-oil.blogspot.com/

//www.beeyoutiful.com/citronella-essential-oil.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3018)


Ways to Keep Weight Off With Natural Sugar Regulators
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Date: July 13, 2013 10:06 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ways to Keep Weight Off With Natural Sugar Regulators

gymnema plant

Weight loss

Some of you might think that to lose weight, you simply have to burn more calories than what you take in. This is actually true, but within the body are different processes that affect the fat burning capacity of the body. A good example of this is the level of insulin. As you all know, the food you take in is converted into glucose, which is the body's source of energy. In order to transport the blood sugar to the various cells in the body, the pancreas creates a hormone called insulin to do the job.

Therefore, the more glucose you have in your blood, the higher your insulin levels would be. This insulin surge is a bad thing, since it signals the body that there is more than enough energy reserves in the body, thus, it can stop burning fat and instead start storing it. Another bad effect of this insulin surge is that once the blood sugar has been transported, the levels of blood sugar and insulin will drop down significantly causing a slump that makes individuals feel hungry.

As you can see, no matter how you good you are at counting the calories you take in and the calories you burn, your blood sugar levels have a major impact at how fat is stored in your body and also on your appetite. It is important, therefore, that you regulate the amount of sugar in your blood, and these natural compounds will be extremely helpful.

Chromium

Chromium is a mineral that enhances the function of insulin in the body. This means that when you have chromium supplement in the body, your pancreas do not need to produce high levels of insulin to transport the blood sugar to your cells. Hence, your body will continue burning fat because it is not getting any signal of an occurrence of an insulin surge. The good thing with chromium is that it works well in regulating blood sugar levels from both end of the spectrum, instead of just focusing at Driving sugar levels to one direction. Therefore, whether you are experiencing a low or high blood sugar levels, chromium will normalize your insulin functions so that you end up having normal blood sugar levels. Chromium can be found in broccoli, but it is available in diet supplements as chromium picolinate.

Gymnema Sylvestre

Gymnema is a herb that is commonly found in Southern and Central India. It is best known to treat diabetes, thus it helps regulate blood sugar levels. According to studies, it has a sugar blocking property, which comes from the Gymnemic acids present in it. This acid, as they say, behaves like glucose, thus, when it attaches to the intestinal receptors, the absorbance of sugar from your meal is regulated. In effect, the production of insulin is also regulated. Today, there are Gymnema tablet supplements available in the market.

Inulin

Another way to regulate blood sugar levels is by taking in some soluble fiber. Although classified as a carbohydrate, fiber is not digested or broken down by the body, thus, it does not contribute to the blood sugar levels. It also helps slow down sugar absorption of the body, keeping the blood sugar levels stable. Prebiotic inulin is a good source of soluble fiber. It is extracted from plants, such as chicory, garlic, dandelion, onion, and cornflower.

Make sure you eat foods low in the glycemic index to reduce sugar spikes in the body.  Maintaining a steady sugar level will help keep weight off and reduce binge eating.


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2847)


If You Are Having Trouble With Night Driving, Bilberry Extract Could Help
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Date: February 02, 2011 10:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: If You Are Having Trouble With Night Driving, Bilberry Extract Could Help

Night blindness is very common nowadays. According to statistics, a lack of vitamin A is the primary cause of night blindness or inability to see at night or in dim light. The treatment of this eye condition will depend upon the cause. Treatment may be as simple as getting a new eye glasses prescription. But invasive procedures may also be required most especially those that are caused by cataracts. Fortunately, Bilberry extracts may help night blindness. bilberryleafplant

Bilberry is a low – growing perrenial shrub growing approximately 15 to 20 inches in height. It is a member of the family Ericaceae in the genus Vaccinium. Its branches are green with sharp edges. It bears edible berr that is seemingly wrinkled and black. Bilberry is a comparative to the common berries known as blueberry and cranberry. The active compounds in bilberry fruit are known as anthocyanosides. Bilberry extract has a deep bluish purple tone which contains the majority of the active substance of the fruit known as anthocyanidin. Anthocyanidin is a component of anthocyanosides. It can help increase the formation of rhodopsin. According to studies, rhodopsin is formed from an aldehyde form of vitamin A called retinaldehyde, or retinal as commonly used. It is then bound to the protein opsin. This compound consisting of retinal and opsin is stored in photoreceptors of the retina of the eye known as rods and cones. Rhodopsin is the compound in the eye that is responsible for adjusting eye perception to light variations.

This plant extract is also commonly used for treating eye problems like cataracts and retinal disorders particularly retinopathy. Scientists found out that anthocyanosides help protect the retina. Since bilberry improves the formation of rhodopsin, adequate levels of rhodopsin can significantly improve night vision and reduce visual fatigue. This eye pigment could help those individuals who are having trouble Driving at night because of its rhodopsin regenerating property.

Aside from supporting a healthy eye function, bilberry has many other health benefits. It has an antioxidant, anti – inflammatory, collagen stabilizing and vasoprotective properties. Generally, anthocyanosides are considerably beneficial to the overall health of the body. It can improve circulation by preventing blood clumping by reducing platelet aggregation. It can also prevent or reduce the amount and extent of damage to cells caused by free radicals.

Further clinical studies are being done to be able to get concrete evidence on the fruit’s benefits especially to the eyes. Preliminary results show that bilberry decreases eyestrain after an excessive use of computers, protects against glaucoma by improving blood vessel integrity in the eyes, reduces the occurrence of cataracts by maintaining the integrity of connective tissues in the eyes and lessens the risk of retinopathy among diabetic patients. Preparations of bilberry extracts include teas, capsules or tablets.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2227)


Phytoestrogen
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Date: March 27, 2009 01:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Phytoestrogen

Menopause is the time at which a woman stops ovulating and menstruation ceases, which indicates the end of fertility. Menopause is not a disease, but rather a natural progression in life, similar to puberty. Many years before a woman stops ovulating, her ovaries will begin to slow their production of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. Estrogen and progesterone are often thought of as the reproductive hormones.

