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  Messages 1-50 from 55 matching the search criteria.
Overcoming adrenal fatigue naturally Darrell Miller 7/22/18
5 Signs You're Not Getting Enough Potassium and How To Overcome It Darrell Miller 2/21/18
Health Watch: What Do You Know About Vitamin K? Darrell Miller 12/30/17
Top 7 Foods That Boost Serotonin Darrell Miller 9/1/17
Fish Oil Supplements: Are They Good for Cardiovascular Health? Darrell Miller 3/23/17
3 Ways to Naturally Beat Wintertime Depression Darrell Miller 1/14/17
Trilobites: Your Liver Doesn’t Know It’s the Holidays Darrell Miller 12/31/16
Six reasons why walking is the best medicine for mental health Darrell Miller 11/13/16
Daylight saving time could increase depression Darrell Miller 11/9/16
11 Foods that Help You Sleep Better Darrell Miller 11/4/16
Can EDTA help my cardiovascular system Darrell Miller 10/10/16
Does Melatonin Decline As We Age? Darrell Miller 9/22/15
All about trace minerals. Darrell Miller 3/18/14
What Is GABA And Why Is It Important For The Brain Darrell Miller 12/21/13
Can Tribulus Herb Boost Testosterone? Darrell Miller 12/2/13
Magnesium Is An Important Mineral For The Cardiovascular System Darrell Miller 11/25/13
Can Melatonin Be Used For Fibromyalgia? Darrell Miller 12/28/12
Can Melatonin Help Me Sleep? Darrell Miller 12/20/12
Coq10 and its benefits Darrell Miller 10/26/12
The Health benefits of P-5-P Darrell Miller 7/20/12
The Major Health Benefits Of Hemp Darrell Miller 4/6/12
Use Turmeric Herb Instead Of Cox-2 Inhibitor for Pain Relief Darrell Miller 2/17/12
How Does Tart Cherry Work To Fight gout and Inflammation? Darrell Miller 5/25/11
Potassium: Cardiovascular Health, Muscle Function, Cellular Activity, And Blood pH Darrell Miller 5/11/11
Natural Vitamins for the Heart Darrell Miller 7/6/10
Hawthorn Berries Darrell Miller 9/17/09
Potassium And Magnesium Darrell Miller 12/30/08
Fiber For Better Health Darrell Miller 7/11/08
Health And Applications Of Coenzyme Q10 Darrell Miller 4/17/08
Did You Know There Is One Mineral That Could Change Your Life Forever? Darrell Miller 3/5/08
Apple Cider Vinegar to Fight Heart Burn Darrell Miller 2/16/08
Six Foods that Boost Heart Health Darrell Miller 1/21/08
How to Manage Migraines Naturally: Magnesium - Feverfew - Butterbur - Ginger Darrell Miller 12/21/07
7-Keto, The Next Dhea With No Side Effects Darrell Miller 11/10/07
Active Coenzyme Q10 Darrell Miller 7/7/07
The Vital Role of Magnesium in Natural Calm Darrell Miller 6/1/07
Too Little Magnesium Can Cause Health Problems Darrell Miller 4/20/07
CoQ10 for Heart Health Darrell Miller 3/28/07
For Better Heart Health ... Darrell Miller 2/6/07
HDL Booster - Boost your good cholesterol Darrell Miller 3/16/06
Molecularly Distilled Omega-3 fish Oil Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 1/12/06
Trace Minerals and Migraines Darrell Miller 11/16/05
Re: Magnesium Darrell Miller 10/6/05
Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen Darrell Miller 7/27/05
Maintaining Healthy Veins Darrell Miller 7/25/05
Pain - Post Op and Relaxation Darrell Miller 7/13/05
Natural Health for a Healthy Heart Darrell Miller 7/13/05
5-HTP - The Science of Sleep Darrell Miller 6/29/05
Caffeine - a nervous system stimulant Darrell Miller 6/21/05
Enhancer for Youthful Vitality Darrell Miller 6/16/05



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Overcoming adrenal fatigue naturally
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Date: July 22, 2018 11:53 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Overcoming adrenal fatigue naturally





Overcoming adrenal fatigue naturally

The human body has a well-developed system it uses to aid us when we experience stress. Firstly, the brain identifies the threat. Then the body releases hormones designed to do two things, rush blood to the muscles and heart to assist in fighting off the aggressive agent and dampening body processes that are not needed in the attack, such as digestive ones.

Were one fighting of a saber-tooth tiger, this would be of benefit. Today's stresses are far more nuanced, insidious and long-lasting. And when constant stress overworks the adrenals, which are the rabble-rousers in charge of turning off immunity and digestion until the tiger has turned tail, well then they get tired. This condition is called, aptly, adrenal fatigue. It can last for a short while, or a long time. It induces fatigue and it can lead to "brain fog." Other symptoms can include disturbances in mood, or sleep, food cravings and muscle and bone loss. To recuperate, it's necessary to convince the body the tiger has gone. Eat healthy, sleep healthy. Take vitamins and nourish yourself physically and psychically.

Key Takeaways:

  • Some symptoms of adrenal fatigue include brain fog and insulin resistance. And busy new parents, college students and caregivers are most at risk of getting it.
  • The adrenal gland functions rhythmically. During the day it releases cortisol that wakes us up and at the evening it reduces it to make us go to bed.
  • Adrenal fatigue stresses the adrenaline such that when stress occurs, it takes longer for the individual to recover.

"One of the most important parts of restoring adrenal function is listening to your body and minding your stress levels."

Read more: https://www.healthnutnews.com/overcoming-adrenal-fatigue-naturally/

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5 Signs You're Not Getting Enough Potassium and How To Overcome It
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Date: February 21, 2018 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Signs You're Not Getting Enough Potassium and How To Overcome It





When we are sick, we lose vitamins and minerals. We lose electrolytes through the flu and stomach viruses. When we lack potassium if we have water retention. Numberness or tingling can be caused to the loss of potassium. Potassium is responsible for the nervous system. The Rhythm that a heart beats to can be changed when we do not have enough potassium in our system. Fruits are great for their levels of potassium, especially pomegranates and apricots.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0_7mkwycFs&rel=0

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Health Watch: What Do You Know About Vitamin K?
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Date: December 30, 2017 03:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Watch: What Do You Know About Vitamin K?





Most people are familiar with benefits of vitamins. The most common vitamins with which people are familiar are A, B, C, D and E. However few people know about the benefits of vitamin K. It derives from the German word Koagulation which is similar to the English word coagulation. That refers to blood clotting. Most people are not deficient in vitamin K unless they suffer from malnourishment. Babies are usually given a shot of vitamin k within a day of birth to stimulate coagulation. There are a number of forms of vitamin K with K1 being the most common. It is also the one present in green vegetables. When people have blood clots, strokes or abnormal heart rhythms, doctors often prescribe anti K drugs such as warfarin which act as anticoagulants. Food high in vitamin K can aid in having a healthy heart. Foods that are high in vitamin K include green vegetables such as kale, spinach, collard greens, parsley, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Fruit , milk and meat also have vitamin k in different quantites. Vitamin K also comes in K2 and K3 versions which also aid in bone health. In fact study of 72,000 women over a decade followed by the The Nurses' Health Study found that those with less than 109 micrograms a day of vitamin K were 30% more likely to suffer a hip fracture. Overall Americans are not eating enough vitamin K. Eating more would promote healthier cardiovascular systems and stronger bones.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamin K is required by the human body for coagulation or clotting of blood.
  • Dietary sources of Vitamin K include but are not limited to kale, blueberries, spinach, mustard greens, and broccoli.
  • Some anticoagulant medications may interfere with the action of Vitamin K.

"K2, as well as K1, are believed to play an important role in bone health; low levels have been associated with an increased risk of both osteoporosis and arthritis."

Read more: http://www.caledonianrecord.com/features/health/health-watch-what-do-you-know-about-vitamin-k/article_b2ae97dd-2bd4-57df-8a42-307a4d5fe6a0.html

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Top 7 Foods That Boost Serotonin
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Date: September 01, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Top 7 Foods That Boost Serotonin





Serotonin helps regulate body temperature, mood, sleeping patterns and aids in digestion, among other benefits. It's common for those that have low levels of serotonin to experience depression and many antidepressant medications raise serotonin levels to combat depression. If you want to raise your serotonin levels naturally(or tryptophan a serotonin precursor), without the side effects involved with prescription medications, you may want to try adding these foods to your diet. They include frits, vegetable, eggs, meats and even chocolate

Key Takeaways:

  • Serotonin, also known as 5-HT, is a neurotransmitter released by the pineal gland of the brain.
  • Foods that boost serotonin include: kiwi, dark chocolate, seeds, nuts and vitamin D-rich foods
  • Some foods contain tryptophan, which is a precursor to serotonin, but these are only effective when consumed with a high-carb, low-protein diet

"Serotonin plays an important role in controlling our circadian rhythms - our body’s internal clock."

Read more: https://www.healthambition.com/foods-boost-serotonin/

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Fish Oil Supplements: Are They Good for Cardiovascular Health?
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Date: March 23, 2017 08:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fish Oil Supplements: Are They Good for Cardiovascular Health?





Conventional wisdom has long been that fish oil supplements are very beneficial for heart health. In fact, the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends fish oil for heart patients. However, there is some disagreement about the effectiveness and safety of fish oil. Read this article and discover 3 reasons why some data may be flawed regarding this supplement along with concerns regarding safety of some fish oil. In the end, eating fish may be more heart-healthy.

Key Takeaways:

  • While the American Heart Association recommends heart patients consume fish oil tablets, one MD is not so sure.
  • While some studies seem to show that Omega 3 fatty acids from fish oil are good for heart patients, some doctors see flaws in the structure of the studies.
  • Since the FDA does not regulate fish oil pills, one doctor suggests it could be more beneficial to just eat more fish.

"Fish oil contains omega-3 fatty acids, which, when consumed by eating fatty fish, can cause blood vessel relaxation, reduced blood clotting, reduced inflammation and possibly stabilization of heart rhythm."

Read more: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2017/03/fish-oil-supplements-good-cardiovascular-health/

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3 Ways to Naturally Beat Wintertime Depression
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Date: January 14, 2017 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 3 Ways to Naturally Beat Wintertime Depression





The winter weather got you down? Here are 3 sure fire ways to help you get out of that funk. Featured in this article are 3 very easy ways to beat the wintertime blues. Even better news, they cost almost nothing. Very informative with real world examples from the author this post is a definite must read to trick our bodies from going into mental hibernation.

Key Takeaways:

  • Wintertime depression is a form of depression that occurs during the winter months. In my experience, it is generally caused by a lack of natural light, poor food choices and not enough physical activity.
  • Living in Rhythm with the sun is critically important to a long and healthy life.
  • One thing the pharmaceutical industry will never tell you is that even a short workout may be just as helpful in treating depression as a little pill.

"If you suffer from wintertime depression, make sure you are eating two servings of vegetables and one fruit with each meal. Yes, this means two servings of vegetables even with your breakfast. If you can get your nine servings daily of vegetables and fruits hopefully you will be too full to even think about eating sugar or processed foods."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//kutv.com/features/studio-guests/3-ways-to-naturally-beat-wintertime-depression&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNF7igoaqgXjQV2FrbynTI1m8dVA2Q

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Trilobites: Your Liver Doesn’t Know It’s the Holidays
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Date: December 31, 2016 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Trilobites: Your Liver Doesn’t Know It’s the Holidays





The study included 89,000 middle-aged men and women who were followed for up to 13 years. At study entry 68 percent of the men and 11 percent of the women were regular drinkers. The analysis was confided to the men because the number of female drinkers was so small. The investigators found that men who drank relatively heavily on most days of the week had a heightened risk of dying from any cause. In contrast, men who drank roughly the same amount alcohol each week, but drank less frequently, showed no increase in their mortality risk. The findings, which appear in the American Journal of Epidemiology, give some credibility to the widespread social belief in Japan that a "liver holiday," a few days off from drinking each week helps counter the ill effects of alcohol.

Key Takeaways:

  • If you’re experiencing indigestion or your energy levels are low after too many holiday parties, your liver could be out of sync.
  • Over the holidays, many of us will drink, stay up past bedtime, eat an extra slice of pie and sleep in. Fun as they are, these activities can tamper with our circadian Rhythms, the feedback loops that sync our body’s functions to our external environment.
  • Circadian Rhythms are important for helping the liver anticipate the body’s demands throughout the day, like stockpiling energy after meals and releasing it when we sleep.

"To keep your liver’s clock consistent this holiday season, avoid extreme behaviors"



Reference:

//www.nytimes.com/2016/12/22/health/your-liver-doesnt-know-its-the-holidays.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0

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Six reasons why walking is the best medicine for mental health
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Date: November 13, 2016 10:04 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Six reasons why walking is the best medicine for mental health





Did you know walking can help you work better, help with addiction, make you happy and keep you young? Walking can make you more creative and give your confidence a boost in addition to creating new brain cells that can help with decision-making and learning. By releasing endorphins, walking can also make you feel happier and it can also help control addiction by increasing dopamine. Walking can even help you age by sharpening memory and by preventing cognitive decline.

Key Takeaways:

  • If you've hit a lull in your work and are feeling sluggish, head out for a short walk.
  • According to research, workers who exercise regularly have more energy and are more productive than those who do not.
  • If your work schedule allows it, try to plan your walk for midday as that's the best time for a walk according to your body's circadian Rhythm.

"A lot of people take up walking in hopes of getting fit or losing a little bit of weight, but many people find that it becomes a surprisingly enjoyable habit once they get started."



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/055913_walking_mental_health_depression.html

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Daylight saving time could increase depression
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Date: November 09, 2016 02:49 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Daylight saving time could increase depression





Setting our clocks back every winter can have its benefits, like gaining an extra hour of sleep. However, a recent study has revealed that gaining an extra hour could also lead to depression due to it getting dark an hour earlier in the evening. Psychiatric hospitals in Denmark reported over a 17-year period, 11 percent of new cases decreased after the time change. Dr. Oexman has recommended that we decrease how much alcohol or caffeine we drink this weekend in order to keep our circadian Rhythms in check.

Key Takeaways:

  • Depression cases at psychiatric hospitals in Denmark increased immediately after the transition from daylight saving time, the study says.
  • An analysis of 185,419 severe depression diagnoses from 1995 to 2012 showed an 11% increase during this time period. The cases dissipated gradually after 10 weeks.
  • Researchers from the departments of psychiatry and political science at the universities of Aarhus, Copenhagen and Stanford were well aware of the negative effects associated with daylight saving time, such as the increased heart attacks and stroke risk.

"Depression cases at psychiatric hospitals in Denmark increased immediately after the transition from daylight saving time, the study says."



Reference:

//www.cnn.com/2016/11/04/health/fall-back-time-transition-depression/index.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2Fcnn_health+%28RSS%3A+CNN+-+Health%29

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11 Foods that Help You Sleep Better
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Date: November 04, 2016 04:09 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 11 Foods that Help You Sleep Better



Did you know that there are some foods that actually help you sleep better? If you are like most people, sleep is a very expensive luxury to come by now a days but with these eleven foods you can help sleep better. These foods are rich in both magnesium and in tryptophan which can help promote not only sleeping quicker but also a more restful sleep. To learn more, please take a closer look into this article.

Key Takeaways:

  • Try eating foods high in magnesium, say researchers at Edinburgh and Cambridge Universities.
  • Dark chocolate is a great source of magnesium, as are a multitude of other foods we've highlighted below.
  • Magnesium regulates circadian Rhythms, so you get sounder, more satisfying sleep.

"Magnesium regulates circadian Rhythms, so you get sounder, more satisfying sleep. Dark chocolate is a great source of magnesium, as are a multitude of other foods we've highlighted below."



Reference:

//www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what-to-eat/11-foods-help-you-sleep-better


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Can EDTA help my cardiovascular system
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Date: October 10, 2016 03:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Can EDTA help my cardiovascular system

EDTA, also referred to as Calcium Disodimum Edathamil, is a synthetic amino acid used to treat a host of conditions including cardiovascular diseases. It can be administered intravenously, intramuscularly or orally.

Primary use: Detox Metals and Clean Veins

The hardening that occurs in our arteries, commonly known as atherosclerosis, contributes massively to poor cardiovascular health. This plaque buildup blocks your arteries causing diseases like high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and heart attacks. 

 EDTA chelation therapy has been proven to effectively dissolve the plaque restoring the arteries to their previously clear state. The healthy arteries allow good blood flow eliminating cardiovascular diseases.

EDTA is also beneficial in lead poisoning treatment. It has the ability to bind itself to heavy metals like lead, arsenic and mercury in the bloodstream. EDTA treats heavy metal toxicity. It is also used in dentistry during root canals, as well as to remove excess digoxin (the drug used for abnormal heart Rhythms) in the body.

Everybody should take EDTA once a year to maintain a health cardiovascular system.


References:

//www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1032-edta.aspx?activeingredientid=1032&
//umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid
//www.life-enhancement.com/magazine/article/531-oral-edta-helps-restore-cardiovascular-function


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Does Melatonin Decline As We Age?
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Date: September 22, 2015 01:00 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Does Melatonin Decline As We Age?

Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal glands.  The circadian production of melatonin is tied to the day/night cycle. Light through the retina signals the pineal glands to suppress its production. Lack of light stimulation (at night) results to increased production of melatonin. The increased hormone production at night is associated with a good night’s sleep. According to a study, melatonin significantly reduces sleep latency and increases sleep efficiency. It has thus been used to treat insomnia.

Sleep

Aging and Insomnia

Insomnia is commonplace among the elderly. As we age, sleep problems which include difficulty in falling asleep and maintaining the sleep are so rampant. This is so because melatonin production declines with age. With age comes the disruption of the circadian Rhythms associated with the production of melatonin. To this end, melatonin supplements come handy to the elderly in maintaining a good night’s sleep.


Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

There is more to this hormone than a good night’s sleep and normal aging. There are evidences that melatonin suppresses Alzheimer’s disease. AD is the leading cause of dementia among individuals older than 65 years. Lack of sleep is a common symptom among AD patients and feels bad but sundowning (worsening of symptoms during evening hours) is worse. According to Netherlands Institute of Brain Research, the declining production of melatonin among the elderly not only affects the circadian Rhythms but also enhances the development of Alzheimer.


Melatonin as an Antioxidant

Melatonin production starts to decline at age 60. This is the onset of diseases like AD which leads to increased production of free radicals in the brain. According to a review paper written in 2000, there is a lot of pathological changes among AD patients’ autopsied brains as a result of free radical activity. Melatonin carries antioxidant properties which fight the free radicals and protect the brain neurons.


