SearchBox:

Search Term: " Fracures "

  Messages 1-50 from 50 matching the search criteria.
Use warm water and turmeric to cleanse your body, support digestion Darrell Miller 5/10/19
You Need To Know About Vitamin K Darrell Miller 9/30/17
Osteoporosis: what it is and how you can fight back Darrell Miller 6/2/17
Magnesium 'could prevent broken bones' Darrell Miller 4/19/17
Keeping magnesium levels high reduces risk of fractures, study suggests Darrell Miller 4/18/17
Magnesium Could Prevent Fractures in Elderly Darrell Miller 4/17/17
Flaxseed Consumption and Bone Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women. Darrell Miller 2/7/17
Increased Dietary Protein Improves Bone Strength Darrell Miller 2/6/17
Menopause: anti-inflammatory diet could help prevent fractures and boost bone health Darrell Miller 2/3/17
Bone health: Here's why you should be eating anti-inflammatory foods Darrell Miller 2/3/17
Anti-inflammatory diet could reduce risk of bone loss in women Darrell Miller 2/2/17
Olive oil could slash your chance of bone fractures in half, study says Darrell Miller 2/1/17
Signs You Have a Vitamin Deficiency Darrell Miller 1/13/17
Why Vitamin D Is Extra Important for Athletes Darrell Miller 12/18/16
How inflammation interferes with the formation of new bone material Darrell Miller 12/14/16
Nourish your bones with vitamins - The Detroit News Darrell Miller 12/13/16
How to strengthen your bones Darrell Miller 12/10/16
Give your skeleton some love Darrell Miller 11/25/16
Diabetes and bone loss: Strategies to manage bone health with diabetes Darrell Miller 11/23/16
How to Build Strong Bones Darrell Miller 11/7/16
Eye Inflammation and one Herb To Prevent It! Darrell Miller 9/20/16
Health Benefits Associated with Silica Darrell Miller 12/25/13
How calcium can Help Prevent Bone Loss Darrell Miller 11/8/13
Can Butcher's Broom Boost Cardiovascular Health? Darrell Miller 10/30/13
Can Vitamin D-3 Do More For Bone Health Than Calcium? Darrell Miller 1/10/13
Does Calcium Really Strengthen The Bones? Darrell Miller 10/23/12
What Are The Health Benefits Of Magnesium? Darrell Miller 3/3/12
Herbs And The Immune System Darrell Miller 7/30/10
Calcium, Magnesium And Vitamin D Darrell Miller 6/24/09
Phytoestrogen Darrell Miller 3/27/09
L-Arginine An Amino Acid Essential Or Not You Be The Judge? Darrell Miller 1/6/09
Hyaluronic Acid can help Restore Joint Function Darrell Miller 12/1/08
Isoflavones Darrell Miller 9/2/08
Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin D Darrell Miller 8/6/08
Vitamin D Supplements Darrell Miller 7/29/08
Fight Osteoporosis With Minerals To Build Bones And Improve Quality Of Life Darrell Miller 4/2/08
Prevent Disease With Discount Vitamins Darrell Miller 10/24/07
Supplements for Children Darrell Miller 6/26/07
Possible Billions in Health Care Costs, why hasn’t the government stepped in? Darrell Miller 6/26/07
Learn about Bone Health! Darrell Miller 4/20/07
Osteoporosis, Calcium and Magnesium Darrell Miller 4/20/07
The sunshine vitamin can impart an all-over healthy glow. Darrell Miller 9/18/06
Strontium Bone Maker 60 VC - Strengthen Bones Darrell Miller 7/27/05
PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS Darrell Miller 7/25/05
Pain - Post Op and Relaxation Darrell Miller 7/13/05
America's Most Wanted Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Better Bones Darrell Miller 6/11/05
Bone Power - Natures Plus Darrell Miller 6/11/05
Fighting Arthritis Naturally Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Study Says Supplements Could Save Billions in Health Care Costs Darrell Miller 5/9/05




Use warm water and turmeric to cleanse your body, support digestion
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 10, 2019 02:25 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Use warm water and turmeric to cleanse your body, support digestion





It is estimated that a lot of Americans are affected by digestive problems. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) alone affects about 20 percent of Americans according to a 2010 estimate and that number should have increased by now. Pharmaceutical products being used to treat these symptoms can do more harm than good. Some of the drugs used for proton pump inhibitors of which 113 million are prescribed every year have been identified as the cause of bone fractures in older women and clostridium infections that result in diarrhea and life threatening conditions in older people. Some natural products though can do the work of cleansing your digestive system without the side effects and also help detox the body. One of them is turmeric. Just add some turmeric in warm water and one is ready to have these benefits. Warm water on its own is very important to the body but when mixed with turmeric it will help create bile that breaks down and absorbs fat in the body. Bile eliminates wastes in the body thereby detoxing your body the natural way.

Key Takeaways:

  • The purview of the NIDDK, otherwise known as the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Disorders, covers a range of digestive complaints.
  • The large array of digestive specific ailments covered includes pancreatitis, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome and much more.
  • Data suggests that proton pump inhibitors, like Nexium, can cause serious long-range side effects.

"Turmeric mixed in a warm glass of water will not only help cleanse your body, but they will also lend support to your digestive system."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-04-03-warm-water-turmeric-to-cleanse-your-body-support-digestion.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6307)


You Need To Know About Vitamin K
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 30, 2017 10:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: You Need To Know About Vitamin K





There are many kinds of vitamins and your body needs a good balance of them. There are supplements you can take for many of them, or you can change your diet if necessary. This talks about vitamin K in particular. It will give you the facts you nee so you know if you have enough of this important nutrient. If you need more and aren't sure how to get it you can also communicate with a dietician or your doctor.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamen K can help you maintain blood vessels. It is a fat soluble store in the liver and fat tissues.
  • Vitamin K can help you keep your bones healthy and prevent fractures, especially in women.
  • Vitamin K helps your body heal wounds. The primary thing is to control clotting.

"Lack of vitamin K in your body can lead to increased bleeding, osteoporosis, and defection in blood clotting."

Read more: http://positivemed.com/2017/09/20/vitamin-k/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5293)


Osteoporosis: what it is and how you can fight back
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 02, 2017 11:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Osteoporosis: what it is and how you can fight back





What is Osteoporosis? Well it is a bone disorder that affects one of five women who is past the age of fifty. There are steps you can take to prevent Osteoporosis. You can have a good healthy diet, exercises, know your risk factors, go get checked at the doctor's office, take steps to prevent bone fractures and lastly, get information about medications that can be most helpful to you. This is something you should consider talking to your doctor about.

Read more: Osteoporosis: what it is and how you can fight back

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4753)


Magnesium 'could prevent broken bones'
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 19, 2017 08:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Magnesium 'could prevent broken bones'





Iron and calcium, in combination with eating healthy and other vitamins and supplements, is known to help strengthen your skeletal system, helping to prevent fractures and broken bones. However, a recent survey has shown that magnesium, taken either in a pill form or in increased amounts in your diet, is equally important in the overall health of your skeletal system. So, if you worry about your bones being weak, find a way to increase your magnesium intake.

Key Takeaways:

  • As people get older, they are more prone to broken bones, but research has been done saying that offering magnesium supplements could help prevent broken bones after falls.
  • A 20 year survey has been done with the result that men with higher magnesium level were less likely to have bone fractures from falls, and at least 22 percent of these individuals had no broken bones
  • This study can only provide a correlation, but not a causation as to whether or not there is a direct relation and affect between levels and broken bones.

"Researchers say offering magnesium supplements to some older people could help prevent broken bones after falls."

Read more: http://www.webmd.boots.com/vitamins-and-minerals/news/20170413/magnesium-could-prevent-broken-bones

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4432)


Keeping magnesium levels high reduces risk of fractures, study suggests
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 18, 2017 11:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Keeping magnesium levels high reduces risk of fractures, study suggests





Most people are aware that Calcium and vitamin D should be taken by people who have a high risk for bone fractures. However, one key ingredient that most people are not aware of is magnesium. People who are at a high risk of bone fractures should definitely have this mineral in all of their supplements and eat foods that are high in this mineral as well. Citric acid should not be overlooked either, as that helps you body absorb and process magnesium.

Key Takeaways:

  • Research has been done that people who take magnesium and has shown higher levels of it in their blood are less likely to get fractures.
  • As an individual grows order, absorption of magnesium decreases due to their ability to absorb the magnesium. This can be caused by excess medication and bowel disorders.
  • There has been tests done that proves that taking in magnesium has no bad effects on the body.

"High levels of magnesium in the blood reduce the risk of fractures by 44 per cent, according to a new study published in the European Journal of Epidemiology."

Read more: http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/keeping-magnesium-levels-high-reduces-risk-of-fractures-study-suggests-1.3368755

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4428)


Magnesium Could Prevent Fractures in Elderly
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 17, 2017 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Magnesium Could Prevent Fractures in Elderly





Calcium and Vitamin D are widely known to improve your overall skeletal system health and prevent bone breaks and fractures. However, a new mineral supplement has emerged to help Vitamin D and calcium help with the skeletal system. Whether you take magnesium as a supplement or in increased amounts of your diet, you should do whatever you can to try and increase your magnesium intake to help improve your skeletal system health and prevent breaks and fractures.

Read more: Magnesium Could Prevent Fractures in Elderly

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4421)


Flaxseed Consumption and Bone Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women.
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 07, 2017 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Flaxseed Consumption and Bone Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women.





Determine the benefits of phytoestrogen-rich flaxseeds on decreasing bone turnover in postmenopausal women. To observe the effect of consuming 40g of flaxseeds/ daily for 12 weeks on bone health of postmenopausal women by measuring some markers of bone resorption and formation 3 during the study period (baseline, 6 and 12 week)

Key Takeaways:

  • Flaxseed Consumption and Bone Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women.
  • Osteoporosis affects approximately 1 in 3 women over the age of 50 and accounts for more days spent in hospital than diabetes and breast cancer;
  • A healthy diet (including food rich in calcium, vitamin D and phytoestrogens) may protect against osteoporosis and risk of fractures

"Osteoporosis affects approximately 1 in 3 women over the age of 50 and accounts for more days spent in hospital than diabetes and breast cancer; amongst women of that age group (Cosman, De Beur et al. 2014)."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.satprnews.com/2017/01/30/flaxseed-consumption-and-bone-metabolism-in-postmenopausal-women/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEh2JTq5uJ9w9S_bo99GhXNfAWB1g

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3902)


Increased Dietary Protein Improves Bone Strength
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 06, 2017 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Increased Dietary Protein Improves Bone Strength





Many people have low bone density or brittle bones. This especially prevalent among the elderly but is not limited to them. This tells how eating more protein can increase your bone strength. This will cut down on fractures and other problems so should not be ignored. Diet can affect many things about your health and this is just one more way.

Key Takeaways:

  • Protein from animal products is best for bone strength.
  • A diet high in protein is often used to combat or slow osteoporosis.
  • Bone strength and microstructure are both affected by and linked to a protein diet.

"While no link has been established between dietary protein and bone strength, it is also unclear whether the protein source has an effect on bone strength and structure."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.medicalnewsbulletin.com/increased-dietary-protein-improves-bone-strength/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNH687C2pomkWVp-Fzrl6s1I03-gnA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3897)


Menopause: anti-inflammatory diet could help prevent fractures and boost bone health
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 03, 2017 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Menopause: anti-inflammatory diet could help prevent fractures and boost bone health





A new study shows women ages 50 to 79 could reap big benefits from an anti-flammatory, Mediterranean diet. Such a diet could help reduce bone loss, resulting in fewer fractures. In addition, Mediterranean diets, which focus on fruits, vegetables and beneficial fats, have been shown to lower the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Key Takeaways:

  • Menopause: anti-inflammatory diet could help prevent fractures and boost bone health.
  • As they reach menopause, at around 50 years of age, many women discover that they are suffering from osteoporosis, a condition that weakens bones,
  • Younger white women following high-inflammatory diets were found to be at greatest risk of suffering fractures.

"An anti-inflammatory, Mediterranean-style diet -- already beneficial to heart health -- could help prevent fractures linked to reduced bone density in certain women, according to researchers in the USA."



Reference:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/menopause-anti-inflammatory-diet-could-help-prevent-fractures-101411015.html?ref=gs

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3877)


Bone health: Here's why you should be eating anti-inflammatory foods
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 03, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bone health: Here's why you should be eating anti-inflammatory foods





If you have chronic inflammation from leading an unhealthy lifestyle adopting an anti-inflammatory diet can help. New research is suggesting that regularly eating vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains, could boost bone health and prevent fractures in women. Foods that fight this inflammation include green leafy vegetables - such as spinach, kale, and collards - nuts, fatty fish, olive oil, fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, cherries, and oranges.

Key Takeaways:

  • Adopting an anti-inflammatory diet is can help counter some of the chronic inflammation that results from leading an unhealthy lifestyle.
  • New research suggests that regularly eating vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains, could boost bone health and prevent fractures in women.
  • The results showed women with healthier diets did not lose bone as quickly as those with high-inflammation diets, and this is important because after menopause women see a drastic loss in bone density that contributes to fractures.

"It's a natural part of healing, but chronic inflammation could have a negative impact on your body and your health."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//zeenews.india.com/health/bone-health-heres-why-you-should-be-eating-anti-inflammatory-foods-1971059&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNH_OWh1ob9EAX2AN_vJ4pzq0062ww

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3873)


Anti-inflammatory diet could reduce risk of bone loss in women
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 02, 2017 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Anti-inflammatory diet could reduce risk of bone loss in women





Women listen up that anti-inflammatory diet that is high in vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains could boost your bone health and prevent fractures. Researchers examined data from the landmark Women’s Health Initiative to compare levels of inflammatory elements in the diet to bone mineral density and fractures and found new associations between food and bone health. Suggesting your diets and health could impact your bones.

Key Takeaways:

  • Anti-inflammatory diets – which tend to be high in vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains – could boost bone health and prevent fractures in some women, a new study suggests.
  • Researchers examined data from the landmark Women’s Health Initiative to compare levels of inflammatory elements in the diet to bone mineral density and fractures and found new associations between food and bone health.
  • The study, led by Tonya Orchard, an assistant professor of human nutrition at The Ohio State University, appears in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

"Women with the least-inflammatory diets had lower bone mineral density overall at the start of the study, but lost less bone than their high-inflammation peers, the researchers found."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://news.osu.edu/news/2017/01/26/diet-and-bones/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEKOzqG4aUNh77Pm-Jk-lpYEZU_aw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3871)


Olive oil could slash your chance of bone fractures in half, study says
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 01, 2017 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Olive oil could slash your chance of bone fractures in half, study says





Extra virgin olive oil could have better benefits besides making your meals taste better. A recent study found that people who regularly consume EVOO have a decreased risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture. When regular olive oil was analyzed, it was not found to have the same benefits. The reason behind this difference is believed to be due to the greater amount of processing. The olives that are pressed into EVOO contains the highest amounts of antioxidants and bio-active compounds.

Key Takeaways:

  • The phenolic compounds found in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) have a potential benefit on bone health, lowering the risk of fractures by 51%, if consumed regularly, say Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) researchers from Madrid.
  • However common olive oil – where 80% of the make-up is refined oil – consumption is not associated with a lower risk of fractures in the study.
  • Mintel say the health benefits of EVOO could be the reason why so many of us are willing to pay higher prices for it, as 39% of consumers prefer EVOO compared to 22% who prefer common olive oil.

"Eating more extra virgin olive oil could cut your risk of osteoporosis related fractures, says a new study."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.foodnavigator.com/Science/Olive-oil-could-slash-your-chance-of-bone-fractures-in-half-study-says&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFGn1bJZfyyO8T-crzwvhW1BHMrUg

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3866)


Signs You Have a Vitamin Deficiency
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 13, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Signs You Have a Vitamin Deficiency





When it comes to deficiency's there are many different signs that can tell you whether or not you have a vitamin deficiency in general. Some of these signs for knowing whether or not you have a vitamin deficiency include brittle hair, diarrhea, frequent bone fractures, and lastly having high blood pressure, as well as a deficiency in potassium.

Key Takeaways:

  • According to the Center for Disease Control’s Second Nutrition Report, less than 10 percent of the U.S. population has deficiencies of most major vitamins and minerals.
  • Hair health is a good indicator a nutrient deficiency.
  • Weak bones are a sign of inadequate calcium intake.

"A rich or decadent meal can lead to a loose bowel movement, but persistent episodes of diarrhea may be evidence that the body is not retaining nutrients."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.lawndalenews.com/2016/12/signs-you-have-a-vitamin-deficiency/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjVkYjY3ZDViNDdiNGM3ZTc6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEOj2LDVYnRC0Z2XIKWFwF530zOqQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3776)


Why Vitamin D Is Extra Important for Athletes
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 18, 2016 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Why Vitamin D Is Extra Important for Athletes





Vitamin D is one of many essential substances that our bodies need to function properly. It should be one of the easiest vitamins for us to get since it is provided by the sun. However, recent culture has lead us to spend more time inside, which makes it more difficult. This vitamin helps our bodies maintain bone, immunity, and brain health as well as having many other benefits. It has also been linked to less inflammation and pain, which can be very helpful for athletes. If you suffer from these issues, you may need to check your vitamin D intake.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamin D is so essential for our existence that our bodies have evolved to get it from the sun, the only nutrient source that’s available on almost every square inch of the planet.
  • Much of the nutrient is stored in our adipose tissue, so more body fat means less is available for use.
  • Some supplements, even staples like multivitamins and fish oil, still come with their fair share of controversy. Vitamin D isn’t really one of them.

"Vitamin D has been linked to reduced inflammation and pain, a lower risk of fractures, and an increase in muscle protein and type II muscle fibers."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://barbend.com/vitamin-d-athletic-performance/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFqjKA2wXctoNxXSuk4A0hbjk0XYA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3667)


How inflammation interferes with the formation of new bone material
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 14, 2016 10:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: How inflammation interferes with the formation of new bone material

One suffers from autoimmune inflammation when the immune system takes healthy cells to be foreign and fights them. This disease causes abnormal changes and growth in body organs; it can affect many or just one body tissue. Autoimmune inflammation usually runs in families. The main cause of the disease is not known, but theories usually rotate on factors like chemical irritants, drugs, environmental irritants and virus. Autoimmune inflammation interferes with the process of bone formation as the chemicals released by body cells increase blood flow resulting in warmth or swelling of the infected part. This swelling causes irritation of the joints and the bones cartilage wears down swelling the joint lining.

With patients with autoimmune inflammation, there will be the erosion of the cartilage and the bone. It causes weakening of the bone which is as a result of deterioration of the bone structure and low bone mass. This increases the risks of fractures as the bone becomes more fragile. It affects the bone formation by reducing muscle forces on the bone which can cause paralysis. From the activation of cells and immune system, there is a production of inflammatory cytokines which induce the bone loss. This is because it causes local cartilage degradation and thus inhibits bone formation.

Bone remodeling highly depends on the balanced action between bone-resorbing and the osteoblast, in this process, an inflammatory process that would target the joint will affect the structure of the bone. This will result in impaired function of the bone and the destruction of bone tissue. OPC generally helps to lower the blood pressure, protect the brain, stop deep vein thrombosis, prevent oxidative and stop inflammation. The seed extract reduces anything damaging the joints and helps in immune regulation. They help stop the symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis. It helps in building of the backbone. It acts as antibacterial agents, preventing inflammable infections. Inflammation can also be prevented through exercises and stopping obesity. Modification of the diet and consumption of supplements will also help avoid inflammation.



(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3645)


Nourish your bones with vitamins - The Detroit News
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 13, 2016 06:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nourish your bones with vitamins - The Detroit News





Bones are constantly being broken down and rebuilt to make it stronger. To decrease the chance of the "replacement bones" of being weaker, there are a few vitamins that will make your bones stronger. These vitamins include Vitamin D, Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin K, Vitamin B12, and Folate. These vitamins can be taken in pill form or be found in certain foods.

Key Takeaways:

  • Unlike the static human skeletons that commonly hang in biology classrooms, your bones are continually being broken down and rebuilt.
  • Vitamin D helps you absorb calcium from food and supplements. Without vitamin D, less than 10 percent of the calcium you consume is absorbed.
  • Magnesium is a component of bone, giving it resiliency and protection against fractures; it also is essential for converting vitamin D to its active form in the body.

"Vitamin B12 and folate support bone health by helping to keep levels of homocysteine, a compound that stimulates the breakdown of bone, low. This role is further confirmed by genetic studies that reveal a link between an increased risk of osteoporosis in older adults and a common gene mutation (MTHFR C677T) that can lead to high homocysteine levels."