Although estrogen is essential in reproduction, it is also extremely important in other non-reproductive organs and systems in the body. Cells in the uterus, bladder, breasts, skin, bones, arteries, heart, liver, and brain all contain estrogen receptors. These organs need this hormone in order to stimulate these receptors for normal cell function. Estrogen is needed to keep the skin smooth and moist and the body’s internal thermostat working properly. Estrogen is also essential for proper bone formation. Even though estrogen levels drop sharply after menopause, they do not disappear entirely. Other organs take over for the ovaries, continuing to produce a less potent form of estrogen. These organs, known as endocrine glands, secrete some hormones from fatty tissue in order to maintain bodily functions.

Progesterone works along with estrogen, stimulating changes in the lining of the uterus to complete the preparation for a fertilized egg during the second half of the menstrual cycle. If no egg is fertilized, the uterine lining is broken down and expelled, allowing the cycle to being again. Progesterone also has effects beyond the reproductive system, as it calms the brain and also affects other aspects of nervous system function. Testosterone is most important for both men and women, with women producing about 80 percent less than men do. However, it is the Driving force for maintaining a healthy life and proper functioning organs.

The period when a woman’s body is preparing for menopause is known as perimenopause. For the majority of women, hormone production beings to slow down then they reach their thirties, continuing to diminish with age. Many women will experience few if any symptoms at this time, but others may suffer from anxiety, dry skin, fatigue, feelings of bloating, headaches, heart palpitations, hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, decreased interest in their significant other, loss of concentration, mood swings, night sweats, reduced stamina, urinary incontinence, uterine dryness and itching, weight gain, cold hands and feet, joint pain, hair loss, and/or skin changes.

Menopause occurs when a woman stops menstruating altogether. At this point, most of the acute problems a woman may have experienced are actually over and a new balance between all hormones should be established. However, women become increasingly vulnerable to other, potentially serious health problems at this time. Over the long term, the diminished supply of estrogen increased the likelihood of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and uterine atrophy. Osteoporosis especially is a major problem for women after menopause, with an estimated 80 percent of the hip fractures that occur in the United States every year being due to osteoporosis.

A proper diet, nutritional supplements, and exercise can help to minimize or eliminate most of the unpleasant side effects of menopause. The following nutrients are recommended for dealing with this stage of life: beta-1, cerasomal, coenzyme Q10, DHEA, essential fatty acids, lecithin granules, a multi-enzyme complex, soy protein, vitamin B complex, vitamin D3, vitamin E, boron, calcium, magnesium, quercetin, silica, zinc, l-arginine, multiglandular complex, a multivitamin and mineral complex, vitamin C, aloe vera gel, slippery elm, damiana, amaranth, chickweed, dandelion greens, nettle, seaweed, watercress, anise, black cohosh, fennel, licorice, raspberry, sage, unicorn root, wild yam root, hops, valerian root, gotu kola, red clover, dong quai, St. John’s wort, and Siberian ginseng.

All these above listed vitamins and herbs are available in capsule, tablet, or powder forms. When looking for natural alternatives to help replace estrogen naturally, look to your local or internet health food store for name brand products that can help restore an imbalance over time.

--
Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1983)


The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, D-Ribose, L-Carnitine, and Magnesium
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Date: May 18, 2007 01:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, D-Ribose, L-Carnitine, and Magnesium

The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, L-Carnitine,

D-Ribose, Magnesium

 

The “Awesome Foursome” of Coenzyme Q10, L-Carnitine, D-Ribose, and magnesium helps our hearts metabolize energy more efficiently and protects them from the stress of cardiovascular disease. This powerful combination of nutrients goes directly to the basic biochemistry of cellular energy metabolism. Now let’s take a closer look at how Coenzyme Q10, L-Carnitine, D-Ribose, and magnesium work in synergy to promote cardiovascular health.

 

Coenzyme Q10:

Energy Recycling through the Electron Transport Chain

Coenzyme Q10 is a powerful antioxidant that helps protect the mitochondrial membrane, mitochondrial DNA, and cell walls from free-radical attack. But its most important function in the body is its central role in energy metabolism.

Most – about 90 percent – of the ATP used by cells is recycled as food (fuel) and oxidized in the mitochondria. Fatty acids, carbohydrates, and, occasionally, proteins are carried across the mitochondrial membrane and enter the Krebs’ cycle, moving from step to step and spinning off electrons. These electrons are then handed off to the electron transport chain, where, in the presence of oxygen, the energy from the electrons is captured as a phosphate group is added to ADP to form ATP. This recycling of ATP is called oxidative phosphorylation, and the by-products of these pathways are CO2 and water.

In this fashion, Coenzyme Q10 acts as a gatekeeper of electrons, making sure they are carried to just the right place to pass on their life-giving energy.

What is critical, however, is the simple fact that without Coenzyme Q10 the electron transport chain would totally break down. And since the electron transport chain is (by far!) the largest contributor to cellular energy turnover, its loss would be catastrophic. It is also important to know that there has to be an excess of Coenzyme Q10 in the mitochondria to be maximally effective. Having just enough isn’t sufficient to do the job properly, and having a deficiency seriously affects the mitochondria’s ability to supply the cell with energy.