Melatonin Supplements

Melatonin is a powerful hormone. Its function in sustaining optimal human health is crucial. New discoveries are being made on this versatile hormone. The fact that its production starts to decline at 60 only means that you need to use supplements and not fret over the onset of AD or insomnia. It is clear that besides being harmless and natural in treating insomnia, Melatonin is the most effective way of averting deleterious aging effects.



References

www.life-enhancement.com/magazine/article/1025-melatonin-can-reset-your-biological-clock

www.quora.com/Why-do-we-sleep-less-as-we-age

www.biomedgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/56/1/B21.full

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All about trace minerals.
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Date: March 18, 2014 10:26 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: All about trace minerals.

About minerals

foods rich in mineralWhile much accentuation is put on the trace minerals that are discovered to be crucial to the human form, to be specific, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, and zinc, there are additionally follow minerals which help the figure to perform its normal schedules. Follow minerals are required by the constitution, yet just in little measurements. Moment measures of follow components can mean the distinction between poor and fitting health. A number of them perform distinctive, critical capacities which are needed by the constitution. In this article, we'll examine a portion of the diverse follow minerals that are of service to people.

Iodine

Iodine is advantageous to the human figure because of the way that it serves to control advancement and usefulness in the thyroid organ. This is a capacity of most extreme criticalness, as the thyroid organ is answerable for to such an extent. The generation of vitality inside the human figure, fortified digestion system, discourse capability, and solid hair, skin, and teeth are all because of a legitimately working thyroid organ.

Copper

Copper is an alternate essential follow mineral. It has been discovered to be vital for legitimate assimilation of iron in the human form. It additionally works with the cell reinforcement Vitamin C to help structure elastin, which is a substance utilized within the muscles of the constitution. Fitting bone development, and also the best possible building of red platelets are likewise made conceivable because of copper.

Manganese

Manganese, in itself, is capable cell reinforcement. Notwithstanding performing the capacities of a cancer prevention agent, manganese is answerable for fitting breakdown of amino acids and vitality generation. Vitamin B-1 and Vitamin E are likewise influenced by manganese, as it helps the form to metabolize them legitimately. Also, sex hormone creation is controlled by manganese.

Chromium

While of service for all people, diabetics specifically profit from the best possible measurements of chromium. It helps insulin in the constitution to metabolize sugar, keeping glucose at a sensible level. Chromium is additionally answerable for serving to clean garbage out of our conduits, lessening cholesterol and triglycerides.

Potassium

Potassium works in pair with sodium in regulation of the physique's waste procedures. It animates the kidneys to help free the assemblage of harmful waste. Heart Rhythms might additionally be stabilized by getting the correct dose of potassium. It is likewise known to encourage send more oxygen to the mind, which can bring about clearer considering.

Selenium

Selenium is an alternate follow mineral that has critical cancer prevention agent properties. Some therapeutic reviews have demonstrated that a fitting selenium admission may bring about a diminished shot of contracting bosom, lung, colon and prostate malignancy.

The trace minerals recorded above are simply a portion of the more applicable follow minerals. There are numerous distinctive follow minerals that your constitution requirements and it might take truly a long rundown to depict every one of them. To get all the minerals you need, make sure to consume your everyday necessities of products of the soil. This sustenance’s hold probably the most vitamin and mineral-rich mixes accessible, and are beneficial to consume, to boot!

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What Is GABA And Why Is It Important For The Brain
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Date: December 21, 2013 01:22 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is GABA And Why Is It Important For The Brain

brainWhat is GABA

The human brains need various supplements to make it work better. One such supplement is the gamma aminobutyric acid, abbreviated as GABA. It is the second most important neurotransmitter for the brain. The neurotransmitters allow synapses that transfer information to gray matter in human. This amino acid gives human an inhibiting experience thus making one calm. This makes it possible for one to have a feeling of well being and tranquility.

GABA on Human Body

GABA is useful in the human body because it acts as neurotransmitters. This means you are protected from nerve impulses. This neurotransmitter cools the brain. Research has shown that it helps to increase alpha wave production. This is related to the feeling of relaxation we have in brains.

For the brain to work, it must receive impulses smoothly. Human who lack GABA get affected by receiving impulses in spurts. Spurt makes the brain get arRhythmia. This contributes your emotional well being.

For the brain to work well, it has to be free from various conditions. Some of these conditions come because GABA is not present. Insufficiency leads to one showing symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and constant headaches, getting hypertension, palpitations, epilepsy, low sex drives and heart disorders.

GABA on Insomnia

With enough GABA, it is known to prevent the feeling of insomnia. This comes when neurons firing decreases to make one have a restful sleep. The calming effect helps an individual’s brain to have elevated moods which is an important part for reducing blood pressure. To enable an individual have more concentrations when working, they need to have increased levels of GABA.

Ideally, the brain changes as we become old. With enough concentration of GABA in bodies, we actually slow the aging effects. This helps to trigger and stimulate pituitary glands that give human beings their growing hormone, the HGH. Aging causes HGH to slow down thus leading to degenerative diseases and wrinkles.

References:

  1. //www.wisegeek.com/what-is-gaba.htm
  2. //bethanycarder.com/archives/238

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Can Tribulus Herb Boost Testosterone?
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Date: December 02, 2013 07:16 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Tribulus Herb Boost Testosterone?

Understanding Testosterone

Tribulus Herb

As you all know, testosterone is a male hormone produced by the testicles, which greatly influence sexual characteristics in men. Apart from that,hormo it is also essential for maintaining muscle bulk, for improving the bone growth, and for maintaining a general sense of well-being in men. Therefore, it goes without saying that any decrease in the natural levels of testosterone hormone can cause major problems in a man’s life. So, how can we tackle the natural decrease of this hormone which is often accompanied with aging? One method of doing this is by boosting the testosterone level by some of the natural methods like using the herb tribulus terrestris.

What is Tribulus Terrestris?

It can be thought of as a natural remedy to the low testosterone levels experienced by males. It has been around for thousands of years and was used for this very purpose by many ancient Asian traditional healing doctrines. The main advantage of using tribulus to boost testosterone hormone in males is that as it is a boosting process and not a hormone replacing process it does not get accompanied by unfortunate side effects usually found in hormone replacement therapies which can even include shrinkage of testicles itself. Also, hormone replacement therapies will require you to take these synthetic hormones for your entire life time whereas testosterone boosting supplements can be stopped at any time and allow the body to settle down to its own Rhythm. Therefore testosterone boosting is a better method to tackle low levels of testosterone in men when compared to hormone replacement therapies.

How Tribulus Work?

Now, here is how tribulus work on males to boost the testosterone levels. The main thing to keep in mind regarding this herb is that it is not a hormone. Instead it acts by stimulating the testicles to produce another hormone called Lutenizing which in turn will prompt your body to produce more testosterone.

References:

  1. //www.webmd.com/erectile-dysfunction/guide/testosterone-replacement-therapy
  2. //ezinearticles.com/?How-Does-The-Herb-Tribulus-Terrestris-Boost-Testosterone?&id=5361808

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Magnesium Is An Important Mineral For The Cardiovascular System
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Date: November 25, 2013 06:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Magnesium Is An Important Mineral For The Cardiovascular System

What is Magnesium?

Cardiovascular SystemMagnesium is an earth metal that is alkaline. It is the 8th most abundant mineral on the earth’s crust. Magnesium is soluble in water thus it’s commonly found in sea water. In human body it is the 11th most abundant element by mass. Most of the magnesium contained in our bodies resides in the teeth and skeleton - about sixty to sixty five percent. Almost all the remaining amount is found in muscle cells and tissues and only 1 percent is found in the human blood.

Magnesium is a very important mineral in human body and is needed for more than three hundred biochemical reactions. Some of its health benefits include formation of healthy teeth and bones, body temperature regulation, energy production and nerve impulses transmission.

Body Relaxation

Magnesium acts as a calcium channel blocker and it’s responsible for relaxation. Magnesium is very essential to the smooth functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system. A human body operates well in a relaxed and calm parasympathetic state as opposed to the heart pounding and adrenaline driven state of sympathetic nervous system.

Physical and mental stress related to the flow of adrenaline, consumes large quantities of magnesium. This is because adrenaline affects blood pressure, muscle contraction, vascular contraction and heart rate - actions that all require continuous supply of magnesium for healthy functioning. The nervous system relies on adequate magnesium for the calming effects including a restful sleep.

Cardiovascular System

Magnesium lowers the risk of suffering from coronary heart diseases. Many dietary surveys have found out that sufficient intake of magnesium may lower the risk of a stroke. Magnesium deficiency increases the chance of experiencing abnormal heart Rhythms that increases the chance of having complications after heart attack.Thus,taking the correct amount of magnesium is beneficial to cardiovascular system.

References:

  1. www.orielseasalt.com
  2. www.westonaprice.org/vitamins
  3. www.newsmax.com

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Can Melatonin Be Used For Fibromyalgia?
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Date: December 28, 2012 04:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanet.net)
Subject: Can Melatonin Be Used For Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia is a condition that may be very frustrating and has no known cure currently. Due to its complexity and also the number of symptoms that occur during an infection with fibromyalgia, one may be moody, anxious, depressed or irritable. Melatonin, a natural hormone which controls sleep patterns, can help relieve some symptoms of fibromyalgia and promote one's feelings of well-being.

About Melatonin

Melatonin hormone is produced by the brain's pineal gland. It is majorly responsible for controlling the sleep-wake cycle; called the circadian Rhythm. The secretion of melatonin is influenced by exposure to light. Whenever it gets dark, melatonin production rises. Conversely, during exposure to sunlight, the production of melatonin is lowered. Several people employ the use of melatonin supplements to promote symptoms of insomnia, since it can aid to reset one's body clock and even make it easier to fall and stay asleep.

How melanin treats Fibromyalgia

Disturbances of sleep and the frequent disruption of circadian Rhythms occur during fibromyalgia. Melatonin has always been proven to synchronize the circadian Rhythms and promote the quality of sleep. Excess damage by free-radicals is quite common in fibromyalgia patients. Melatonin as well as its metabolites have been discovered to be potent scavengers of free radicals and indirect antioxidants.

Elevated Nitric Oxide In Patients

Some studies have shown that synthesis of nitric oxide is elevated in fibromyalgia patients. Melatonin acts as a potent inhibitor of a rate-limiting enzyme in the production of nitric oxide. Depression is at times a symptom or maybe an overlapping fibromyalgia condition.

Melatonin As An Antidepressant:

Melatonin has also been proven to be an antidepressant. There is a component of melatonin that has been synthesized in the pharmaceutical industry and is now being enhanced as an antidepressant. Lyrica, antiepileptic drugs, have been proven to be effective in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Melatonin has been found to work as an antiepileptic too.

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Can Melatonin Help Me Sleep?
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Date: December 20, 2012 12:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Melatonin Help Me Sleep?

What is melatonin?

Melatonin can be described as a hormone generated in the pineal gland found in the brain. It controls the body circadian Rhythms such as sleep-wake cycle. The levels of melatonin in the blood increase before you fall asleep due to darkness (Lack of sunshine).

Where to find melatonin

Melatonin occurs naturally in humans and plants. Natural melatonin quantity produced decrease with age. Older people produce very little quantities of it.

Current Sources

It is a synthetic medication that is produced in the laboratories. It is available in pill or liquid forms. The pills can be put in the cheek, underneath the tongue or swallowed. This permits direct absorption in the body. Melatonin supplements are available in health food shops.

Food Sources

It is also found in foods, in small quantities, such as milk, chicken meat, turkey, and peanuts but in small quantities.

Melatonin and sleep

Melatonin does not work for every kind of insomnia or sleeping disorders. Your body needs to be ready for sleep for melatonin to be effective. It is safe to use melatonin supplements in low doses long term.

Melatonin treats insomnia, autism in children, and as a sleep reliever after withdrawal from benzodiazepine drugs use. It is also very significant for changing sleep/wake patterns for people who work schedules changes regularly. It can also be used to calm individuals before anesthesia is administered for surgery purposes.

The body has an internal clock that regulates sleeping cycle and waking hours. The body clock regulates the amount of melatonin produced each day. Melatonin production is affected by light. 

For effective treatment of cycle sleep, make sure you take the supplements at the appropriate time of the day (Night time).

Use the right method and dosage for it to be helpful.

Consuming the sleep supplement at the inappropriate time of the day can lead to biological clock reset. It is essential to understand the right quantity, time of taking and its effectiveness. Taking 1-10mg of melatonin every day restores the pace in people experiencing insomnia synchronizing them to duration of 1day.

Melatonin helps enhance sleep.

It enhances sleepiness feeling and can intensify the duration of sleep. This supplement has been applied successfully for improving sleep in healthy people and also decreasing jet lag feeling during travels. Remember to consult a physician if you are experiencing sleep issues.  Give melatonin a try start with lower doses like 1 mg before bed time and gradually increase till it becomes effective.


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Coq10 and its benefits
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Date: October 26, 2012 11:04 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Coq10 and its benefits

CoQ10

We insist that vitamins and essential nutrients should be an essential part of our daily diet. But are we aware that some vitamins and chemical nutrients are also created naturally in our bodies? One such essential compound is known as Coq10. Found in most living organisms, Coq10 also known, as ubiquinone is a chemical that boosts the levels of energy produced in the body. It monitors the functioning of the mitochondria and cells that are useful for metabolizing the fat in the body. Without the presence of this essential compound, there could be some serious problems. Here are its respective virtues for people.

Heart And Muscle Repair

Scientific studies have proved that the enhanced production ofCoq10 has helped to solve some major health issues for people. The enhanced production of the compound was instrumental in strengthening the muscles and tissues of the heart. This meant that adequate levels of Coq10 help to reduce the congestion in the heart and veins. Also, the presence of this ubiquitous compound will also help in getting respite from muscular dystrophy. Also, those, who are vulnerable to breathing problems and arRhythmia, can also find a solution through such a compound in their bodies.

Immunity And Blood Pressure

Those, who have the problem of high blood pressure, would be advised to eat more of things like fish or meat as these contain Coq10 in good amounts. Adequate levels of this chemical will aid in reducing the levels of blood pressure and improving the circulation of blood in the body. Also, Coq10 is known for improving the person's immunity against the common degenerative diseases as well as cancers and malignant tumors and so on. Thus, it can be safely said that Coq10 is a powerhouse of nutrients that help to keep disastrous afflictions at bay. You should have more of it.

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The Health benefits of P-5-P
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Date: July 20, 2012 07:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Health benefits of P-5-P

P-5-P or Pyridoxal-5-phosphate

P-5-P or the most commonly called Pyridoxal-5-phosphate is known to be the most active form of the Vitamin B6. This is known to be converted from organic compounds pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine. The Vitamin P-5-P is a coenzyme which support several other enzymes in the body which play a important role in biosynthesis. This also makes optimum use of the vitamin B6 by improving the body metabolism and many other biological process as well. The vitamin B6 traditionally comes in the form of pyridoxine hydrochloride which the body finds difficult to synthesize in its existing state. Hence, this pyridoxine hydrochloride is processed and is formed as Pyridoxal-5-phosphate to help the body to use the vitamin B6 effectively.

There are a lot of benefits of the vitamin P-5-P

Let us have a look at some of them.

Pyridoxal-5-phosphate uses the information from the genes ad helps to produce proteins.P-5-P is also helpful in the formation of hemoglobin, histamine and neurotransmitters and is also helpful in the metabolism of amino acids, fats and glucose.Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also helps in the conversion of dopa which is a useful substance used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Dopa is converted to dopamine which is a neurotransmitter which is produced in the brain and is released by the hypothalamus.

Food Source

The P5P is also helpful in the utilization of the food sources for the formation of energy and also helps in the easy release of glycogen which is the stored energy.P5P also converts glutamate into GABA which is gamma amino butyric acid which is again a neurotransmitter which is known to be found in the mammals. This is found in their central nervous system.The Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also helpful in the process of decarboxylation which is the conversion of histidine to histamine.

This also converts SAM-e to propylamine which is known to be a precursor of polyamines.The Vitamin P5P is also responsible to lower the homocystenie levels which are caused by the intake of high amounts of methionine.The Vitamin Pyridoxal-5-phosphate helps in the treatment of irregular heartbeat , which is a condition termed as arRhythmia.This plays a important role in the treatment of myocardial infections. This prevents the blood platelets from sticking to each other which usually causes blood clots.The enzymes produced by the Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also helps in the formation of different kinds of amino acid reactions which keeps the carbon ions stable. This process is very important in the metabolism of the cells.The P5P also helps in the metabolism of the amino acids.

Here it helps in converting methionine to cysteine and also converts tryptophan to niacin.Pyridoxal-5-phosphate also plays a vital role in the formation of glucose. This process is known as gluconeogenesis.This also acts a important co-enzyme in the process of glycogenolysis which happens in the liver and muscles and this is known to be a reaction which occurs due to presence of glycogen.The P5P also helps in the formation of antibodies and also assists in the process of hemoglobin synthesis as well.

To keep it simpler, the vitamin P5P performs many functions which is very beneficial to the whole human body. The P5P deficiency can also happen in many individuals and even such symptoms are hard to identify. Any person suffering from the P5P deficiency will have symptoms like muscle weakness, irritability or depression. Consulting a physician and taking necessary supplements will help to overcome the P5P deficiency.

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The Major Health Benefits Of Hemp
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Date: April 06, 2012 07:47 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Major Health Benefits Of Hemp

Hemp Protein

Hemp is the only food with the largest amount of protein available on earth. It is easily digestible and it is the only food with a wide range of proteins. These include important fatty acids and amino acids. It is the only food that supplies the human body with all dietary needs at once. Thus, it is the only food that is capable of sustaining human life alone without other nutritional supplements.

Apart from being a good source of proteins, hemp supplies the body with important minerals and vitamins. However, the most important component of this food is the essential fatty acids. These include the alpha-linolenic (omega 3) and linoleic acids (omega 6). These two categories of fat are important in the body because human body is not capable of manufacturing them. Therefore, they have to be consumed in the daily meals. The ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 in hemp is 3:1. This is close to the 4.0 on average as the optimum recommendation of the world health organization for a human diet.

It plays an important role in various organs of the body including:

Heart health

Hemp has important nutrients are that are essential for the good health of the human heart. These are the essential fatty acids which play a very important role in ensuring the health of the heart. Several studies have revealed that substituting saturated fats with healthy polyunsaturated reduced risk of cardiac arrest. Such fats are found in hemp and are important in preventing sudden cardiac arRhythmia. They also reduce levels of cholesterol in the blood. Hemp has important fats that also decrease build-up of cellular in the arteries. This is very important as it is associated with a condition known as atherosclerosis. Phytosterol contained in hemp plays an important role in reducing cholesterol in the blood by about ten percent.