Reference:

//www.detroitnews.com/story/life/food/2016/12/04/nourish-bones-vitamins/94692746/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3631)


How to strengthen your bones
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 10, 2016 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to strengthen your bones





The vast majority of those affected are over 50, and mostly women - one in two women, and one in five men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a result of osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Society, with the wrists, hips, and spine most commonly affected. Stress exerts its adverse effects on bone density, mainly via the action of cortisol, one of the major stress hormones, says Max Tuck, author of Love Your Bones: The Essential Guide To Ending Osteoporosis And Building A Healthy Skeleton.

Key Takeaways:

  • It's easy to dismiss osteoporosis as an inevitable part of growing old - but understanding the causes, and how to manage the condition, can make a big difference.
  • Severe osteoporosis can be very problematic due to the increased risk of fractures - which can have a knock-on effect, including pain and mobility difficulties.
  • The key reason for this is menopause, when a woman's ovaries stop producing eggs, and eventually periods stop.

"It's believed that more than three million people in the UK are currently living with osteoporosis, associated with weakened, fragile bones."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.heraldscotland.com/life_style/14927262.How_to_strengthen_your_bones/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNG3NBdkUanmESxcSVU75-3EfLEHXQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3611)


Give your skeleton some love
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 25, 2016 04:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Give your skeleton some love





Did you know that exercise is not only good for your heart, but your bones and joints too? Little to no activity can weaken bones over time and lead to ailments such as arthritis. To promote bone and joint health, physical activity in moderation and a healthy diet should be incorporated into your lifestyle.

Key Takeaways:

  • Hopping, skipping and jumping (in moderation, of course) are good for your joints – ensuring they continue to function at an optimal level.
  • Risk factors that contribute to the development of bone and joint problems include obesity, poor diet, smoking and lack of exercise.
  • The most common bone and joint condition affecting people – besides injuries such as sprains, dislocations and fractures – is arthritis.

"Hopping, skipping and jumping (in moderation, of course) are good for your joints – ensuring they continue to function at an optimal level."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//roodepoortrecord.co.za/2016/10/30/give-your-skeleton-some-love-naweek-2/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNGAbKIZCtd0RuLYgg4Ibn8G1ziSow

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3509)


Diabetes and bone loss: Strategies to manage bone health with diabetes
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 23, 2016 08:06 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Diabetes and bone loss: Strategies to manage bone health with diabetes





A recent study has indicated that bone density can be affected by diabetes in addition to the already long list of complications it causes. The high levels of glucose and possible loss of calcium in the urine can adversely affect the bones, which can lead to life-threatening bone fractures. Diet and exercise are already recommended to help deal with diabetes, but these things are also very important for maintaining bone health. A calcium supplement may also need to be added to the diet if absorption is low or loss of the mineral is high in the urine.

Key Takeaways:

  • Diabetes can increase the risk of bone loss, and the severity of diabetes can determine its impact on bone health.
  • Many studies have even shown that type 2 diabetics, even with above average bone mineral density, are still at a higher risk for bone
  • The researchers measured the women’s bone material strength and found that diabetics had weaker bone material strength.

"Diabetes can increase the risk of bone loss, and the severity of diabetes can determine its impact on bone health."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.belmarrahealth.com/diabetes-bone-loss-strategies-manage-bone-health-diabetes/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNGiwYDYtXU18R5z_WEvjDmEie4cdA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3492)


How to Build Strong Bones
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 07, 2016 02:31 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: How to Build Strong Bones

You often heard your mother keep saying it when you were younger; also you hear your doctor say it even now "If you don't drink your milk, your bones will get weak."


Weak bones, joint pains due to lack of calcium and other vitamin deficiencies are fast becoming common. If you are amongst those who suffers from either, it is important that besides your weekly visit to your chiropractor, you also chalk out a healthy diet that is essentially good for your bones. There are plenty of bone-building foods that contribute to stronger bones, lesser joint pains and healthier bodies.


Foods Essential for the Bones

  • Nuts- Most nuts, particularly walnuts contain omega 3 fatty acids that help in reducing bone breakdown. Brazil nuts are an excellent source of magnesium, much needed for bone formation and strengthening. Peanuts and almonds are packed with potassium and are an excellent source of protein which helps keep the bones strong.
  • Milk- Milk and most dairy products like cheese and yogurt are excellent sources of calcium. Everybody knows the role calcium plays in building strong bones, teeth, and nails. Thus at least 2 cups of milk and milk products must be consumed daily to get the body's required calcium content.
  • Seeds- Almost all seeds like flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and even sesame seeds are extremely rich in nutrients and vitamins, specifically the bone-building mineral magnesium.
  • Leafy Vegetables- Vitamin K cuts calcium loss in urine, and its deficiency is known to increase the risk of hip fractures. Leafy green vegetables contain Vitamin K, Calcium, and Magnesium which are crucial to bone development.
  • Eggs- The yolk of an egg can give you about 6 % of the Vitamin D required by your body. Whole eggs are thus considered very good for bones. They are also high in protein.
  • Soy Milk- Lactose intolerance is common amongst Americans and soy milk is thus an excellent option for all those looking to get their dose of calcium but allergic to milk. Tofu is another food rich in calcium that can be consumed for better bone mass.
  • Fish- Salmon, Sardines, and Tuna are all excellent food to consume for bone building and strengthening. These fish contain extremely high levels of vitamin D and also omega 3 fatty acids essential for health and constant bone formation.

Multivitamins and calcium supplements will provide only so much of the required vitamin content of your body; moreover, they are expensive and not always natural. Finally, they are medicines that should be avoided.

Bones are made up of live cells that break down and build up every day and to assist and speed up this process, particularly of formation, ample amount of bone-building foods must be consumed. Most foods that contain Vitamin D and K or are rich in Calcium and Magnesium are perfect for strong, healthy bones and a painless lifestyle

So now you understand the natural method to build strong bones by retaining your calcium through a diet high in vegetables content and vegetables and then some more vegetables!



Related Products

0212459487732

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3399)


Eye Inflammation and one Herb To Prevent It!
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 20, 2016 11:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Eye Inflammation and one Herb To Prevent It!

What is eye inflammation?


Inflammation is a process by which bodies react against infection, injury or irritation. Inflammation may occur due to quite harmless substances such as dust or even pollen grains. Body's immune system can also react against its own tissues to cause an autoimmune reaction. Inflammation of the eye occurs in response to irritation, injury, autoimmune disorders, or allergies. An inflamed eye often appears red, watery and in most cases, painful. Such eye inflammation affects all ages and lasts from a few minutes to months and years depending on the causative agent or other underlying disease conditions. It can affect one eye or both the eyes.

What are the signs and symptoms of an inflamed eye?

Inflammation of eyes can affect the surrounding soft tissues such as eyelids. The primary signs of inflammation include redness of the eye, swelling, increased warmth in the affected eye and excessive tearing. Other symptoms are causal in nature. These include-

Bruising: It is mainly observed on the eyelids. Bruising usually stems from an eye trauma/injury.

Increased Sensitivity: The affected eye has an increased sensitivity to bright light (photophobic). Other visual changes that may be noticed are blurred vision or loss of vision.

Pus Discharge: There is increased pus discharge in the affected eye. It is noticeable in the morning with the stickiness of the eyelids.

Bulging of Eyes: Bulging or protruding of the eye signifies swelling of the eyes.

Watery Eyes: Affected areas secrete excessive tears due to irritation.

Dryness: Depending on the underlying diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome, dryness of mucous membrane occurs. Dry eyes tend to become itchy and gritty.

Other prominent symptoms include general body swelling (edema), respiratory problems or change in level of consciousness, which indicate a serious problem and it is advisable to visit a physician.

What are the causes of eye inflammation?


Eye inflammation is a response to infections, allergies, injury to the eye, or autoimmune diseases. Some of the common causes of eye inflammation include:

Allergic reaction: Many individuals develop allergic reactions to substances which are not compatible with their body. Reaction to environmental allergens such as dust and pollen grains is the most common cause of irritation of the eye which leads to inflammation. Other common allergic substances include drugs, some foods, and insect bites such as bee sting.

Infections: Eye inflammation due to infections is common in people with low hygiene standards. Cleaning eyes twice a day, in the morning and before sleep at night, is advised to prevent infections. Women who use mascara are advised to wash their make-up before sleeping to prevent its adverse reaction with eyes.

Traumatic Injury: The eye is prone to injuries due to its exposure to the environment. Common injuries that cause eye inflammation include blunt trauma, corneal abrasion, irritants such as chemicals, orbital fractures or insect bites.

Autoimmune diseases: Inflammation of the eye could be a manifestation of an underlying autoimmune disease. In such a case, the body might develop inflammatory response towards tissues of the eyes. Some of the common diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, Behcet's syndrome (cause ulcers and abrasions), and Sjogren's syndrome (cause dryness of mucous membranes causing itchiness).

Contact lenses: People who use contact lenses are at a higher risk of getting an inflamed eye. Contact lenses should be kept clean to avoid importation of irritant substances and infections into the eye.

How is an inflamed eye treated?


In many cases inflammation of the eye does not need treatment as it lasts for a few minutes. In case the inflammation exceeds four days, there is a need to see the doctor to determine any underlying causes.

Inflammation of the eyes can be relieved in the following ways:

  1. Clean the eyelids in the morning and evening.
  2. Rub gently from outside to inside with a wet cotton swab.
  3. Lay a warm wet cloth on the eyes. This relieves the symptoms of the inflamed eye.
  4. Avoid wearing contact lenses as they can worsen the symptoms of eye inflammation.
  5. Visit the doctor for comprehensive treatment. The doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce inflammation while evaluating any underlying diseases.

The one single most important herb anybody can take to reduce inflammation, in the eye as well as systemic inflammation is "curcumin."  Curcumin is the most powerful substance discovered so far in nature which naturally lowers inflammation with zero side effects.  If you have followed the above list of ways to help reduce inflammation and you still struggle with eye inflammation,  consider taking curcumin daily to eliminate inflammation throughout the body!


For more information visit: //www.webmd.com/first-aid/eyelid-inflammation-blepharitis-treatment

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3299)


Health Benefits Associated with Silica
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 25, 2013 04:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Benefits Associated with Silica

What is Silica

silica foodSilica is among the most common minerals on earth. It is present in clay, sand and even granite. For human consumption purposes most silica sources include carrots, onions, pumpkins, fish, raw cabbage, apples and oranges. If you need higher quantities of silica then hard water will be the perfect source. Here are some of the health benefits associated with silica;

How Silica Works  with Calcium

Silica works together with calcium to help in increasing the amount of collagen necessary for bone formation and strengthening. Furthermore, if you have bone fractures or join dislocations, silica will help in healing of the bones.

Health Benefits of Silica

Silica is important to have healthy hair. You might find people with thin hair a condition referred to as Alopecia. Alopecia is a result of eating a diet that lacks important nutrients such silica. Silica encourages the growth of thick hair that is also healthy. It further makes it shiny which good no need to use enhancements.

If you want a skin which is smooth and glowing, then you need to eat a lot of food rich in silica. Silica helps to prevent the skin from getting all flabby but keeps it looking good. In addition, it also helps in preventing commonly occurring skin problems.

For those who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease should consider using a diet full of silica food. Silica easily bond with Aluminum present in the brain lesions which are responsible for the disease. This bonding will eliminate Aluminum intoxication in the brain leaving a healthy person.

There will be no need of using fake nails anymore if silica is present in your diet. This is especially for the ladies, silica helps in developing quality nails which do not break easily while doing your laundry. Silica further helps in protecting you from nail infections and keeps your fingers strong and attractive.

For those who suffer from dehydration, silica helps in restoration of mucosa along the respiratory tract of the body.

References:

  1. //beforeitnews.com
  2. //www.webmd.com
  3. //www.jashbotanicals.com


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2940)


How calcium can Help Prevent Bone Loss
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 08, 2013 09:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How calcium can Help Prevent Bone Loss

calciumWhat is bone loss?

Bones are always in a flux. Since it's living tissue, old bone is absorbed, and new bone is built up. This process is referred to as remodeling. Bone loss occurs when there is absorption of more bone than is being built up.

What causes it?

Bone loss is a natural process that comes with age. There are factors that are beyond human control like genetics, sex, and ethnicity, that contribute to loss of bone. However, some lifestyle factors that can be controlled for instance, being physically inactive, low hormone levels, that is, estrogen in females, and testosterone in males, habits like smoking and drinking alcohol do contribute to faster loss of bone.

When you are intoxicated, you risk falling and breaking a bone. Alcohol cases loss of magnesium via urine. Smokers generally have weaker bones. Female smokers are even at a higher risk of bone fractures after menopause. They also begin their menopause early due to reduced estrogen levels. Both male and female smokers are thinner, thus tend to have less bone mass and take longer to heal in case of fractures.

How to salvage the situation

The best way to prevent bone loss is by ensuring that you develop very strong bones during the first 30 years of your life and then minimize their loss in adulthood. This is how to go about it:

Ensure that you intake vitamin D in your diet, expose yourself to early morning or evening sunlight, and take supplements if need be. Vitamin D is very helpful when calcium levels are low in the body. It is converted to its active form reducing loss of calcium via urine in the kidney, and increasing its absorption in the small intestine.

Intake a lot of calcium too, as there are two sources of calcium in your body: via your diet and from your bones. It is the latter that is dangerous. Your body will absorb calcium from the bones if there isn't enough in the body. This calcium is really difficult to replace.

Intake a diet with magnesium too. It helps in absorption of calcium. If there is excess calcium in the body, one could suffer from arthritis as it will collect in the soft tissues.

References:
  1. //www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium-full-story/#bone-loss
  2. //www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Osteoporosis/osteoporosis_ff.asp
  3. //www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/patientinstructions/000506.htm

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2884)


Can Butcher's Broom Boost Cardiovascular Health?
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 30, 2013 09:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Butcher's Broom Boost Cardiovascular Health?

 

Where to find Butchers Broom


butchers broomThe butcher’s broom also known as ruscus aculeatus is an evergreen low shrub that grows in the Eurasian region. It is known to produce greenish flowers that are small sized and blooms during Spring. It has leaves that produce red berries after the falling off of its female flowers. It is reputed among native cultures as much as asparagus, with the roots been eaten in various preparations.


It is mainly recurrent in woodland as a result of bird-spread though is now grown as a garden plant in regions across the world. It has general names like the pettigree, Jews’myrtle, sweet broom, petit houx and knee holly. Its roots are deployed as medicines in different remedies.


Application


It has been used as an effective tool to constrict capillaries and blood vessels by herbal and alternative medicine practitioners. Its efficiency in constricting blood vessels is considered to result from the constituent chemicals. This prevents the veins from pooling blood thereby improving the flow of blood in the hands, brain and legs.

It has been used to heal fractures and reduce swelling, as well as treatment for hemorrhoids and gallstones. It is reputed for constipation relief and ease of urine ejection.


Result


As a result of its wide application and effectiveness, the German Health Commission listed it as a useful for the treatment of hemorrhoids. It is advised in medical circles that its use by pregnant women should be subject to consultation of a qualified medical practitioner to avoid possible contraindications and safeguard the fetal balance.


Clinical research is still open in several fronts to ascertain its virility and possible side effects as a result of the widespread usage across the globe by alternative medicine practitioners for a variety of medical conditions. This evidently will provide clues as to acceptable dosage and prescription in the years to come.


References:


1. //www.rxlist.com/butchers_broom-page2

2. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruscus_aculeatus

3. //www.webmd.com

4. botanical.com: Broom, Butcher's

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2866)


Can Vitamin D-3 Do More For Bone Health Than Calcium?
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 10, 2013 01:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Vitamin D-3 Do More For Bone Health Than Calcium?

Loss of density and mass in bones has become very common these days because of the increase in the number of people suffering from osteoporosis. It is shocking to note that the number of osteoporosis related fractures in US is more than 1.3 million. Bone health can be improved by taking the right nutrients and minerals. It is generally assumed that calcium is the only mineral needed to prevent and treat osteoporosis. Calcium supplement have been used by many people to improve their bone strength. is it correct?

Do calcium supplements treat osteoporosis completely?  The answer is NO.

A recent study conducted in Iceland concludes that maintaining right levels of vitamin D-3 provides greater protection to bones than taking calcium supplements every day.

What are the results of this study?

Maintaining ideal levels of PTH or parathyroid hormone is essential for bone health. It has been proved by researchers that sufficient vitamin D-3 levels ensure the ideal level of PTH and not calcium. PTH is not in the ideal level in an individual who takes more than 1200 mg calcium a day if he has vitamin D deficiency. On the other hand PTH level is ideal in a person who has sufficient vitamin D even if he takes less than 800 mg of calcium a day.

Vitamin D-3 has calcium sparing effect and if the status of vitamin D in the body is assured, there is no need to take calcium of more than 800 mg a day. The results of this study clearly indicate the importance of vitamin D-3 for bone health. It is clear that sufficient levels of vitamin D-3 are more important than sufficient levels of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. In another study, women who were hospitalized for osteoporosis related fractures were studied. It was found that more than 50% of them had vitamin D-3 deficiency.

The duration of the study was two years and it proved that vitamin D-3 supplementation improved the bone strength and reduced the risk of fractures in these women. It is an unarguable fact that calcium is an important mineral to build bones and to keep bones healthy and strong, but how does the human body absorb calcium? It is the presence of vitamin D-3 that helps in absorption of calcium. Without adequate vitamin D-3, intake of calcium supplements is meaningless.

To absorb calcium sufficient amount of vitamin D-3 must be present in the body. Vitamin D-3 is also needed for the efficient utilization of calcium by the body. The mass and density of the bones are increased only when calcium is absorbed by the body. Absorption of calcium is not possible without vitamin D. Vitamin D-3 plays an important role to build bones in children and to keep bones strong and healthy in adults. It also improves immunity, prevents muscle weakness, regularizes the functioning of thyroid glands and helps in blood clotting.

Deficiency in vitamin D-3 may increase the risks of Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Vitamin D-3 is the natural form of vitamin D. It is produced when skin is exposed to the ultraviolet rays in the sun. Those who live in latitudes, who have dark skin, who spend most of the day indoors and who wear sunscreen lotion whenever they step outdoors lack sufficient levels of vitamin D-3. They should take vitamin-D supplements to avoid a lot of health risks and to improve their bone health.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2809)


Does Calcium Really Strengthen The Bones?
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 23, 2012 07:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Does Calcium Really Strengthen The Bones?

Does it? Definitely, yes.

Calcium, principally, is a fundamental component of the bones. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body; however, aside from its role to keep the bones healthy, it plays other different vital roles - for normal heartbeat; for muscle contractions and relaxation; for nerve and hormone function; and for blood pressure regulation. Since it has many purposes, calcium is always in demand.

The bones are good calcium storage. When the body runs out of this mineral, the body will tend to use the bone as a reserve. The bones are broken down to release the needed calcium. However, eventually, it will need to redeposit calcium to strengthen the bones. If the body is not able to replace this, the bones cannot be rebuilt that will result to bone-related diseases.

Most commonly, this results to osteoporosis for the elderly, a condition where the bones become breakable and weak. In children, on the other hand, calcium deficiency can develop to Rickets syndrome, which is the softening of bones that can potentially lead to fractures and deformity.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2691)


What Are The Health Benefits Of Magnesium?
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 03, 2012 08:05 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Health Benefits Of Magnesium?

Magnesium

Magnesium is of paramount importance for the overall health. It is required by the body in sufficient amount to facilitate certain metabolic processes. Unfortunately, most people are so focused on the need to supply the body with vitamins, iron and calcium that they forget about this important mineral. It is found in green vegetables, peas, nuts, beans, fish, fruits and whole grains. Its deficiency can result in serious effects like weak muscles, loss of appetite, vomiting and nausea. The following are some health benefits of magnesium.

magnesium Benefits

Magnesium benefits for the bones and muscles Magnesium is important for the formation of strong bones and teeth. However, it is not directly responsible but it helps the body to absorb calcium to keep the bones strong.Its supplements are used to treat back ache as it relieves muscle tension and stress also.It can be used by people with calcium deficiency although it should not replace calcium. The person should continue taking calcium even when taking magnesium.Magnesium is used in muscle contractions treatment as it helps the muscles to relax.Athletes and sportsmen are advised to consume lots of magnesium as it aids in blood circulation during physical exercises to ensure that muscles have enough oxygen.

Benefits of magnesium for heart health Magnesium is very important for health. It aids heart rates and also prevents the formation of blood clots which can cause stroke.In addition, to preventing heart diseases, it can aid in recovering from heart disease.It is also regulates breathing and thus is used in treatment of respiratory illnesses such as asthma and bronchitis.It regulates blood sugar levels to prevent high blood pressure.

Magnesium Absorption

Other benefits of magnesium Absorption: magnesium aids the absorption of potassium, phosphorus and sodium which are important for the general health of our bodies.Prevent diabetes: it regulates the production of insulin in the body to make sure the blood glucose levels are maintained at the right levels.

Pregnancy: in pregnant women it reduces safe delivery and reduces labor pain also. Not only that, it regulates blood sugar levels to ensure the health of the unborn baby and the mother.