Cellular stress can cause Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, which places a severe strain on Coenzyme Q10 availability. People with heart disease, hypertension, gingival disease, Parkinson’s disease, and the other disorders we’ve discussed are known to be deficient in Coenzyme Q10. Whether these deficiencies are the cause or the effect of these varied medical problems, the end result is that they sap the life out of their mitochondria and reduce their energy supplies. You see, Coenzyme Q10 cannot function properly if electrons are not coming out of the Krebs’ cycle, and the Krebs’ cycle won’t work without the fuel that’s transported into the mitochondria by L-Carnitine.

 

L-Carnitine:

Transporting the Cellular Energy Fuel

Fatty acids are the preferred energy fuel for hearts and most other cells in the body. L-Carnitine facilitates the beta oxidation of fatty acids as energy fuel. And since fatty acids are the preferred fuel for energy recycling in cells, this action is critical to cell and tissue function. Unfortunately, L-carnitine is deficient in people with heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, lipid metabolic disorders, mitochondrial disorders, and many other disease syndromes we reviewed earlier. This L-carnitine deficiency disrupts the normal metabolism of fatty acids, reducing available energy supplies and leading to the accumulation of toxic by-products of fatty acid metabolism. L-carnitine supplementation revives fatty acid metabolism and restore normal mitochondrial function. But even this powerful improvement in cellular energy metabolism cannot up for the energy drain that comes from the loss of energy substrates caused by low oxygen delivery to the tissue. Only D-Ribose can do that.

 

D-Ribose:

Rebuilding the Cellular Energy Pool

As long as cells and tissues have plenty of oxygen, the pool of energy substrates in the cell remains high. And as long as there is enough L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 available, the process of energy utilization and supply can proceed unimpeded. However, the cellular supply of oxygen can be restricted by acute or chronic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, any number of skeletal – or neuromuscular diseases, or even high-intensity exercise.

When cells are deprived of oxygen the mitochondrial energy turnover becomes inefficient. Remember, oxygen is required to let the oxidative pathway of energy recycling work properly. If the mitochondria are not able to recycle energy efficiently, cellular energy supply cannot keep pace with demand. But the cell has a continuing need for energy so it will use all its ATP stores and then break down the by-product, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), to pull the remaining energy out of this compound as well. What’s left is adenosine menophosphate (AMP). Since a growing concentration of AMP is incompatible with sustained cellular function it’s quickly broken apart and the by-products are washed out of the cell. The net result of this process is a depletion of the cellular pool of energy substrates. When the by-products of AMP catabolism are washed out of the cell, they are lost forever. It takes a long time to replace these lost energy substrates even if the cell is fully perfused with oxygen again.

Ribose is the only compound used by the body to refill this energy pool.  Every cell in the body has the capacity to make ribose, but hearts, muscles, and most other tissues lack the metabolic machinery to make ribose quickly when the cells are stressed by oxygen depletion or metabolic insufficiency.  Ribose is made naturally in the cells from glucose.  In stressed cells, however, glucose is preferentially metabolized for the energy turnover and is not available for ribose synthesis.  So when energy pools are drained from stressed cells, the cells must first wait for the slow process of ribose synthesis before they can begin to replace their lost energy stores.

    Acute ischemia, like that which takes place during a heart attack, heart surgery, or angioplasty, drains the cell of energy.  Even when oxygenated blood flow returns, refilling the energy pool may take ten or more days.  But when oxygen deprivation is chronic, or when energy metabolism is disrupted by disease, there may be so much continual strain on the energy supply that the pool can ever refill without the assistance of supplemental ribose.  Conditions like ischemic heart disease or congestive heart failure fall into this category.  In these situations, supplementing the tissue with exogenous ribose is the only way the cell can keep up with the energy drain.

 

Magnesium:

Switching on the Energy Enzymes

Magnesium is an essential mineral that's critical for energy requiring processes, in protein synthesis, membrane integrity, nervous tissue conduction, neuromuscular excitation, muscle contraction, hormone secretion, maintenance of vascular tone, and in intermediary metabolism.  Deficiency may lead to changes in neuromuscular, cardiovascular, immune, and hormonal function; Impaired energy metabolism; and reduced capacity for physical work.  Magnesium deficiency is now considered to contribute to many diseases, and the role for magnesium as a therapeutic agent is expanding.

    Magnesium deficiency reduces the activity of important enzymes used in energy metabolism.  Unless we have adequate levels of magnesium in our cells, the cellular processes of energy metabolism cannot function.  Small changes in magnesium levels can have a substantial effect on heart and blood vessel function.  While magnesium is found in most foods - particularly vegetables - deficiencies are increasing.  Softened water and a trend toward lower vegetable consumption are the culprits contributing to these rising deficiencies.

 

Supporting the Links in The Energy Cycle Chain – the Synergy

Clearly, each membrane of the “Awesome Foursome” is fundamental to cellular energy metabolism in its own right. Each plays a unique and vital role in supplying the heart with the energy it needs to preserve its contractile force. Each is independently effective in helping hearts work through the stress of disease. And while each contributes immeasurable to the energy health of the cell, in combination they are unbeatable. Allow me to reiterate the step-by-step, complicated cellular processes involved to be sure that you really understand the rationale for using these nutrients.

The cell needs a large, sustained, and healthy pool of energy to fuel all its metabolic functions. Contraction, relaxation, maintenance of cellular ion balance, and synthesis of macromolecules, like proteins, all require a high energy charge to carry their reactions to completion. The energy pool must be preserved, or these fundamental cellular functions will become inefficient or will cease to operate altogether. To keep the pool vibrant and healthy, the cell needs ribose. But even with supplemental ribose, the cell needs the efficient turnover of its energy stores to balance ongoing energy utilization with supply. That’s where CoQ10 and L-carnitine come into play.