Brain health

Human brain has a large portion that includes essential fat acids. Since hemp supplies the body with these fats, it becomes essential for brain health. It is also vital for proper memory function. Diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's are preventable with consumption of hemp. The Omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids also help in delaying or reducing neurological effects that come with these diseases. This improves the kind of life led by individuals with such diseases.

Skin health

Essential fatty acids play an important role in ensuring healthy skin. Perhaps, this is why hemp seed has been used as an ingredient in various cosmetic products. The Lipids allow the acids to permeate via the skin. Hemp component in the cosmetic products help to nourish the skin directly. Hemp is also very beneficial to people with psoriasis and eczema skin conditions.

These are just the major benefits of hemp in the human body. Others include increasing of metabolic rate and energy levels, improving immunity and organic function, among others. Hemp is also crucial in the prevention of degenerative diseases and this proves why it is crucial for positive human health. This food provides a lasting solution to various health complications and you may as well try it and enjoy its benefits.

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Use Turmeric Herb Instead Of Cox-2 Inhibitor for Pain Relief
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Date: February 17, 2012 07:15 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Use Turmeric Herb Instead Of Cox-2 Inhibitor for Pain Relief

What Is a Cox-2 Inhibitor?

Cox-2 Inhibitor is a form of NASID. NASID stands for Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which function to bring inflammation down. It is one of popular painkillers. It is very useful since medical science has gained information about serious problem about inflammation. Yet, it has been reported that it causes fast heart rate. It is a risky heart Rhythm condition which is also named with atrial fibrillation. Medical experts said that it is a serious problem because it might lead to the risk of heart failure. Besides, it might also cause stroke and even death.

As a form of NASID, Cox-2 Inhibitor will crucial to bring the inflammation down from a disease such as arthritis and an injury. In the United State, the common form of arthritis is Osteoarthritis. In short, this is the primary benefit of it. Besides that, it also functions as pain reducer. It is done by blocking proteins and enzymes made naturally by the body. However, it brings harm for our body on the other side. It seems to be side effects. Earlier research has noticed that it leads to the death.

Inflammation solution

As the solution, you can pick turmeric herb. It appears in a form of yellow colored spice. Similar to Cox-2 Inhibitor, it is very helpful for relieving the pain for arthritis. It is a perennial herb which originally grows in India. In the past, Indian people use it for cooking. Curcurmin becomes the most important part of turmeric. It is the most medicinal part contained in turmeric. We can easily find it in form of yellow color. Besides India, China has already use this herb in their daily live. For both Indian and Chinese, this herb has significant function as an anti-inflammatory. Besides, it also can be used as an antiseptic and several powerful ways.

Besides for curing arthritis, turmeric herb is able to inhibit the spread and the growth of cancer cell. It has been proved by a university of Texas study. The result concluded from its research shows that turmeric herb prevents the breast cancer to be spread out to the lungs. It works together with our body by identifying the mutated cells and then it kills them. To make it more effective, it is suggested to combine turmeric herb with cruciferous vegetables.

Other benefits of Turmeric

Another benefit taken from turmeric herb is a protection toward our heart. For several countries especially the United State, heart disease has become the number one killer. In this case, this herb will play the role to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol. It is very important since the oxidized cholesterol might lead to the heart attack and stroke. It is because this oxidized cholesterol is able to damage blood vessels.

Cox-2 Inhibitor has benefits yet they are not equal with the side effects created such as heart attack and also stroke. Having had similar function, turmeric herb is highly recommended to take for pain relief. For long time, it has been used for anti-inflammatory too. In short, turmeric herb is better choice than Cox-2 Inhibitor.

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How Does Tart Cherry Work To Fight gout and Inflammation?
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Date: May 25, 2011 12:46 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Does Tart Cherry Work To Fight gout and Inflammation?

Health Benefits Of Tart Cherry

Tart cherry may be the newest addition to the growing list of superfruits. This species of sour cherries have been cultivated for centuries, but only recently has research started to uncover its medicinal potential. It is believed to contain a larger number of phenolics and anthocyanins than its sweet counterparts. Plus, it has been linked to more studies in the past few years.

Prunus cerasus are species of cherries native to Europe and parts of Asia. Tart cherries have less than 10 varieties cultivated around the world, but they have steadily grown in popularity. There are two major cultivars: the bright red amarelle and the darker morello. Among the popular cultivars are Montmorency, Balaton, and Griotte de Kleparow.

Counteracts Pain Chemicals

Anthocyanins have long been associated with the alleviation of joint pains and related symptoms, and tart cherry are among the best sources of these organic compounds. Anthocyanins are actually pigments that give fruits such as apples and cherries their red coloration. As a general rule, fullness of color is directly proportional to the anthocyanin content of fruits. Cancer research on anthocyanins is considered unrivaled due to the availability and reliability of documented data. The anthocyanins found in tart cherries counteract the inflammatory mediators that initiate tumorigenesis, which are the same chemicals responsible for sensitizing joints to pain.

Promotes Purine Metabolism

Gout ensues when purine metabolites in the form of uric acid crystallizes and in the process triggers local inflammatory responses. High levels of uric acid in the blood may form into urate crystals anywhere, but often precipitate in the joints of the lower extremities. The big toe is particularly vulnerable to gout, but it may also manifest in the form of joint pains and kidney stones. Unfortunately, human beings lack a functional enzyme that breaks down uric acid and re-balance uric acid levels. This is when tart cherries come to the rescue. They contain phytochemicals that regulate purine metabolites and promote the excretion of uric acid.

Accelerates Muscle Recovery

Solaray - Tart Cherry 90ct 425mgIt is a common belief in the nutraceutical industry that tart cherries are one of the best sources of antioxidants. Free radicals are natural by-products of cellular respiration, and they become so abundant during workout that the muscles begin to feel sore. It takes a longer time to recover from radical damage when the antioxidant defense of cells is compromised. The antioxidant profile of tart cherries enables the skeletal muscles to recuperate fast after intense physical exertion.

Improves Sleep Disorders

Tart cherries have been commercially touted to cure insomnia. While this remains to be proven, tart cherries are in fact excellent sources of melatonin, the primary hormone responsible for inducing sleep in response to dark environments. Sleep disorders may result from a variety of factors, including stress, and sudden lifestyle changes may interfere with the chemical reactions that govern our biological clock. Tart cherries provide a ready source of melatonin, which normalizes circadian Rhythm and enables the brain to relax.

Fight back against gout and inflammation pain with Tart Cherry.

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Potassium: Cardiovascular Health, Muscle Function, Cellular Activity, And Blood pH
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Date: May 11, 2011 12:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Potassium: Cardiovascular Health, Muscle Function, Cellular Activity, And Blood pH

Potassium is a dietary mineral required in relatively large quantities in comparison with other minerals found in the human diet. It is the most abundant positively charged ion, or cation, in the cytosol, the liquid cytoplasmic matrix found inside all cells of the human body. It has a special relationship with sodium, the major cation outside animal cells. Together they facilitate cellular reformations and intercellular activities, greatly influencing the development of muscles, the brain, and the heart.

Electrolytes are solutions of bases or acids that help maintain a healthy pH inside the body. Potassium is an electrolyte absolutely necessary for the upkeep of cells. They enable organic compounds to move charges, which is central to neuronal activities, muscle contraction, and endocrine functions. The presence of potassium is also required to activate the catalytic functions of several enzymes. Some of these enzymes are indispensable in the metabolism of carbohydrates.

Powers Cellular Activities

A cellular phenomenon described as membrane potential affects several types of cells throughout the human body, such as neurons, muscle cells, and endocrine cells. Potassium is involved in this phenomenon, powering countless molecular devices found in the cell membrane much like a battery. It also participates in transmitting signals between cellular organelles, creating an electric current that flows between different parts of the cell.

Intercellular communication that induces the release of neurotransmitters, hormones, and other related organic compounds throughout the body rely on healthy levels of potassium. For example, it allows the beta cells of the pancreas to respond to levels of carbohydrates that get in and out of the systemic circulation, releasing insulin when needed. It fuels a chain of cellular events that lead to many bodily functions.

Promotes Muscle Function

It is not a coincidence that unhealthy levels of potassium lead to bouts of muscle cramps. While involuntary contractions of the skeletal muscles are often associated to older populations, they may afflict people of all ages at any time of the day. More often than not, the underlying cause is malnutrition, especially deficiency in dietary minerals like potassium.

Contractions produced by skeletal muscles are a classic example of physiological functions that necessitate the presence of potassium. When electrical impulses of cell membranes rise and fall at a very fast rate, it results in a cellular event called action potential, igniting a chain of events that lead to muscle contraction. This is the reason why potassium is important in the maintenance of healthy muscles.

Maintains Cardiovascular Health

Potassium is particularly good for the heart. The cardiac muscle is engaged in continuous coordinated contractions that propel blood out of the atria and ventricles to the rest of the cardiovascular system. A condition called hypokalemia, in which the level of potassium in the blood is low, has been linked to abnormal heart Rhythms, high blood pressure, and congestive heart failure. Not surprisingly, potassium supplements are used as a therapeutic remedy in the treatment of these diseases.

pH Balance

Potassium has a pH of 14. Taking potassium daily can help you regulate your pH so you can maintain a pH of 7 throughout the day. By maintaining a pH of 7, you can improve your health and reduce the instance of illness.

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Natural Vitamins for the Heart
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Date: July 06, 2010 02:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Vitamins for the Heart

It has been consistently revealed by epidemiological research that individuals with a high dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins have a risk that is lower-than-average of cardiovascular disease. This evidence seems to be especially consistent for vitamin E. Additionally, many clinical studies show that magnesium supplementation is of significant benefit in the treatment of cardiac arRhythmias and in reversing the depletion of potassium that comes along with a magnesium deficit. Many cardiovascular events like angina pectoris, congestive heart failure, and cardiomyopathy are related directly to low magnesium status. Coenzyme Q10 is an essential component in cellular energy production. This nutrient is also prevalent in the heart muscle. When tissue levels of CoQ10 are low, there is an association with several cardiovascular complications. Among these are angina, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and mitral valve prolapse. Research has found that the trio of coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, and magnesium plays a crucial role in the maintenance of cardiac health and the prevention of disease states.

The cardio-protective effect of vitamin E seems to come from its ability to bind to LDL cholesterol, which protects it from free-radical induce oxidative damage along with the consequent buildup of atherogenic plaque. Low levels of vitamin E in the blood are a predictive factor of heart health almost 70% of the time.

Studies on the general population have suggested that there is a link between the intake of calcium and blood pressure. Although results of the studies have not been consistent, there are several studies showing that calcium supplementation can lower blood pressure in those individuals who experience hypertension. Overall, those intakes of calcium that are sub-optimal contribute directly to hypertension. It seems that dietary calcium reduces blood pressure by normalizing intracellular calcium levels.

Supplementation with magnesium is of benefit for the treatment of cardiac arRhythmias and the prevention of potassium depletion. Both magnesium and potassium play an important role in the functioning of the heart. Several studies have found that there is improvement in heart function in those patients that have cardiomyopathies when they supplement with magnesium. Since magnesium acts in so many ways to enhance cardiac function and optimize cellular metabolism, magnesium is widely recognized as a critical nutrient for general cardiac support.

Several double-blind studies have taken place in those patients that experience various cardiomyopathies in order to show the benefits of CoQ10 supplementation. One study reported an 89% improvement rate in 80 cardiomyopathy patients who were treated with CoQ10. The coenzyme also appears to moderate blood pressure through the usual mechanism, as it lowers cholesterol levels and also stabilizes the vascular system with its antioxidant properties. Because of this, it is able to reduce vascular resistance. Several studies on CoQ10 supplementation have confirmed that this nutrient posses the ability lower both systolic and diastolic pressures by up to ten percent.

There are other nutrients that play important roles in optimizing cardiovascular health and reducing hypertension. Among these nutrients are gamma tocopherol, calcium, magnesium, l-carnitine, acetyl-l-carnitine, procyanidolic oligomers, phenolic compounds, and lycopene. As you can see there are many natural supplements that can help the cardiovascular system. Remember to always consult your doctor before adding supplements to your diet while on prescription drugs. Look to your local or internet health food store for quality vitamins, herbs, and specialty formulas to boost your health and wellness.

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Hawthorn Berries
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Date: September 17, 2009 10:57 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hawthorn Berries

Ancient Greeks used hawthorn berries for heart disease. The Greeks and Romans looked to hawthorn as a source of happiness and hope for the future. The berries were used by the Chinese for digestion and circulatory problems. Christian legend says that the crown of thorns that was placed upon the head of Christ was made from hawthorn. The crushed fruit or leaves were used as a poultice for their drawing powers to remove thorns and splinters for centuries in England. Native Americans believed that hawthorn was useful for rheumatism and heart problems.

This herb contains many different components which work together to benefit the heart and body. Hawthorn can both feed and strengthen the heart and arteries. It seems to work on the heart muscle to make it work more effectively. The herb may even help a damaged heart. Hawthorn contains some mild sedative properties, which can help when heart disorders are due to stress and with insomnia. Hawthorn has been used to treat and prevent arteriosclerosis, rapid heartbeat, feeble heartbeat, enlarged heart, angina, and breathing difficulties due to a lack of oxygen in the lungs. Some people recommend using hawthorn to protect against disease before symptoms occur.

Hawthorn is known for its ability to regulate arterial blood pressure. It increases the strength of the heart muscle and also works to increase coronary blood flow. This herb is great in helping to reduce the heart rate and lessen the heart’s workload.

Some studies have found that this extract is responsible for dilating the blood vessels, which results in reduced peripheral resistance. Hawthorn may also have some further cardio-protective effects that become pronounced after prolonged use. Research on 132 patients found substantial positive results with the use of this herb. These stage two stable heart failure patients had improved exercise tolerance, and a reduction in shortness of breath and fatigue after exercise. The researchers noted that for maximum effect, hawthorn must be used for one to two months. Cardiac improvement accelerates with long-term use and relatively high doses. One of the most positive facts about hawthorn is its safety. This herb is believed to be safe for long-term use without side effects. Some experiments have found that hawthorn dilates the blood vessels, lowers blood pressure, and strengthens the heart. This herb is commonly prescribed by German physicians to treat minor heart problems. Hawthorn also contains a mild sedative effect. This effect may contribute to a healthy heart. Stress, anxiety, and nervousness are often associated with heart conditions.

The berries and flowers of the hawthorn plant are used to provide alterative, antispasmodic, astringent, cardio-alterative, diuretic, sedative, and vasodilator properties. The primary nutrients found in hawthorn are choline, inositol, and vitamins A, B-complex, and C with bioflavonoids. Primarily, hawthorn is extremely beneficial in dealing with angina, arRhythmia, arteriosclerosis, high and low blood pressure, heart conditions, heart palpitations, and hypoglycemia.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating arthritis, blood clots, edema, hypertension, insomnia, liver disorders, rheumatism, sleeplessness, and stress. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by hawthorn, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Potassium And Magnesium
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Date: December 30, 2008 01:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Potassium And Magnesium

Potassium and magnesium are the two most common minerals found within the cells of your body. They each have specific individual functions within your body, and together help to maintain the correct balance of electrolytes and the proper functioning of smooth and striated muscles. That includes allowing muscles to relax properly rather than to cramp.

Before discussing this, let's have a look at the major individual properties of these two metallic minerals with respect to the body's biochemistry.

Magnesium is needed to ensure the proper functioning of the sodium/potassium pump. This is a complex topic, and we shan't dwell on it at length here, although the basics are that it is responsible for the movement of ions into and out of cells. Sodium and potassium ions are moved in opposite directions across the cell plasma membrane, three sodium ions being pumped out for every two potassium ions pumped into the cell.

This is of particular importance to nervous cells responsible for transmitting impulses in response to specific stimuli. In the event of a magnesium deficiency, this pumping action is impaired and the sodium/potassium balance within and without the body cells are imbalanced. This in turn impairs the response of nerve cells to stimuli. Both magnesium and potassium can be depleted through the use of diuretics, in which case a magnesium supplement can redress the imbalance.

There are several consequences of such an electrolytic imbalance, some having potentially serious consequences. Many can cause death if left untreated, although the symptoms usually allow appropriate medical treatment prior to the condition becoming fatal, such treatment frequently involving administration of magnesium and potassium. Among these are:

Calcium overload in certain heart cells that reduces the effective use of oxygen and ATP and causes overactive contraction of the heart muscle.

Spasms in coronary blood vessels.

Over-activity of the striated muscle fibers, leading to cramps in the calf and thigh muscles, for example.

Cramp and pain in the smooth muscles of hollow organs such as the bladder or uterus that can also cause premature labor.

Several heart problems caused by an increase in energy consumption and a calcium overload and potassium deficiency that leads to cardiac ischemia and arRhythmia that continue to create a serious medical condition and hazard to life. Potassium, that can stop the heart if given in excess, can be just as harmful if present in too small a concentration.

The whole situation creates a self-perpetuating cycle that can be broken by a magnesium and potassium supplement that restores the correct gradient of potassium and magnesium across the cell membrane, improves the function of the sodium/potassium pump and reduces the excess cellular calcium by replacing it with magnesium.

This only works if both potassium and magnesium are taken together: just either alone is no good. It also takes time for the effect to occur, so the supplement is not suitable for emergency use. A regular supply can prevent the condition occurring.

There are many other properties that magnesium and potassium possess with regard to the body's biochemistry such as the effect of magnesium in activating certain enzymes. However, in discussing relaxation, both of these essential minerals have a significant part to play.

It has been mentioned that a magnesium and calcium deficiency causes spasms and cramps in the smooth and striated muscles, and the corollary is also true. Magnesium and potassium can be used to relieve such cramps, and relax muscle tissue. Hence, because it can relax excited smooth bronchial muscle tissue, magnesium can be used to relieve asthma attacks. The intravenous administration of magnesium is, in fact, an accepted and proven clinical treatment for acute asthma attacks.

In the same way, magnesium has been used to treat muscle spasms and cramps. Again, it is not an immediate treatment for emergency use, but can be used over a period of days to treat athletes with a history of muscle spasms. Such spasm frequently occur after prolonged periods of exercise, when magnesium and potassium, among other electrolytes, can be lost through a combination of sweating and urination.

However, this is not the only means by which magnesium is lost from your body cells, and probably not even the main one. Less obvious, but likely of more importance, is the transfer of magnesium from the plasma into the red blood cells (erythrocytes). The amount by which this occurs is directly proportional to the more anaerobic the exercise, hence the need by athletes and weightlifters for more magnesium. It can be rapidly lost through exercise with insufficient oxygen, and cause their muscles to cramp up.