Depression: by regulating blood pressure it relieves the symptoms of depression which include stress, anger and anxiety. Migraine: Magnesium is beneficial for people suffering from migraine as well as those with insomnia.Anti aging: It prevents the signs of aging such as wrinkles by nourishing the body cells. It is also effective in preventing degenerating diseases such as cancer.

What are the symptoms of magnesium deficiency?

Magnesium deficiency can result in diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Osteoporosis and nerve malfunctioning are other symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Osteoporosis is a bone disease which increases the risk of fractures and injury. Other symptoms are listed below. Asthma Depression Headache Leg cramps Migraine Loss of appetite Diarrhea.

The symptoms are always subtle but they should not be neglected because by addressing them early one can prevent complications such as heart disease.

The above listed health benefits of magnesium are a clear indication that people should include the mineral in the diet.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2600)


Herbs And The Immune System
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 30, 2010 10:07 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Herbs And The Immune System

When looking for an herb to help with the immune system, look for herbs containing sulphur, which helps to dissolve acids in the system. Additionally, sulphur acts as an antiseptic and strengthens the tissues and the body. The following herbs range in amounts of sulphur, but are all good for helping to protect the immune system.

Burdock root, one of the best blood purifiers, can reduce swelling and help to rid the body of calcification deposits. This is because it promotes kidneys function, helping to clear the blood of harmful acids. Burdock contains high amounts of vitamin C and iron. It also contains protein, carbohydrates, some vitamin A, P, and B-complex, vitamin E, PABA, and small amounts of sulphur, silicon, copper, iodine, and zinc.

Capsicum, which is also called as cayenne, is known to be the best for warding off diseases and equalizing blood circulation. It has been called a supreme and harmless internal disinfectant. This herb is extremely important for quick action against flu and colds. Capsicum is high in vitamins A, C, iron, and calcium. Additionally, it contains vitamin G, magnesium, phosphorus, sulphur, B-complex, and potassium.

Catnip helps in fatigue and improves circulation. It helps in aches and pain, upset stomach, and diarrhea that are associated with flu. Catnip is high in vitamins A, C, B-complex, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, sodium, and a small trace of sulphur.

Chaparral, which has the ability to cleanse deep into the muscle and tissue walls, is a potent healer to the urethral tract and lymphatics. It tones up the system and rebuilds the tissues. One of the best herbal antibiotics, chaparral has been said to be able to rid the body of LSD residue. Chaparral is high in protein, potassium, and sodium, and contains silicon, tin, aluminum, sulphur, chlorine, and barium.

Comfrey is one of the most valuable herbs known to botanic medicine, as it has beneficial effects on all parts of the body. It is one of the finest healers for the respiratory system, being able to be used both internally and externally for the healing of fractures, wounds, sores, and ulcers. Echinacea, which stimulates the immune response, increases the body’s ability to resist infections. It improves lymphatic filtration and drainage and also helps to remove toxins from the blood. Fennel helps to stabilize the nervous system and moves waste material out of the body. This herb is known for improving digestion and possesses a diuretic effect.

Garlic, nature’s antibiotic, has a rejuvenative effect on all body functions, building health and preventing diseases, as well as dissolving cholesterol in the bloodstream. Garlic stimulates the lymphatic system to throw off waste materials. It is full of antibiotics like substances that are effective against bacteria.

Juniper berries are used in cases where uric acid is being retained in the system. It is an excellent disease preventative, being high in natural insulin. Juniper has the ability to restore the pancreas where there has been no permanent damage and is excellent for infections.

Kelp, a good promoter of glandular health, has a beneficial effect on many disorders of the body. It is called a sustainer to the brain and nervous system, as it helps the brain to function normally. Kelp is essential during pregnancy.

Along with the above herbs, other beneficial herbs for the immune system are lobelia, mullein, plantain, parsley, sarsaparilla, shepherd’s purse, stinging nettle, and watercress. Look to your local or internet health food store for quality herbs to help boost the immune system.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2176)


Calcium, Magnesium And Vitamin D
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 24, 2009 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Calcium, Magnesium And Vitamin D

In February 2006, the findings of an $18 million double-blind placebo-controlled study were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. This study was conducted by the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and was on the protective effect of calcium and vitamin D. The New York Times reported on this study, declaring that the study found that there were no clear benefits to calcium pills. In this article, the fact that the women who stuck to their supplementation regime experienced 29% reduction in hip fractures was dismissed. This result is rarely achieved, even with use of the strongest pharmaceuticals.

This study was designed to determine whether postmenopausal women who were given calcium and vitamin D would have a lower risk of hip fracture. The intervention group was given 1,000 mg each day of calcium carbonate, along with 400 IU of vitamin D. Although these women portrayed a greater preservation of hipbone density, the decrease in risk of fracture of 12% was not significant as a whole. The fact that many of the women who were included in the study were under sixty, and therefore, not typically at risk for fractures, causes these results to be unsurprising.

The results that were found were also skewed as a result of the fact that compliance with the prescribed daily intake was only 59% by the end of the study. 41% of the study participants had fully stopped taking the prescribed daily dosage of calcium and vitamin D, with 24% having discontinued the supplementation altogether. With such an unexpectedly low compliance rate, along with the fact that the projected hip fracture rate was over twice what was actually observed, the power of the study was reduce to only 48%. As a result, the trial had less chance than a simple flip of a coin to find anything but the largest of differences in a risk for fracture.

Despite these shortcomings, the researchers looked at the subgroups, and found different pictures emerging. Looking only at the women who mostly stuck to their prescribed regime, researchers found that a reduction in fractures of 29% was experienced. Additionally, those women over sixty experienced a reduction in the risk of fracture of 21%. These results are actually remarkable, especially after considering the many problems which clouded the accuracy of the data. Unfortunately, reporters did not look at these findings, causing a slanted account of the study to be published. Because of this, the media failed to acknowledge what were actually significant findings.

Additionally, the design of the WHI study disregarded the fact that a reduction of fracture risk is actually dependent on several factors other than calcium. Studies have actually shown that magnesium is also of equal important in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis, as a deficiency plays a central role in the development of the disease. Postmenopausal women and those women with osteoporosis usually have low bone-magnesium content, exhibiting other indicators of magnesium deficiency that are not seen in non-osteoporotic women. Also, calcium competes for absorption with magnesium, meaning that postmenopausal women who increase calcium intake without also increasing magnesium intake can impair their absorption of magnesium. With this knowledge, the failure of the researchers to include magnesium supplementation along with calcium and vitamin D caused the potential for a study that could cause harm on the patients. With the results as they are how can we trust studies that are conducted when the patients who participate do not follow the rules? For those who want to prevent osteoporosis, calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D when taken together can help slow and prevent the onset of brittle bones.

Calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D come in capsule, tablet, and liquid softgel forms at your local or internet health food store. Always look for a name brand calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D supplement to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2024)


Phytoestrogen
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 27, 2009 01:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Phytoestrogen

Menopause is the time at which a woman stops ovulating and menstruation ceases, which indicates the end of fertility. Menopause is not a disease, but rather a natural progression in life, similar to puberty. Many years before a woman stops ovulating, her ovaries will begin to slow their production of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. Estrogen and progesterone are often thought of as the reproductive hormones.

Although estrogen is essential in reproduction, it is also extremely important in other non-reproductive organs and systems in the body. Cells in the uterus, bladder, breasts, skin, bones, arteries, heart, liver, and brain all contain estrogen receptors. These organs need this hormone in order to stimulate these receptors for normal cell function. Estrogen is needed to keep the skin smooth and moist and the body’s internal thermostat working properly. Estrogen is also essential for proper bone formation. Even though estrogen levels drop sharply after menopause, they do not disappear entirely. Other organs take over for the ovaries, continuing to produce a less potent form of estrogen. These organs, known as endocrine glands, secrete some hormones from fatty tissue in order to maintain bodily functions.

Progesterone works along with estrogen, stimulating changes in the lining of the uterus to complete the preparation for a fertilized egg during the second half of the menstrual cycle. If no egg is fertilized, the uterine lining is broken down and expelled, allowing the cycle to being again. Progesterone also has effects beyond the reproductive system, as it calms the brain and also affects other aspects of nervous system function. Testosterone is most important for both men and women, with women producing about 80 percent less than men do. However, it is the driving force for maintaining a healthy life and proper functioning organs.

The period when a woman’s body is preparing for menopause is known as perimenopause. For the majority of women, hormone production beings to slow down then they reach their thirties, continuing to diminish with age. Many women will experience few if any symptoms at this time, but others may suffer from anxiety, dry skin, fatigue, feelings of bloating, headaches, heart palpitations, hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, decreased interest in their significant other, loss of concentration, mood swings, night sweats, reduced stamina, urinary incontinence, uterine dryness and itching, weight gain, cold hands and feet, joint pain, hair loss, and/or skin changes.

Menopause occurs when a woman stops menstruating altogether. At this point, most of the acute problems a woman may have experienced are actually over and a new balance between all hormones should be established. However, women become increasingly vulnerable to other, potentially serious health problems at this time. Over the long term, the diminished supply of estrogen increased the likelihood of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and uterine atrophy. Osteoporosis especially is a major problem for women after menopause, with an estimated 80 percent of the hip fractures that occur in the United States every year being due to osteoporosis.

A proper diet, nutritional supplements, and exercise can help to minimize or eliminate most of the unpleasant side effects of menopause. The following nutrients are recommended for dealing with this stage of life: beta-1, cerasomal, coenzyme Q10, DHEA, essential fatty acids, lecithin granules, a multi-enzyme complex, soy protein, vitamin B complex, vitamin D3, vitamin E, boron, calcium, magnesium, quercetin, silica, zinc, l-arginine, multiglandular complex, a multivitamin and mineral complex, vitamin C, aloe vera gel, slippery elm, damiana, amaranth, chickweed, dandelion greens, nettle, seaweed, watercress, anise, black cohosh, fennel, licorice, raspberry, sage, unicorn root, wild yam root, hops, valerian root, gotu kola, red clover, dong quai, St. John’s wort, and Siberian ginseng.

All these above listed vitamins and herbs are available in capsule, tablet, or powder forms. When looking for natural alternatives to help replace estrogen naturally, look to your local or internet health food store for name brand products that can help restore an imbalance over time.

--
Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1983)


L-Arginine An Amino Acid Essential Or Not You Be The Judge?
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 06, 2009 04:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: L-Arginine An Amino Acid Essential Or Not You Be The Judge?

L-Arginine is an amino acid that is one of 20 needed by the body for its existence. To some, it is not what is known as an essential amino acid, since it can be biosynthesized by the body, but arginine is termed a conditionally essential amino acid in that we must include some in our diet because our biochemistry does not produce all that our body needs, particularly during the growing years.

Amino acids are the building blocks of life, and are the units from which proteins and ultimately our DNA are built. In fact DNA contains the blueprints for every protein used by our bodies, including all the enzymes without which our biochemistry could not occur. When a supply of a particular protein is needed, the DNA template provides the sequence of amino acids needed to produce it.

Of the 20 amino acids we need, only 10 can be produced by our body: the other 10 must be included in our diet and are termed 'essential' because they are an essential part of our diet, just as vitamins and minerals are. Without an adequate supply of essential components, we cannot survive, and if the essential amino acids are depleted in our diet then the body will break down muscle tissue to release them.

Although L-arginine is termed a 'conditionally' essential amino acid, it is included by many among the 10 regarded as being essential. Hence, depending upon who you read, it can be either essential or non-essential. That is because, as inferred earlier, arginine is needed for growth and development, and there is insufficient in the diet to meet these needs. Therefore, while it is essential in cases where growth is still taking place, it is not in those where normal growth is complete.

Proteins are essential for all animal life, forming not only the enzymes, or biochemical catalysts, but also muscles and DNA among other bodily tissues. Protein is also a necessary part of our diet, and it is from protein, animal or vegetable, that we get the amino acids in our diet. L-arginine is one of these, being available from all meats and seafood’s, and vegetables rich in protein such as soy, seeds, nuts and grains.

So what does arginine do for us, quite a lot in fact, many of its functions being related to our health? Arginine plays an important role in the healing of wounds, especially bone, assisting the immune function, decreasing blood pressure and speeding up the repair time of tissue. However, it possesses other properties such as increasing muscle mass, helping to increase male fertility and improving the circulation.

It also helps to remove ammonia from the body, and is a precursor for the biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO2). It is in the way that L-arginine works with the nitrogen stores of the body that we will focus on here, prior to touching on its other properties.

L-Arginine transports, stores and excretes nitrogen, and used biochemically to manufacture nitric oxide. This oxide of nitrogen plays a very important role in your body, and is produced in every cell of your body. Nitric oxide helps in the dilation of your blood vessels, allowing a reduction in blood pressure, better circulation and helping to prevent a mans man-hood dysfunction, all of which are due to its relaxing effect on smooth muscle contraction and the promotion of the increased blood flow necessary for men and their functions. It is also important to your immune system and nervous system.

It works in a similar way to the effect of nitroglycerine on the heart: this is converted in the body to nitric oxide which relaxes the blood vessels and so reduces the amount of work needed by the heart. The way in which L-arginine forms nitric oxide is by the action of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase.

The amino acid is also an important component of the Citric Acid or Kreb's cycle, where it reacts with ammonia which is a toxic by-product in the generation of energy in the mitochondria. Ammonia is converted to urea by L-arginine and excreted from the body. This is another way in which L-arginine is involved in the storage and use of nitrogen-containing compounds in your biochemistry.

It was mentioned earlier that arginine is an essential amino acid for children. Studies have indicated that it supports the release of the human growth hormone from the pituitary gland although the amount released through supplementation of the amino acid varies widely between individuals. The growth hormone maintains the production of proteins and muscle tissue in the body cells. This reduces as we age, and arginine becomes non-essential, the smaller amounts needed in our biochemistry being manufactured by the body.

The anabolic effect of the supplement is believed to increase the effectiveness of exercise intended to increase muscle bulk and reduce the percentage of body fat, and many take L-arginine as a supplement while undergoing such anabolic fitness and exercise programs. It is normally best to start with low supplement levels and work up due the potential side effects (diarrhea and nausea).

Arginine is an important component in the body's healing mechanisms for both tissue and bone, and studies have confirmed accelerated healing of wounds and fractures with arginine supplementation. Although the mechanism by which this occurs is not yet understood, there is evidence that it may be connected with the nitric oxide pathway and increased blood flow, and also with its effect on the immune system in reducing inflammation at the healing site.

Diabetics, however, should be careful with substances that promote the release of growth hormone, and children with incomplete bone growth should also use such agents only under medical supervision. With diabetics, their condition could be either exacerbated or improved, and those with herpes and some psychotic conditions should also be careful.

Nitrogenous compounds are essential to life, and L-arginine plays a significant role in the storage, use and secretion of them. Without it life would not be possible, although it is its visible uses, such as the effect of nitrous oxide on blood flow and of proteins on muscle metabolism, for which it is best known to those that use it, either as a supplement or as a remedy. Pure supplement form is available at your local or internet health food store.

--
Buy L-Arginine at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1959)


Hyaluronic Acid can help Restore Joint Function
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 01, 2008 10:03 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hyaluronic Acid can help Restore Joint Function

Hyaluronic acid, also known as hyaluronan, is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue and joints, and is one of the main chemicals contained in the synovial fluid that lubricates your joints. Before we discuss how it can be used to help restore the function of damaged joints, let's have a look at what causes joint pain, and why joints can break down long before their time.

You might have heard that arthritis is an inflammatory condition, or that it is due to the immune system. This is true to an extent, and rheumatoid arthritis is an immune system problem, although osteoarthritis is a different problem altogether. Arthritis is not the only cause of joint pain of course, but is by far the most common cause. As already inferred, there are two forms of arthritis, each with a different basic cause.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of joint disease, and is largely due to wear and tear, injury or can be hereditary. However it is usually initiated by damage, the joint surface becomes roughened and the bone around the damaged area gets thicker to compensate. A joint is where two bones meet, and not all joints move. You have the fixed joints in your skull, for example, and those between the ribs and the spine. However, arthritis generally affects the joints associated with movement, mainly the knees, hips, fingers, toes and elbows.

The ends of the bones are covered with a thin layer of cartilage, which can absorb shocks and both cushion the joint and allow the ends of the bones to move smoothly over each other. Round each joint is a membrane known as the synovium that is filled with the thick synovial fluid, which lubricates the cartilage. The bone ligaments hold them close to the joint, and prevent them moving too much and dislocating. Finally, the joint is completed by the tendons that attach the muscles to the bones they control.

Osteoarthritis causes a joint to deteriorate: the cartilage becomes rougher and wears, and the bone beneath the cartilage gets thicker. At the edge of the joint the bone tends to grow outwards, forming spurs and the synovium swells producing extra synovial fluid. This causes swelling and pain, and ultimately the joint can be damaged beyond repair. This process takes a number of years to reach a stage whereby pain and discomfort are felt.

Before that situation occurs, however, the joint tries to repair itself, and hyaluronic acid can take part in this process. It is mainly involved in the reparation of connective tissues such as cartilage, although there are other connective tissues which hyaluronan has been found to repair. These include skin, eyes and heart valves and hyaluronic acid can arguably be used to help repair all of them.

However, it is joint tissue with which we are concerned here, and hyaluronan is an important component of articular cartilage: the type of cartilage involved in movement (knees, hips, etc), as opposed the type that forms your nose or the external part of your ears. It is believed that injections of hyaluronic acid can help to repair damaged articular cartilage. However, osteoarthritis is only one of the two forms of arthritis. The other is rheumatoid arthritis, and this is much more sinister.

Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by the attack of your joints by your own immune system, although why this happens is unknown. The most likely theory is that certain infections trigger the immune system, and it then proceeds to attack the synovial joints. Cytokines are responsible for inflammation of the synovial fluid, which can also cause fever, loss of weight and appetite, and inflammation of the blood vessels.

The body tries to generate more synovial fluid which causes swelling round the whole joint, putting pressure on the damaged areas, and generating even more pain. The inflammatory response commences and the whole area becomes seriously painful.

The smaller joints are most commonly affected, such as the fingers and toes, but it can progress to the elbows, hips and the knees. The joints become red, swollen and finally too stiff to be used. The sinusitis eventually leads erosion of the joint and deformation.

Because hyaluronic acid behaves like the synovial fluid, it is believed that it can be used to treat both forms of arthritis. It is a glycosaminoglycan, an unbranched polysaccharide of the same type as chondroitin sulfate that is commonly used to treat arthritis. It can be used to increase the viscosity of the synovial fluid, and render a more effective lubricant.

However, it is in treatment of osteoarthritis that hyaluronan is most likely to find success. It is used to improve the viscosity of the synovial fluid, so providing increased lubrication to the joint and helping reduce the pain. In fact it not escaped notice that those who eat a diet rich in hyaluronic acid tend to live longer and look younger than those that do not do so.

Commercial preparations are currently in use or under evaluation for disorders such as glaucoma, fractures, and detached retinas, damage to cartilage, healing ligaments and osteoarthritis. These last three are particularly of interest to arthritis sufferers, and signs are that they are effective with many cases.

However, it has also been established that smoking cigarettes can negate the effect of hyaluronic acid, and excessive levels of Vitamin C can also degrade it. Estrogen treatment, however, can enhance its effect in repairing connective tissue. Zinc deficiencies have also been found to have negative results, so make sure that these factors are addressed if you are using hyaluronic acid to treat arthritis.

Something to keep in mind if you are taking hyaluronic acid orally is the size of the molecule. It is a very large molecule, and suffers from the same absorption problems as chondroitin sulfate. There are smaller hyaluronan molecule versions available if you can find them, that improve the absorption through the intestine, but if not then the dose will generally be greater than expected due to the low absorption levels due to the molecule being too large to be easily absorbed through the tissues into the bloodstream.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1942)


Isoflavones
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 02, 2008 10:10 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Isoflavones

An isoflavone from soy has been evaluated for its effect on various female functions such as the menopause and some effects on estrogens. Soy products have been part of the diet in the Far East for thousands of years, and it is a known fact that these people suffer fewer incidences of conditions such as breast cancer, menopausal problems, rectal cancer and diseases of the heart and joints.

The benefits that such a diet appeared to confer on those taking it initiated many studies into the active constituents of soy, and how the biochemistry involved imparted these benefits. A result of this was an intensification of investigations into many so-called -women's functions' or 'women's problems' that hitherto had been accepted as a part of life. Now, however, they are better understood, just as many other components of the Oriental diet are being found to have wider implications in terms of disease prevention and increasing life expectancy. So back to soy and its isoflavone content.

Soy contains a number of isoflavones, commonly known as phyto-estrogens - plant estrogens - because their chemical formula is similar to that of estrogen, a female hormone. Isoflavones possess some properties that support the beneficial properties of estrogens, and others that suppress some of the risk factors possessed by estrogen. We shall discuss here how these isoflavones are related chemically to estrogens, and how they can be used to support some specific female functions.