The converse is also true. Even if the cell is fully charged with energy, cellular energy supply will not keep pace with demand if the mitochondria are not functioning properly. CoQ10 and L-carnitine work to keep mitochondrial operations running at peak efficiency, and one side cannot work effectively without the other. Even though CoQ10 and L-carnitine can make the energy turnover mechanisms work more efficiently, they cannot increase the cell’s chemical Driving force, and their action will be only partially effective. Ribose on the other hand, can keep the energy pool supplied with substrate, but the value of energy pool repletion cannot be fully realized if the substrate cannot be maximally utilized and recycled. Ribose fills the tank; CoQ10 an L-carnitine help the engine run properly.

Magnesium is the glue that holds energy metabolism together. By turning on the enzymes that drive the metabolic reactions, magnesium allows it all to happen.

These four nutrients must be utilized by cardiologists and other physicians as they treat patients day-to-day. On my own journey, using Coenzymes Q10 for two decades, L-carnitine for more than ten years, D-Ribose for two years, and magnesium equally as long, I’ve seen this “Awesome Foursome” reduce suffering and improve the quality of life for thousands of patients.

The future of nutrition in conventional medicine is very bright, although the integration of nutritional supplements has been a slow and, at times, lonely process.

L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 are finally gaining the recognition they deserve. D-Ribose is emerging as a new player in the complex understanding of metabolic cardiology, and doctors are beginning to discuss the important role of magnesium deficiency in heart patients. As a practicing cardiologist for over thirty years, I see metabolic cardiology as the future for the treatment of heart disease and other complex disease conditions, as well.



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Anabol Naturals Metabolic Fat Burners
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Date: January 07, 2006 01:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Anabol Naturals Metabolic Fat Burners

Founded in 1983, Anabol Naturals has been the premier provider of the highest quality pharmaceutical-grade, free form amino acids for 22 years. The Anabol Naturals cutting edge line of free form, amino acid-based formulas in renowned for purity, quality and efficacy by professional and world-class athletes, fitness enthusiasts, health and natural food stores, as well as longevity and wellness specialists.

Driving sales nationally and internationally has been the recognition and recommendation of the Anabol Naturals line for product effectiveness and consumer satisfaction in such leading health bestsellers as Prescription for Nutritional Healing by Phyllis Balch and Healthy Healing by Linda Page.



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Vision Quest - help fight eye problems.
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Date: June 18, 2005 08:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vision Quest - help fight eye problems.

Vision Quest by Phyllis D. Light, RH Energy Times, February 11, 2004

Since your eyes are in constant use every day, exposed to the damaging energy of sunlight and pollutants that waft through the air, these delicate orbs are often in danger of wearing out.

To keep this vital part of your anatomy functioning as you age, you have to feed and care for your eyes properly. Otherwise, you are in real danger of losing your vision and independence.

Your vision may be in danger. Experts estimate that 8 million Americans over the age of 55 are at serious risk of blindness linked to a condition called age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD can wipe out your central vision and is the primary cause of blindness in Western society.

While AMD causes no pain, it blurs the sharp, central vision necessary for Driving, reading and other activities where you need to see either up close or straight ahead. During AMD, the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to pick out fine detail, is destroyed. The macula sits at the center of your retina, the nerve center at the back of your eye that senses light and sends optic signals to the brain.

Age is not the only risk factor for AMD. Scientists have isolated a genetic defect that can lead to some forms of macular degeneration (Nature Genetics 2001; 27:89-93). Smoking and excessive exposure to sunlight are other hazards best avoided if you want to save your sight.

In many cases, AMD progresses so slowly that victims of this condition don't even notice that their vision is deteriorating until much of it is irrevocably gone.

Dry and Wet AMD

Wet AMD occurs when blood vessels in back of the retina start to overgrow and leak blood. As this occurs, blood and other fluids push on the macula and quickly damage its sensitive nerve endings. When wet AMD occurs, you lose your central vision rapidly. If straight lines appear wavy to you, you may be suffering from wet AMD. If you notice this or other unusual vision changes, contact an eye care specialist as soon as possible. You need what is called a comprehensive dilated eye exam that can uncover signs of AMD.

Dry AMD strikes the eye when light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly deteriorate, gradually blurring central vision in the affected eye. As dry AMD progresses, a blurry spot in the center of your vision may appear. Eventually, as more of the macula becomes dysfunctional, the central vision in the eye can gradually disappear.

The most common sign of dry AMD is slightly blurry vision. This can make it hard to recognize faces and also make it harder to read without very bright light. Dry AMD generally attacks both eyes, but vision can be lost in one eye while the other eye stays normal. In the early stages of dry AMD, drusen, yellow deposits that gather under the retina, may form. Dry AMD progresses in three stages:

  • • Early AMD: Small drusen form but vision is unaffected.
  • • Intermediate AMD: Many medium drusen appear or, alternately, one large drusen occurs. Center vision is often blurred and reading requires bright lights.
  • • Advanced Dry AMD: Drusen formation is accompanied by deterioration of tissue in the macula. Blurs in central vision expand, eventually destroying most vision. Note: Because of the fast destruction it causes, wet AMD is an advanced form of this disorder that is considered more severe than the dry version.

    Vitamins and Minerals for AMD

    Fortunately, scientists have found ways to combat AMD: An analysis of a study called the national Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) shows that more than 300,000 Americans could avoid losing their sight to AMD if they took daily supplements of antioxidant nutrients and zinc.

    This conclusion, reached by scientists at Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute, is based on research involving more than 4,500 adults suffering various stages of AMD. The study demonstrated that people who already had some AMD could lower their risk of the more advanced form of this condition by 25% when they took vitamin C, natural vitamin E and beta carotene along with zinc. Those suffering from advanced AMD lowered their chances of losing vision by about 19%. (Supplements did not affect the risk of cataracts or the chances of some vision loss for people in the early stages of AMD.)