Magnesium deficiency is common in Americans, although factors such as high calcium intake, alcohol intake, diuretics, and kidney and liver disease are more responsible for this than a dietary deficiency. Potassium is readily available in bananas, brown rice, potatoes, tomatoes and oranges and dietary deficiencies are not common although supplements are readily available.

Magnesium is also known to play an important part in the secretion and use of insulin by the body. Supplementation with magnesium can help diabetics to make best use of insulin, become more tolerant to glucose and improve the fluidity of the membrane of red blood cells. The mineral; also has a small but definite effect in lowering blood pressure. Other uses for magnesium supplements include congenital heart failure, where higher magnesium contents lead to greater life expectancy and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) where magnesium supplements can significantly increase energy levels.

Other uses to which your body puts potassium other than to allow proper muscle contraction and relaxation and to maintain the balance of electrolytes in the body, includes the function of brain and nerve neurons. This, however, is academic since should your potassium levels drop by 50%, death would result.

Potassium, Magnesium and Calcium are essential in maintaining the proper workings of your body cells, although the most visible effect of magnesium and potassium is their relaxation properties on the body, put to specific use by sportsmen and women, particularly those involved in the more anaerobic sports.

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Fiber For Better Health
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Date: July 11, 2008 12:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fiber For Better Health

We have been told that we must eat a certain amount of fiber with our meals because it is ‘good for us’. Most of us have been led to believe that this is because fiber promotes bowel motions and prevents us from suffering from constipation. It is also good for our digestive system. But how true is this, and just what are the real benefits of fiber in our diet?

First of what, what is fiber? Sure, we know there must be fiber in food such as cabbage, beans and celery because we can see it. But is all fiber actually fibrous? Of course not, so let’s first have a close look at what dietary fiber actually is.

Fiber is composed of these parts of a plant that are broken down by the action of enzymes in our digestive juices in the upper parts of our intestinal tract. Some fiber can be digested by the bacteria in our lower intestine, and some is not. So where does fiber come from? By that definition, fiber can be any part of your food, not only the stringy bits, and by definition are of vegetable origin.

Water insoluble fibers increase fecal bulk. That’s the stringy stuff in celery and string beans. It is also contained in cellulose materials, lignin, wheat bran, whole grains and most vegetables. These have the effect of increasing the efficiency of the peristaltic movement of the intestine on the passage of chyme (the creamy fluid that exits the stomach into the duodenum) through your system.

The liquid and nutrients are progressively removed, and the fiber maintains the bulk needed for peristalsis to work properly. Peristalsis is the Rhythmic movement of the intestine that forces your food right from your stomach to your rectum. It is also the basis of some forms of industrial pump that operate on the same principle. Without fiber this pump would be inefficient.

Soluble fiber includes the gum and pectin that are obtained from plant cells. They swell up the chyme, and slow down its rate of travel through the gastrointestinal system, although they have no effect on fecal bulk. Specific examples are oat bran, fruit and most vegetables (all plants contain both). A peach, for example, consists of a skin which is insoluble fiber, and the juicy pulp beneath it which is predominantly soluble fiber.

Although a distinction is made between dietary and crude fiber, they both have their part to play. The term ‘fiber’ is a wide one and it cannot be said that fiber as a whole imparts a specific health benefit. The benefits of fiber are a combination of those imparted by the full range of types of fiber and their sources that are contained in the human diet, both crude and dietary, soluble and insoluble.

So what specifically are these benefits, other than just the generalization that they are ‘good for your intestinal health’? As you likely know, it is the fiber in your diet that binds your feces together into a solid, rather than leaving it as a mobile liquid. Although around 75% of feces are liquid, the bulk of the rest is fiber, bacteria and undigested food.

Since insoluble fiber makes feces bulkier and softer it can help treat constipation, where the stool has an excess of solid content. Any substance that absorbs water and swells can help with this condition. The same is true of hemorrhoids and a condition of the wall of the intestine known as diverticulosis. Once the inflammation has subsided, a high soluble fiber diet can help prevent a recurrence.

If you want to lose weight, a fiber diet can make you feel full without the calories, since fiber is calorie-free. There is also the fact that high fiber foods have to be chewed longer before they can be swallowed, and so you are liable to eat less in the same time. However, if you are determined, all that means is that you will have to lunch longer to get the same weight gain!

There is little doubt that a fiber-rich diet contributes significantly to intestinal health, and that if the correct amount of fiber is not taken then problems such as constipation, diarrhea, diverticulosis and a lack of absorption of nutrients will occur. The peristaltic pumping motion of the whole gastrointestinal tract, from the top of the throat to the anus, is dependent on solids rather than liquids. While a semi-liquid fecal consistency will pass through your body, it will take the bulk of the nutrition extracted from your food with it. It is fiber that is needed to bulk it up and to enable the liquid to be extracted through the intestinal wall and the fibrous solid to pass on through the colon to the anus.

There are other benefits of a diet high in fiber, though they generally depend on the type of fiber. Take cholesterol, for example. High LDL blood cholesterol levels are associated with atherosclerosis, and the consequent risk of heart disease and strokes, due to the oxidation of the LDL by free radicals. When the HDL lipids carry cholesterol back to the liver, it is destroyed by the action of bile acids. Since water soluble fiber binds bile acids, it figures that some types of fiber can promote the excretion of cholesterol from the body. The fiber most effective in achieving this comes from rolled oats and also pectin.

It has also been claimed that dietary fiber might be effective in preventing cancer of the colon. The theory is that bowel cancer is caused by toxins in the feces and if the fecal matter is expelled from the body quickly, the toxins will have less time to act. Fiber promotes the expulsion of the contents of the colon. This has not been confirmed, however.

What has been confirmed is that your bowel can collect mucoid plaque that sticks to mainly your colon, and is an ideal environment for parasites and yeast infections. The National Fiber Council has stated that most people do not eat enough fiber, and the average requirement is 38g a day for men and 25g a day for women.

So eat your fiber, because fiber can boost your intestinal health and wellness.

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Health And Applications Of Coenzyme Q10
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Date: April 17, 2008 02:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health And Applications Of Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10 is a critical cofactor in the biological energy process. It is a powerful antioxidant and plays a vital role in our health and wellness. Coenzyme Q10 is involved in many disease states, consuming adequate coenzyme Q10 can ensure that one maintains good health which can reduce the risk of chronic disease such as the ones listed below:

Cardiovascular disease

  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Angina pectoris
  • ArRhythmias
  • Mitral valve prolapse
  • Hypertension
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiotoxicity (drug induced)

Neurodegenerative disease

  • Huntington’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

Neuromuscular disease

  • Mitochondrial cytopathies (melas, merrf, ect.)
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Ataxias
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Asthma
  • Immune disorders
  • Periodontal disease
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome

Many prescription drugs can cause Coenzyme Q10 to deplete especially statin drugs (cholesterol meds). Beta blocking drugs and anti-diabetic drugs can also leach the body of vital Coenzyme Q10 which could lead to the above diseases if left un-checked over time.

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Did You Know There Is One Mineral That Could Change Your Life Forever?
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Date: March 05, 2008 04:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Did You Know There Is One Mineral That Could Change Your Life Forever?

Did you know there is one mineral that could affect the way you feel and change the way you live life forever? Yes that’s correct – forever - magnesium is that mineral! More than 50% of all Americans consume less then the required amounts of magnesium to stay healthy.

You might be wondering how you would know if you are deficient in magnesium and where you can get a test. Unfortunately it is not that simple. A magnesium test is available from your doctor, but when most people take this test, the results normally come back as normal, so we think everything is fine. This test only measures blood serum levels and not cellular magnesium. One needs to have their red blood cells tested to accurately measure the uptake of magnesium and at this time. This kind of testing needed is not readily available.

You might ask, “how can I tell whether I have a deficiency or not?” It is simple, look at your medical history. Symptoms of magnesium deficiency include signs such as, muscle cramps or twitches, insomnia, irritability, sensitivity to loud noises, anxiety, nervousness, autism, ADHD, heart palpitations, angina, constipation, spasms in the muscles, headaches, migraines, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, asthma and kidney stones (typically caused by a calcium-magnesium imbalance), diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, menstrual cramps, irritable bladder, irritable bowel, acid reflux, and premenstrual syndrome, depression, low energy, weakness in the muscles, weakening bones, and calcification of organs.

If you did not notice, this is an extensive list of symptoms that may be attributed to a deficiency in magnesium. Magnesium is essential for cardiac function in stabilizing cardiac membranes preventing arRhythmias. This mineral helps the cardiovascular system relax aiding in the relief of angina symptoms. Millions of Americans are diagnosed with heart disease yearly, a magnesium deficiency may be the cause.

The reason we are deficient in magnesium is mostly due to the fact that we eat refined, over-processed foods with white flour that have absolutely zero magnesium. The consumption of foods not rich in magnesium will rob our bodies of the little we still have in our bones and organs. Drinking coffee, alcohol, eating lots of sugary foods and stress will cause the body to become depleted.

If you are experiencing one of the above mentioned symptoms and suspect you have a magnesium deficiency, changing they way you eat can help. Pick up a nutritional almanac and find foods high in magnesium like nuts, sea vegetables, dark leaf vegetables and beans to start. Also, kelp, wheat bran, wheat germ, buckwheat, millet, brown rice, rye, tofu, soybeans, brown rice, figs, dates, avocados, parsley, barley, dandelion greens and garlic all contains high amounts of magnesium. Adding a magnesium supplement to your diet which provides 200 to 400 milligrams per day will help. One should limit the intake of coffee, alcohol, colas, salt, and sugar. Actually, many medications can deplete the body of magnesium such as water pills (diuretics) and antibiotics to name two.

So now you know what to do, you might be thinking that a magnesium supplement would be the fastest way to boost magnesium in the body for the time being. What form of magnesium is best? The recommended form of magnesium is magnesium citrate, because of its digestibility and absorbability in the body. Avoid magnesium carbonate, sulfate, gluconate, and oxide if at all possible for these forms of magnesium are harder to digest and will result in smaller amounts being absorbed by the body. Now what are you waiting for, give magnesium a try and see how good you can feel from it!



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Apple Cider Vinegar to Fight Heart Burn
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Date: February 16, 2008 08:55 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Apple Cider Vinegar to Fight Heart Burn

Strange as it may seem, apple cider vinegar can be used to fight heart burn, even though that type of vinegar is composed of acetic acid the same as any other. It wouldn’t seem logical to use an acid to alleviate a condition caused by excess acidity in the stomach, but all will be clear shortly.

First, let’s have a look at what cider apple vinegar is, and what health benefits it can impart to the body. There is more to the old maxim regarding an apple a day than most appreciate. Although an orange has more vitamin C, apples have a lot going for them. They not only contain the soluble dietary fiber and prebiotic pectin, that can help reduce blood cholesterol levels, but are also rich in vitamins and minerals. Many consider apple cider vinegar the form of the apple that provides its ultimate health benefits.

Hippocrates himself has written of the health benefits of apple cider vinegar and used it for the benefits to health that it imparted. That goes back almost 2400 years, to an age when the biochemistry of the body was unheard of and even the alchemists had yet to work their magic. There was no surprise then that an acid could be used to increase the alkalinity of the body since the terms had yet to be understood, let alone invented.

The later applications of vinegar followed a path that would be expected of a substance recognized as a form of medicine, and it has been poured over wounds to sterilize them from early in history, and by people of the 14th and 17th centuries to protect themselves against the Black Death and the Great Plague respectively. It was believed by people in these times that the disease was transferred by breathing in the ‘ill vapors’ and that a vinegar-soaked cloth over the face would protect them.

Many people, associate vinegar with ‘bad wine’ or solutions of acetic acid, generally 5%. But how is real cider apple vinegar produced? All vinegar has acetic acid as its key ingredient. The reason that it can be produced from wine is that acetic acid is produced naturally by the fermentation of ethanol, or ethyl alcohol, the main alcoholic product of the fermentation of sugars. If the fermentation of wine is allowed to continue after the sugar has been used up, then the yeast will act on the ethanol and convert it to acetic acid. In fact the word comes from the old French ‘vin aigre’ or ‘sour wine’, due to it resulting from the undesirable continuing fermentation of wine.

The concentration varies according to the use it is put, though commercial pickling vinegars can be distilled to any required concentration of acetic acid. Apple cider vinegar is obtained by the over-fermentation of apple must usually used for cider, and can be obtained either the clear filtered form, or unfiltered with a hazy light brownish color. Although the manufactured distilled vinegars consist of acetic acid at various concentrations, natural vinegars contain by-products of the fermentation process such as citric and tartaric acids.

However, none of this explains why apple cider vinegar should help to cure heartburn. The first thing you should keep in mind is that this type of vinegar has some nutritional value that will be explained later, but also that it is less bitter than many other types of vinegar and many enjoy drinking it with a small amount of honey as an energy pick-me-up and also to prevent various digestive problems that it appears to alleviate such as bloating and diarrhoea.

The reason that many people experience heartburn is due to the body finding that that the acidity of the stomach is lower than it should be to digest a meal. There might be several reasons for the body believing this, such as drinking too much milk during the meal and thereby neutralizing some of the acid while also introducing more fat to be digested. The body reacts by injecting more acid into the stomach. Excessively spicy foods or alcohol can cause the same effect.

Stomach acid is concentrated hydrochloric acid that is very corrosive and can even dissolve a nail. If your stomach is slightly full, the acid causes a slight, but not full, reflux and you get the burning sensation known as heartburn due to the corrosive effects of the very strong acid on the esophagus, which is not protected by the stomach lining that is designed to withstand it. Sometimes the excessive acid in your stomach will cause the bottom of the esophagus to open, allowing some of the stomach contents into the esophagus giving the horrible burning sensation. That sensation is acid corrosion of your body tissue, but it is rapidly repaired and does no lasting damage unless it is chronic when you have to see your doctor.

Since heartburn is caused by excess acidity then, it will seem strange that you can use an acid to alleviate it. However, keep in mind that your heartburn is due to the body (brain) being convinced that there is insufficient acid in your stomach. If you introduce a weak acid, then you can convince your brain that the acid has been brought to a satisfactory level and so it will stop sending signals to the stomach lining cells that secrete the HCl.

If you remember what I asked you to remember above, regarding the traditional uses of apple cider vinegar and how easy it is to drink, then that vinegar is the ideal acid to take. It floods the stomach with acetic acid and signals pass back and forth between the stomach wall to the brain and back again to the effect that the stomach has enough acid and so no more hydrochloric acid need be secreted.

Had you treated it with milk or even an antacid, it would have worked initially, but eventually the signal would be initiated and the lining would secrete more HCl. With an antacid that can occur after the stomach contents have been passed on, but although it has had its effect, your food will have been poorly digested, and so the better remedy is likely not an alkaline antacid but a weak acid such as apple cider vinegar.

That’s how it works, but what other benefits does it bring to you. For starters it is a good source of potassium which is essential to maintain a proper cardiac Rhythm. Potassium can also help to maintain a good blood pressure, and it is necessary for healthy nails, hair and teeth, and also helps to repair damage to soft tissues and to allow cells to repair internal tissue loss.

Potassium is an essential mineral, although there is normally sufficient in a healthy diet. However, if somebody is displaying the symptoms of potassium deficiency then this form of vinegar can help to resolve the problem. The elderly especially can benefit from a regular dose.

Other than its antiseptic effect, the most common popular use of apple cider vinegar, however, is to fight heart burn and in that respect it is very effective, even if it seems a bit of a paradox.



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Six Foods that Boost Heart Health
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Date: January 21, 2008 01:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Six Foods that Boost Heart Health

The majorities of baby boomers are looking for a way to loose weight and lower their cholesterol. Both of these are two important factors in heart disease, which still remains the number one killer in the United States. The good news is that you can dodge heart disease through your food choices. Below are six foods that can help boost your heart health.

Many studies have proven the variety of health benefits given by fish, ranging from joint inflammation in arthritis sufferers to brain development in babies. The omega-3 fatty acids found in fish support circulation and improve blood vessel function. Researchers have also determined that omega-3s can prevent heart-attack deaths as they stop the electrical disturbance that causes death and half of all heart attacks are due to these arRhythmias. Each week, you should eat one to two 3-ounce servings of fatty fish such as an Alaskan salmon, anchovies, herring or mackerel. By baking or poaching these fish at low heart you can help to preserve the omega-3s. For vegetarians, omega-3 rich flaxseeds can be added to oatmeal, smoothies, or salads. For those who don’t care for fish there are omega-3 oil supplements available as well.

Have you ever wondered why oatmeal is so good for you? In your body, this gluey beta-glucan, which is soluble fiber, binds to bile acids found in the intestines and stomach and excretes them as waste. In order to make more bile acids, the liver needs cholesterol and takes it from the blood. This results in lower blood cholesterol levels. You need 3 grams of soluble fiber each day to reduce your cholesterol by five percent. A cup and a half of cooked oatmeal is a good size serving that can be jazzed up in flavor with frozen berries, non-fat plain yogurt, almonds and much more.

High-glycemic foods like potatoes, white bread, and white rice should be avoided because you get a harmful burst of glucose and insulin that’s harmful immediately after eating them. These bursts tire out the pancreas in the long run and increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Research also shows that having high-glycemic foods at one meal will make you even hungrier and eat more at the next, which is why these foods are associated with weight gain. People with excess fat are much more likely to develop heart disease and stroke even if there are no other risk factors. Because of this, focusing on true grains such as brown rice, quinoa, and barley and choosing them over refined grains as much as possible.

Nuts are important for their unsaturated fats and their ability to help lower cholesterol. Walnuts actually contain omega-3 fatty acids, while almonds boost calcium, helping the heart muscle to contract, and Brazil nuts have selenium, which is a heart-protective antioxidant. About one ounce each day of nuts is good for you, but they do have a lot of calories so make sure to go easy on them. If you have a nut allergy, topping you salad with olives is a good alternative, as they contain unsaturated fats.

Beans also contain soluble fiber like oatmeal which helps to reduce cholesterol and keep arteries clear. By choosing the protein from beans instead of meat, you can cut back on saturated fats which raise cholesterol. Eating beans four to five times a week is recommended, as they can be added to a lot of meals. If you don’t tolerate beans well, try adding kombu, a sea vegetable, to them to help break down the components that cause gas. Your body also does adapt to beans over time, so try building up your bean servings slowly. Food enzymes can help reduce gas as well so don’t forget to take your enzymes.

Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and other berries all have strong antioxidant properties that can help fight heart disease and are also low in calories and high in fiber. Eating two cups of fruit each day for general health is recommended, but you should eat as many berries as you can tolerate. Free radicals can break down cholesterol that is flowing in your blood and make them sticky so to deposit on the arterial walls of your blood vessels. Fight this with antioxidant rich foods to reduce cholesterol build up.

Eating healthy is one step in boosting heart health and overall cardiovascular health. Exercise is also important in keeping your body strong and vibrant so one can live a healthier longer life.

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How to Manage Migraines Naturally: Magnesium - Feverfew - Butterbur - Ginger
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Date: December 21, 2007 10:41 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to Manage Migraines Naturally: Magnesium - Feverfew - Butterbur - Ginger

Before you can understand how to manage migraines naturally, it is necessary to understand exactly what they are and how certain treatments could work. It is not generally known that the word ‘migraine’ means ‘half the head’ because it frequently hurts only on the right or the left of the head of sufferer. Some people with migraines do feel pain on both sides at once, although this is not generally the case.

A migraine occurs in stages which are activated by fluctuations in the hormone content of the blood. The ‘aura’, when you see spots and flashing lights in front of your eyes, is the first stage of a migraine attack, and during this time the blood vessels in your neck and head are contracting. You could also find it difficult to concentrate and your fingers could feel cold. At this point they do not have the headache that starts when the blood vessels begin to dilate.

Rather than the contracted blood vessels slowly returning to normal, your hormones have an excessively strong reaction, and cause them to dilate rapidly and become much wider than they should be leading to a severe headache due to pressure on the nerves. Different hormones can be involves with each attack, and the range of effective natural treatments reflect this fact. During this period, your brain could swell slightly, your muscles can tense up and other things can happen to the chemical and hormonal balance of your body. That is why some herbal treatments work for some but not for others, and different people find different treatments effective for them. What works for you might not work for somebody else if their migraine has a different cause. Basically, though, migraines occur in two phases, one being associated with an excess of hormones and the other with a shortage.

It is not easy to live with a migraine since it can be completely debilitating. Some just have a severe headache, while others are affected for days at a time. The headache can become before and after the onset of the shimmering lights and other optical effects that are generated by the brain. It would certainly be useful if those prone to migraines had one or more of the possible natural remedies to hand since there is rarely time to seek to seek professional medical help once the migraine begins, and through the use of natural remedies a potentially bad attack could be nipped in the bud, and at least its effect on you reduced.

MAGNESIUM

Magnesium is common in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and cabbage, whole grains, nuts and seeds. It is an essential mineral for human biochemistry, and is also needed with calcium for healthy bone development and maintenance.

Magnesium is a muscle relaxant, and relaxes the muscles of the blood vessels helping them to relax their dilatancy that cause the migraine pain. It is also useful to help the immune function, reduces blood pressure (by the same blood vessel relaxing mechanism) and also the Rhythm of your heart. Magnesium therefore provides you with many health benefits, and though the western diet is not generally deficient in magnesium, some areas can be and a magnesium-containing supplement will not do you harm.

However, particularly high dose of magnesium can lead to nausea, diarrhea, low blood pressure and many other unpleasant side effects, so do not take more than the RDA (recommended daily allowance) in your supplement. Many studies have confirmed its effectiveness in reducing the symptoms of migraine, but not all studies have been successful. However, the condition is so debilitating to so many people, that it should be tried although not in excess. Make sure, however, that your doctor is informed since it could interfere with other medication you are taking for your migraine.

Riboflavin, vitamin B-2, is also believed to useful in reducing the duration and frequency of migraine attacks, working in much the same way as magnesium. It is known that there are many cases of people who suffer from vitamin B-2 deficiency also suffering from migraines, and a riboflavin supplement is also worth trying if you are a consistent victim of this condition.

FEVERFEW

Feverfew is the best known of the herbal remedies for migraine, and has been used for centuries in the treatment of fevers, headache, migraine and other painful conditions such as arthritis. The active ingredient is parthenolide, an anti-inflammatory that is also an anti-hyperalgesic, and that would explain its effect on reducing the pain. It also blocks lipolysaccharide-induced osteolysis by suppressing the activity of a eukaryotic transcription factor protein known as NF-kappaB that can cause a number of immune response problems, including inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, hence its use to relieve that condition.

Its effect on migraines could be explained by this activity in repressing the inflammatory response to certain stimuli that could be brought about by hormonal activity. Because it must be taken for a few weeks before the actual problem arises in order to be effective against it, feverfew is not effective to treat an existing attack, but to prevent future attacks. Double blind studies have proved its effectiveness in many tests, but not in all. However, if you take feverfew as a regular supplement in you diet, you might never have to try magnesium or vitamin B-2 supplements.

Some people swear by the leaves of feverfew, eating one per day which is easy way to take it. It is important, however, that you do so regularly, since it can take for up to 6 – 8 weeks for you to notice a reduction in your attacks. Don’t give up after 5 or 6 weeks, but continue, since the results will be well worth it. If you stop for a week or two you will have to start all over again. You might get a sore mouth and perhaps mouth ulcers to start with, but these will eventually go once your body is used to it.

You are probably best not to take if you are pregnant since it could cause you to abort. Otherwise, however, it has been shown to be effective in many severe cases. Feverfew is bitter, and can be used as a tea with other herbs, such as rosemary, lavender and sage. If you are taking warfarin, aspirin or other blood-thinning drugs, see your doctor first, and the same is true of NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). If you are taking these for arthritis, the feverfew itself might be more effective!

If you are taking feverfew as a supplement using commercially available dried leaf then the recommended dosage is around 125mg of the dried leaf. It should contain at least 0.2% of parthenolide (0.25mg/daily), although other studies have indicated that a total of 0.7 mg parthenolide a day should be taken (100mg at 0.7%). Parthenolide is unstable so don’t take it after its sell by or best by date.

BUTTERBUR

Butterbur is also useful in the treatment of migraines. The active ingredient here is petasin, a sesquiterpene ester that also has anti-inflammatory properties, all though it works in a different manner to feverfew. Here, it inhibits the activities of leukotriene generation in neutrophils and eosinophils, which indicates that it also possesses anti-allergenic properties that could help asthmatics that also suffer from migraines. It does not prevent the release of histamine, but does appear to reduce smooth muscle spasm.

You should never take the raw herb, only the extract, because it contains alkaloids that can harm you. The butterbur extract, however, is a perfectly safe supplement and found effective by many people in the treatment of migraine.

GINGER

If your migraine is at the front of the head, then you should try ginger. Unlike feverfew, ginger works on a migraine as it is occurring, and improvement can be achieved for a bad migraine within half an hour. In fact if, like many people, you can feel a migraine coming on, half a teaspoon of freshly ground ginger can stop the pain before it starts.

Many herbal treatments for migraine include a combination of some of the above remedies, and many people swear by them. However, migraine treatment is very personal, and you should use what works best for you. If you are also taking other medical treatments however, please make sure that you refer to your physician before using any others, and that includes herbal remedies or supplements.



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7-Keto, The Next Dhea With No Side Effects
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Date: November 10, 2007 12:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 7-Keto, The Next Dhea With No Side Effects

7-Keto is a natural derivative of DHEA that is claimed to be free from many of the side-effects of regular DHEA supplements. DHEA is dehydroepiandosterone, which is the most abundantly produced of the adrenal hormones. After production in and release into the bloodstream by the adrenal glands that are situated just over the kidneys, DHEA undergoes metabolism to the male androgen hormones, and the female estrogens.

As you age, the production DHEA declines, starting at about 30, with a 50% decline by time you reach 40 and almost 85% at 70. This is true of the levels of many hormones in the body, though some, like the steroidal aldosterone, remain constant throughout life. The general rate of metabolism also reduces with age resulting in an even lower conversion rate of DHEA to the male and female hormones.

At the same time as this occurs, there also occurs a significant reduction in the biosynthesis of protein in the body, which results in a loss of muscle mass as you age, and also in the regeneration of bone tissue that results in what is commonly termed age-related osteoporosis. Brain cells die at an increasing rate leading to many neurological conditions and the immune system is also affected negatively.

Due to the concurrence of these aging effects, many scientists have related the general hormonal decline with the other effects of aging. The have asserted that if these hormones were restored, than many of the effects of aging could be delayed. Osteoporosis would be delayed due to the body’ s increased ability to restore lost bone mass, the metabolic rate would improve and fat would be burned at a faster rate and continue to build muscle, the brain would lose its functionality at a significantly lower rate and the immune system would continue to protect the body against disease.

In other words we might be able to live longer, but if not that then at least the quality of life would be maintained longer as we aged. This is a very welcome and desirable situation, but the taking of hormones as supplements has long been regarded as fraught with danger due to the possibility of undesirable side effects, some of them potentially very serious. DHEA was considered as one of these hormones that could be used as a supplement to achieve positive results in reducing these age-related changes because it exhibited these effects in tests on animals.

However, in order that a specific substance can be declared responsible for any metabolic improvement that involves liver biochemistry, some form of receptor has to be identified, and this failed to materialize in DHEA. There appears to be no such DHEA receptor, although that does not necessarily imply that DHEA is not responsible in some way. It might very well be a DHEA metabolite that is responsible, and that has still to be identified. It is certainly true that DHEA administered to both animal and human subjects has resulted in an increase in the testosterone and estrogen levels of the subjects. Such an increase is not desirable due to a number of potential side effects as previously inferred.

These are particularly liable to occur with people who already have an adequate level of natural DHEA production within their body. The side effects include acne, irregularity in the menstrual cycle, itchy scalp, increased body odor and an excess of androgenic hormones can lead to hair loss, or male pattern baldness. Interruptions in the heart Rhythm, or palpitations, are another very serious side effect of DHEA supplementation, and high doses over a long period introduce a theoretical risk of certain cancers.

However, the discovery of 7-Keto, a natural derivative of DHEA claimed to be free from many of these side effects, has altered the situation. 7-Keto is a powerful antioxidant that speeds up the metabolism of fat and helps to reduce body weight. It also helps to replace lost fat with muscle mass, though it must be stated that this effect is only valid after the natural production of DHEA has slowed down. It is not a body-building supplement.

It was Professor Henry Lardy, of the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin, who tested over 150 DHEA metabolites over 10 years and identified 7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone as having the greatest biochemical effect without having any detectable side effects. This material was trademarked 7-KETO by the Humanetics Corporation, and one of its known effects is to burn fat quicker by stimulating thermogenesis. It had also been shown to strengthen the immune system and to improve the memory. All of this without any measurable increase in any of the sex hormones. It was released after a careful and intensive series of safety tests on both humans and animals found it safe for human consumption.

It should be stressed that 7-Keto is not a hormone, and is not chemically the same as DHEA: it is a different chemical altogether that is produce when DHEA degrades in the body. Because of this it can be promoted as a non-androgenic or estrogenic form of DHEA. It is thought that all of the conditions that decline as we age that can benefit from a supplement of DHEA, will also benefit from a supplement of 7-Keto. However supplementation is only required from the ages of 25 – 30, when the natural amount of DHEA and 7-Keto in the body start to decline.

It causes neither high blood pressure nor any form of cancer, and was submitted to the FDA prior to being made publicly available. It is important to stress that the substance is neither a steroid nor does it metabolize to steroidal hormones, and is also not a sex hormone. It also has no effect on the body’s sex hormones. The whole point of 7-Keto is that it has the effect of DHEA without having any connection whatsoever with steroidal hormones or any hormonal substances. It is totally innocuous and safe to use, without the risk of heart palpitations, lost hair or any of the other side effects of DHEA.

Without a doubt, 7-Keto is a DHEA substitute that has none of the side effects of its precursor. So if you are over the age of 30 and feel the need for an energy boost, give 7-keto a try.

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7 keto DHEA Sale

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Active Coenzyme Q10
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Date: July 07, 2007 01:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Active Coenzyme Q10

Active CoQ10

 

The benefits of Coenzyme Q10 have become increasingly well-known. This important nutrient has been shown in clinical trials to improve heart function, reduce the side effects of certain drugs used to treat cancer, and slow the progression of serious brain diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. Now research has opened a new chapter in the CoQ10 story, highlighting the benefits of ubiquinol, the active form of CoQ10, to increase energy and stamina, and reduce some of he physical signs of aging.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor we will review the benefits of Coenzyme Q10, and discuss the differences between CoQ10 and its active form –ubiquinol.

 

Q. What is CoQ10?

A. CoQ10 is a natural, fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all cells. CoQ10 also is known as ubiquinone. That’s because CoQ10 is ubiquitious and exists everywhere there is life. CoQ10 is vital to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. ATP is the energy-rich compound used for all processes requiring energy in the body. Although CoQ10 is produced by the body and exists in some limited dietary sources, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirements. CoQ10 levels diminish with age and as a result of dietary inadequacies and various disease states. Also, some drugs, especially a group of cholesterol lowering prescription drugs known as “statins,” (Pravachol, Zocor, Lipitor, etc.) significantly reduce CoQ10 levels in the body.

 

Q. What is ubiquinol? Is it the same or different from CoQ10?

A. Ubiquinol and CoQ10 are very closely related. Ubiquinone, or CoQ10, is the oxidized form of the molecule. This means it has to be converted to a non-oxidized form before it can perform its work. Ubiquinol is the active form of this nutrient. Our bodies convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol – which is the form needed to produce cellular energy. Until recently, it was not possible to use ubiquinol as a supplement because it is very unstable outside the human body. But research has now found a way to keep this molecule stable so it can be successfully taken in supplement form.

 

Q. If CoQ10 gets converted to ubiquinol anyway, can’t I just take CoQ10?

A. While it is true that our bodies can convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol, it isn’t true that we all do this equally well. In fact, as we age, our ability to convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol declines. And some people even have a gene that makes them less effective at this conversion than the majority of the population. IN fact, several common health issues have been associated with less than optimal ratios of CoQ10 to QH. For healthy people the ideal ratio is approximately 97% Ubiquinol to 3% CoQ10. But in people with diabetes, for example, the ratios have been found to range from 43% ubiquinol to 47% CoQ10 in mild diabetes, to only 24% ubiquinol to 76% CoQ10 in severe diabetes. These numbers are for men; the numbers for women vary by 2 to 5 percentage points.

So for older folks, the 30-50% of people who have the gene that impairs CoQ10 conversion, or for people who have serious health concerns, supplementing with ubiquinol instead of CoQ10 might be the smart choice.

 

Q. What are the health benefits of CoQ10 and Ubiquinol?

A. There have been many studies showing that CoQ10 is beneficial in treating and preventing heart disease and conditions such as high blood pressure atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), angina, and congestive heart failure (CHF). It’s been shown that heart attacks tend to occur when CoQ10 levels are low in the body. Exciting new research has found that CoQ10 in a unique delivery system supplementation may slow the progression of symptoms associated with neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, ALS, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition, CoQ10 is beneficial for diabetes, immune dysfunction, cancer, periodontal disease, prostate cancer, and neurological disease. While the research on ubiquinol is still very new, it is reasonable to expect that its benefits will be equal to or perhaps even better than CoQ10, because it is the more active form.

 

Q. Why is CoQ10 especially important for preventing and treating heart disease, and for neurological diseases like Parkinson’s disease?

A. The heart and brain are some of the most metabolically active tissues in the body. Both require large amounts of uninterrupted energy, which means these tissues also need increased amounts of ubiquinol. Research has shown that many people with heart of brain diseases have serum CoQ10 levels that are lower than those of healthy people. Correcting such deficiencies often can produce significant results. However, these diseases become more common as we age – right at the time our ability to convert CoQ10 to its active form, ubiquinol, declines.

 

Q. How might ubiquinol be important for the heart?

A. Heart Health: A study on patients admitted to the hospital with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) found that CoQ10 can provide rapid protective effects in patients with a heart attack if administered within three days of the onset of symptoms. Seventy-three patients received CoQ10 (120 mg/d). The study’s control group consisted of 71 similarly matched patients with acute AMI. After treatment, angina pectoris (severe chest pain signifying interrupted blood flow to the heart), total arRhythmias (dangerously irregular heartbeats), and poor function in the left ventricle (the essential chamber of the heart) were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden cardiac failure and nonfatal heart attacks also were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared with the placebo group.

In another study, CoQ10 was studied in 109 patients with high blood pressure (hypertension). The patients were given varying doses of supplemental CoQ10 with the goal of attaining a certain blood level (greater than 2.0 mcg/l). Most patients were on medications to treat hypertension. Half the patients were able to stop taking some or all of their prescription drugs at an average of 4.4 months after starting CoQ10. The 9.4% of patients who had echocardiograms, performed both before and during treatment, experienced a highly significant improvement in heart wall thickness and function. This improvement was directly attributed to CoQ10 supplementation.

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating disease that affects 5 million people in the U.S. It causes edema, difficult breathing, and impaired circulation. In another study, CoQ10 restored healthy heart function in CHF patients. Patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the investigators introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of patients’ hearts to determine the degree of CHF damage to the heart muscle. The patients’ heart muscles at rest and work improved significantly. The researchers concluded CHF patients would greatly benefit from adjunctive CoQ10 treatment. Since ubiquinol is the active form of CoQ10, it may be able to overcome the hurdles to providing maximum impact, most importantly, age and genetic related inefficiencies in converting CoQ10 to active CoQ10 (Ubiquinol).

 

And Neurological Health?: A study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health showed that supplementing with CoQ10 in a unique delivery system was associated with a slowing of the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Participants were divided into 4 groups and their physical skills (coordination, walking, etc) and mental skills were evaluated. Each group then received 300 mg, 600 mg, or 1200 mg of a special form of chewable CoQ10, or a placebo. The researchers evaluated the participants after 1, 4,8, 12, and 16 months of treatment. Each participant was again scored on motor, mental, and activities of daily living skills.

The results of the study showed that the people who took the highest dosage of CoQ10-1200 mg-experienced the least decline in their physical abilities. The results were so encouraging that the researchers will be continuing with new studies, suing higher dosages to see if the results can get even better.

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating and degenerative inherited disease that is always fatal. In fact, no other medication, drug, or nutritional supplement has ever been shown to cause a decline in the progression of this terrible disease. A study compared CoQ10 against remacemide (an investigational HD drug made by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals), in 347 HD patients who were in the early stages of the disease. Remacemide blocks glutamate, the neurotransmitter scientists think may cause the death of brain cells that occurs in Huntington’s disease. While remacemide had no effect on the progression of HD, CoQ10 showed a trend toward slowing the disease by an average of 15%. This meant the HD group taking CoQ10 was able to handle every day activities of life a little longer than the patients taking remacemide or a placebo. They also were able to focus their attention better, were less depressed, and less irritable.