In order to understand how isoflavones work we go back to the 1980s, when alpha and beta estrogen receptors were discovered. Until then, the biochemistry of estrogen was not fully understood, and problems connected with estrogen had not been fully investigated.

Like all hormones, estrogen works by finding receptors that are located on cells. With regard to estrogen there are two types of receptor. The beta receptors are connected with the beneficial properties of estrogen, while the alpha receptors tend to lead to the unfavorable effects such as cancers related to estrogen. Each of your different tissue types possesses different ratios of these two receptor types.

The unfavorable alpha receptors predominate in tissues such as the breast, ovaries and uterus. The favorable beta receptors predominate in the blood cells, bladder, prostate gland, thymus and bones. Studies have indicated that isoflavones appear to attack to the beta receptors and simulate the beneficial effect of estrogen when the levels of estrogen in the body are low, and allow the proper functioning of these cells in the body.

The alpha cells are also populated by isoflavones, which then protect these areas of your body against cancers that can be stimulated by estrogen, such as cancers of the breast, ovaries and uterus. It appears that cancers that can develop when the alpha receptors are populated by estrogen do not occur when isoflavones have captured them

Isoflavones are present in the form of glucosides. These are composed of sugar and non-sugar components, the latter known as aglycones, and the main isoflavones in soybean are based on the three aglycones genistein, daizein and glycetein. The glucosides are water soluble and are broken down into enzymes known as B-glucosidases in the intestine. This releases the aglycones that can be further metabolized into other substances.

Current studies are examining the possibility that a diet rich in isoflavones taken early in life up to teenage years can reduce the incidence of breast cancer in later years. Isoflavones have been used in the laboratory to reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells, and animal studies have reinforced this finding. The fact that Japanese men suffer less from prostate cancer than those eating diets low in isoflavones also tend to reinforce this connection.

The same mechanism can be used to in prostate cancer by binding to testosterone receptors. Genistein, in particular, can help treat certain types of cancer by inhibiting enzymes such as tyrosine kinase that can become hyperactive and overstimulate the growth of potentially cancerous cells.

It is probable that the estrogen binding facility of isoflavones complements the activity of estrogen in women with low levels of hormone. When the female estrogen level is low, isoflavones can reduce the effects of the menopause and symptoms such as hot flushes and night sweats become less severe. While not all women benefit, it has been found that women with these symptoms tend to suffer less when taking a diet rich in soy foods containing isoflavones.

In addition to its moderating effect on these cancers, and its effect on the menopausal symptoms on many women, soy isoflavones possess a few other beneficial health properties. They are strong antioxidants, and help to support the immune system by mopping up free radicals. They also help to protect from atherosclerosis by preventing the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and depositing it as plaque in the arteries.

There is evidence that isoflavones in the diet can help to maintain strong healthy bones. This is largely through the fact that Chinese women taking a diet rich in soya suffer fewer fractures than those on a low soy diet, but studies are continuing into potential reasons for this. Estrogen receptors in bones regulate bone growth and density. Isoflavones can modulate these receptors and promote greater bone density just like estrogen hormones with out estrogen side effects.

Isoflavones have few dietary sources, the richest being soybeans and other soy products. These are very low in the non-Asian diet, so few people, other than Asians, receive the benefit of these phytochemicals. This is believed to be the major reason for Asians suffering significantly lower rates of certain cancers than non-Asians.

Soy milk and tofu are the richest sources, although there is no standardization of isoflavones in soy-based foodstuffs. This is because the isoflavone content varies according to growing conditions, although a diet containing the recommended quantities of soy foods, such as soy milk or soy beans, together with a low cholesterol diet, should help women to overcome many of the problems associated with excess estrogen, or a lack of it especially when taking in conjunction with essential fatty acids.

Any supplement containing soy will be beneficial to most women, particularly during the menopausal stages, although the effect of isoflavones on certain cancers to which women are susceptible cannot be ignored. Such supplements should therefore be used by all women from at the teens onwards, studies having indicating that an isoflavone-rich diet should be beneficial over the longer term.

Isoflavones from soy is effective in helping to support female functions, although the normal Western diet is traditionally very short in these forms of phytoestrogen. Isoflavones can modulate estrogen receptor sites through out the body helping the body regulate its functions and easy the symptoms related to a estrogen deficient body.

--
Buy Isoflavones at VitaNet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1880)


Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin D
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 06, 2008 12:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin D

Osteoporosis has always been known to threaten women, as it afflicts 8 million females in the US, but this bone-thinning disorder is becoming a serious public health issue among men also. More than 2 million men may be at risk for osteoporosis and bone fractures, with 6% of them over age 50 will experience a hip fracture as a result of this disease. Even though osteoporosis does not affect men as often as it does women, the risk for men increases with age, with the risk factors being similar to those of women. Osteoporosis often shows no symptom until a bone fracture occurs, which makes early detection extremely important.

With new bone material constantly replacing the old, more bone is produced than removed during childhood, which lets the skeleton grow. Bone mass peaks for most people during their 30s, with the processing reversing itself afterwards. The amount of bone slowly begins to decline as the removal of old exceeds the formation of new. Because female hormone production drops rapidly at menopause, this condition is immediately associated with increased bone loss. Hormonal changes in men occur much more slowly, with testosterone levels declining about 1% each year after the age of 40, remaining unnoticeable until after age 60.

Women lose bone more rapidly than men up until after age 65, when the rates equal out. The absorption of calcium decreases in both sexes, while excessive bone loss increases the fragility of bones, leading to fractures in the hip, spine, and wrist. Women begin to get spine fractures in their late 50s, while men take about 10 years longer for this to begin, which can partially be attributed to their larger skeletons, which takes longer for osteoporosis to develop.

Along with being brought on by advancing age and lower testosterone levels, osteoporosis can develop due to small stature, smoking, excessive alcohol intake, gastric cancer, HIV infection, celiac disease, various medications, and growth hormone deficiency. Because nothing can be done about one’s stature, some basic lifestyle adjustments, such as not smoking, limiting alcohol consumption to no more than two drinks each day, and increasing exercise, can help a man protect his bones. A man should also look for treatment for any other underlying medical conditions that affect bone health.

Calcium, one of the best known nutrients associated with healthy bones, needs help to provide maximum protection. Therefore, other skeleton-strengthening minerals necessary are magnesium, which regulates calcium transport within the body; zinc, which is required for collagen; and boron, which is a trace element that helps the body to use calcium, magnesium, and other minerals. Boron is also important because it activates vitamin D.

Finally, vitamin D is another key bone nutrient. In order to ensure adequate D intake, at least 10 minutes of sunlight a day or dietary supplements is important. In colder, cloudier times, vitamin D supplementation is highly recommended. Additionally, B vitamin deficiencies have often been associated with an increased chance of developing osteoporosis. The best way for a man to avoid osteoporosis is to be aware of his risk. The knowledge of osteoporosis in women has led to a downward trend in women breaking hips, but the incidence is still going up for men.



--
Find Bone Support At Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1855)


Vitamin D Supplements
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 29, 2008 02:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vitamin D Supplements

Scientists at the Children’s Hospital and Research Center in Oakland, California have recently begun studying whether there is substantial convincing biological or behavioral evidence that links vitamin D deficiency to brain dysfunction. The study found that there is biological evidence which proves that there is an important role for vitamin D in the development of the brain and its function. Supplementation for groups that are chronically low in vitamin D has been found to be extremely beneficial. Vitamin D is involved in brain function through its wide distribution of vitamin D receptors throughout the brain.

Vitamin D affects the proteins in the brain that are known to be involved directly with learning, memory, motor control, and possibly even maternal and social behavior. Research has shown that supplementation is beneficial to those groups whose vitamin D status is extremely low, especially nursing infants, the elderly, and African Americans, but the need for further study has been established. The authors of the study argue that vitamin D supplementation is necessary for those groups that are at risk.

Increased vitamin D levels protect the body against osteoporosis, cancer, and multiple sclerosis. There is now evidence that suggests that vitamin D may help protect against a potentially dangerous rise in blood pressure which occurs in some people as they get older. A study that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition had researchers finding that as many as 60 percent of whites and more than 90 percent of blacks who participated in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey had insufficient blood levels of vitamin D.

Researchers also investigated the association between vitamin D, blood pressure, and age. This investigation found that people with lower blood levels of vitamin D had significantly higher increases in systolic blood pressure as they aged than did those people who had healthy levels. Actually, the age-related rise in blood pressure turned out to be 20 percent lower in those people who had healthy vitamin D levels, as oppose to those people who did not. This suggests that vitamin D deficiency may play a critical role in high blood pressure development.

Many other studies have suggested that there is a role for vitamin D in reducing blood pressure. According to Vin Tangpricha MD, PhD., an assistant professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Lipids at Emory University School of Medicine, there is not enough evidence that vitamin D prevents hypertension available, however, because vitamin D insufficiency is highly prevalent throughout the United States, it may be a good idea to take a vitamin D supplement solely because of the strong evidence on vitamin D’s ability to prevent osteoporotic fractures. It has been noted that further studies are needed in order to determine vitamin D’s effect on blood pressure.

Additionally, it needs to be determined if giving all patients vitamin D will help lower blood pressure. Those people who have a family history of other risk factors that are associated with high blood pressure, such as being older than sixty-five, should have their blood pressure checked regularly. Be sure to look for more studies and information on the effects of supplemental vitamin D on both white and black habitants of the United States to help battle vitamin D deficiency. To learn more about supplemental vitamin D, contact your local health food provider.

--
Buy Vitamin D At Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1846)


Fight Osteoporosis With Minerals To Build Bones And Improve Quality Of Life
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 02, 2008 11:06 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fight Osteoporosis With Minerals To Build Bones And Improve Quality Of Life

Bone consists predominantly of collagen and calcium phosphate. The collagen provides the connective framework for bone that is hardened by the calcium phosphate, and without healthy bones, your quality of life would be significantly reduced due to bone breakage. That is why it is essential to supplement this framework with the vitamins and minerals needed to maintain a good bone density at those periods in your life when bone density is liable to deteriorate.

This begins to happen between the ages of 30 and 35 and in women and accelerates during the menopause, when your ovaries stop producing the hormone estrogen that is necessary for the maintenance of healthy bones. Through time, your bone mass drops creating first a condition known as osteopenia, or reduced bone mass, and then osteoporosis, when your bones become brittle, porous and very prone to fractures.

Before we look at what can be done to reduce your chances of developing osteoporosis, lets have a close look at how bone develop so that it will be easier to understand the remedial action that can be taken.

Calcium is the most common mineral in the body, and the vast majority is in the bones and teeth. Phosphorus is also essential for healthy bones because as stated earlier, the bone consists of collagen that is hardened by calcium phosphate. The two main uses of phosphorus are in bone structure and animal metabolism, since phosphates are also essential for the vast majority of the energy-production chemical reactions within your body.

Calcium has other functions within the body other than bone, however, including exchange of fluids within and between cells, the maintenance of your heartbeat and in blood clotting. Vitamin D is necessary to help calcium be absorbed from your diet, through the membranes of the duodenum. More calcium is absorbed there than in the small intestine, and the calcium is also most available to the body when it is in a water-soluble form.

In fact, the reason that stones form in your kidney for example, is that the calcium is rendered insoluble through the formation of calcium oxalate from the oxalic acid in foods such as rhubarb and soy. High fat diets can also slow down the absorption of calcium.

Estrogen plays a significant part in bone physiology, and is an important factor in the maintenance of bone density in women. Bone is living tissue, and is constantly being absorbed and remodeled throughout life. The part played by estrogen is to maintain a proper balance between the osteoclasts, the cells that reabsorb bone tissue, and osteoblasts, the cells that form new bone tissue.

When estrogen is deficient, this balance is lost and rather than bone formation and resorption occurring constantly, they take place in spurts so that first an area of new bone will be formed, then resorption will occur some weeks later, resulting in a structure where there are cavities between areas of bone. With time, these cavities will increase and weaken the integrity of the bone structure.

However, that is not the whole story. The effect of estrogen is to limit the active period of osteoclasts so that the areas of bone resorbed into the body are relatively small so that the removed bone cavity can easily fill up with new bone by the osteoblasts, which are invigorated by estrogen. When estrogen is deficient, not only is the activity of the bone-forming osteoblasts reduced, but the bone-absorbing osteoclasts activity is not regulated, and they form deeper holes in the bone structure than the osteoblasts are able to fill.

The net result is bone loss, with more bone being reabsorbed than is being formed. The end result of all this is spongy bone tissue with many tiny hole and also with larger areas of missing bone. Eventually this passes a critical point and the bone fractures during normal use. A simple jump from one step to another can fracture a bone at its weakest point, such as at the hip joint where the neck of bone is thinner.

Not everybody is at the same risk, and there are certain risk factors that you should be aware of, each of which could increase the chances of you developing weak bones. The condition particular affects white or Asian women, and those who have a small frame. If you smoke and drink an excessive amount of alcohol, you will also be more prone to osteoporosis, although exercise can help you to avoid it. An inadequate intake of calcium and vitamin D will also contribute, and magnesium is an essential part of strong bone development.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has carried out surveys that indicate American women to be taking only 50% of the calcium recommended to maintain a healthy bone density. However, it is not only dietary calcium that is needed for the formation of bone, but also magnesium and boron, and vitamin D also helps with the absorption of calcium in the gut.

If you are on steroids then they can render you more prone to brittle bone disease. Unfortunately the symptoms of osteoporosis do not become evident until there has been a significant amount of bone loss, which is why post menopausal women, and those over 65, should have a bone density scan (DXA test). It is important to understand that osteoporosis is not a disease as such: you cannot ‘catch’ it, but it develops as the result of a gradual reduction in the minerals that maintain the density of your bone structure.

Your diet is important in helping you prevent bone loss and osteoporosis later in life, and your lifestyle is also important. Reducing your daily alcohol intake will certainly help, and cigarette smoking further retards the activity of the bone-creating cells. Calcium and vitamin D supplements will help, but do not restrict yourself only to these.

If you want to maintain proper bone density through and beyond the menopause stage of life, you should take a balanced supplement that contains a combination of vitamins and minerals needed to maintain a healthy balance between natural bone loss and regeneration. There is more to it that only calcium and vitamin D, and a balanced supplement takes this out of your hands. You can rest in the knowledge that you are doing the best for your body and its bone density.

--
Build Bones With Vitanet ® Help!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1734)


Prevent Disease With Discount Vitamins
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 24, 2007 09:33 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Prevent Disease With Discount Vitamins

You can prevent disease with discount vitamin just as easy as with those you pay top dollar for on the High Street. Vitamins are vitamins, and they do not lose quality for price as long as you know what to look for and stick with name brands. They are the most purchased supplement in the western world, and there are ways of getting them for less than the normal price.

First, though, a definition of what a vitamin is since an astounding number of people have no idea of what actually constitutes a vitamin even though they can recite all the letters. In fact, a vitamin is a molecule, obtained from an organic animal or vegetable source that is essential for life. Without it there can be no animal life and vitamins generally catalyze or act as coenzymes in the biochemistry that makes up all of the chemical reactions of the body. A catalyst allows a reaction to occur without changing itself, and a coenzyme allows enzymes to do their jobs.

Let’s have a look at one or two vitamins to provide examples of these statements. In bygone days when sailors used sail to cross the oceans in open boats powered only by sail and oar, a trip that takes us a week in a cruise liner these days could take sailors several months. It was not only the fact that they relied on favorable winds, but also that they did not always know where they were going, and were frequently unable to store up for a whole voyage. They depended on landing at islands on the way to replenish supplies. Disease due to lack of nutrition was common and one of these was scurvy.

This condition is not strictly a disease and is due to a lack of vitamin C, or ascorbic acid. In fact the name ‘ascorbic’ comes from the Latin for ‘without scurvy’. The symptoms are liverish spots over the body, spongy gums that cause the teeth to fall out and bleeding from the mucus membranes. Healed scars will open up, and cured and knitted bone fractures will separate. Ultimately it causes death. The first person is used since scurvy still exists.

It is due to a breakdown in the synthesis of collagen which heals scars, keeps joints held together, and forms the outside part of cells, and also some inner cell structures. Collagen synthesis is dependent on the amino acids proline and lysine that are hydroxylated by the enzymes lysyl and prolyl hydroxylase. The problem is that these enzymes need ascorbic acid (vitamin C) to do their work. Without it, collagen cannot be made.

Although the chemistry was unknown, early sailors soon found that citrus fruits such as lemons and limes prevented this horrible condition. The English used to stock up their ships with fresh limes at any port of call that had them, and this is why the English are frequently referred to a ‘Limeys’. It got them a nickname, but it saved their lives. Scurvy is now rare, but it is not a disease as such that can be eradicated. It occurs now and again in teenagers with poor diets that do not include fresh fruit and vegetables.

Vitamin C supplements are now available, and it is one of the most common of the discount vitamins on the market. The same is true of vitamin A that is essential for good eyesight. It has many other uses, as has vitamin C, but without it we could not survive. Without it we will eventually become blind, although the first symptom is night blindness. However, an excess can lead to hypovitaminosis A, a condition common in the developed world. Its absence can kill us, and vitamin A deficiency is one of the more common conditions of the developing world. Vitamins are contrary creatures, and can do us harm as well as good.

How about vitamin D, the sunlight vitamin? We don’t think of it, yet it is responsible for the strength of your skeleton and the regulation of calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood. Without it our bones become soft, our children get rickets and we eventually die – frequently through cancer.

1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol is the chemical name for calcitriol, which is the form of vitamin D found in the body, known as vitamin D3. This has been found to kill some cancer cells in the laboratory, and it is thought that supplements of vitamin D might help to prevent some types of cancer. The reults of a four year cancer study were released in June, 2007, that showed a reduction of 60% in cancers where patients were given a aupplement of 1100 inernational units daily. This rose to 77% where the cancers had been diagnosed in their first year.

The effect of vitamin D was emphasized by the reults of a study of more than 4 million cancer patients that showed a marked difference in the risk of cancer according to whether they lived in sunny or less sunny climates.

So these are the benefits of some discount vitamin supplements. How, then, do you find vitamins at discount prices? The easiest way is to purchase in bulk. There are those that form online clubs for vitamins and pay a weekly or monthly fee to join. When offers come online for specific supplements at low prices, they are purchased by the groups and distributed. You could do the same yourself with some friends, since it is generally cheaper to purchase 5 Kg of a vitamin that 500g. Your local health food store could also help you out since they are likely to be able to procure discount bulk prices from their supplier.

Another way is to wait until your local store makes special offers, or seek offers in the press. These can often be found, but if you are concerned mainly with the common vitamins A, B complex, C, D and E then a large proportion of the population are interested in these and you should not find it difficult to sell several kilos of these. You will not only get yours free, but will a sizeable profit into the bargain.

Anything between that and the normal price is an advantage for chemicals that are essential for life. One thing to always remember, buy reputable name brand vitamins because if the vitamins seem to cheap than you’re probably right. Name brand vitamins have quality and can be purchased at discount prices if you look long enough.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1604)


Supplements for Children
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 26, 2007 09:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Supplements for Children

Supplements for Children

 

While most parents try hard to make nutritious meals for their family, most children find the appeal of refined, fast, and junk food simply overwhelming. And, sadly, increasingly easy to buy and consume, as well. From kindergarten through 12th grade, in both grade schools and high schools, vending machines offer calorie laden candy bars, sugar-filled soft drinks, and snack foods loaded with fat and salt. Many school cafeterias actually sell fast-food to children for lunch every day. In fact, it seems almost everywhere children go and gather, visually enticing but nutritionally lacking snacks and soft drinks are sure to be available.

Determined to counteract this disturbing trend, parents everywhere are urgently seeking solutions to help their children get the nutrition they need. One answer is supplemental multivitamins. There are certainly plenty of multivitamins formulated for children currently on the market. However, these products vary considerably in quality and content. Some lack certain vital nutrients. Some taste terrible. Still others are loaded with sugar and artificial flavorings. The good news is that there are superior multivitamins and exceptional immune boosting products formulated specifically for children that actually taste great. In this issue of Ask the Doctor, we will discuss childhood nutrition and how to help ensure your children’s health with high quality, 100% natural flavored nutritional supplements.

 

Q. Do children really benefit from vitamin supplements? Can’t I make sure they get the vitamins and minerals they need from meals?

A. Even the most nutritionally vigilant parent cannot be 100% certain what nutrients are in the food they serve their children. That’s because there’s so much variability in the food we prepare. For instance, fat-soluble vitamins can withstand normal cooking, but vitamins A and E are gradually destroyed by exposure to air. Water-soluble vitamins such as B1, B6, folic acid, and pantothenic acid are destroyed by heat. Vitamin B2 is destroyed by light and heat, while light and air destroy vitamin C. Certain food preservatives and preparation methods also destroy the vitamins in food. To further complicate matters, some fruit and vegetables are grown and harvested in such a way that does not promote nutrient content – so even raw foods may be lacking.