    " Without treatment to reduce their risk, we estimate that 1.3 million adults would develop the advanced stage of AMD," says Neil M. Bressler, MD, professor of ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins and author of the current study, published in Archives of Ophthalmology (11/03).

    According to Dr. Bressler and the other researchers, people who now have intermediate AMD (some vision loss) in one eye have about a 1 in 16 chance of having their vision deteriorate until they have advanced AMD. They also calculate that about 1 in 4 of those with intermediate AMD in both eyes and 43% of those with advanced AMD in one eye will develop advanced AMD in five years without treatment.

    In their view, older people at risk of AMD blindness should take daily supplements of 500 milligrams of vitamin C, 400 milligrams of natural vitamin E, 15 milligrams of beta carotene, 80 milligrams of zinc as zinc oxide and 2 milligrams of copper as cupric oxide. Evidence also exists that a diet which is high in fat can cause AMD to progress to an advanced stage. The exceptions: The healthy fats found in fish and nuts (Archives of Ophthalmology 2003; 121:1728-37).

    Lutein Protection

    Oddly enough, some of the same pigments that color vegetables and other foods also color your eyes. And scientists believe that those pigments, which are classified as carotenoids, help protect the eyes by helping them fight off the negative effects of caustic molecules called free radicals. Free radicals are formed when the energy from sunlight strikes the eyes and disrupts the composition of natural chemicals found there.

    When scientists compared healthy eyes with eyes suffering from AMD, they found that AMD eyes contained lower levels of lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoid pigments contained in egg yolk, spinach, broccoli and other dark green vegetables (Ophthalmology 2003; 109:1780). Furthermore, they found that levels of these chemicals generally decline as you grow older.

    " This research is a major step toward large-scale clinical studies to prove the extent to which lutein and zeaxanthin protect against age-related macular degeneration," says Paul S. Bernstein, MD, PhD, at the University of Utah School of Medicine at Salt Lake. "We know that these carotenoids are specifically concentrated in the macula of the human eye."

    Dr. Bernstein adds that, as you age, taking supplements containing lutein and other antioxidants may lower your AMD risk. In his investigation, people with AMD who did not take lutein had one-third less lutein in their eyes than older people whose vision was normal.

    Avoiding Cataracts

    Another eyesight hazard is cataracts, in which the eye's lens-the part that focuses incoming light onto the retina-becomes cloudy. Cataracts form when the proteins found in the normally clear lens become damaged; signs include progressively blurred vision (especially outdoors), focusing problems, seeing streaks of light from headlights and stoplights, and colors that look faded.

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. One of every six Americans 40 and older suffers from some degree of cataract; it affects half of all Americans who reach age 80. Nuclear cataracts, the most common form of this disorder, develop in the center of the lens and tend to grow slowly. Cataracts may also develop at the back of the lens; this form is linked to eye trauma and long-term use of certain medications, including steroids.

    Like AMD, cataracts become more common as people age. Up to 40% of individuals between the ages of 75 and 85 have them, compared with only 5% to 10% of those folks under the age of 65. And like AMD, sunlight exposure and smoking increase the risk of developing cataracts, as does the presence of diabetes.

    Lutein and zeaxanthin, the carotenoids that are so plentiful in the macula, are also found in the lens (although in lower concentrations), leading many researchers to believe that these nutrients may help drop your risk of cataract development. Early studies indicate that an increased intake of lutein and zeaxanthin reduces one's chances of needing cataract surgery, the most common surgery in the United States (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1999; 70(4):509-16; 517-24).

    Antioxidants and the Lens

    Scientists believe that free-radical damage is a leading cause of cataracts, and so it isn't surprising that antioxidants have proved useful in preventing this problem.

    Almost 500 women filled out diet questionnaires as part of a very large research effort called the Nurses' Health Study; those who had taken vitamin C supplements for 10 years or longer enjoyed the lowest rates of nuclear cataracts (Archives of Ophthalmology 2001; 119:1009-19).

    So the answer to lowering your risk of eye problems is clear, whether you are already in your mature years or plan to be someday: Lead a healthy, eye-friendly lifestyle, eating a diet filled with colorful fruits and vegetables. Take frequent walks and jogs around the block.

    And yes, when you kick back and take your just-as-frequent doses of antioxidant supplements, you're allowed to take your sunglasses off and see the world clearly.



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    Breast Cancer
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    Date: June 10, 2005 09:44 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Breast Cancer

    Breast Cancer by Joseph L. Mayo,MD Mary Ann Mayo, MA Energy Times, May 2, 1999

    What do you fear most? Bankruptcy? Floods? Heart disease? If you're like many women, breast cancer stands near the top of that dreaded list.

    But that fear doesn't permeate other cultures the way it does ours.

    A woman like Mariko Mori, for instance, 52 years old, Japanese, worries about intense pressures beginning to burden her toddler grandson. But worry about breast cancer? Hardly.

    In Indiana, Mary Lou Marks, 50, has similar family frets, mulling over her 28-year-old daughter's career choice.

    But on top of that, when Mary Lou tabulates her other worries, she recoils at the thought of breast cancer. She's heard about her lifetime risk: 1 in 8. Meanwhile, Mariko's is merely 1 in 40, according to Bob Arnot's Breast Cancer Prevention Diet (Little, Brown).

    American Problem
    Experts reporting in "Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer: A Primary Care Perspective" (Prim Care Update Ob/Gyns, vol. 5, no. 6, 1998, p. 269) say the risk of developing breast cancer for the average American woman during ages 40 to 59 is 3.9%; by 60 to 79 years of age that rises to 6.9%. A high-risk 40-year-old has a 20% chance of breast cancer in the next 20 years.