The 15% slowing of decline can result in about one more year of independence of HD patients. Needless to say, the gift of an additional year of health in the lives of HD patients is incredibly significant.

Because of these impressive results, researchers are hopeful that supplemental CoQ10 will have beneficial effects for people with other neurological diseases such as ALS and Alzheimer’s disease, too. Studies are under way to confirm these effects.

Using the active form of CoQ10 helps to assure that, regardless of age or illness, the CoQ10 can have the greatest impact.

 

Q. What have been the results of research studies with Ubiquinol?

A. One of the most interesting effects of Ubiquinol that has been reported so far is its ability to slow the physical signs of aging. In laboratory studies, administration of stable ubiquinol to mice forestalled the changes associated with aging – rounded spine, patchy fur and irritated eyes. While the mice who received ubiquinol did not necessarily live longer than the mice that didn’t, they lived better. But it is important to note that these mice were bred to die at a young age. Human studies are needed to determined true impact on longevity.

Additionally, supplemental, stable ubiquinol has been shown to increase physical energy and stamina. In an animal study, the length of time rats were able to run on a treadmill before getting tired was measured. The same rats were then given ubiquinol and the treadmill test was repeated. The length of time the rats were able to run before tiring increased 150 times.

 

Q. How can one supplement have applications for neurological diseases, heart health, and even the immune system?

A. Supplements often have more than one function, especially when it’s a substance like CoQ10, which is present in all parts of the body. All nucleated cells (most cells other than red blood cells) have mitochondria and all cells require energy to function. CoQ10 is vital to ATP production. Thus, CoQ10 has applications not only in neurological (neurons or nervous system cells) and cardiac health (myocardium or heart tissue), but also for the immune system.

 

Q. Should I take CoQ10 or ubiquinol? How much should I take?

A. While everyone can benefit from CoQ10 or ubiquinol supplementation, it appears that ubiquinol should be the first choice for older adults, people with known genetic inefficiencies in converting CoQ10 to ubiquinol, and for people with serious heart disease or neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, who are otherwise supplementing with high levels of CoQ10. For people in overall good health, a high quality CoQ10 supplement with proven absorption is a good choice.

Take 200 to 300 mg of CoQ10 or 100 mg ubiquinol daily, depending on your health history. The safety of both forms has been tested, and no significant side effects reported. Occasional mild stomach upset may occur. Taking your CoQ10 or ubiquinol with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

 

Conclusion
CoQ10 is not the only answer to the complex issues of heart disease, neurological diseases, or immune dysfunction; however, research indicates that it’s a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagines. The more we study this naturally occurring compound, the more benefits we find. And with this new ability to provide CoQ10 in its active form, ubiquinol, for the first time, even greater benefits may be derived.

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The Vital Role of Magnesium in Natural Calm
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Date: June 01, 2007 10:20 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Vital Role of Magnesium in Natural Calm

Natural Calm Magnesium has an important role in essentially every life function. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve activity, keeps heart Rhythms steady, supports a healthy immune system and keeps bones strong. Magnesium also helps maintain blood sugar levels in the normal range, promotes normal blood pressure and is involved in energy metabolism.

Yet many of us are not getting the Recommended Daily Allowance of magnesium. The result can be negative health effects, such as lack of energy, PMS and hormonal imbalances, occasional sleep disturbance, minor pain, muscle tension, muscle spasms and cramps, impaired bone density, and anxiety, nervousness or irritability.

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Too Little Magnesium Can Cause Health Problems
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Date: April 20, 2007 12:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Too Little Magnesium Can Cause Health Problems

The Recommended Daily Allowance of magnesium (which is the minimum level needed to stave off deficiency symptoms not the maximum level) varies by age and gender:

Children 1 to 3 years: 80mg, Children 4 to 8 years: 130mg, Children 9 to 13 years: 240mg

Boys 14 to 18: 410mg, Girls 14 to 18: 360mg

Men 19 to 30: 400mg, Men 31 plus: 420mg

Women 19 to 30: 310mg, Women 31 plus: 320mg

Pregnant women 19 to 30: 350mg, pregnant women 31 plus: 360mg

A survey conducted by The Gallup Organization found that 72 percent of adult Americans fall short of the Recommended Dietary Allowance of magnesium.

Because magnesium is required for hundreds of enzymatic reactions (enzymes are protein molecules that stimulate every chemical reaction in the body), deficiency can cause a wide variety of symptoms, such as low energy, fatigue, weakness, PS and hormonal imbalance, inability to sleep, weakening bones, muscle tension, spasms and cramps, abnormal heart Rhythms, headaches, anxiousness, nervousness and irritability.

Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of The Miracle of Magnesium states: “The recommended daily allowance (RDA) is about 350mg per day, but most researchers say you need two and three times that amount, partly because it’s not in foods. If it is in foods, if you cook and process the foods in any way, you lose magnesium.”

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CoQ10 for Heart Health
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Date: March 28, 2007 12:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CoQ10 for Heart Health

CoQ10 for Heart Health

 

More than 40% of all deaths in the U.S. are from cardiovascular disease (CVD). You have a greater chance of dying from heart disease than from cancer, AIDS, diabetes, and accidents combined. More than 2,600 Americans die each day of CVD – an average of 1 death every 33 seconds. One in 5 men and women have some form of CVD. If all forms of major CVD were eliminated, life expectancy would rise by almost 7 years.

One of the most – if not the most – important things people can do to improve their overall health and life expectancy is to improve their heart health. Diet, exercise, and the wise use of dietary supplements can improve heart health dramatically. One dietary supplement that’s extremely beneficial to heart health is coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10).

 

Q. What is CoQ10?

A. CoQ10 is a natural, fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all cells. CoQ10 also is known as ubiquinone. That’s because CoQ10 is ubiquitous and exists everywhere there is life. CoQ10 is vital to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. ATP is the energy-rich compound used for all energy-requiring processes in the body. Although COQ10 is produced by the body and exists in some dietary sources, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirements. CoQ10 levels diminish with age and as a result of dietary inadequacies and various disease states. Also, some drugs, especially a group of cholesterol-lowering prescription drugs known as “statin,” (Pravachol, Zocor, Lipitor, etc.) significantly reduce CoQ10 levels in the body.

 

Q. For what health conditions is CoQ10 used?

A. CoQ10 is beneficial in treating and preventing CVD and conditions such as high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), angina, and congestive heart failure (CHF). It’s been shown that heart attacks tend to occur when CoQ10 levels are low in the body. In addition, CoQ10 is beneficial for diabetes, immune dysfunction, cancer, periodontal disease, prostate cancer, and neurological disease.

 

Q. Why is CoQ10 especially important to heart health?

A. The heart is one of the most metabolically active tissues in the body. In the average person, the heart propels 2,000 gallons of blood through 65,000 miles of blood vessls by beating 100,000 times each day. Thus, it requires large amounts of uninterrupted energy. Heart cells have a greater number of mitochondria, and subsequently, more CoQ10 than any other type of cell. Each heart cell can have thousands of mitochondria to meet these energy demands.

 

Mitochondria are highly specialized structures within each cell and are often referred to as cell powerhouses. These tiny energy-produces produce 95% of the energy the body requires. The number of mitochondria in a cell depends on its function and energy needs. A cell’s ATP production is dependent on adequate amounts of CoQ10.

 

Heart disease patients are commonly CoQ10 deficient. Correcting such deficiencies often can produce amazing results. The presence of supplemental CoQ10 is a key to the heart’s optimum performance.

In people who have had a heart attack (myocardial infarction), CoQ10 assists in repairing the heart muscle and restoring heart function. This is due to increased ATP production.

 

Q. What studies support this fact?

A. A 1998 study found CoQ10 can provide rapid protective effects in patients with a heart attack if administered within three days of the onset of symptoms. The study focused on patients admitted to the hospital with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) diagnosis. Seventy-three patients received CoQ10 (120 mg/d). The study’s control group consisted of 71 similarly matched patients with acute AMI. After treatment, angina pectoris (severe chest pain signifying interrupted blood flow to the heart), total arRhythmias (dangerously irregular heartbeats), and poor function in the left ventricle (the essential chamber of the heart) were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden cardiac failure and nonfatal heart attacks also were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared with the placebo group.

 

In another study, CoQ10 was studied in 109 patients with high blood pressure (hypertension). The patients were given varying doses of supplemental CoQ10 with the goal of attaining a certain blood level (greater than 2.0 mcg/l). Most patients were on medications to treat hypertension. Half the patients were able to stop taking one to three antihypertensive drugs at an average of 4.4 months after starting CoQ10. Only 3% of patients required the addition of one antihypertensive drug. The 9.4% of patients who have echo cardiograms, performed both before and during treatment, experienced a highly significant improvement in heart wall thickness and function. This improvement was directly attributed to CoQ10 supplementation.

 

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating disease that affects 5 million people in the U.s. It causes edema, difficult breathing, and impaired circulation. In another study, CoQ10 restored healthy heart function in CHF patients. Patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the investigators introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of patients’ hearts to determine the degree of CHF damage to the heart muscle. The patients’ heart muscles at rest and work improved significantly. The researchers concluded CHF patients would greatly benefit from adjunctive CoQ10 treatment.

 

Q. I’ve heard that CoQ10 can also help people who have neurological diseases. Is this true?

A. Yes, it is. CoQ10 has been studied for its ability to improve the health of individuals with amotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. A recently completed study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health showed that CoQ10 caused a slowing of the progression of Huntington’s disease, a devastating and degenerative disease that is always fatal. In fact, no other medication, drug, or nutritional supplemental has ever been shown to cause a decline in the progression of this terrible disease.

 

The study compared CoQ10 against remacemide (an investigational HD drug made by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals), in 347 HD patients who were in the early stages of the disease. Remacemide blocks glutamate, the neurotransmitter scientists think may cause the death of brain cells that occurs in Huntington’s disease. While remacemide had no effect on the progression of HD, CoQ10 showed a trend toward slowing the disease by an average of 15%. This meant the HD group taking CoQ10 was able to handle every day activities of life a little longer than the patients taking remacemide or a placebo. They also were able to focus their attention better, were less depressed, and less irritable. The 15% slowing of decline means that CoQ10 can result in about one more year of independence for HD patients. Needless to say, the gift of an additional year of health in the lives of HD patients is incredibly significant.

 

Because of these impressive results with HD, researchers are hopeful that the studies of CoQ10 in those with ALS and Parkinson’s disease will similarly have a positive effect on the symptoms and/or progression of these neurological disorders, too.

 

Q. Why is it crucial for a CoQ10 supplement to cross the blood-brain barrier?

A. The brains’ blood vessels are composed of cells with extremely tight junctions. These junctions form the blood-brain barrier, which restricts what can pass from the bloodstream into the brain. While this barrier protects the brain, it can be a significant obstacle to central nervous system therapy. To leave the bloodstream and reach the brain cells, a substance must pass through the tightly connected cells of the capillary walls. Only substances with unique solubilities or those with a transport system can cross the blood-brain barrier to a significant degree. As a result, crossing the blood-brain barrier presents a significant challenge to supporting neurological health.

 

While most CoQ10 supplements enter the bloodstream and increase blood serum levels, only special forms of CoQ10 have been shown to cross the blood-brain barrier. For CoQ10 to enter the mitochondria within the brain, CoQ10 must first cross the blood-brain barrier to produce significant neurosupportive clinical results.

 

Q. How can one supplement have applications for neurological diseases, heart health, and even the immune system?

A. Supplements often have more than one function, especially when it’s a substance like CoQ10, which is present in all parts of the body. All nucleated cells (most cells other than red blood cells) have mitochondria and all cells require energy to function. CoQ10 is vital to ATP production. Thus, CoQ10 has applications not only in neurological (neurons or nervous system cells) and cardiac health (myocardium or heart tissue), but also for the immune system.

 

Q. Are all CoQ10 supplements created equal? Doesn’t CoQ10 just have to get into the bloodstream to be effective?

A. There are some important distinctions among CoQ10 products, as they vary greatly in quality and absorbability. It’s crucial to find a CoQ10 product that’s:

 

1. Scientifically shown to absorb through the digestive tract, cross cellular membranes, and increase mitochondrial levels of CoQ10. Chewable forms of CoQ10 provide rapid bioavailability and absorption. Serum level determination of CoQ10 in the bloodstream is not necessarily the most important measure of efficacy. For a CoQ10 supplement to be fully effective, it must cross the cellular barrier and raise intracellular CoQ10 levels. A key indicator of effective CoQ10 supplementation is its presence in cell mitochondria.

 

2. The natural form of CoQ10. The natural process uses living organisms. CoQ10 also can be synthesized by a chemical process, which produces a distinctly different product that contains chemical compounds not found in the natural form.

 

3. Formulated with ingredients that provide the transport system CoQ10 needs to cross cellular membranes and the blood-brain barrier. Not all forms of CoQ10 have been scientifically proven to cross cell membranes and the blood-brain barrier. Some prestigious groups that have investigated this issue include researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

 

4. Studied by respected organizations, with research published in peer-reviewed journals by reputable scientists.

 

Q. How much CoQ10 should I take?

A. Take 100 to 200 mg of CoQ10 daily, depending on your family history of heart disease and personal heart disease experience.

 

CoQ10’s safety has been evaluated. Dosages in studies have ranged from 100 mg to 1,200 mg per day. To date, no toxicities have been reported. Occasional mild stomach upset may occur. Taking CoQ10 with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

 

Q. What are some other heart-friendly supplements?

A. CoQ10 is an excellent supplement for overall cardiovascular health, as in L-carnitine. L-carnitine is the naturally occurring form of carnitine that’s found in food and synthesized in the body. Much of the body’s L-carnitine is found in the heart and skeletal muscle, tissues that rely on fatty acid oxidation for most of their energy. Nearly 70% of the energy needed for heart function is derived from fatty acid breakdown. Proper L-carnitine supplementation transports fatty acids into cell mitochondria, where it’s burned for energy. L-carnitine is an excellent addition to CoQ10, especially for people with heart disease, and has been shown to improve many symptoms associated with CVD. In one study, people who had experienced one heart attack received either L-carnitine or placebo. The L-carnitine group had a statistically significant reduction in second heart attacks, and improved overall survival.

 

Q. What supplements support healthy blood pressure and cholesterol?

A. In addition to maintaining overall cardiovascular health, it’s also important to address your essential fats/lipids levels and healthy circulation/blood pressure. Fish oil supplements can significantly reduce blood pressure, cholesterol, and homocysteine levels. Choose a supplement that’s a rich source of EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids naturally obtainable in fish oil. Find a product that’s been clinically studied and purified to ensure it contains the beneficial active constituents of the whole oil, while removing any dioxins, DDT, PCBs, or heavy metals, toxins present in some commercial fish oil preparations. An enteric-coated garlic product that provides a minimum of 5,000 mcg of beneficial allicin supports healthy blood pressure and circulation. And magnesium, niacin, vitamin E, folic acid, hawthorn extract, and L-cysteine provide overall nutritional support to the heart and vascular system.

 

Conclusion

CoQ10 is not the only answer to the complex issues of heart disease, neurological disease, or immune dysfunction; however, research indicates that it’s a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagined. The more we study this naturally occurring compound, the more benefits we find.

The key to this supplement is the manufacturing quality. For safety and overall effectiveness, use a CoQ10 product that’s supported by product-specific research from reputable institutions. Choose tested products from a well-respected company to increase your potential to achieve and maintain heart and blood vessel health.

Supplementation with clinically studied products can have a major impact on your heart’s health and strength. However, no supplement replaces the need to eat a healthful diet low in refined foods (especially sugar), and saturated fats, and to exercise your most important muscle – your heart – on a regular basis.

 

 



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Buy Quality Discount CoQ10 at Vitanet ®

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For Better Heart Health ...
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Date: February 06, 2007 12:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: For Better Heart Health ...

Nutrients Every Heart Needs

 

High blood pressure. High cholesterol levels. Ever increasing stress. All are factors related to the development of heart disease – the leading cause of death for both men and women. In fact, 1 in 2 women in the United States die of heart disease or stroke, while 1 in 30 dies of breast cancer. If current trends remain unchanged, not only will heart disease remain the primary killer in our country, the number of people it claims will steadily and dramatically increase in the next 20 years.

 

Fortunately, heart disease is a problem you can do something about. Proven ways to prevent or mitigate the effects of heart disease include taking targeted nutritional supplements, making changes in the foods we eat, exercising most days of the week, drinking in moderation, eliminating tobacco use and adapting a positive attitude. Research shows that those of us who are often angry and depressed have more heart disease than people that live their lives with a more positive outlook.

 

In this Ask the Doctor, we’ll talk about specific nutritional supplements that are heart healthy, whether your goal is to prevent heart disease or reduce the effects of heart disease if you currently have it.

 

Q. I am trying hard to live a healthier life. But it all seems so overwhelming. How do I start?

A. It may help to know that you’re not alone in feeling overwhelmed. Lots of people feel this way. This is why the Centers for Disease Control and the American Heart Association are both urging people to prevent heart disease by identifying their individual health risk factors.

 

A risk factor is an indicator of whether or not you may develop a certain health condition. In heart disease prevention, there are two kinds of risk factors. There are risk factor you can control – such as diet, exercise, and the supplements you take. There are also risk factors you can’t change or control –your age, race, and gender, as well as your family’s history of heart disease.

 

Examples can be really helpful. Let’s follow three adults – Fred, Jane, and Earl – and determine their risk factors.

 

Low Risk

Fred is 32, single, has a job he loves, has an optimistic attitude about his life, and works out 5 days a week. Most days Fred’s diet is fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low fat. Occasionally Fred will eat a cheeseburger and fries when he watches the game with his buddies. Fred’s risk factors are his male gender and the occasional high fat content in his diet.

 

Moderate Risk

Jane is 55, a lawyer, married, and has a very stressful job. Jane eats lots of salads, fruits, and whole grains. However, her job requires her to work long hours which leaves little time to exercise. Jane is for the most part happy with her life, but her work stress had led to times of negativity. Her father had a heart attack when he was 56. Jane’s risk factors include her age (greater than 50), negativity from job stress, lack of regular exercise, and a family history of heart disease.

 

High Risk

Earl is 65, married, and has just retired from a job he hated. He spends most of his day watching TV and eating potato chips and other high fat, salty snacks. Earl has told his friends and family since he worked so hard for so long, he is sure to drop dead soon after retiring. He has high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Earl’s father had a heart attack and died when he was 73. Earl’s risk is his male gender, age (greater than 50), sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, negative outlook on life, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and a family history of heart disease.

 

Q. OK, it’s pretty easy to see that Fred needs to watch his diet, Jane needs to exercise more, and Earl needs lots of help. But, which supplements should they take?