Then there are those crazy food phases all children seemingly go through. While these phases are generally harmless in the long run, a recent alarming exception was in the news. A five-year old boy ate nothing but cheese pizza, Pop-tarts, biscuits, and water, refusing fruits, vegetables, juices and vitamins. He slowly developed limp, swollen gums, and small purple spots appeared on his skin. After five months of this extremely deficient diet, he was unable to walk or get out of bed because the pain was so severe. Doctors diagnosed the boy as having a severe vitamin C deficiency after ruling out other ailments such as leukemia. Within a week of getting vitamin C supplements, the boy’s pain and other symptoms were completely resolved. Obviously, this little boy’s story is unusual. However, even mild food phases (such as “If It’s Green It Must Be Yucky” or “The Only Good Crust Is A Cut-Off Crust”) can result in awfully lop-sided nutrition.

 

Q. Can multivitamins help my child’s performance in school?

A. Most teachers firmly believe that nutrition and learning go hand in hand. They are convinced that children who are well nourished possess the mental stamina that’s needed to learn and retain even difficult concepts. But can multivitamins help children become better students?

Two independent research teams recently conducted randomized trials to find the answer. The researchers followed 245 school-children aged 6 to 12 years for three months. They gave half of the children multivitamin tablets every day, and half of the children placebos. When the children were tested, the children in the multivitamins group showed an increase in their nonverbal intelligence scores. Nonverbal intelligence is closely associated with academic performance.

 

Q. I can’t get my children to take 100% natural flavored multivitamins because they don’t taste very appealing. Isn’t there some way to make a 100% natural multivitamin taste good enough for my children to willingly take?

A. Yes, there is! Because most children need chewable multivitamins, manufacturers need to contend with the truly terrible taste of certain minerals. Magnesium, iodine, copper, and iron are probably the worst tasting. Some solve this dilemma by skimping on the amounts of these minerals in their children’s formulas. Others cover up the bad taste with either massive amounts of sugar or artificial flavors, or both.

However, a select few multivitamin makers have discovered how to offer a natural flavored, great tasting children’s multivitamin that contains these vital minerals. The best children’s vitamins are prepared in a base of natural fruit that provides both antioxidants and other healthy phytonutrients. Children’s multivitamins made in such a fruit base have very low sugar content, as well, providing as little as four calories a day. Fructose – fruit sugar – is the preferred sweetening agent, in addition to the fruit content.

 

Q. What vitamins should be in a multivitamin for children?

A. There are several vitamins and minerals that children need to take each and every day. They include biotin, folate, niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamins B12, B1, A, B6, C, D, E, and K. Let’s review a few. We’ll start with folate, one of the B vitamins. This vital vitamin helps the body use protein, helps make DNA, helps cells grow and divide, and keeps the nervous system healthy. In fact, folate is so important to children that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandated that folate must be added to many foods most children eat daily. Since 1998, cereal, enriched bread, flour corn meal, rice, and pasta have been folate-fortified with this B vitamin.

One of folate’s vital actions is the reduction of homocysteine levels in the blood. Homocysteine is an amino acid (the building block of protein) that is normally produced in the human body. Research has shown that high levels of homocysteine can irritate blood vessels, make blood clot more easily than it should, and cause blockages in arteries increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes .

However, study after study has proven that taking folate reduces harmful homocysteine levels. While most of this research has been in adults, a recent study looked at children’s homocysteine levels. Researchers examined over 3500 children and discovered that high homocysteine levels increased the risk for heart disease in these children, especially as they grow. The researchers leading this study reinforced how critical folate is for all children.

Other critical vitamins for children are the vitamins C and E. The rates of childhood asthma have increased significantly here in the US. There seem to be several reasons for this troubling trend, including environmental pollution and changes in the earth’s atmosphere. However, when vitamin C and vitamin E are given to children with asthma, they are able to breathe better and feel much better, too. It seems C and E, both antioxidants, keep asthmatic bronchial tubes from constricting which results in wheezing less and breathing better.

 

Q. Which minerals do children need?

A. It is absolutely crucial that children get calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, manganese, selenium, zinc, and phosphorus every day. Sadly, however, the majority of our children are not getting the recommended amounts of many of these vital minerals. Children in America today drink more carbonated soft drinks than milk and are in the midst of a calcium crisis. Green leafy vegetables, another good calcium source, are also negligible in teen diets.

According to statistics from the National Institutes of Health, only 13.5 percent of girls and 36.3 percent of boys age 12 to 19 in the United States get the recommended daily amount (RDA) of calcium. Because almost 90 percent of adult bone mass is established by the end of this age range, children today are in danger of being part of an osteoporosis epidemic in the future as they enter late adulthood.

Lack of adequate calcium has immediate consequences for children, as well. The number of fractures among children and young adults has increased as a direct result of poor calcium intake. Pediatricians are also seeing children with rickets, a bone disease caused by low levels of vitamin D. Rickets became almost nonexistent after vitamin D was added to milk in the 1950s, but, due to lower milk consumption, is now appearing at greater rates around the country. And milk itself can be problematic for some children. Aside from alarming reports of hormones and herbicides in commercial dairy factory milk, even organic milk is not tolerated by all because of lactose intolerance and allergies.

Zinc is another mineral that’s vital for children. Because zinc is critical for normal growth and development, children need to take it every day. A study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, however, found more than half of US children ages two to 10 years fail to get the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for zinc. What’s even more troubling is that zinc is vitally connected to children’s ability to process information, pay attention, as well as remember and retain new information

Zinc does a lot to keep children healthy. More than 200 enzymes in our bodies rely on zinc. However, it’s zinc’s ability to connect with our immune systems to help fight infections that is crucial for children. While researchers are not certain how zinc precisely boosts a child’s immunity, they think that zinc might fight pneumonia and other infections by either enhancing the body’s immune status, preventing the infection from establishing itself, or improving the immune system’s ability to rid itself of the infecting organism. It’s possible that zinc does all three.

 

Q. No matter what I do, my children seem to come down with bad colds each year. Besides giving them a multivitamin, are there other nutritional supplements that can keep my children healthy?

A. Absolutely! In fact, there are 100% natural flavored children’s immune formula nutritional supplements that contain their good buddy zinc, vitamins B6, C, and A (as beta carotene), plus elderberry extract. Elderberry extract has been used as a traditional medicine for hundreds of years to treat colds and flu. And as it so often happens, scientific research has validated this use. In fact, scientists have discovered that elderberry keeps viruses from invading other cells and replicating. It also spurs important immune cells into action to fight invading germs.

While we previously discussed vitamin C’s ability to help children with asthma breathe easier, it also provides powerful immune protection. It speeds up the healing of wounds, such as those knee and elbow scrapes so common in childhood. However, vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin and can’t be stored in the body. It must be replenished every day. When children are under increased stress (like when they get sick with a cold or flu), their vitamin C levels are more rapidly depleted.

Vitamin B6 is also water-soluble and can only work in children’s bodies for eight hours. Then more B6 must be obtained. Vitamin B6 strengthens the immune system by helping white blood cells make antibodies. Vitamin A helps make lysozymes, important anti-infectious agents found in tears, saliva, and sweat. It also stimulates the thymus gland, an important immune organ, especially in children, to work better.

 

Q. Should children take an immune formula every day or only when they are sick?

A. It can be taken several ways. Some parents may want to give the formula when school first starts or other times that their children are exposed to lots of germs. For a child who suffers from asthma or seasonal allergies or just seems to get sick frequently, parents could provide the immune formula every day, increasing the dose when needed. And still others might feel it’s best to give their children the immune formula only whey they do catch a cold or have the flu.

No matter how it is given, the 100% all natural flavored, immune boosting nutritional supplement can provide powerful protection against all those disease-causing germs your children are exposed to every day.

 

Conclusion

The nutritional choices we make for our children today will have a profound effect on their health tomorrow. Recent research has revealed that diabetes, heart disease, obesity, osteoporosis, and cancer in adults often result form nutritional deficiencies that occurred in childhood.

Thankfully, the reverse is just as true. This means that children who are well nourished with an optimal intake of minerals, vitamins, and helpful herbs can grow into healthy and happy adults. Providing high quality multivitamins and immune boosting nutritional supplements for our children can be an important part of that process.

 



--
Vitanet, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1578)


Possible Billions in Health Care Costs, why hasn’t the government stepped in?
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 26, 2007 02:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Possible Billions in Health Care Costs, why hasn’t the government stepped in?

With the ever growing and aging population in the United States, dietary supplements could save the nation $24 billion in Health care cost.

Calcium with Vitamin D – approximately 776,000 hospitalized for hip fractures over 5 years.

Folic acid – could prevent 600 babies a year from neural tube defects saving $344.7 million in 5 years. Over the child’s life time 1.4 billion saved.

Omega-3 fatty acids – reducing the occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD) with only 1800mg each day consumed. Saving $3.2 billion. Approximately 374,301 hospitalizations and associated physician fees due to CHD possibly avoided.

Lutein with Zeaxanthin – by supplementing 6 – 10 mgs of lutein with Zeaxanthin we could save over $3.6 billion over 5 years. Approximately 190,927 individuals could avoid dependency because of loss of vision.



--
Buy Supplements at Vitanet, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1577)


Learn about Bone Health!
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 20, 2007 12:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Learn about Bone Health!

Bone Health

Approximately 44 million American women and men aged 50 and older have osteoporosis (severe bone loss) or osteopenia (mild bone loss), with women being affected about twice as often as men. At least 1.5 million fractures of the hip, vertebra (back or neck), or wrist occur each year in the United States as a result of osteoporosis, and the annual cost of treating this disorder is nearly $14 billion and rising. Unfortunately, the toll in human suffering and loss of independence is even greater.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor, we will discuss the risk factors for osteoporosis and some key nutrients you can add to your diet that can minimize bone loss and reduce your chances of developing this disease.

Q. What are the risk factors for osteoporosis?

A. Small body frame, underweight, Caucasian or Asian race, a sedentary lifestyle, cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol or caffeine intake, high intake of carbonated beverages (especially colas), and having other family members with osteoporosis all increase personal risk of developing the disease. Certain medical conditions, including diabetes, celiac disease, hyperthyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive lung disease, hyperadrenalism, and hyperparathyroidism, are all associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis. Some medications increase the rate at which bone is lost; these include drugs prescribed for the treatment of seizures, drugs used for blood thinning, steroids such as prednisone, aluminum-containing antacids, and loop diuretics (furosemide {Lasix}).

Q. Isn’t bone loss just a normal consequence of aging?

A. Although bone mass normally declines after the age of 35, bone loss severe enough to cause fractures after just minor trauma (such as bump or fall) seems to be a relatively new phenomenon. Osteoporosis was rare in the late 19th century, and it was not until around 1920 that the condition began to attract attention among doctors. Since that time, the percentage of people who develop osteoporosis has continued to increase. For example, the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis in England and Sweden double between 1950 and 1980. In addition, the percentage of elderly people with osteoporosis in some developing countries is lower than that of elderly Americans, despite lower calcium intakes in the developing countries, further suggesting that osteoporosis is a disease of modern civilization.

Q. Can osteoporosis be prevented?

A. Engaging in regular weight bearing exercise, avoiding excessive consumption of alcohol and caffeine, and quitting smoking will slow the rate of bone loss. Eating adequate, but not excessive, amounts of protein also enhances bone health. In addition, a growing body of research has shown that supplementing with various vitamins and minerals may not only help prevent, but in some cases actually reverse, bone loss. At least 15 different nutrients have been found to play a role in bone health.

Q. What type of calcium is best?

A. For most people, calcium salts are absorbed about the same, between 30% and 40% of the administered dose. People who low stomach acid (hypochlorhydria) should not use calcium carbonate, because that form of calcium is absorbed poorly in the absence of stomach acid. Calcium phosphate may be preferable for many older people, because phosphorus is necessary for normal bone formation, the phosphorus intake of older people is often low, and calcium supplements inhibit the absorption of phosphorus.

Also, calcium bound to phosphorus is the form in which calcium in the bone is stored, and it has a much greater bone activity than other forms.

Q. How much vitamin D is needed to promote strong bones?

A. Because vitamin D is produced when the ultraviolet rays from the sun hit skin, people who stay out of the sun, wear sunscreen, or live in a northern latitude (such as Boston or Seattle) where less ultraviolet light reaches the skin, are at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. In addition, aging decreases a person’s ability to synthesize vitamin D in the skin. Results from five research trials on vitamin D found that supplementation with 700-800 IU of vitamin D per day decreased the number of hip fractures by 26%, but 400 IU per day was ineffective. In addition to enhancing bone health, vitamin D improves nerve and muscle function in older people, thereby reducing their chances of falling down. Supplementation of elderly women with 800 IU of vitamin D per day has been shown to decrease the number of falls by about 50%.

Q. Is that much vitamin D safe?

A. The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine established a “safe upper limit” of 2,000 IU per day in 1997. More recent research suggests that up to 4,000 IU of vitamin D per day is safe for the average person. However, you likely don’t need nearly this much to address most bone issues.

Q. Why would nutrients besides calcium and vitamin D is important?

A. Bone is living tissue, constantly remodeling itself and engaging in numerous biological functions. Like other tissues in the body, bone has a wide range of nutritional needs. The typical refined and processed American diet has been depleted of many different vitamins and minerals, some of which play a key role in promoting bone health. Not getting enough of one or more of these micronutrients may be and important contributing factor to the modern epidemic of osteoporosis. In addition, supplementing with calcium may cause a loss of magnesium, zinc, silicon, manganese, and phosphorus, unless these nutrients are also provided.

Q. What nutrients besides calcium and vitamin D promote healthy bones?

A. Magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, vitamin K, boron, strontium, silicon, folic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, phosphorus, and vitamin C have all been shown to play a role in bone health. Following is a brief description of the role that each of these 15 nutrients play in building healthy bones.

Calcium: A component of the mineral crystals that make up bone.

Vitamin D: Enhances calcium absorption, prevents falls by improving nerve and muscle function.

Magnesium: Important for bone mineralization (accumulation of minerals which form bones). Magnesium deficiency is associated with abnormal bone mineral crystals in humans. In an open clinical trial, magnesium supplementation increased bone mineral density by an average 5% after 1-2 years in postmenopausal women.

Copper: Laboratory research has found that copper promotes bone mineralization and decreases bone loss, and that osteoporosis can develop if the diet is deficient in copper. Western diets often contain less copper than the amount recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. In a 2-year double-blind trail, copper supplementation reduced bone loss by 90% in middle-aged women, compared with a placebo.

Zinc: Like magnesium, zinc is important for bone mineralization, and also has been shown to decrease bone loss. Low dietary zinc intake was associated with increased fracture risk in a study of middle-aged and elderly men. The zinc content of the diet is frequently low; a study of elderly low-income people found they were consuming only half the Recommended Dietary Allowance for this mineral.

Manganese: Plays a role in the creation of the connective-tissue components of bone. Manganese deficiency in laboratory tests resulted in low bone mineral density and weak bones. Manganese deficiency may be associated with the development of osteoporosis.

Boron: Supports creation of bone-protecting hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, and DHEA. Boron supplementation prevented bone loss in experimental studies. In human volunteers consuming a low-boron diet, boron supplementation decreased urinary calcium excretion by 25-33%, a change that may indicate reduced bone loss.

Silicon: Plays a role in the synthesis of the connective-tissue components of bone. Silicon deficiency has been associated with bone abnormalities. In an observational study, higher dietary silicon intake correlated with higher bone mineral density. In a clinical trial, administration of an organic silicon compound increased bone mineral density of the femur (or thigh bone) in postmenopausal women.

B vitamins (folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12): These three B vitamins have been shown to lower blood levels of homocysteine, a breakdown product of the amino acid methionine. An elevated homocysteine concentration is a strong and independent risk factor for fractures in older men and women. Homocysteine levels increase around the time of menopause, which may explain in part why bone loss accelerates at that time. In a 2-year double-blind trial, supplementation of elderly stroke patients with folic acid and vitamin B12 reduced the number of hip fractures by 78%, compared with a placebo.

Strontium: This trace mineral is incorporated into bone and appears to increase bone strength. It also stimulates bone formation and inhibits bone breakdown. Controlled trials have demonstrated that strontium supplementation of postmenopausal women increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture risk.

Vitamin K: Best known for its effect on blood clotting, vitamin K is also required for the creation of osteocalcin, a unique protein found in bone that participates in the mineralization process. The amount of vitamin K needed for optimal bone health appears to be greater than the amount needed to prevent bleeding. Vitamin K levels tend to be low in people with osteoporosis. In randomized clinical trials, supplementation of postmenopausal women with vitamin K prevented bone loss and reduced the incidence of fractures.

Q. Which form of vitamin K is best?

A. Two forms of vitamin K compounds are present in food: vitamin K1 and vitamin K2. Vitamin K1 (also called phylloquinone) is present in leafy green vegetables and some vegetable oils, and vitamin K2 is found in much smaller amounts in meat, cheese, eggs, and natto (fermented soybeans).

To make things a little more complicated, Vitamin K2 itself can occur in more than one form. The two most important to this discussion are menaquinine-4 (MK-4, also called menatetrenone), which is licensed as a prescription drug in Japan, and menaquinone-7 (MK-7), which is extracted from natto.

Research suggests that MK-7 from natto may be an ideal form of vitamin K. The biological activity of MK-7 in laboratory studies was 17 times higher than that of vitamin K1 and 130 times higher than that of MK-4. After oral administration, MK-7 was better absorbed and persisted in the body longer, compared with MK-4 and vitamin K1. Although both have shown ability to prevent osteoporosis in laboratory research, a much lower dosage (600 times lower) of MK-7 is required, compared to MK-4, to obtain beneficial effects.

Thus, MK-7 has greater biological activity, greater bioavailability, and possibly more potent effects on bone, compared with other forms of vitamin K. The potential value of MK-7 for bone health is supported by an observational study from Japan, in which increasing natto consumption was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture. While additional research needs to be done, the available evidence suggests that the best forms of vitamin K for long-term use at physiological doses are MK-7 and vitamin K1.

Q. Why is strontium so important in building strong bones?

A. Strontium is of great interest to bone health researchers and has been studied in very high doses. Surprisingly, lower doses are not only safer for long-term supplementation, but may in fact have a greater impact on bone health than very high doses. Too little, and bone density is impaired; too much and health may be impaired. This is a case where dosing needs to be just right for optimal impact. Therefore, until more is known, it is wise to keep supplemental strontium at less than 6 mg per day.

Q. Can people taking osteoporosis medications also take bone-building nutrients?

A. Because nutrients work by a different mechanism than osteoporosis drugs, nutritional supplements are likely to enhance the beneficial effect of these medications. Calcium or other minerals may interfere with the absorption of biphophonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) or etidronate (Didronel). For that reason, calcium and other minerals should be taken at least two hours before or two hours after these medications. Also, it is always best to discuss the supplements you are using with your healthcare practitioner to create an integrated health plan.

Final thoughts…

Bone health ramifications extend beyond osteoporosis and fractures. Bone health is essential for freedom of movement, safety, comfort, independence and longevity. Weak bones do not heal well – sometimes they never heal at all. Osteoporosis-related fractures rob us of our mobility and consign thousands of Americans to walkers and wheelchairs every year. In fact, 40% of people are unable to walk independently after a hip fracture, and 60% still require assistance a year later. The most terrible consequence of fractures related to osteoporosis is mortality. The impairment of the ability to move around freely can cause pneumonia and skin damage leading to serious infections. It is estimated that suffering a hip fracture increases the risk of dying almost 25%. Making bone health a priority now will allow you to reap health dividends for many years to come.



--
Build Strong Bones with Vitamins from Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1523)


Osteoporosis, Calcium and Magnesium
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 20, 2007 12:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Osteoporosis, Calcium and Magnesium

Consider the following: what country has the highest rate of pasteurized milk consumption? USA Today reports that more than 45 percent of Americans, aged four years and older, drink milk. Now, what country has the highest calcium supplement consumption? America. So, America must have the lowest occurrence of osteoporosis, calcium loss and bone fragility. Right? Wrong! We have the highest rate! Why? Excess calcium combined with low magnesium.

One research study concludes that neither milk nor a high calcium diet appears to reduce the risk of osteoporotic hip fractures in postmenopausal women. Another study concluded that findings “do not support the hypothesis that higher consumption of milk or other food sources of calcium by adult women protect against hip or forearm fractures.” On the other hand, a recent double-blind trial conducted by Yale University School of Medicine found that magnesium significantly increased bone mineral content of the hip bones of girl’s ages 8 to 14 years.