    New studies have found the effect of carrying the gene linked to breast cancer, which is responsible for only 5 to 10% of breast cancer incidence, is not as great as first suspected. Earlier estimates that the gene reflects an 80% chance of incurring breast cancer by age 70 has been recalculated to be only 37% (The Lancet, 1998;352:1337-1339).

    Complex Causesbr> Researchers agree: No one factor is solely responsible for breast cancer. Risk depends on many factors, including diet, weight, smoking, alcohol consumption, activity level and, of course, those genes.

    Regardless of their actual chance of getting breast cancer, women worry. Mary Lou faces no factors that would place her in particular jeopardy. But her anxieties about radical therapies and medical expenses paralyze her: She forgets to visit her health care provider and skips her annual mammogram appointments. Mary Lou's daughter, perhaps in reaction to her mother's gripping fears, campaigns ardently for cancer prevention, educating herself and mobilizing against the cumulative effects of known cancer risks. Smart young woman: A malignancy, after all, can take years to develop. A tumor must swell to one billion cells before it is detectable by a mammogram.

    Dietary Benefits
    Of all the tactics for reducing the risk of breast cancer, diet ranks high on the list.

    The soy-rich regimen of Japanese women like Mariko Mori, for example, helps to explain the low breast cancer rates in Asian countries (see box at center of the page).

    Tomatoes, because of their high quotient of the carotenoid lycopene, have been found to protect cells from the corrosive clutches of oxidants that have been linked with cancer in 57 out of 72 studies (The Santa Rosa Press Democrat, February 17, 1999, page A6, reporting on a Harvard Medical School study). For more on tomatoes see page 16.

    But there's no one magic anti-cancer food or diet. Eating to prevent breast cancer requires a balanced menu with fiber, healthy fats, phytoestrogens and antioxidants, all fresh and free of chemical additives.

    Modifying the balance and type of estrogen, the female sex hormone produced by the ovaries, offers an important breast cancer safeguard. Fat cells, adrenal glands and, before menopause, the ovaries, produce three "flavors" of estrogen, the strongest of which, estradiol, is believed to be carcinogenic when too plentiful or persistent in the body.

    Estrogen does its work by attaching to estrogen receptors. Receptors are particularly numerous in the epithelial cells that line milk sacs and ducts in the breasts.

    A receptor site is like a designated parking spot: Once estrogen is parked there it triggers one of its 400 functions in the body, from preparation of the uterus for pregnancy to intensifying nerve synapses in the brain.

    The food we eat can be a source of estrogen; plant estrogens, called phytoestrogens, are much weaker than the body's estrogens, but they fit the same receptors. Phytoestrogens exert a milder estrogenic effect than bodily estrogen and are capable of blocking the more potent, damaging versions.

    Finding Phytoestrogens
    Foods high in phytoestrogens include vegetables, soy, flaxseed and herbs such as black cohosh, chasteberry, red clover and turmeric. Soy is the darling of the day for good reason. Both soy and flaxseed can lengthen periods, reducing the body's overall exposure to estrogen.

    Soy also contains genistein, an "isoflavone" very similar in molecular form to estrogen but only 1/100,000 as potent. Because of its structure, genistein can attach to cells just as estrogen does; it also helps build carriers needed for binding estrogen and removing it from the body (Journal of Nutrition 125, no.3 [1995]:757S-770S). It acts as an antioxidant to counteract free radicals.

    Tumor Inhibition
    Studies have demonstrated that genistein inhibits angiogenesis (new tumor growth), slowing the progression of existing cancer.

    Soy is most protective for younger women. Postmenopausal women benefit from soy's ability to diminish hot flashes and for cardiovascular protection, especially in combination with vitamin E, fiber and carotene (Contemporary OB/GYN, September 1998, p57-58).

    Experts don't know that much about the cumulative effect of combining hormone replacement with soy, herbs and a diet high in phytoestrogens. Menopausal women who boost their estrogen this way should work with their health care providers and monitor their hormonal levels every six to 12 months with salivary testing.

    The Vegetable Cart
    Some vegetables are particularly protective against breast cancer because they change the way the body processes estrogen. Indol-3-carbinol, found in the co-called cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli and cabbage, diminishes the potency of estrogen. (Broccoli also contains isothiocyanates that trigger anti-carcinogenic enzymes.) These vegetables supply fiber, beta-carotene, vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals (Proc of the National Academy of Science USA, 89:2399-2403, 1992).

    Fiber from fruits, vegetables and whole grains reduces insulin levels and suppresses the appetite by making make us feel full, thus helping with weight control, so important to resisting cancer. Fiber also helps build estrogen carriers that keep unbound estrogen from being recirculated and reattached to the breast receptors.

    Cellulose, the fruit and vegetable fiber most binding with estrogen, also rounds up free radicals that damage DNA within cells.,p> Feeding the Immune System Despite heightened public awareness and efforts to stick to wholesome, healthful diets, experts increasingly link poor nutrition to depressed immune systems. Many Americans are at least marginally deficient in trace elements and vitamins despite their best attempts to eat well; that's why a good multivitamin/mineral is wise, even mandatory. Vitamins given to people undergoing cancer treatment stimulate greater response, fewer side effects, and increased survival (International Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 1, no. 1, January/February 1999).

    Nutrients tend to work synergistically on the immune system. They should be taken in balanced proportions, and in consultation with your health care provider.

    Immune Boosters
    In Research links low levels of calcium and vitamin D, an inhibitor of cell division and growth, to higher breast cancer rates.

    n Riboflavin (B2), pyridoxine (B6), pantothenic acid (B5), zinc and folate strengthen immunity. Selenium, in lab culture and animal studies, has helped kill tumors and protect normal tissues.

    n Beta-carotene and vitamins A, E and C are antioxidants. Vitamin C enhances vitamin E's effects, boosting immunity and protecting against cell damage. The antioxidant isoflavones in green tea, with soy, convey the anticancer effects of the Asian diet. Research shows actions that discourage tumors and gene mutations.