A. The Whole Heart Nutrition chart is an easy way to determine the supplements each risk level needs. As you can see, everyone wanting to prevent heart disease – Fred, Jane, Earl, you, and I – need to take quality heart formula multivitamin, garlic, and a fish oil supplement providing Omega-3 fatty acids. CoQ10 is also a smart choice for complete heart heath support.

 

Q. Why do we all need to take a “heart multivitamin”? Why can’t we take a regular multivitamin to prevent heart disease?

A. Since the human heart simply cannot function without adequate amounts of certain vitamins and minerals, it seems logical that a multivitamin would be the foundation of good nutrition for your heart. Heart-health formulated multivitamins provide the exact nutrients needed to prevent heart disease.

 

That’s why we need to take a specially formulated heart-focused multi-vitamin. The cells and the tissues that make up the heart must have vitamins C, A, and E, as well as B1, B6, and B12 to function. Folic acid, the little B vitamin that is so crucial in preventing spina bifida (a birth defect), breast cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease is also needed to keep heart muscles strong. The B vitamins and folic acid are very important to heart health because they help lower homocysteine levels. Homocysteine is a potential and emerging cardiac risk factor,

 

Magnesium is a mighty mineral and healthy hearts need it every day. Aloha lipoic acid, a fatty acid, provides protection against heart cholesterol and high blood pressure. Lutein and lycopene are all-natural nutrients and keep our arteries free from the buildup of plaque, a condition linked to heart attacks and strokes.

 

Multivitamins formulated with these exact vitamins, minerals, and nutrients will work with medications often prescribed to treat heart disease and provide the nutrition our hearts need.

 

Q. Don’t all multivitamins work with medications prescribed to treat heart disease?

A. Many multivitamin formulas contain herbs and other nutrients that can interfere with prescription medications, especially mediations prescribed to treat heart disease. One multivitamin does not fit all.

The more risk factors you have, the greater your chance of developing heart disease.

Factors you CAN’T change

 

Increasing age

About four out of five people who die of coronary heart disease are 65 or older.

Male gender

Men have more heart attacks than women. Even after menopause, when women’s death rate from heart disease increases, men continue to have more heart attacks until both groups reach their 80s.

Heredity (including Race)

While heart disease has often been noted to occur in families, recent research has shown this link may be the result of environment more than heredity. In other words, your dad’s high blood pressure and your high blood pressure may be related more to your mutual love of salty foods than your genetics. African Americans tend to have very high blood pressure and a higher risk of heart attacks than other races.

Factors you CAN change

 

Tobacco smoke

Smokers have twice the risk of heart attack than nonsmokers.

High blood cholesterol

As blood cholesterol rises, so does the risk of heart disease.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure increases the heart’s workload, causing the heart to thicken and become stiffer.

Physical inactivity

Exercise most days of the week helps prevent heart disease. The more vigorous the activity, the greater your benefits.

Obesity and overweight

People who have excess body fat are more likely to develop heart disease and stroke even if they have no other risk factors.

Individual coping styles

Research has shown there is al ink between heart disease risk and stress, happiness, negativity, and socioeconomic status.

Alcohol consumption

Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure. However, the risk of heart disease in people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol (an average of one drink for women or two drinks for men per day) is lower than in nondrinkers.

 

Q. What can garlic supplements do for Fred, Jane and Earl or other people with low to high risk factors?

A. Garlic supplements have a very long and very successful history of preventing premature death from heart attacks. Lately, however, there have been some conflicting news stories about supplemental garlic’s ability to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure – the causes of heart disease and death. That’s because many different garlic supplements have been used in these studies – garlic oil, garlic powder, aged garlic extract, and supplements made from fresh garlic. They have all been studied clinically for their effects in heart disease.

 

The best garlic supplements (and the ones that showed the best effects in garlic studies) contain alliin, which is then converted to allicin. Allicin is the compound that lowers harmfully high cholesterol levels and dangerous blood pressure readings. Allicin is also responsible for garlic’s characteristic odor. Because alliin is very stable when dry, properly prepared and enteric coated fresh garlic preparations preserve the allicin-producing action until the garlic mixes with the fluids of the intestinal tract. Fresh garlic extract’s enteric coating also prevents garlic breath. In contrast, aged garlic contains absolutely no allicin or allicin potential. This fact is probably responsible for the poor results noted in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure from aged garlic preparations.

 

The most effective garlic supplements are made from fresh garlic, enteric coated, and provide a daily dose of at least 10 milligrams (mg) alliin or a total allicin potential of 4,000 micrograms (mcg). Taking a once-daily garlic supplement that delivers 4,000 mcg of allicin will lower Jane’s and Earl’s high blood pressure and Earl’s high cholesterol, naturally and effectively.

 

Whole Heart Nutrition

Supplement

Low Risk

Moderate Risk

High Risk

Heart multivitamin

Every day

Every day

Every day

Garlic supplement 4,000 mcg allicin

1 tablet each day

1 tablet each day

1 tablet each day

Fish oil supplement with omega-3 fatty acids

600 mg each day

1200 mg each day

1800 mg each day

CoQ10

60 mg

100-200 mg each day

200-400 mg each day

Each additional risk factor requires additional supplements or increased doses for protection from heart disease.

 

Q. What about fish oil supplements? I know they can prevent heart disease but I’ve also heard they contain harmful substances, too.

A. You’re right on both counts. But, there are excellent fish oil supplements naturally loaded with Omega-3 fatty acids, powerful nutrients that prevent heart disease, that are also certified free of harmful contaminants.

 

In the 1980s, researchers first began noticing the native Inuit (Eskimo) populations of Greenland and Alaska had hardly and heart disease despite a very high-fat diet. The deep-water fish that these peoples eat (and continue to eat to this day) are indeed quite fatty. But, this kind of fat, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids actually protects the heart instead of harming it.

 

Research has shown that the Omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil supplements can:

-Reduce the risk of arRhythmias, lethal heartbeat Rhythms that cause sudden death.

-Lower the levels of triglycerides, fats in the blood that can increase a person’s

risk of dying from a heart attack, even if a person’s cholesterol levels are normal.

-Slow atherosclerosis – the growth of harmful plaque on artery walls.

Atherosclerosis develops over many years. If the plaque growth is slow and

stable, chances are low that a heart attack will result. However, rapidly growing

or unstable plaques can rupture. The body responds with inflammation, which

causes blood clots to form. These blood clots block the artery and cause a heart

attack.

-Keep blood pressure levels low. Many people have high blood pressure for years

without knowing it. That’s because it has no symptoms. Uncontrolled high

blood pressure can lead to stroke, heart attack, heart failure, and kidney failure.

While 25% of Americans have high blood pressure, nearly one-third of these

people don’t know they have it. This is why high blood pressure is often called

the “silent killer.”

 

You can get all of this heart disease preventive protection from just 600-1800 mg of fish oil. It’s pretty simple to see why Fred, Jane, Earl, and you and I need to take fish oil supplements every day.

 

However, it is absolutely critical that the fish oil supplement you take is free of contaminants and guaranteed fresh! Make sure that the manufacturer of the fish oil supplement you buy is able to provide documentation of purity in their product. Supplements should contain no detectable dioxin (a widely used toxic preservative), DDT (a toxic insecticide), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) or heavy metals such as mercury and lead.

 

Before you buy any fish oil supplement, ask the clerk if you can open the bottle or jar and smell the contents. A fishy smelling fish oil supplementation means it is rancid. Rancid fish oil is not going to help your heart at all and may actually hurt it.

 

Q. That leaves CoQ10. Why is it important for Jane and Earl?

A. CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone, is the premier heart supplement! CoQ10 is part of our energy producing system. It works directly in the mitochondria of each cell. Mitochondria are highly specialized structures within each cell and are often referred to as powerhouses. These tiny energy producers generate 95% of the energy the body requires. The number of mitochondria in a cell depends on its function and energy needs. The heart has very important functions and requires a vast amount of energy. Thus, the heart has a lot of mitochondria or little powerhouses.

 

CoQ10 is incredibly crucial to the health of our hearts. Especially to hearts that are pumping blood with too much cholesterol. But, in a dangerous paradox, CoQ10 levels can become dangerously depleted when physicians treat high cholesterol in their patients with certain medications. The so-called “statin” drugs (Mevacor/lovastatin and Crestor/rosubastatin are two examples) are powerful and medications prescribed to lower harmful cholesterol levels. However, one very harmful side effect they share is that they deprive cells of CoQ10. While some physicians are aware of this serious side effect and tell their patients to take at least 400 mg of CoQ10 each day, most are not. The result? Any good the statin drugs may be doing is actually negated by their depletion of CoQ10.

 

Q. How does CoQ10 actually work? Has it been studied in heart disease?

A. Yes, it has! CoQ10 has been extensively studied in heart disease. This natural nutrient is present in every nucleated cell in our body (the only cells that don’t contain CoQ10 are red blood cells). Heart cells, however, are absolutely loaded with CoQ10. Its job is fairly simply – CoQ10 is vital to the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the compound our body uses for 95% of its energy needs.

 

In 1998, 144 patients who had been admitted to the hospital after a heart attack, participated in a CoQ10 study. Half of the patients received 120 mg of CoQ10 a day in addition to the usual treatments given to heart attack patients. The other half, the control group, received the usual treatments and a placebo, but no CoQ10.

 

The results showed that the group taking CoQ10 had less irregular heartbeat, experienced less angina (a type of heart pain), and had much better function in the left ventricle (the most essential chamber of the heart), compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden heart failure or another heart attack were also reduced in the CoQ10 group.

 

Q. What if I have already been diagnosed with Congestive Heart Failure? Will CoQ10 still help me?

A. CoQ10 has been proven in study after study to help slow down the destruction that occurs in congestive heart failure (CHF), a serious heart disease, and heal the heart muscles damaged by heart attacks. In fact, heart attacks often occur when the body’s CoQ10 levels are low.

 

In a CHF study, patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the researchers introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of the patients’ hearts to determine the degree of muscle damage CHF had caused. In the group who took CoQ10, the pumping ability of the heart improved significantly. The placebo group’s hearts did not. The researchers conducting the study recommended that people with CHF add CoQ10 to the other medications they need to take to stay alive and well.

 

Q. Are some types of CoQ10 better than others?

A. Indeed they are. CoQ10 products are not created equally. The key to this natural medicine is the quality of the manufacturing. Take a CoQ10 supplement that’s been used in research conducted by prestigious universities (it will tell you this right on the label). Researchers want the best CoQ10 for their studies. You want the best CoQ10 for yourself and your loved ones.

 

The best CoQ10 has to meet the following criteria:

1. Must be easily absorbed during the digestion process so that it can get into the

bloodstream.

2. Must reach the mitochondria in the cell.

3. Must be proven effective in studies.

4. Must be safe and free of impurities.

 

Q. It sounds as if CoQ10 is only for people with moderate or high risk factors. Can others benefit from this supplement?

A. Many people, including those like Fred with low risk factors or no risk of heart disease take CoQ10 every day. CoQ10 supplements may reduce your risk of cancer, prevent gum disease, and help certain nerve cells work more effectively.

 

Conclusion

Understanding your personal risk factors, making it better lifestyle choices, taking a multivitamin formulated for your heart, an enteric-coated fresh garlic supplement, fish oil supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids, and CoQ10 – the heart’s super-nutrient – can help keep your heart healthy and strong.

 

Helen Keller, the famous lecturer and author, who was both blind and deaf wrote, “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot e seen or even touched. They must be felt with the human heart.”

 

Healthy hearts have the most opportunities to “feel” the best and are the most beautiful thing our world has to offer.

 



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HDL Booster - Boost your good cholesterol
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Date: March 16, 2006 12:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HDL Booster - Boost your good cholesterol

 

                                      

 

 

HDL BOOSTER

(Product No. 02922)

 

 

 

DESCRIPTION:

 

HDL Booster is a physician-developed dietary supplement that has been clinically shown to increase good cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-2, the best form of cholesterol.* The formula combines essential vitamins and minerals, at levels recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA), with key amino acids, powerful antioxidants, and traditional herbal extracts to provide superior support for cardiovascular health.*  

 

HDL Booster:

 

·         Formulated by Dr. Dennis Goodman, Chief of Cardiology at Scripps Memorial Hospital

·         Clinically studied to increase good cholesterol levels up to 23%*1

·         All-inclusive formula; includes ingredients recommended in accordance with the American Heart Association

·         Replaces the CoQ10 depleted by cholesterol lowering (statin) drugs.*2

 

STRUCTURE/FUNCTION:

 

HDL Booster has been clinically shown to increase HDL cholesterol levels.* HDL Booster also supports healthy cholesterol and healthy triglyceride levels already within the normal ranges.* By reducing C-reactive protein levels, HDL Booster helps support the body’s natural anti-inflammatory response.*  

 

FORMULA:

 

Two tablets (one serving) contain:

 

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)                                                          148 mg

Vitamin E (as natural mixed tocopherols)                                    35 IU

Niacin (as niacinamide)                                                              21 mg

Vitamin B6 (as pyridoxine HCl)                                                  3 mg

Folic Acid                                                                                 301 mcg

Vitamin B12 (as cyanocobalamin)                                              20 mcg

Magnesium (from magnesium amino acid chelate)                       10 mg

Selenium (as L-selenomethionine)                                               49 mcg

Proprietary Blend                                                                      388 mg

   hawthorn (Crategus oxyacantha) berry extract,         

   taurine, garlic (Allium sativum) bulb, grape seed (Vitis

   vinifera) extract, grape skin (Vitis vinifera) extract,

   N-acetyl-L-cysteine, alpha-lipoic acid, soy (Glycine

   max) isoflavones, tocotrienols

L-Arginine (as L-arginine HCl)                                                  153 mg

L-Carnitine (as L-carnitine L-tartrate)                                        51 mg

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)(ubiquinone 10)                         25 mg

Policosanol                                                                                7 mg

 

Other ingredients: See label for most current information.

 

Contains no: sugar, salt, yeast, wheat, gluten,  corn, dairy products, artificial coloring, artificial flavoring, or preservatives.  This product contains natural ingredients; color variations are normal. 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Cholesterol, the soft, waxy substance present among the lipids (fats) in the bloodstream and in all cells, is important for wide variety of physiological functions. It is essential for the formation of cellular membranes, necessary for the production of bile salts, and also plays a role in the synthesis of certain hormones.3-5

 

Cholesterol is both produced by the body and obtained from food. Endogenous cholesterol is formed by human cells, particularly liver cells, whereas exogenous cholesterol is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract from food.3,4

 

Because cholesterol can not be metabolized for energy, it must be removed from the body once it has served its function. The major route of removal is through the liver, where it is processed and subsequently excreted from the body.3,4

 

Types of Cholesterol

 

Cholesterol is lipophilic (“fat loving” or water insoluble) by nature. It can not be dissolved in the blood, and must, therefore, be transported by carriers known as lipoproteins. These carriers are classified by density, with LDL (low density lipoproteins) and HDL (high density lipoproteins) being the most common.4,5

 

LDL is often referred to as “bad” cholesterol. LDLs carry cholesterol throughout the body. Conversely, HDL, or “good” cholesterol, is responsible for carrying cholesterol away from the arteries to the liver where it is eventually processed and eliminated from the body.3,4,6

 

Scientific studies have shown that both types of cholesterol are important indicators of cardiovascular health. But recent research, focusing on the beneficial subtypes of HDL, has found that certain fractions of HDL may be more supportive of cardiovascular health than others. The two most notably supportive HDL fractions are HDL-2 and HDL-3.7

 

The smaller HDL-3 is synthesized by the liver and intestines. This form, which is known as “free cholesterol-rich” HDL, scavenges or “scoops up” free cholesterol. The cholesterol is then chemically altered by the addition of an ester group. When sufficient cholesterol is esterified, HDL-3 becomes HDL-2, which is therefore referred to as “cholesterol ester-rich” HDL. HDL-2 is larger in size and has been shown to be more cardiosupportive than HDL-3.*7  

 

HOW IT WORKS:

 

HDL is known to possess antioxidant activity and to help balance the body’s natural anti-inflammatory response, both of which are important for cardiovascular health, but its most important function is the role it plays in cholesterol transport.6,8 High levels of HDL cholesterol are also associated with reduced platelet activity, another key indicator of arterial and venous health.9

 

Both HDL and LDL levels are important indicators of healthy cardiovascular function.* Therefore, supplements that increase the level of good cholesterol can profoundly impact heart health.* In 2002, an open label pilot study was conducted at Scripps Memorial Hospital to evaluate the effects of a proprietary supplement on lipid profiles. The dietary supplement, which mirrors HDL Booster and contains a combination of antioxidants, B-vitamins, amino acids, and botanical extracts, was developed by Dr. Goodman, the leading cardiologist at Scripps. The trial involved 50 people, who were evaluated prior to the study, then again at three and six months. After three months of supplementation, good cholesterol levels increased in all groups.* The changes were more pronounced at the six-month time point, where good cholesterol rose up to 23 percent and levels of HDL-2 (the best cholesterol) increased 50 percent in one subset of participants (HDL <40 mg/dL).*1 Additionally, the supplement also helped maintain healthy triglycerides levels that were already within the normal ranges.* Decreases in homocysteine, an amino acid found in the blood that plays a role in cardiovascular health, were observed as well.*1,10

 

The following chart summarizes the benefits of each of the ingredients in HDL Booster:

 

Ingredient

Benefit

Vitamin C

An antioxidant clinically shown to support the health of the cardiovascular system and increase HDL-2 cholesterol levels.*11,12 An important factor in many metabolic reactions, including the conversion of cholesterol to bile salts and the formation of healthy connective tissue. Vitamin C provides protection for the inner lining of the arteries.*13,14

Vitamin E

Another powerful antioxidant, which inhibits the oxidation of low density lipids by inactivating free radicals.* Thought to inhibit the breakdown of certain fatty acids that help form cell structures, especially membranes13

Also supports healthy cholesterol levels already within the normal range.*15,16

Niacin

In lipid metabolism, supports normal cholesterol production and metabolism to help retain healthy cholesterol levels that are already within normal limits.*13 Increases good cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-2 (the best cholesterol).*17 Through peripheral vasodilatation, niacin also supports the retention of healthy blood pressure that is already within the normal range.*13

Vitamin B6

An essential coenzyme for normal amino acid metabolism. In particular, vitamin B6 is necessary for the breakdown of homocysteine, an amino acid that plays a supporting role in cardiovascular health.* Also involved in the production of circulating antibodies.13 High levels of circulating vitamin B6 have been associated with reduced levels of C-reactive protein, another important indicator of heart health.*18