It is magnesium that will handle a calcium deficiency as well as the lack of adequate magnesium, and it will dissolve excess calcium from the body while helping any needed calcium to assimilate. Today we have diets dangerously low in magnesium. Factor in the recent addition of nutritional calcium via supplements and food fortifications that are meant to stave osteoporosis, and many of us are getting inadequate magnesium plus too much calcium.

Magnesium is crucial to increasing bone mass, since it is magnesium that allows calcium to assimilate. People taking supplemental calcium should accompany their calcium with the magnesium necessary for absorption. Women taking calcium supplements to ward off osteoporosis, with out adequate magnesium nutrition, can further exacerbate the effects of a magnesium deficit. (Calcium supplements taken without sufficient magnesium can actually LOWER the bone mineralization process.) Magnesium is as important as calcium in the prevention of osteoporosis and is vital to increase bone mass.



--
Buy Magnesium Mineral supplement at Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1522)


The sunshine vitamin can impart an all-over healthy glow.
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 18, 2006 03:42 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The sunshine vitamin can impart an all-over healthy glow.

When papers like the Los Angeles Times write articles with titles like “wonder Pill-really” about a seemingly ho-hum nutrient like vitamin D, attention must be paid. The attention is now forthcoming from researchers who are exploring this humble vitamin’s connection to an astonishingly wide spectrum of health issues. And these scientist are concerned that, dispite fortification of such common foods as milk, many people aren’t getting the D they need for optimal well-being.

Vitamin D generally recognized as calcium’s indispensable little helper, which makes it vital to maintaining bone health. But we now know that D’s benefits extend far beyond calcium control; it plays crucial roles in immunity, blood cell formation and hormone regulation.

Anti-Cancer D-Fense

Scientists believe that vitamin D helps cells differentiate, or mature into specialized roles each is meant to play. That’s important in cancer defense because malignant cells tend to be undifferentiated, primitive types given to reproducing uncontrollably. Cells, both malignant and healthy, have vitamin D receptors on their surface; when d binds to cancer cells, they stop growing.

This may help explain why men with low levels of vitamin D are particularly prone to dying of cancer and why higher rates of prostate cancer occur in climates where exposure to the sun-which powers D creation within the skin—is low. On a more positive note, investigators at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center of San Diego report that taking 1,000IU of vitamin D daily appears to drop the risk of developing breast, colon and ovarian cancer by up to 50% (American Assn for Cancer Research, Ninth Meeting). Other studies suggest that even after cancer develops, D may help hinder disease progression and enhance survival.

Vitamin D does a body good in a number of other ways. For example, the sunshine vitamin lights up both the immune system and production of insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. In one study women who took the amount of vitamin D generally found in multivitamins (400 IU) and had a 31% reduced fisk of dying from heart disease; in another, D from multivitamins dropped the risk of multiple sclerosis development by 40%. Supplements have also helped stroke victims avoid the muscular wasting that leaks to falls and fractures (Cerebrovascular Disease 7/05). Conversely, low D levels have been linked to poor lung function, unexplained muscle pain and increased obesity risk.

Widespread D-ficiency

Currently, the federal government recommends daily vitamin D intakes of 200IU for people under age 51, 400IU for those 51 – 70 and 600 IU for ages 71 and up. But many prominent scientists believe those levels are two low, especially since so many folks avoid sun exposure to cut skin cancer risk. “I’m 99% sure that vitamin D deficiency is becoming more common,” Harvard nutrition expert Dr. Walter Willett told the LA Times (06/12/06). Deficiencies are more likely among dark-colored individuals (whose skins do not make D effectively), vegans (who avoid dairy) and people with disorders that reduce intestinal absorption, such as Crohn’s disease. Higher dosages should always be taken under practitioner’s watchful eye, especially if a medical condition already exists.

No matter what health hazard you’re trying to illuminate, don’t hesitate to bask in the sunshine vitamin’s warm radiance. –Lisa James.



--
Buy Vitamin D at Vitanet ®

Also available: Solaray Vitamins and Now Vitamins

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1380)


Strontium Bone Maker 60 VC - Strengthen Bones
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 27, 2005 12:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Strontium Bone Maker 60 VC - Strengthen Bones

Benefits

Helps maintain strong, healthy bones.*

In Vitro and Animal Studies

Strontium is a bone-seeking mineral incorporated by ionic substitution for calcium onto the crystal surface of bone.2 In the test-tube (in vitro), strontium inhibits the activity of osteoclasts, bone cells that break down bone, or “resorb” bone as part of the normal bone remodeling process.3 The effect of strontium, in the form of strontium ranelate (a salt of strontium and ranelic acid), was studied in monkeys over a six-month period. Strontium altered the remodeling of bone in the monkeys, resulting in decreased bone resorption with a concomitant maintenance of bone formation. A trend toward increased volume of osteoid, the organic matrix of bone, was observed, although this was not associated with defects in bone mineralization.4 In another animal study, monkeys fed strontium at high doses for six weeks showed a marked increase in bone strontium content. No harmful effects on bone mineral chemistry or structure occurred.5 At low doses, strontium has been shown to increase the number of bone forming sites in thighbones of adult rats, without adverse effects on the mineral content of bone or mineralization of the organic bone matrix.6 Strontium was shown to reverse bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency in rats.7

Clinical Trials

Human clinical trials have examined the effect of strontium on bone in postmenopausal women. In the dose-ranging (Phase 2) PREVOS trial, women in early menopause were administered strontium ranelate or a placebo for two years. Strontium ranelate was given at daily doses of 125 mg, 500 mg or 1 gram. (Total weight of compound; strontium plus ranelic acid). Compared to women in the placebo group, who lost bone, women on strontium at the 1 gram dose showed statistically significant increases in bone mineral density (BMD) of the hip, thigh and lumbar spine. Biochemical markers of bone formation, such as serum alkaline phosphatase, increased. No effect on markers of bone resorption was observed, leading to the conclusion that strontium ranelate, at the 1 gram daily dose, increased bone formation without decreasing bone resorption proportionally. It was concluded that 1 gram per day is the minimum effective daily dose of strontium ranelate in these women.8

In another Phase 2 trial (STRATOS trial), 353 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, who had experienced at least one spinal fracture, took strontium ranelate for two years at daily doses of 500 mg, 1 gram or 2 grams. Women on the 2-gram dose showed a significantly greater increase in lumbar spine BMD than those on placebo. The number of subjects who had new spinal deformities was significantly reduced.9 As in the PREVOS trial, serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, a marker of bone formation, increased, while markers of bone resorption (breakdown) decreased. The overall conclusion is that the minimum effective daily dose of strontium ranelate (whole compound) is 1 gram in early postmenopausal non-osteoporotic women and 2 grams in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.10

Phase 3 efficacy studies on strontium ranelate have been conducted on 1649 subjects in 12 countries. These studies began with an open-run (non-controlled study period in which subjects took calcium and vitamin D supplements to normalize their blood levels of these nutrients.11 Following this, two parallel groups were administered 2 grams daily of strontium ranelate or placebo for 3-years. The subjects continued to take calcium and vitamin D during the study. In subjects on strontium ranelate, BMD increased in the lumbar vertebrae by 14.4 percent and in the thighbone by 8.3 percent. The number and risk of vertebral fractures decreased.12

Safety

Suggested Use: Take two capsules daily. Calcium intake must also be adequate. Do not take this product with calcium supplements.

Strontium ranelate was well-tolerated in the trials discussed above. The incidence of adverse events in subjects on strontium ranelate was statistically equivalent to the placebo groups, and no negative effects on hematology and other biochemical parameters have been observed.

In view of the fact that subjects on the strontium trials also took calcium, and in some cases vitamin D, to maintain normal blood levels of these nutrients, it is important to ensure calcium and vitamin D intakes are adequate when supplementing with strontium. This is underscored by earlier research on animals suggesting that increasing the intake of strontium via diet may demineralize bone when calcium is deficient.13 In rats with chronic kidney failure, strontium has been shown to cause osteomalacia, a condition in which bone is softened due to lack of mineral content. For this reason, people on kidney dialysis should not use strontium supplements.14

Scientific References

1. Shorr E, Carter AC. The usefulness of strontium as an adjuvant to calcium in the remineralization of the skeleton in man. Bull Hosp Joint Dis 1952; 13:59 -66.

2. Dahl SG, Allain P, Marie PJ, et al. Incorporation and distribution of strontium in bone. Bone 2001;28(4):446-53.

3. Baron R, Tsouderos Y. In vitro effects of S12911-2 on osteoclast function and bone marrow macrophage differentiation. Eur J Pharmacol 2002; 450:11-17.

4. Buehler J, Chappuis P, Saffar JL, et al. Strontium ranelate inhibits bone resorption while maintaining bone formation in alveolar bone in monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) Bone 2001;29(2):176-79.

5. Boivin G, Deloffre P, Perrat B, et al. Strontium distribution and interactions with bone mineral in monkey iliac bone after strontium salt (S 12911) administration. J Bone Miner Res. 1996 Sep;11(9):1302-11.

6. Grynpas MD, Hamilton E, Cheung R, et al. Strontium increases vertebral bone volume in rats at a low dose that does not induce detectable mineralization defect. Bone 1996;18(3):253-9.

7. Marie PJ, Hott M, Modrowski D, et al. An uncoupling agent containing strontium prevents bone loss by depressing bone resorption and maintaining bone formation in estrogen-deficient rats. J Bone Miner Res 1993;8(5):607-15.

8. Reginster JY, Deroisy R, Dougados M, et al. Prevention of early postmenopausal bone loss by strontium ranelate: the randomized, two-year, double-masked, dose ranging, placebo-controlled PREVOS trial. Osteoporosis Int 2002; 13:925-31.

9. Meunier PJ, Slosman DO, Delmas PD, et al. Strontium ranelate: dose-dependent effects in established postmenopausal vertebral osteoporosis––a 2-year randomized placebo controlled trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2002;87(5):2060-66.

10. Reginster JY, Meunier PJ. Strontium ranelate phase 2 dose-ranging studies: PREVOS and STRATOS studies. Osteoporosis Int 2003; 14(Suppl 3):S56-S65.

11. Meunier PJ, Reginster JY. Design and methodology of the phase 3 trials for the clinical development of strontium ranelate in the treatment of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Osteoporosis Int 2003;14(Suppl 3):S66-76.

12. Meunier PJ, Roux C, Seeman E, et al. The effects of strontium ranelate on the risk of vertebral fracture in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. N Engl J Med 2004;350(5):459-68. 13. Grynpas MD, Marie PJ. Effects of strontium on bone quality and quantity in rats. Bone 1990;11:313-19.

14. Schrooten, I, Cabrera W, Goodman WG, et al. Strontium causes osteomalacia in chronic renal failure in rats. Kidney Int 1998;54:448-56.



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=697)


PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 25, 2005 10:18 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS

PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS

At this writing, evidence points to the fact that natural progesterone may be even more effective in treating osteoporosis than estrogen replacement therapy. While this evidence is still in its initial stages, it is significant and must be considered. In 1981, Dr. John Lee conducted a landmark study evaluating the effectiveness of using natural progesterone for osteoporosis.20 His study indicated that it is the cessation of progesterone production in postmenopausal women which causes the development of osteoporosis. Contrary to current trends, progesterone replacement, not estrogen, in fact may be the answer to preventing and treating osteoporosis. Dr. Lee’s study has profound implications for all women.

In his practice, Dr. Lee applied a natural progesterone cream on one hundred postmenopausal women and eliminated their usual dose of oral Provera (a synthetic progestin). The majority of these women were in varying stages of osteoporosis. Each participant used the natural progesterone cream for several consecutive days each month over a period of three years. The results were dramatic, to say the least. In addition to preventing further height loss and eliminating aches and pains, the bone mineral density of the spine was preserved in 63 of the women. In other words, these women not only stopped the bone loss associated with osteoporosis but actually experienced an increase in bone mass which, in many cases was more dramatic than had been seen with other therapies. In addition, the incidence of bone fractures actually dropped to zero. Dr Lee’s study found that estrogen was not the panacea for bone density previously assumed. He discovered that the women who took estrogen in combination with the progesterone were not better off than those who took progesterone alone. What was even more impressive was discovering that osteoporosis is a reversible condition with progesterone therapy. Concerning the use of progesterone for osteoporosis, Dr. Lee writes:

. . . when my 40 year old housewives had become 60-year olds with osteoporosis and I learned of transdermal natural progesterone (being sold as a skin moisturizer), I started adding it to my therapeutic regimen for osteoporosis, at first only to those for whom estrogen was contraindicated. To my surprise, serial bone mineral density tests showed a significant rise without a hint of side effects. With this obvious success, my use of natural progesterone spread to osteoporosis patients who were not doing all that well on estrogen alone. Again, it proved successful.21

Apparently, women who had the lowest bone densities experienced the greatest increases, implying that age and the progression of the diseases does not affect the beneficial therapeutic action of natural progesterone.

This study is profoundly significant in that it strongly suggests that women who take estrogen to prevent or treat osteoporosis may be better off using natural progesterone. As a result of Lee’s findings, several physicians began to use natural progesterone cream for their pre- and postmenopausal patients.

The most striking implication of Dr. Lee’s work with natural progesterone is that contrary to current medical opinion, osteoporosis may be more a manifestation of a progesterone deficiency than a lack of estrogen. In addition, the disease may be initiated long before menopause when estrogen levels are still high.22 Moreover, continued estrogen therapy for women with osteoporosis often caps out whereas progesterone therapy continually promotes the production of new bone.23 Dr. C. Norman Shealy, M.D. states: I believe that natural progesterone cream derived from wild yam extract should be used by almost every mature adult . . . The most common cause of death in elderly women is from the complications of fracture of the hip from osteoporosis. Such fractures are also remarkably common in men. I believe that progesterone cream could do more to preserve health and well-being in elderly people than all the drugs in the world.24

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=672)


Pain - Post Op and Relaxation
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 13, 2005 09:24 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pain - Post Op and Relaxation

Relaxation, Music Reduce Post-Op Pain. New research has found that relaxation and music, separately or together, significantly reduce patients' pain following major abdominal surgery. The study, published in the May issue of the journal Pain, found that these methods reduce pain more than pain medication alone. Led by Marion Good, PhD, RN, of Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, the study is supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), at the National Institutes of Health. "This is important news for the millions of Americans who undergo surgery and experience postoperative pain each year," said Dr. Patricia A. Grady, director of the NINR.

"Better pain management can reduce hospital stays and speed recovery, ultimately improving patients' quality of life." Dr. Good and her research team studied three groups of patients undergoing abdominal surgery. In addition to the usual pain medication, one group used a jaw relaxation technique, another group listened to music, and a third group received a combination of relaxation and music.

Findings revealed that, after surgery, the three treatment groups had significantly less pain than the control group, which received only pain medication. "Both medication and self-care methods which involve patient participation are needed for relief," said Dr. Good.

"These relaxation and music self-care methods provide more complete relief without the undesired side effects of some pain medications." The findings have important implications for the 23 million people who undergo surgery and experience postoperative pain annually in the United States. Pain can hamper recovery by heightening the body's response to the stress of surgery and increasing tissue breakdown, coagulation and fluid retention. Pain also interferes with appetite and sleep and can lead to complications that prolong hospitalization.

Dr. Good and her research staff worked with 500 patients aged 18-70, who were undergoing gynecological, gastrointestinal, exploratory or urinary surgery. Prior to surgery, those in the music, relaxation or combination groups practiced the techniques. The relaxation technique consisted of letting the lower jaw drop slightly, softening the lips, resting the tongue in the bottom of the mouth, and breathing slowly and rhythmically with a three-rhythm pattern of inhale, exhale and rest. Patients in the music group chose one of five kinds of soothing music--harp, piano, synthesizer, orchestral or slow jazz.

On the first and second days after surgery, all patients received morphine or Demerol for pain relief by pressing a button connected to their intravenous patient controlled analgesia pumps. The groups receiving the additional intervention used earphones to listen to music and relaxation tapes during walking and rest, while the control group did not. The research team measured the patients' pain before and after 15 minutes of bed rest and four times during walking to see if the sensation and distress of pain changed.

Dr. Good found that during these two days postsurgery the three treatment groups had significantly less pain than the control group during both walking and rest. "Patients can take more control of their postoperative pain using these self-care methods," says Dr. Good. "Nurses and physicians preparing patients for surgery and caring for them afterwards should encourage patients to use relaxation and music to enhance the effectiveness of pain medication and hasten recovery."

Dr. Good's findings have implications for future research into the effectiveness of self-care methods on other types of pain, including chronic pain, cancer pain, and pain of the critically ill.

-----------------------------

Vitamin D Lack Linked to Hip Fracture. Vitamin D deficiency in post-menopausal women is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass. In a group of women with osteoporosis hospitalized for hip fracture, 50 percent were found to have a previously undetected vitamin D deficiency. In the control group, women who had not suffered a hip fracture but who were hospitalized for an elective hip replacement, only a very small percentage had vitamin D deficiency, although one-fourth of those women also had osteoporosis. These findings were reported in the April 28, 1999, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study, conducted by Meryl S. LeBoff, MD; Lynn Kohlmeier, MD; Shelley Hurwitz, PhD; Jennifer Franklin, BA; John Wright, MD; and Julie Glowacki, PhD; of the Endocrine Hypertension Division, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, was supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR. These investigators studied women admitted to either Brigham and Women's Hospital or the New England Baptist Hospital, both in Boston, between January 1995 and June 1998.

A group of 98 postmenopausal women who normally reside in their own homes were chosen for the study. Women with bone deterioration from other causes were excluded from the study.

There were 30 women with hip fractures caused by osteoporosis and 68 hospitalized for elective joint replacement. Of these 68, 17 women also had osteoporosis as determined by the World Health Organization bone density criteria. All the participants answered questions regarding their lifestyle, reproductive history, calcium in their diet, and physical activity.

Bone mineral density of the spine, hip, and total body were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) technique, as was body composition. Blood chemistry and urinary calcium levels were analyzed. The two groups of women with osteoporosis did not differ significantly in either time since menopause or bone density in the spine or hip. They did, however, differ in total bone density.

The women admitted for a hip fracture had fewer hours of exercise than the control group. Fifty percent of the women with hip fractures were deficient in vitamin D, 36.7 percent had elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels (a hormone which can stimulate loss of calcium from bone), and 81.8 percent had calcium in their urine, suggesting inappropriate calcium loss. Blood levels of calcium were lower in the women with hip fractures than in either elective group.

These researchers propose that vitamin D supplementation at the time of fracture may speed up recovery and reduce risk of fracture in the future. Current Dietary Reference Intake Guidelines contain a daily recommendation of 400 IU of vitamin D for people aged 51 through 70 and 600 IU for those over age 70.

"We know that a calcium-rich diet and regular weight-bearing exercise can help prevent osteoporosis. This new research suggests that an adequate intake of vitamin D, which the body uses to help absorb calcium, may help women to reduce their risk of hip fracture, even when osteoporosis is present," observed Dr. Evan C. Hadley, NIA Associate Director for geriatrics research.

"Osteoporosis leads to more than 300,000 hip fractures each year, causing pain, frequent disability, and costly hospitalizations or long-term care. "Prevention of such fractures would greatly improve the quality of life for many older women and men, as well as significantly reduce medical costs." The bones in the body often undergo rebuilding. Some cells, osteoclasts, dissolve older parts of the bones. Then, bone-building cells known as osteoblasts create new bone using calcium and phosphorus.

As people age, if osteoporosis develops, more bone is dissolved than is rebuilt, and the bones weaken and become prone to fracture. Also in many older persons, levels of vitamin D in the blood are low because they eat less or spend less time in the sun, which stimulates the body's own production of vitamin D.

Experts do not understand fully the causes of osteoporosis. However, they do know that lack of estrogen which accompanies menopause, diets low in calcium, and lack of exercise contribute to the problem. Eighty percent of older Americans who face the possibility of pain and debilitation from an osteoporosis-related fracture are women. One out of every two women and one in eight men over the age of 50 will have such a fracture sometime in the future. These fractures usually occur in the hip, wrist, and spine.

-----------------------------

Sleep Apnea, Diabetes Link Found. Adults who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea are three times more likely to also have diabetes and more likely to suffer a stroke in the future, according to a new UCLA School of Dentistry/Department of Veterans Affairs study published today in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Sleep apnea, a serious condition marked by loud snoring, irregular breathing and interrupted oxygen intake, affects an estimated nine million Americans. The culprit? Carrying too many extra pounds.

"The blame falls squarely on excess weight gain," said Dr. Arthur H. Friedlander, associate professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery at the UCLA School of Dentistry and associate chief of staff at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Los Angeles. Surplus weight interferes with insulin's ability to propel sugars from digested food across the cell membrane, robbing the cells of needed carbohydrates. Diabetes results when glucose builds up in the bloodstream and can't be utilized by the body. Being overweight can also lead to obstructive sleep apnea, according to Friedlander.