    The food you eat influences hormones. Excess sugar raises insulin, which acts as a growth factor for cancer and interferes with vitamin C's stimulation of white blood cells. It may contribute to obesity.

    Alcohol is converted to acetaldehyde, which causes cancer in laboratory animals. It affects gene regulation by decreasing the body's ability to use folic acid. It increases estrogen and the amount of free estradiol in the blood. The liver damage that accompanies high alcohol consumption frequently reduces its capacity to filter carcinogenic products, regulate hormones and break down estrogen. Studies of alcohol consumption have caused experts to estimate that drinking more than two alcoholic beverages a day increases breast cancer risk by 63% (OB-GYN News, November 1, 1998, p. 12).

    Fat Can be Phat
    Fat conveys nutritional benefits. Not all fats are bad: we can't survive for very long without certain fats. Fat can turn you into a "well-oiled" machine. But the wrong kind of fat (the fatty acids in red meats and fatty poultry) is believed to be a major culprit in breast cancer.

    Fat cells produce estrogen. Excess fat stores carcinogens and limits carriers that can move estrogen out of your system.

    Once estrogen has attached itself to a receptor, the health result depends on the type of fat in the breast. Saturated fat, transfatty acids and omega-6 fat from polyunsaturated vegetable oils such as safflower oil, peanut, soybean oil, corn oil and in margarine can increase the estrogen effect and trigger a powerful signal to the breast cell to replicate.

    Restraining Prostaglandins
    Blood rich in the essential fatty acids omega-3 and omega-9 lowers cancer risk by Driving down levels of prostaglandins, which promote tumor growth. The blood and tumors of women with breast cancer usually contain high levels of prostaglandins.

    Breast tissue is protected by omega-3 fat chiefly from fish and flaxseed and by omega-9 from olive oil. Salmon once a week or water packed tuna three times a week are particularly beneficial. Fish oil supplements processed to reduce contaminates are available. Cod liver oil isn't recommended: its vitamin A and D levels are too high.

    Flaxseed is the richest known plant source of omega-3. Use a coffee grinder to benefit from the seed and oil for the full estrogen effect; sprinkle ground flaxseed over cereal or fold into baked goods. Drizzle flaxseed oil, found in the refrigerator section of your health food store, over salads or cereal. (Store the oil in the refrigerator.)

    Olive oil, especially in the context of the so-called Mediterranean diet of vegetables, omega-3-rich fish and fresh fruit (Menopause Management, January-February 1999, p. 16-19), lowers the risk of breast cancer (The Lancet, May 18, 1996;347:1351-1356).

    Selecting Organic Food
    Select organic foods for extra anticancer protection. Pesticides stimulate erratic cell action and often inhibit the estrogen carrier's ability to attach and remove estrogen from the body. Free floating estrogen then can attach to breast receptors and cause trouble.

    Buy or grow fresh, organic foods whenever you can. When grilling meat, fish or poultry, reduce the area where carcinogens may accumulate by trimming fat. Charred, well-done meat is known to be carcinogenic. When grilling, marinate meat first and reduce the cooking time on the grill by slightly precooking.

    Cancer prevention is an interlocking puzzle requiring the limitation of fat consumption, weight control, exercise, stress reduction and care for psychological and spiritual balance. Possessing more cancer fighting pieces makes you more likely to be able to complete the prevention picture.

    Joseph L. Mayo, MD, FACOG and Mary Ann Mayo, MA, are the authors of The Menopause manager: A Safe Path for a Natural Change, an individualized program for managing menopause. The book's advice, in easy-to-understand portions, isolates in-depth explanations with unbiased reviews of conventional and alternative choices. A unique perspective for mid-life women who want to know all their options.

    Also from the Mayos - The HOW Health Opportunities For Women quarterly newsletter to help women learn HOW to make informed health choices. Learn HOW to: - Choose nutritional supplements

  • - Integrate natural remedies with conventional medicine.
  • - Pick healthier foods.
  • - Reduce breast cancer, osteoporosis and heart disease risk.
  • - Slow aging's effects. Protect against environmental toxins.



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    Vitanet ®

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    The Natural Man
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    Date: June 10, 2005 03:31 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: The Natural Man

    The Natural Man

    by Chrystle Fiedler Energy Times, July 14, 2003

    Men face significant health challenges as they age. "When men go through andropause in their late 40s (like women go through menopause) and testosterone drops, these hormonal changes are associated with heart attacks, high cholesterol and diabetes," says Jacob E. Teitelbaum, MD, Director of the Annapolis Research Center for Effective Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia Therapy in Maryland.

    And although cardiovascular disease and cancer account for about two-thirds of men's deaths, says Michael Castleman, author of Blended Medicine (Rodale), men are also plagued by chronic pain (arthritis, especially from old athletic injuries), sexual problems and mental decline.

    But men, and the women who love them, need not accept decline as an inevitable sign of aging. A natural man lifestyle makeover can make a difference. "Prostate problems can be significant [for men as they age]," says Jamey Wallace, ND, clinic medical director at the Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Seattle. "As men get older there can be an enlargement of the prostate that can cause urinary problems, with increased frequency and discomfort. There's a correlation between inactivity and weight gain and perhaps prostate problems as well." Besides lack of exercise, other contributing factors to health problems include a diet loaded with pesticide residues and chemicals, a lack of fiber and an excessive amount of unhealthy fats.

    The Stronger Sex?

    Women, on average, live five years longer than men. "At every age, American males have poorer health and a higher risk of mortality than females," says David Williams of the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research. The gap in life expectancy between men and women may have both genetic and lifestyle origins. More men smoke than women, and men are twice as likely to be heavy drinkers. A recent study Williams led, published in the American Journal of Public Health, confirms that men's behavior is indeed a contributing factor to longevity or lack thereof. "Men take more risks than women," says Castleman. "Men ride motorcycles, go skydiving and do 'death-defying' things. Sometimes, death wins." A macho attitude can prompt men to practice risky behavior by, say, Driving without a seat belt. Men also typically engage in more dangerous occupations like construction or fire fighting.

    Get Him to the Health Practitioner

    Being macho may also mean men postpone visits to their health practitioners. Women are twice as likely to schedule an annual checkup.

    "Men postpone admitting and getting help for problems," says Shoshana Zimmerman, ND, author of My Doctor Says I'm Fine...So Why Do I Feel So Bad? (Blue Dolphin). "They may want to prove they are tough or are preoccupied with their jobs and responsibilities." "Starting in adolescence men feel they can take care of themselves," says Dr. Wallace. Unfortunately, this means that it may take a health crisis like severe pain to prompt a man's visit to a health practitioner. "Men care less about their health, so they don't take care of themselves as well as women do," says Castleman.

    Get Him to Take the Long View

    "Health problems are a result of decades of poor diet and not enough exercise," says Dr. Wallace.

    Dr. Teitelbaum, author of From Fatigued to Fantastic (Avery/Penguin) says, as a rule of thumb, "Things that make you feel good are generally good for you." But there is a difference between a craving, say for sugar, and what makes you feel good. The difference is how you feel an hour after you've eaten something. Sugar may make you feel fatigued; a high-protein diet may make you feel energized. "If you have low energy, that's the time to add eggs and meat. Others need to be vegans. It's really individualized. Listen to your body."

    Zinc is an important nutrient for men's health, particularly for the prostate, and can be found in pumpkin seeds. "Sprinkling a small handful on salads on a daily basis or bringing a small bag to the office and nibbling on those can be a helpful adjunct," says Dr. Wallace. Don't overdo zinc supplementation because high levels can lowers HDL-the good cholesterol-levels. If you do use supplements, follow package directions.

    By eating different whole foods, you get optimal daily doses of vitamin A (in the form of mixed carotenoids); flavonoids; B vitamins; vitamins C, D, E and K; and important minerals like calcium, boron, manganese and magnesium, the single most critical nutrient. "It's also the one most Americans are deficient in," says Dr. Teitelbaum. "It promotes heart health, improves mental function and mood, helps you relax and sleep better." When sleep is elusive, herbs that can help include wild lettuce, Jamaican dogwood, hops, passionflower and valerian.

    For many men, an enlarged prostate is part of aging. Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) may reduce the frequent urge to urinate that can result.

    "After age 40, men's levels of testosterone decline, while levels of other hormones, notably prolactin, increase," says Castleman. "This results in an elevation of the male sex hormone dihydrotestosterone, which is responsible for the overgrowth of prostate tissue that is characteristic of benign prostate enlargement. Many studies have shown that saw palmetto shrinks enlarged prostates and relieves symptoms." It takes about six weeks to work. (Since urinary difficulties can signal several health problems, it's important to consult a trained practitioner first.)

    Give Him a Multivitamin

    Add a good multivitamin with essential nutrients from a natural food store, says Dr. Wallace. "You'll find vitamins there with bioavailability. You can take something but it may be in a form that you can't assimilate. You need a multivitamin that your body can actually use."

    Powdered vitamin formulas can be a good choice, says Dr. Teitelbaum, since they don't have binders or fillers. "You can just put it into a glass of say orange juice or mix it into a smoothie."

    In addition, omega-3 oil offers antioxidant protection and anti-inflammatory action, says Dr. Zimmerman: "Especially on the arteries, which protects against plaque buildup."

    Get Him Eating Better and Exercising

    To help your spouse or significant other improve his health and vitality, start by setting a good example both in nutrition and activity.

    "Eat a whole-food diet yourself, include foods like vegetables, fruits and whole grains like quinoa, teff and kamut (find them at your local natural food store) full of fiber and B vitamins, instead of refined bread and pasta," says Dr. Wallace. "Choose foods you both like. Go to a natural food store and look through whole food cookbooks, find recipes that use ingredients that you know your spouse likes and try those."

    "Spend your time in the produce section, have salads and fruit salads in the fridge at all times, and serve them at all meals," says Castleman.

    Make gradual, healthy substitutions, steps you both can live with. For example, replace one meat lunch and dinner a week with a vegetarian alternative, says Castleman. "Make a big pot of hearty bean and vegetable soup a week, and just keep it in the fridge for an easy heat-and-eat meal." You can also broil fish instead of frying it. Use olive or canola oil when cooking.

    To get your four to five servings of vegetables each day, eat a five-color salad. "You'll get a variety of nutrients so the body can select what it needs from the different vegetables," says Dr. Wallace.

    "Serve more vegetables, at least two with dinner and add fruit into your man's (and your own) diet," says Dr. Zimmerman. "Eating three each of protein, vegetables and fruits per day goes a very long way to improving health." So does drinking plenty of water, eight to ten glasses a day.

    Besides providing a good example by eating healthy foods, a woman can do the same thing with exercise. "If a woman wants to start walking she can invite her husband to go along. Thirty minutes of walking every day can be very helpful," says Dr. Wallace. Walking, like sex, keeps the pelvic area active and improves prostate health by stimulating blood flow. Remember, in both diet and exercise, nagging doesn't work-while setting an example and trying to be inclusive, and not demanding, often makes a big difference for better health.



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