"When people gain too much weight, fatty deposits build up along the throat and line the breathing passages," he explained. "The muscles in this region slacken during sleep, forcing the airway to narrow and often close altogether." Reclining on one's back magnifies the situation. "When an overweight person lies down and goes to sleep," Friedlander said, "gravity shoves the fat in the neck backwards. This blocks the airway and can bring breathing to a halt."

Friedlander tested the blood sugar of 54 randomly selected male veterans whom doctors had previously diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. He discovered that 17 of the 54 patients, or 31 percent, unknowingly suffered from adult-onset diabetes. Using the same sample, Friedlander also took panoramic X-rays of the men's necks and jaws. The X-rays indicated that 12 of the 54 patients, or 22 percent, revealed calcified plaques in the carotid artery leading to the brain.

These plaques block blood flow, significantly increasing patients' risk for stroke. Seven of the 12, or 58 percent, were also diagnosed with diabetes. In dramatic comparison, the 17 patients diagnosed with diabetes showed nearly twice the incidence of blockage. Seven of the 17 men, or 41 percent, had carotid plaques. Only five of the 54 patients who displayed plaques did not have also diabetes. If he conducted this study today, Friedlander notes, he would likely find a higher number of diabetic patients. After he completed the study in 1997, the American Diabetes Association lowered its definition for diabetes from 140 to 126 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood.

"This is the first time that science has uncovered a link between sleep apnea and diabetes," said Friedlander. "The data suggest that someone afflicted with both diabetes and sleep apnea is more likely to suffer a stroke in the future." "Persons going to the doctor for a sleep-apnea exam should request that their blood be screened for diabetes, especially if they are overweight," he cautioned. More than half of the individuals who develop diabetes as adults will need to modify their diet and take daily insulin in order to control the disease, he added.

------------------------------

Stress, Surgery May Increase CA Tumors. Stress and surgery may increase the growth of cancerous tumors by suppressing natural killer cell activity, says a Johns Hopkins researcher.

Malignancies and viral infections are in part controlled by the immune system's natural killer (NK) cells, a sub-population of white blood cells that seek out and kill certain tumor and virally infected cells. In a study using animal models, natural killer cell activity was suppressed by physical stress or surgery, resulting in a significant increase in tumor development.

These findings suggest that protective measures should be considered to prevent metastasis for patients undergoing surgery to remove a cancerous tumor, according to Gayle Page, D.N.Sc., R.N., associate professor and Independence Foundation chair at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. "Human studies have already found a connection between the level of NK activity and susceptibility to several different types of cancer," says Page, an author of the study.

"We sought to determine the importance of stress-induced suppression of NK activity and thus learn the effects of stress and surgery on tumor development. "Many patients undergo surgery to remove cancerous tumors that have the potential to spread. If our findings in rats can be generalized to such clinical settings, then these circumstances could increase tumor growth during or shortly after surgery." The research was conducted at Ohio State University College of Nursing and the Department of Psychology at UCLA, where Page held previous positions, and at Tel Aviv University.

Results of the study are published in the March issue of the International Journal of Cancer. In laboratory studies, Page and her colleagues subjected rats to either abdominal surgery or physical stress, and then inoculated them with cancer cells. In the rats that had undergone surgery, the researchers observed a 200 to 500 percent increase in the incidence of lung tumor cells, an early indicator of metastasis, compared with rats that had not received surgery.

The experiment also showed that stress increased lung tumor incidence and significantly increased the mortality in the animals inoculated with cancer cells. "Our results show that, under specific circumstances, resistance to tumor development is compromised by physical stress and surgical intervention," says Page.

"Because surgical procedures are life-saving and cannot be withheld, protective measures should be considered that will prevent suppression of the natural killer cell activity and additional tumor development. "Researchers do not yet know how to prevent surgery-induced immune suppression, but early animal studies have shown increased use of analgesia reduces the risk."

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, and the Chief Scientist of the Israeli Ministry of Health. Lead author was Shamgar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D., and other authors were Raz Yirmiya, Ph.D., and Guy Shakhar.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=599)


America's Most Wanted
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 14, 2005 05:23 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: America's Most Wanted

America's Most Wanted

by Brian Amherst Energy Times, January 6, 2000

The United States eats well, a little too well, according to experts. Amply supplied with a large supply of high-calorie food, our diets might seem to be chock full of every conceivable nutrient. Well, to the question "Getting all the right vitamins, minerals and other nutrients?" the most appropriate answer seems to be "Not exactly." Eating a lot doesn't equal eating a lot of the most important vitamins and minerals. So, which vitamins and minerals are likely to show up in short supply in the typical American diet? Calcium certainly sits at the top of list. According to the most recent Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, which is conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), women and girls age 12 and up are not consuming adequate calcium from their diet. Research reveals that about 1200 mg. day suffices for those over age 50 and 1000 mg a day should be adequate if you're between the ages of 19 and 50. Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Stanford University, ". . .osteoporosis is a pediatric disease." For long-range protection against that bone-weakening disease, kids should eat calcium-rich, low-fat dairy products and plenty of leafy greens (broccoli, cabbage, kale) as well as salmon (with bones), seafood and soy. But the calcium campaign does not end in early adulthood. Bone mass begins to deteriorate at about age 30. Menopausal hormonal changes can exacerbate bone brittleness. Medical conditions, including cancer, liver disease and intestinal disorders; prescription drugs; tobacco and alcohol indulgence; or a decline in activity, especially the weight-bearing kind, also jeopardize bone strength. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, about one in every two American women will break a bone after age 50 due to osteoporosis. That translates into about half a million fractured vertebrae and more than 300,000 shattered hips. Frequently, those breaks are life-threatening.

Crucial Calcium

The critical role of calcium in many body functions is perhaps the most extensively clinically documented among nutrients. Researchers in the Department of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, reviewed epidemiological and clinical studies conducted over the past two years on the relationship between dietary calcium and blood pressure (J Am Coll Nutr October 1999: 398S-405S). "Nearly 20 years of investigation in this area has culminated in remarkable and compelling agreement in the data," the researchers report, "confirming the need for and benefit of regular consumption of the recommended daily levels of dietary calcium." Investigators at the State University of New York, Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, presented results of their studies of calcium and vitamin C and gum disease at the June 26, 1998 meeting of the International Association for Dental Research. Two separate inquiries revealed that people who consumed too little calcium as young adults, and those with low levels of vitamin C in their diets, appear to have nearly twice the risk of developing periodontal disease later in life than folks with higher dietary levels of either nutrient.

Calcium: Much Documented Researchers offer extensive evidence of calcium's benefits on many fronts: n Osteoporosis poses a threat to older men as well as women, according to Randi L. Wolf, PhD, research associate at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Dr. Wolf presented her award-winning study to an October 3, 1999 meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Dr. Wolf suggests that men increase their consumption of calcium, particularly after age 80, to avoid age-related declines in the amount of calcium absorbed. According to Dr. Wolf, "It appears that the hormonal form of vitamin D, which is the main regulator of intestinal calcium absorption, may have an important role. We are conducting more research to better understand the reasons for why calcium absorption declines with age in men." n Scientists at Tufts University in Boston did some earlier work on the calcium-vitamin D connection and reported it in the September 4, 1997 New England Journal of Medicine. Using the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) increased recommended daily intake of 1200 milligrams of calcium and 400 to 600 international units of vitamin D for people over 50, the Tufts researchers found that with supplementation of the nutrients, men and women 65 and older lost significantly less body bone and, in some cases, gained bone mineral density. n Two studies published in American Heart Association journals show that atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be linked by a common problem in the way the body uses calcium. The September 1997 Stroke revealed that, in a group of 30 postmenopausal women 67 to 85 years old, bone mineral density declined as atherosclerotic plaque increased. Researchers reporting in Circulation (September 15, 1997) advanced the theory that the osteoporosis-atherosclerosis connection may be related to a problem in handling calcium. n For people who had colon polyps removed, taking calcium supplements decreased the number of new polyps by 24% and cut the risk of recurrence by 19%, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Medicine. The study, published in the January 14, 1999 New England Journal of Medicine, was a first in crediting calcium with anti-cancer properties.

The D Factor

Without adequate vitamin D, your absorption of calcium slips and bone loss can accelerate, increasing the risk for fractures. Fifty percent of women with osteoporosis hospitalized for hip fractures at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston had a previously undetected vitamin D deficiency (Journal of the American Medical Association, April 28, 1999). University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers told participants at the April 14, 1997 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research that vitamin D "significantly inhibits highly metastatic, or widespread, prostate cancer in animals," suggesting its potential for treating men with similar conditions. Few foods that Americans eat, except dairy, contain much vitamin D, but we can usually synthesize sufficient amounts from as few as five minutes' exposure to the sun. But as skin ages, its ability to act as a vitamin D factory decreases. According to Michael F. Holick, the director of the Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical Center, upwards of 40% of the adult population over age 50 that he sees in his clinic are deficient in vitamin D. Recently, the National Academy of Sciences (the official body that decrees the required amounts of necessary nutrients) increased the daily recommendations of vitamin D to 600 IU for people over 71, 400 IU for those aged 51 to 70 and 200 IU for people under 50. The best dietary sources, apart from dependable supplements, are dairy and fatty fish like salmon. Four ounces of salmon provide about 300 IU.

The Facts About Fats

The American lust for low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets filled with sugary foods has exploded into nothing short of "obsession," according to experts at the General Research Center at Stanford University Medical Center (Am J Clin Nutr 70, 1999: 512S-5S). That mania oftens robs us of the crucial balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids typical of the Mediterranean diet that protect us from heart disease by controlling cholesterol and making blood less likely to form clots. These fatty acids cannot be made by the body but are critical for health: n Omega-3 fatty acid (linolenic acid) comes from fresh, deepwater fish (salmon, mackerel, sardines) and vegetable oils such as canola, flaxseed and walnut. n Omega-6 fatty acid (linoleic acid) found primarily in raw nuts, seeds and legumes and in saturated vegetable oils such as borage, grape seed, primrose, sesame and soybean. The American Heart Association recommends limiting total fat consumption to 30% of daily calories. Saturated fats like those in dairy and meat products as well as vegetable oil should comprise 10% of total calories; total unsaturated fat (fish oils, soybean, safflower nuts and nut oils) should be restricted to 20 to 22% of daily calories.

Be Sure About B12

Vitamin B12 presents a particular problem for the elderly because older digestive systems often don't secrete enough stomach acid to liberate this nutrient from food. (The elderly have no problem absorbing B12 from supplements, because it's not bound to food.) Vitamins generally moderate the aging process but, ironically, that process and the diseases that frequently accompany it affect vitamin metabolism (Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax 83, 1994: 262-6). And because of those changes, we need more of certain vitamins. This is the case for vitamins D, B6, riboflavin and B12. Crucial for health, B12 is necessary to prevent anemia, and, according to recent studies, needed (along with folate and B6) to help stave off heart disease. B12, with thiamine and niacin, boosts cognition (Adv Nutr Res 7, 1985: 71-100). Screening for vitamin B12 deficiency and thyroid disease is cheap and easy and can prevent conditions such as dementia, depression or irreversible tissue damage (Lakartidningen 94, 1997: 4329-32). In the January 5-12, 1999 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA urged doctors to screen levels of homocysteine (the amino acid byproduct of protein digestion that damages arteries, causes heart disease and, possibly, strokes) in patients at high risk for heart disease. They also recommended all Americans to up their daily levels of vitamins B6 and B12, as well as folic acid. Since fruits, vegetables or grains lack B12, vegetarians need B12 supplements. And they're a good idea for the rest of us, too.

Folic Acid Benefits

Folic acid made headlines in the early 1990s when the U.S. Public Health Service declared that "to reduce the frequency of neural tube defects [spina bifida, or open spine, and anencephaly, a lethal defect of the brain and skull] and their resulting disability, all women of childbearing age in the United States who are capable of becoming pregnant should consume .4 milligrams (400 micrograms) of folic acid per day." This recommendation followed voluminous research that showed taking folic acid was associated with a significantly reduced risk of birth defects. (The advisory is based on the fact that nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned. If you think you are pregnant, consult your health practitioner for supplementary advice.)

A Team Player

Folic acid's efficacy intensifies when it works with other nutrients. Among many studies on the preventive powers of folic acid on birth defects, one published in The New England Journal of Medicine (327, Dec. 24, 1992: 1,832-1,835), disclosed an even greater decrease in neural tube defects when supplements of folic acid contained copper, manganese, zinc and vitamin C. As a warrior against homocysteine, folic acid joins the battalion of B12 and B6 in detoxifying this harmful protein. At the University of Washington's Northwest Prevention Effectiveness Center, researchers recently analyzed 38 published studies of the relationship between folic acid, homocysteine and cardiovascular disease and, according to associate professor Shirley A. Beresford, MD, folic acid and vitamin B12 and B6 deficiencies can lead to a buildup of homocysteine.

Compelling Evidence

Canadian researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (275, 1996: 1893-1896) that men and women with low folic acid have a 69% increase in the risk of fatal coronary heart disease. This 15-year study of more than 5,000 people stressed the need for dietary supplementation of folic acid. Folic acid also has been credited with the potential to protect against cancers of the lungs, colon and cervix. It appears to help reverse cervical dysplasia, the precursor cells to cervical cancer, especially for women taking oral contraceptives, which may cause a localized deficiency of folic acid in the cells of the cervix. According to Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning, authors of The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery), folic acid derivatives work with neurotransmitters, the chemicals that permit signals to be sent from nerve fiber to nerve fiber. A lack of folic acid can cause some nervous-system disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia and dementia; it also may be related to some forms of mental retardation. Other supporting roles of folic acid, according to researchers: the formation of normal red blood cells, important for preventing the type of anemia characterized by oversized red blood cells; strengthening and improving white blood cell action against disease; limiting production of uric acid, the cause of gout.

The Best Sources

Many foods are rich in folic acid: beef, lamb, pork and chicken liver, spinach, kale and beet greens, asparagus, broccoli, whole wheat and brewer's yeast. But experts believe that only 25 to 50% of the folic acid in food is bioavailable. Processing also reduces an estimated 50 to 90% of its content. Folic acid supplementation overcomes these obstacles with little risk, as it has no known toxicity. Women taking folic acid who are current or former users of oral contraceptives may require additional zinc. And be sure to augment your folic acid supplement with its synergistic counterpart, vitamin B12.

Focus on Fiber

The American Heart Association came out squarely behind fiber in a June 16, 1997 issue of its journal Circulation: Double your daily intake to lower cholesterol and the risk of heart disease. The American diet is consistently low in fiber, notes Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD, author of the article. Twenty-five to 30 grams a day from foods (or supplements) are not only heart healthy but seem to aid weight control.

Iron Problem

Getting enough iron? An estimated 25% of adolescent girls in the United States are iron deficient, according to an October 12, 1996 issue of the British medical journal The Lancet, which reported that girls who took iron supplements performed significantly better on verbal tests than those who took a placebo. "Teenage girls should be regularly tested for iron deficiency because rapid growth and the onset of menstruation during puberty increase the body's need for iron," says Ann Bruner, MD, of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and a lead author of the study.USDA data reveal that women up to age 50 also tend to get much less than recommended levels of iron, a lack of which leads to anemia, a deficiency of red blood cells, hemoglobin or volume of blood. For kids, deficiency is more common from six months to four years and during the rapid growth spurts of adolescence when the body is growing so quickly that the body's iron stores may sink to dangerous levels. Vegetarian women run the greatest risk for deficiency, as meat is iron-rich; foods like beans, grains and vegetables also contain some iron. Supplements, of course, supply easily absorbable iron. And to absorb iron from vegetarian sources, take vitamin C with your meals. That boosts the amount of this mineral you will take in. Bear in mind, however, that certain folks-older men and post-menopausal women-generally have adequate dietary supplies of iron. Of greater concern, in fact, is excessive iron, and for these folks iron-free multivitamin and mineral supplements are available.

Ante Up the Antioxidants

Antioxidant nutrients help protect the body from oxygen-scavenging molecules called free radicals. The products of pollution, the body's own metabolic processes and other sources, free radicals are linked to heart disease, cancer and other chronic health problems. The most important antioxidants, which include vitamin C, E, beta carotene, and selenium, are often lacking in the American diet. Plus, optimal amounts of vitamin E cannot be consumed from food. You need supplements. The bottom line: even though we live in a land of plenty, you can still miss vital nutrients. So make sure to consume these vital substances.

Sprouts: Nutritional

Source of Missing Nutrients In the search for the nutrients missing from America's diet, one big help is the sprout. The sprout is truly one of nature's heavyweights: fresh, tiny and moist, its power punch of vitamins, minerals, protein, chlorophyll and disease-busting phytochemicals land it in a weight class far beyond that of its full-grown competitors. Size does NOT matter to this nutritional giant. A championship belt currently wraps around the miniscule broccoli sprout, catapulted into the ring by Paul Talalay, MD, professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Talalay discovered that the seedlings contain substantially more of the cancer-fighting substance sulforaphane than mature plants (Proc. Natnl. Acad. Sci. USA, 94, 10367-10372). Sprouts, the quintessential health food of the Sixties, provide a wonderfully varied and versatile way to get your daily greens. Raw or cooked, strong or mild, vegetable and grass sprouts and their algae cousins add low-calorie texture to recipes and a rich, diverse complement of nutrients and fiber.

Ancient Asia to the Modern Lab

Asians stir-fried sprouts as one of the earliest fast foods as long as 5,000 years ago. The ancient Chinese relied on sprouts for year-round vegetables in colder regions of their vast country. Today, researchers studying sprouts and adult plants have identified their important chemoprotective and other health-bolstering substances. In Paul Talalay's research project at Johns Hopkins, scientists found that three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain up to 50 times more sulforaphane than mature plants, which prompts the body to produce an enzyme that prevents cancer tumors from forming. Uniform levels of the compound saturate the shoots, unlike the chemically uneven adult plants. The Brassica family of broccoli and cabbage is richly endowed with phytochemicals that also help reduce estrogen levels associated with breast cancer. Other phytochemical compounds in the Brassica family are associated with the prevention of stomach and lung cancers. Most of the initial landmark work on phytochemicals' cancer-fighting powers has taken place since 1989 under the aegis of the National Cancer Institute's "Designer Food Program," which isolated, for example, the isoflavones in beans that seem to neutralize cancer-gene enzymes.

Strong Suit: Soy and Spirulina

The isoflavones and phytosterols in soy produce an estrogenic effect that appears to relieve menopausal symptoms and help prevent breast cancer. Soy foods expert Mark Messina, PhD, has done extensive work on the subject, some of which has been published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute 83, 1991: 541-6. Researchers also have synthesized a bone-strengthening form of soy isoflavones called ipriflavone, following impressive clinical trials in the treatment of osteoporosis (American Journal of Medicine, 95 [Suppl. 5A] (1993): 69S-74S). Spirulina and other micro-algae are fascinating organisms that inhabit a niche between the plant and animals kingdoms. Named for its tiny spirals, spirulina, a blue-green algae, grows in saline lakes but is cultured for maximum nutritional content. In her book Whole Foods Companion (Chelsea Green), Dianne Onstad notes that spirulina contains "the highest sources of protein, beta carotene and nucleic acids of any animal or plant food." Its nucleic acids, she says, benefit cellular regeneration; its fatty acids, especially GLA and omega-3 acids, make it one of the most complete foods. Sprouts, like any other produce, should be rinsed thoroughly before serving. People at high risk for bacterial illness-young children, the very elderly or folks with weakened immune systems-should limit their consumption of raw sprouts. But no matter how you eat them, you may find more spring in your step from these tiny, sprouting nutritional wonders.



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=352)


Better Bones
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 11, 2005 05:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Better Bones

Better Bones by Deborah Daniels Energy Times, March 13, 2004

As America ages, osteoporosis, a weakening of the bones, grows into an ever-expanding problem. Currently, it affects more than 44 million Americans.

Women are in special danger; of those who suffer weak bones, about 35 million are women. This problem causes a huge amount of damage-physical, emotional and financial. The national bill for hospital and nursing care for osteoporosis victims tops $17 billion a year, about $47 million a day.

Odds are, your bones need help. According to the National Institutes of Health, the bones of more than half of all Americans over age 50 are weak enough to put them at risk of osteoporosis. Weak bones linked to osteoporosis continue to present a serious risk to health. A study published in the British Medical Journal shows that fractures in older people are just as life-threatening today as they were two decades ago (2003; 327:771-5).

When researchers looked at broken legs among more than 30,000 people over the age of 65, they found that just as many people die today after these kinds of bone breaks as they did during the 1980s.

Their findings emphasize how important strong bones are to survival. This study showed that breaking your leg at age 65 or older increases your risk of death more than 12 times. And these high death rates, according to the researchers, reinforce the fact that preventing osteoporosis saves lives.

Blowing Smoke Through Bones

While many bone experts blame the high rate of osteoporosis on sedentary lifestyles and foods low in calcium, Australian research has turned up another bone-weakening villain: smoking. According to these scientists, smoking may be the most destructive lifestyle habit that destroys bone in older women. While other studies have pointed to smoking as a factor in bone loss, this most recent study purports to show that smoking may be one of the most important influences on weak bones (J Bone Min Res 9/03). " This will be an important step forward in the management of osteoporosis, since the results of this study can be used to improve current approaches to preventing bone loss," says researcher John Wark, PhD.

Dr. Wark's study found that older smokers are particularly prone to weak bones. While smoking is always bad for bone strength, after menopause tobacco smoke seems to exert an even deadlier affect on your skeletal support.

" [T]he damaging effects of cigarette smoking may well have been underestimated in the past," says Dr. Wark. When you inhale cigarette smoke, your lungs are exposed to about 500 harmful gases, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, benzene, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia. The infusion of these gases cuts back on the available oxygen used for building bone and other tissues.

Along with these gases, small particles containing chemicals like anatabine, anabase, nicotine, monicotine and other carcinogens also filter into the lungs. Studies (Acad Ortho Surg 2001; 9:9) indicate that bathing the body in these chemicals results in:

  • • Reduction in bone density
  • • Low back problems
  • • Increased chances of fractures
  • • Reduced chances of bone healing

    Bone Building

    While it's never too late to build more bone, the best time for laying down a dependable musculoskeletal foundation is before age 30. That way, as you get older, your strong bones can better resist the weakening effects of aging. Ipriflavone is a natural chemical that has been found to help protect bone. Researchers believe that this supplement can help bones strengthen by absorbing more calcium (Calc Tissue Int 2000; 67:225)

    Other ways to make bones stronger include:

  • • Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and getting plenty of calcium and vitamin D (vitamin D helps calcium go into bones)
  • • Performing weight-bearing exercise, such as walking or weight lifting
  • • Not drinking alcohol to excess
  • • Limiting coffee use; drinking three cups a day raises your osteoporosis risk (Am J Epid 10/90; 132(4):675)

    Weak bones can put a severe crimp in your lifestyle and put your life at risk. How can you tell what shape your bones are in? Health practitioners can help you get the appropriate bone density test. But the tone of your muscles are also a good indicator: Exercise to tone those muscles and chances are you're building your bones, too. All you have to do is get moving!



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray vitamins - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=297)


    Bone Power - Natures Plus
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 11, 2005 04:41 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Bone Power - Natures Plus

    Bone Power by no author Energy Times, May 1, 1997

    Patricia Q. stopped smoking 20 years ago. At 61, she is active, tries to exercise regularly, eats properly and takes a multivitamin. Most would consider Patricia's lifestyle a sufficient safeguard against the diseases of aging. But one debilitating possibility still concerns her: Osteoporosis-bone thinning. She worries that her bones may have begun weakening almost a decade ago. Although her good health habits can slow the demineralization of her bones, osteoporosis may still take its toll. And as her neck and back begin to obviously round, a possible sign of bone weakness, Patricia frets about her future.

    The weakening of bones brought on by age makes them more prone to fracture. One of every two women older than age 50 suffers an osteoporosis-related fracture during her lifetime. Osteoporosis literally means "porous bones," bones that deteriorate and particularly increase the risk of damage to the hip, spine and wrist. In extreme cases, everyday activities assume danger: fractures can result from simply lifting a bag of groceries or from what would otherwise be a minor fall. Some women, fearful of fractures, eliminate many seemingly innocuous activities from their daily lives. Their fear is well founded. Complications from these fractures are a major killer of women.

    As women grow older, the risk grows, too. Ten million individuals already have the disease, and 18 million have low bone mass, placing them at risk for osteoporosis.

    But research shows that osteoporosis may be preventable and controllable. Regardless of age, eating right, getting enough calcium and performing weight-bearing exercises, can lower your risk for this disease.

    Understanding Your Bones

    Bones are not static structures but living tissue constantly reformed in a process called remodeling. Every day old bone is removed and replaced with new bone tissue. When more bone is broken down than is replaced (demineralization), bones weaken. When the structure loses sufficient density, you face eminent danger of a fracture.

    Generally speaking, bones continue to increase their density and calcium content until you reach your 30s, at which point you probably have attained your peak bone mass. Afterward you may either maintain this mass or begin to lose calcium yearly, but you rarely can increase bone density. The loss of bone density can increase at menopause, when your body ceases producing estrogen, a hormone required to improve bone strength. In addition, some medications, used for a long period, compromise bone density.

    Stop Calcium Loss

    Eating a diet rich in nutrients that help your bones stay strong should be the first step in stopping or slowing the process of osteoporosis. Calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, phosphorus, soy-based foods and fluoride compose the major nutrients that strengthen bone.

    At this moment, 98 percent of your body's calcium resides in your bones, the rest circulates in the blood, taking part in metabolic functions. Because the body cannot manufacture calcium, you must eat calcium in your daily diet to replace the amounts that are constantly lost. When the diet lacks sufficient calcium to replace the amount that is excreted, the body begins to break down bone for the calcium necessary for life-preserving metabolic processes.

    Calcium in the diet can generally slow calcium loss from bones, but it usually doesn't seem to replace calcium already gone. The National Institutes of Health recommend 1000-1200 milligrams of dietary calcium per day for premenopausal women and 1200-1500 milligrams for menopausal and postmenopausal women

    Good sources of calcium include milk and milk products, yogurt, ricotta, cheese, oysters, salmon, collard greens, spinach, ice cream, cottage cheese, kale, broccoli and oranges.

    If you cannot tolerate dairy products, calcium supplements are an easy way to consume calcium. Take supplements with a meal to aid absorption of calcium from the stomach.

    In Total Health for Women, Dr. Kendra Kale, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, urges women to read supplement labels. Scrutinize the fine print to see how many grams are considered "elemental"or "bioavailable"-the form of calcium your body will absorb. If you're taking a 750 milligram supplement, chances are only 300 milligrams are elemental. You should also check that the pill will dissolve within 30 minutes and meets the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) standards. If tablets do not break down within 30 minutes, they may pass through you unabsorbed and you won't digest the calcium from them that you need.

    Absorbing calcium from your digestive tract also requires the presence of vitamin D. Ten to 15 minutes of sun exposure daily usually satisfies vitamin D requirements since most people's bodies can use sunlight to manufacture this substance. So walking to work, or going outside for lunch should supply sufficient ultraviolet light to facilitate calcium absorption.

    As we age, however, our body's ability to produce vitamin D gradually diminishes. Our diets can make up the difference: Good dietary sources of vitamin D include egg yolks, liver and fish or nutritional supplements. Many foods, like milk, are supplemented with vitamin D.

    Magnesium is another mineral that helps to build bones. Found in leafy, green vegetables, nuts, soybeans, seeds and whole grains, your daily requirement of magnesium should be about half of your calcium intake.

    Absorbing calcium for bone health also requires phosphorus, but be careful not to get too much of a good thing: excess phosphorus can actually increase your body's need for calcium. This can present a problem for people who drink bottle after bottle of cola soft drinks or who eat an abundance of processed foods which are often high in phosphorus.

    New Soy Research

    New research suggests that soy foods, like tofu or soy milk may be vital for preserving bones. A study of more than 60 postmenopausal women who consumed either diets rich in soy's isoflavones or milk protein found that eating soy restored calcium to some of the women's bones. Even though the researchers didn't think such a replacement due to soy was even possible!

    The researchers at the University of Illinois believe that isoflavones behave in the body in some of the same ways that estrogen does. The study measured bone density at the lumbar spine, a part of the body at the small of the back that is liable to fractures due to osteoporosis.

    Fluoride: Not Just For Teeth

    Although most people associate the mineral fluoride with strong teeth, fluoride is just as important for bone strength. Surveys report that osteoporosis is reportedly less common in communities that drink fluoridated water. Fluoride combines with calcium in the bones to slow mineral loss after mid-life. Good sources of this mineral include fish, tea and most animal foods.

    Cut Back on Alcohol and Coffee

    According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, consuming lots of caffeine is thought to increase the calcium excreted in your urine. In addition, high levels of protein and sodium in your diet are also believed to increase calcium excretion. And although more studies of protein and sodium are needed to precisely determine how these substances influence calcium loss you should limit the caffeine, protein and salt you take in.

    On top of those findings, researchers say that the diuretic action of alcohol and caffeine speed skeletal calcium loss. They believe alcohol may interfere with intestinal absorption of calcium.

    Pumping Up

    Along with a bone-friendly diet, your exercise program should also be designed to preserve bone. Weight-bearing exercise-exercise that places stress on the bones-strengthens bone density and wards off osteoporosis. Weight-bearing exercises include weight lifting, walking, jogging and jumping rope.

    Exercise possesses many benefits for preserving bone, according to Miriam Nelson, Ph.D., author of Strong Women Stay Young. Among them: exercise can help you retain the balance necessary to resist falls and strengthen the muscles that keep you erect. Studies performed on women of all ages found that by doing strength training exercises two times a week for a year, without use of estrogen or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), women, on average, added three pounds of muscle and lost three pounds of fat. They were also 75 percent stronger with improved balance and bone density.

    Although strength training can be performed by anyone at any age, Nelson recommends that if you have an unstable medical condition or if you have recently undergone surgery, wait until you recover and speak with your doctor before beginning an exercise program. If you have not exercised in a long time, consult a health practitioner knowledgeable in sports medicine before beginning an exercise program.

    Other Options

    Drug therapies are now available to combat osteoporosis. One of the most popular is HRT, which supplies estrogen to women undergoing menopause. However, medical experts are still arguing over HRT 's possible role in increasing your risk of cancer, particularly breast cancer.

    According to Jan Rattner-Heilman, co-author of Estrogen, the Facts Can Change Your Life, the conflicting studies that balance the benefits and risk of HRT are bound to confuse the average consumer. Estrogen is recommended to prevent bone loss and forestall heart disease and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Most women take estrogen to ease the discomforts of menopause such as hot flashes, and many experts do not believe that it unduly increases the risk of breast cancer for those at low risk.

    Heilman warns, however, that estrogen probably should not be taken by women especially at risk for breast cancer risk or those who are already suffer the disease.

    Patricia Q. is reluctant to try HRT. "I'm at risk for breast cancer-my mother had it-so I won't take estrogen. I'd rather do what I can without medications. My preference is to watch my diet and exercise as much as I can. That gives me my best chance to avoid osteoporosis."

    Doctor Nelson agrees with this perspective She believes that exercise possesses enough benefits to make it the treatment of choice. "The difference between estrogen and strength training is that strength training has a huge spillover effect; you aren't just decreasing one type of disease. You become stronger with more muscles and less fat, and you become more fit. This decreases your chances for many types of diseases, not just osteoporosis. It can decrease risks for heart disease, diabetes, sleep disturbances, hypertension and more."

    If you believe you are at risk for osteoporosis, ask your doctor about the benefits of bone mineral density screening. DEXA scan (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) measures the bone density in a 15-minute test. But the test is expensive: the cost of this test ranges from $75-200 or more and may not be covered by your health insurance. But financial help may be on the way. A Bone Mass Standardization Act has been introduced in Congress to ensure that the cost of bone mass measurement is covered under Medicare and that standards for coverage are clear and consistent for anyone with medical insurance.

    Fighting Osteoporosis at Different Ages

    Childbearing years (30-40): These years are particularly important for preserving bone through exercise and good nutrition. Eat plenty of low-fat dairy products, vegetables and soy. Perform weight-bearing exercise such as walking, jogging and weight lifting to attain the greatest amount of bone and muscle possible. Being active reduces risk of injury and makes you stronger. If you smoke, now's the time to stop.

    Menopausal years (late 40s-50s): During this time, muscle, bone and estrogen decreases. Minimize loss through diet, walking and weight lifting. Your exercise intensity may have to be decreased but you should not stop being physically active.

    Post Menopause (over 60): Focus on reducing your risk of falling. Minimize balance problems and increase muscle strength through exercise.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=291)


    Fighting Arthritis Naturally
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 10, 2005 02:16 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Fighting Arthritis Naturally

    Fighting Arthritis Naturally

    by Donna Lee Nardo Energy Times, January 8, 2002

    The annoying pain of arthritis grows ever more annoying: one of every six Americans, 43 million people, suffer arthritis, the leading cause of disability in the US. No pharmaceutical can reliably cure arthritis or slow its progression without possibly causing side effects. But you can help heal your hurting joints with nutrients and other natural substances.

    Every move you make hinges on healthy joints. The hinge joints in your fingers, knees and elbows swing back and forth. Ball and socket joints in our hips and shoulders twist and turn our arms and legs. But when arthritis attacks, joint function narrows, causing pain, stiffness, swelling and inflammation. While scientists search for the root cause of arthritis, they recognize that aging, injuries, allergies, a genetic tendency toward arthritis and being overweight all contribute to your risk. Researcher have identified more than 100 types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), gout, lupus, scleroderma, vasculitis, myositis, infectious arthritis, degenerative joint disease and spondylitis. OA and RA represent two of the most common arthritis forms. OA generally attacks the finger joints and larger joints like the hips and knees. Cartilage lining the joint deteriorates, often as a by-product of aging, but this deterioration can happen at any age. Sprains, fractures and repetitive injuries can increase your chances of osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis occurs when joints become inflamed and your immune system apparently releases antibodies in response to allergens. This type of arthritis can destroy and immobilize joints. Traditionally, doctors have treated arthritis with acetaminophen, aspirin and other drugs called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, NSAIDs often offer only short-term relief. They can cause bleeding problems and ulcers. And while they may slow inflammation and pain, they also do nothing to repair damaged joints. A 1995 Journal of Rheumatology article also warned that prolonged NSAID use actually furthers deterioration of the joints (Oct/95; 22 (10):1941-6).

    Glucosamine at Work

    Scientists believe that injuries and aging deplete the body's supply of glucosamine, a natural substance that forms, maintains and repairs joint cartilage. Glucosamine supplements are thought to replenish the supply and are prescribed for arthritis therapy in many countries. Several studies indicate that glucosamine tackles pain and inflammation as effectively as NSAIDs without the side effects. It also helps rebuild arthritic joints. Research supporting glucosamine's benefits abounds in Europe and Asia. One study suggests that glucosamine sulfate supplements relieve pain as well as the NSAID ibuprofen (Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 1994; 2 (1):61-9). A recent Belgian study testing the effectiveness of glucosamine on patients with OA of the knee captured the attention of the American medical profession. Results suggest that glucosamine promotes physical changes in joints that halt the progression of OA (Lancet 2001, Jan 27; 357 (9252):251-56). After analyzing data from scores of clinical trials, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) saw enough promise in glucosamine to launch its own multi-year study.

    Healing Spice

    Scientists have been testing the orange-yellow herb turmeric and have found that it may ease arthritis discomfort. Long a staple in the medical practices of Asia, turmeric has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that reduce swelling and pain associated with arthritis. Researchers think this spice, used in such Indian cuisine as curry, may work more effectively than cortisone and other drugs that reduce inflammation. Ellen Kamhi, PhD, RN, and co-author of Arthritis: An Alternative Medicine Definitive Guide, considers turmeric an important therapy for arthritis. "Turmeric is quite effective, and it's much safer than conventional drug anti-inflammatories, with far fewer possible adverse effects," says Dr. Kamhi, clinical instructor at the State University of New York-Stony Brook Medical School. One study on people with RA demonstrated that the natural benefits of turmeric equaled those provided by a popular prescription drug known to cause side effects (Indian J Med Res 1980; 71:632-4). Another trial, published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, found that turmeric possesses unique anti-inflammatory properties (1993; 38:113-119). A trial published in 1994 also found that turmeric acts as an antioxidant to help protect joints (J Pharm Pharmacol; 46:1013-16).

    Aging Joints

    As we age, our bodies require more antioxidants to fight off damage caused by destructive molecules known as free radicals. Researchers believe that antioxidant nutrients can afford arthritis protection. A 10-year study evaluating the effect of vitamins C and E on the joints concluded that both nutrients protect against cartilage deterioration (Arthritis & Rheumatism 1996, April; 39 (4):648-56). According to Dr. Kamhi, "Arthritis is a lifestyle disease (and) no one remedy, either natural or pharmaceutical, will heal or reverse the arthritic process. Organic foods, exercise, stress reduction, and supplements can lead to a marked decrease in all arthritis symptoms with minimal side effects and enhanced overall health and wellness." While arthritis often makes sufferers limit their activity, experts agree that a sedentary lifestyle only exacerbates problem joints and that exercise maintains your range of motion. The type of activity recommended for each particular form of arthritis differs: for osteoarthritis, specific exercises like stretching and moving arthritic joints can help if more strenuous exercise forms are not possible. Rheumatoid sufferers need to use extra caution to prevent inflammatory flare-ups by balancing gentle exercise with rest. In any case, keep moving: performing household chores or spending time on your hobbies will profit painful joints.

    Weight Control

    In many cases of arthritis, maintaining an appropriate weight is critical. Surplus weight places extra stress on joints and accelerates cartilage deterioration. And don't be discouraged if your mainstream doctor pooh-poohs complementary arthritis control. "Any practitioner who categorically dismisses the use of all-natural therapies," advises Dr. Kamhi, "is not keeping up with reading current medical literature."



    --
    VitaNet ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=265)


    Study Says Supplements Could Save Billions in Health Care Costs
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 09, 2005 05:52 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Study Says Supplements Could Save Billions in Health Care Costs

    Study Says Supplements Could Save Billions in Health Care Costs

    A study released at a House subcommittee hearing in late September on the cost savings and health benefits of selected dietary supplements projected a $15 billion reduction in health care costs over a five-year period from calcium and folic acid.

    The study, commissioned by the Dietary Supplement Education Alliance (DSEA) and conducted by the Lewin Group, found that the five selected supplements—omega-3 fatty acids, glucosamine, and saw palmetto along with calcium and folic acid—could make a significant impact on health care costs while positively affecting consumers’ health status. DSEA asked the Lewin Group to put a dollar figure on the benefits of calcium and folic acid because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows health claims on products containing these nutrients.

    Since the study began, FDA also authorized qualified health claims on omega-3s, and the National Institutes of Health has implemented large-scale studies of saw palmetto and glucosamine.

    “Many industry experts have long believed that dietary supplements provide consumers with long-term health benefits by reducing the incidence of debilitating health problems, and this study proves it,” said Elliott Balbert, president and CEO of Natrol, Inc. (Chatsworth, CA) and president of DSEA. “The findings provide evidence to support both the cost savings and quality-of-life benefits of these particular supplements.”

    DSEA commissioned the Lewin Group to critically review the research literature on the five supplements for consistency, validity, and impact (i.e., size of the effect; to develop estimates of the potential health care expenditure savings that could result from daily use of two of the supplements; and to suggest areas of future research for supplements where there is emerging evidence. The Lewin Group arrived at the $15 billion figure by focusing on two specific health issues: hip fractures (including hospital and nursing facility expenses) in the case of calcium along with vitamin D, and neural tube defects in the case of folic acid. Joan DaVonzo, vice president of the Lewin Group, said at a news teleconference following the Sept. 22 hearing that the savings in health care costs from supplementing calcium intake might be even larger than the projected $13.9 billion if other types of fractures were included.

    Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, professor of nutrition at Tufts University and one of the witnesses who testified before the House Subcommittee on Human Rights & Wellness chaired by Rep. Dan Burton (R-IN), told reporters the health benefits—and potential cost savings—of folic acid supplementation went far beyond the $1.1 billion estimate for neural tube defects. He said folic acid has been shown to help prevent other types of birth defects as well as reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer. “It’s not a one nutrient/one disease relationship,” Blumberg said.

    “Research shows that the typical American diet does not always provide a sufficient level of nutrients. This study just reveals the tip of the iceberg in the ability of supplements to contribute to a healthier America,” said Elwood Richard, president and founder of supplement manufacturer NOW Foods (Bloomingdale, IL), in response to the study.

    DaVonzo acknowledged that the potential for the five supplements studied went beyond the dollar figures projected in the study. For instance, in the case of saw palmetto and its reported prostate health benefits, “The impact could be huge,” she said.

    “It’s no surprise to anyone in the industry that dietary supplements are safe, affordable, and effective, and this study not only confirms that statement, but will, more importantly, reach an audience well beyond industry,” said David Seckman, executive director and CEO of the National Nutritional Foods Association. “An even more critical finding is the fact that dietary supplements can dramatically cut health care costs if used regularly—a point that won’t be lost on any American consumer, the media, and lawmakers aware of the staggering—and rising—cost of health care in this country.”

    To help spread the message beyond the halls of Congress, DSEA prepared an audio news release and was organizing a satellite media tour. DSEA vice chairman Jon Benninger said the hope was to commission followup studies on other nutrients “as funding allows.” Vitamin Retailer Magazine, Inc., 431 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick, NJ 08816 //www.oprmagazine.com/

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=17)



  • VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.