Folic Acid        

Another homocysteine lowering agent, folic acid is essential for the formation of red and white blood cells and involved in the synthesis of certain amino acids.*13

Vitamin B12

A ubiquitous coenzyme necessary for DNA synthesis. Also lowers homocysteine levels.*13

Magnesium

Increases HDL levels, supporting a healthy lipid profile, and helps maintain healthy blood pressure already within the normal limits.*19 Magnesium is a constituent of many coenzymes and is required for normal functioning of muscle and nervous tissue.20

Selenium

An essential trace mineral with powerful antioxidant capabilities.*20 Research has revealed that selenium supports cardiovascular function.*21

L-Arginine

An important amino acid and precursor to nitric oxide (NO), which is important for the health of the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems.*22 In clinical study, an L-arginine-enriched diet increased good cholesterol levels.*23

L-Carnitine      

A naturally occurring hydrophilic amino acid derivative, both produced in the kidneys and liver and derived from dietary sources. Along with coenzyme Q10, L-carnitine is a key factor in metabolism, supporting the production of cellular energy.*24 Also shown to increase good cholesterol (HDL) levels.*25 L-carnitine supports healthy blood flow.*26

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

A fat-soluble nutrient present in the mitochondria of virtually all cells, CoQ10 is an essential factor for cellular energy production.27 Also a powerful free radical scavenger, clinically shown support arterial health.*27,28

Supplementation significantly improves good cholesterol levels.*29 Additionally, CoQ10 supports healthy heart contractility and circulation.*

Policosanol

A unique mixture of essential alcohols, including octacosanol, tetracosanol, hexacosanol and triacontanol, derived from sugar cane.30 In a clinical study, supplementation resulted in a 14 percent increase in HDL cholesterol over an 8-week period.*31

Hawthorn Berry Extract

Helps retain healthy cholesterol levels already within the normal range.* Supports the muscle strength of the heart, helping to maintain healthy heart Rhythm, contractility, and vascular circulation.*32 A source of antioxidant constituents that protect against oxidative damage.* Supports the health of veins and arteries.*33,34 Also helps maintain healthy blood pressure levels already within the normal ranges.*

Taurine

An essential amino acid, present in high amounts in the brain, retina, myocardium, skeletal and smooth muscle, platelets and neutrophils. Possesses both antioxidant and membrane-supportive properties.*35 Helps maintain a healthy lipid profile by increasing good (HDL) cholesterol levels.*36,37

Garlic Bulb

A powerful antioxidant that possesses wide-ranging cardiovascular health benefits.*38 Clinically shown to increase good cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-2 cholesterol.* 39

Grape Seed Extract

A source of free-radical scavenging phytonutrients, known as polyphenols.* Promotes healthy circulation.* Also supports cardiovascular health by increasing HDL cholesterol levels*40,41

N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC)

A derivative of the amino acid, cysteine, NAC is a key intermediary in the conversion of cysteine into glutathione, one of the body’s primary cellular antioxidants.* Supports the health of the cardiovascular and immune systems.* Also shown to significantly increase in HDL cholesterol.*42

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

An antioxidant and vital cofactor necessary for the production of cellular energy, ALA helps recycle other important antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, CoQ10, and glutathione. Also helps maintain healthy blood flow and healthy heart contraction.*43

Soy Isoflavones

Provide antioxidant protection, supporting cardiovascular and immune system health.* Soy protein-enriched diet has been shown

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Molecularly Distilled Omega-3 fish Oil Fact Sheet
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Date: January 12, 2006 03:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Molecularly Distilled Omega-3 fish Oil Fact Sheet

Molecularly Distilled Omega-3 fish Oil Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 10/26/04

LIKELY USERS: Everyone consuming fast foods or diets high in vegetable oils; People with family history of heart disease or diabetes; People with inflammatory conditions

KEY INGREDIENT(S): Molecularly distilled fish oil concentrate

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES:
  • Cholesterol free
  • Natural lemon flavor
  • This oil is easier for many people to tolerate than other fish oils
  • Antioxidant blend of Rosemary Extract, Ascorbyl Palmitate and Natural Tocopherols
  • Natural triglyceride form (unlike some other brands using the ester form)
  • Manufactured and distilled in a pharmaceutical facility in Norway according to pharmaceutical protocols
  • Molecularly distilled and screened for the absence of potentially harmful levels of contaminants (i.e. mercury, heavy metals, PCB's, dioxins, etc.)
  • Derived from open sea catches of sardines and anchovies
  • Also available in unflavored enteric-coated capsules
OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES:
 
  • Molecular distillation removes impurities such as pesticides (PCBs, PCDFs, PCDDs, Dioxin) and heavy metals (mercury, lead)
  • Exceeds contaminant safety standards per CRN monograph and California state law
  • No trans-fats
  • Consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. (FDA evaluated the data and determined that, although there is scientific evidence supporting the claim, the evidence is not conclusive.)
  • Helps control triglycerides and prevent excessive clotting>
  • Promotes anti-inflammatory prostaglandins that also encourage dilation of blood vessels
  • Essential for brain, nerves, cell membranes and blood sugar metabolism
  • Aids in maintaining normal heart Rhythm

    AMOUNT TO USE: One teaspoon a day provides 740 mg. of EPA and 475 mg. of DHA. Use one or more teaspoons per day.

    SYNERGISTS: Other supplements used as cardiotonics include Vitamin E, CoQ10, magnesium, antioxidants, garlic, ginger, cayenne pepper, L-carnitine and hawthorn leaf and flower extract.

    CAUTIONS: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. But no cautions have been noted to date for pregnant or nursing women using fish oils, which are often recommended for pregnant and nursing women.

    Disclaimer:  These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.




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    Trace Minerals and Migraines
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    Date: November 16, 2005 12:02 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Trace Minerals and Migraines

    Trace Minerals and Migraines

    An increasingly large amount of disease today may be attributable to deficiencies in the supply of trace minerals in our diets.1 How can this be the case when the availability of food in our country is unprecedented, with a supermarket on every corner? These deficiencies do not stem from a lack of quantity of food, rather they stem from the quality of food. Trace minerals can be found mainly in whole, unprocessed foods such as vegetables and fruits. Unfortunately, the large majority of fruits and vegetables found in supermarkets today are nutritionally devoid of these minerals, largely in part to the high-yield farming practices in this and other countries.

    The mineral content of food is mainly dependent on the amount of minerals found in the soil in which it is grown. Current farming practices leave soils with less than optimal amounts of these minerals, especially the less common trace minerals. As a result of this, our food supplies leave us at risk for deficiencies of these very important substances. Because of this situation, it is essential that every person now supplement their diet with trace minerals in order to avoid the many diseases that are attributable to this scarcity. A lack of vital nutrients leaves the body unable to function fully, leaving it vulnerable to disease.

    Trace minerals have numerous roles. Oftentimes, because these minerals are found in such small quantities in the body, scientists and physicians have paid little attention to their importance in health and disease prevention. However, with the advent of improved science and the recognition of the efficacy of natural medicine, we are beginning to understand how vital these elements are to our health. Trace minerals, in a sense, are akin to the numerous tiny nails, nuts, and bolts that hold a house together. At first glance, a home is made of much more than these items. However, if they are slowly removed and never replaced, the house will continue to sag and finally fall apart. So it is the same with the smallest building blocks of our bodies. Trace minerals are important in the proper functioning of enzyme systems, nerve conduction and muscle function, assisting with transfer of nourishment into cells, providing the framework for tissues, and regulation of organ functions. These ‘behind the scenes’ functions are not possible without a constant, adequate supply of minerals. Even with the many multivitamin and mineral supplements available, most of these products fall short because they do not contain large enough amounts of the trace minerals that are so important to health.

    Physicians that specialize in natural medicine are some of the biggest proponents of trace mineral supplementation. This type of physician is attuned to the many subtleties of the functions of the human body, and oftentimes addresses health issues with nutritional therapeutics in an attempt to bring the body’s health back into balance. This process of balance, also known as homeostasis, occurs quite wonderfully all by itself, as long as the body has the proper fuel and building materials. Unfortunately, physicians are seeing more and more diseases, which can be attributed to the body’s inability to achieve this balance. This trend towards ill health is directly related to the dearth of nutritional value in our diets today.

    However, practitioners of natural medicine are very excited with the many dramatic turn-arounds toward health that many of their patients have experienced with the use of mineral supplementation. A common example of this is the treatment of migraine headaches with magnesium. Recent statistics suggest that 18 percent of women and six percent of men suffer from migraine and those numbers are increasing.2 The Centers for Disease Control reported a 60-percent increase in the disease from 1980 to 1989.3 Migraine headaches occur when the blood vessels in the brain spasm and constrict. Soon after this constriction occurs, the blood vessels then reflexively open, or dilate. When the vessels become dilated, they occupy more space in the brain, activating nearby pain receptors. It is speculated that an imbalance of mineral stores in the body can lead to this spasm of the blood vessels. Many researchers have suggested magnesium plays an important role in migraine attacks. The activities of magnesium in the body include preventing blood vessel spasm, inhibiting blood clotting, and stabilizing cell membranes, all of which are involved in migraine develoment4. Magnesium concentration exerts an effect on neurotransmitter production and receptors, pro-inflammatory molecules, and other migraine-related chemicals in the brain.5 Recent evidence suggests up to 50 percent of migraine patients have lowered levels of tissue magnesium during an acute migraine attack.6 Another study discovered brain magnesium concentrations were 19 percent lower in patients during migraine attack compared to healthy controls.7 Because recent research strongly indicates a magnesium deficiency in migraine headaches, natural medicine practitioners prescribe magnesium along with other trace minerals as a primary treatment for this condition with great success.

    Because of their widespread distribution throughout the metabolic workings of the human body, trace minerals are integral to the functioning of one of the body’s largest organ systems, the muscles. Mainly, magnesium plays a large role in the relaxation of muscles following their contraction. Without this vital nutrient, it would be impossible for the muscles of the human body to function. Muscle cramps are prevalent in western society due to lack of intake of an appropriate amount of minerals. One easy, straightforward cure for muscle cramping is supplementation with magnesium and other trace minerals, as they allow the muscles to function smoothly and correctly. The role of magnesium in relieving cramped muscles also makes it a highly appropriate therapy for the muscle pain associated with fibromyalgia, a condition that is often treated successfully by practitioners of natural medicine. These practitioners often use high doses of magnesium and other trace mineral combinations to reduce the painful and tender muscles that are so common in fibromyalgia patients.

    Another condition that is successfully treated with magnesium and trace minerals is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. People with this condition often experience profound muscle aches and weakness. It has been shown that in order for proper muscle contraction and relaxation to occur, magnesium and calcium need to be present in proper amounts in the body, which can be difficult to achieve even on a standard healthy diet. Additionally, magnesium and mineral supplementation may decrease the pain involved with sports-related injuries and excessive physical activity. As we use our muscular system, it is slowly depleted of these minerals, making replacement a top priority. Others signs of magnesium deficiency include disorientation, depression, tingling, numbness, seizures, abnormal heart Rhythms in addition to muscle spasms and cramps.8,9

    A minimum of at least 60 trace minerals has been demonstrated to be vital to health and well-being.10 This article has covered only a small fraction of the multitudes of health benefits of trace minerals. As science and natural medicine continues to uncover the many roles for all of these trace minerals, doctors are finding exciting solutions to several maladies that may be successfully treated by replacing these nutrients in the body. Unless we begin replacing these minerals early on in life, we put ourselves at risk for the many diseases of mineral deficiency that are becoming more and more prevalent in society today.

    References:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    1 Medical Nutrition from Marz, 2nd Edition. Omni-Press, 1997. Pps. 103-107

    2 Stewart WF, Lipton RB, Celentano DD, et al. Prevalence of migraine headache in the United States: relation to age, income, race, and other sociodemographic factors. JAMA 1992;267:64-69.

    3 Rappaport AM, Scheftell FD. Headache Disorders: A Management Guide for Practitioners. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Co.;1996:4.

    4 McCarty MF. Magnesium taurate and fish oil for prevention of migraine. Med Hypotheses 1996;47:461-466.

    5Sinclair, S. Migraine Headaches: Nutritional, Botanical And Other Alternative Approaches. Alternative Medicine Review - Volume 4, Number 2, April 1999.

    6 Mauskop A, Altura BM. Role of magnesium in the pathogenesis and treatment of migraine. Clin Neurosci 1998;5:24-27.

    7 Ramadan NM, Halvorson H, Vande-Linde A, et al. Low brain magnesium in migraine. Headache 1989;29:590-593. 8 Rude RK. Magnesium deficiency: A cause of heterogeneous disease in humans. J Bone Miner Res 1998;13:749-58.

    9 Institute of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D and Fluoride. National Academy Press. Washington, DC, 1999.

    10 Kelly, GS. Sports Nutrition: A Review of Selected Nutritional Supplements For Bodybuilders and Strength Athletes-Alternative Medicine Review - Volume 2, Number 3, May 1997
    Dr. Chris Meletis N. D.




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    Date: October 06, 2005 10:08 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    Magnesium is a dietary mineral with a wide array of biological activities in the body. Magnesium participates in numerous life-essential processes that occur both inside and outside cells. Magnesium deficiency impacts normal physiologic function on many levels. Adequate magnesium is a fundamental requirement for optimum function of the cardiovascular system, the nervous system and skeletal muscle, as well as the uterus and GI tract. Magnesium deficiency can affect health of the heart, bones and blood vessels and alter blood sugar balance [1].

    Magnesium–Important for Everyone, Deficient in Many The average person living in a modern country today very likely consumes less than the optimum amount of magnesium [2]. An abundance of data collected over the last two decades shows a consistent pattern of low magnesium intake in the U.S. This pattern cuts a wide swath across various age-sex groups. The USDA’s Nationwide Food Consumption Survey found that a majority of Americans consumed less than the recommended daily magnesium intake [3]. Twelve age-sex groups were studied and this low magnesium intake was true for all groups except 0 to 5 year olds.

    An analysis of the nutrient content of the diets of 7,810 individuals age four and above included magnesium among several nutrients where the amounts supplied by the average diet "were not sufficient to meet recommended standards" [4]. The FDA’s Total Diet study examined the intakes of eleven minerals, including magnesium, among eight age-sex groups. Data was collected four times yearly from 1982 to 1984. Levels of magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc and copper were low for most age-sex groups [5]. Surveys conducted in Europe and in other parts of North America paint a similar picture. Loss of magnesium during food processing is one explanation for this global lack of adequate dietary magnesium [6].

    In particular, the elderly may be susceptible to magnesium deficiency for a variety of reasons, including inadequate magnesium intake, poor absorption due to impaired gastrointestinal function and use of drugs such as diuretics that deplete magnesium from the body [7]. It has recently been theorized that magnesium deficiency may contribute to accelerated aging, through effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems, as well as muscles and the kidneys [8].

    Women who take both synthetic estrogen and calcium supplements may be at risk for low blood levels of magnesium [9]. Estrogen promotes the transfer of magnesium from blood to soft–tissues. Low blood magnesium may result if the ratio of calcium to magnesium intake exceeds 4 to 1. Magnesium supplementation is thus advisable for women taking estrogen and calcium.

    Young adults are not immune to magnesium deficiency. The University of California’s Bogalusa Heart Study collected nutritional data from a cross-sectional sample of 504 young adults between age 19 and 28 [10]. The reported intake of magnesium, along with several other minerals and vitamins, was below the RDA.

    Glycine is a highly effective mineral chelator. This is because it is a low-molecular-weight amino acid, hence is easily transported across the intestinal membrane. A study conducted at Weber State University found this particular magnesium glycinate was absorbed up to four times more effectively than typical magnesium supplements.

    Magnesium-the Versatile Mineral

    The average adult body contains anywhere from about 21 to 28 grams of magnesium. Approximately 60 percent of the body’s magnesium supply is stored in bone. Soft tissue, such as skeletal muscle, contains 38%, leaving only about 1 to 2% of the total body magnesium content in blood plasma and red blood cells. Magnesium in the body may be bound either to proteins or "anions" (negatively charged substances.) About 55% of the body’s magnesium content is in the "ionic" form, which means it carries an electrical charge. Magnesium ions are "cations," ions that carry a positive charge. In its charged state, magnesium functions as one of the mineral "electrolytes."

    Magnesium works as a "co-factor" for over 300 enzymatic reactions in the body. Metabolism uses a phosphate containing molecule called "ATP" as its energy source. Magnesium is required for all reactions involving ATP [11]. ATP supplies the energy for physical activity, by releasing energy stored in "phosphate bonds".

    Skeletal and heart muscle use up large amounts of ATP. The energy for muscle contraction is released when one of ATP’s phosphate bonds is broken, in a reaction that produces ADP. Phosphate is added back to ADP, re-forming ATP. ATP also powers the cellular "calcium pump" which allows muscle cells to relax. Because it participates in these ATP-controlled processes, magnesium is vitally important for muscle contraction and relaxation. By controlling the flow of sodium, potassium and calcium in and out of cells, magnesium regulates the function of nerves as well as muscles [12].

    Magnesium’s importance for heart health is widely recognized. The heart is the only muscle in the body that generates its own electrical impulses. Through its influence on the heart’s electrical conduction system, magnesium is essential for maintenance of a smooth, regular heartbeat [13]. Magnesium appears to help the heart resist the effects of systemic stress. Magnesium deficiency aggravates cardiac damage due to acute systemic stress (such as caused by infection or trauma), while magnesium supplementation protects the heart against stress [14]. This has been found true even in the absence of an actual magnesium deficit in the body.

    Evidence suggests that magnesium may help support mineral bone density in elderly women. In a two-year open, controlled trial, 22 out of a group of 31 postmenopausal women who took daily magnesium supplements showed gains in bone density. A control group of 23 women who declined taking the supplements had decreases in bone density [15]. The dietary intakes of magnesium, potassium, fruit and vegetables are associated with increased bone density in elderly women and men [16]. In an interesting animal study, rats were fed diets with either high or low levels of magnesium. Compared to the high magnesium-fed rats, bone strength and magnesium content of bone decreased in the low-magnesium rats, even though these rats showed no visible signs of magnesium deficiency [17]. While this finding may or may not apply to humans, it raises the possibility that diets supplying low magnesium intakes may contribute to weakening of bone in the elderly.

    Maximizing Absorption––Chelated Minerals Explained Mineral absorption occurs mainly in the small intestine. Like any mineral, magnesium may be absorbed as an "ion," a mineral in its elemental state that carries an electric charge. Mineral ions cross the intestinal membrane either through "active transport" by a protein carrier imbedded in the cells lining the membrane inner wall, or by simple diffusion. The magnesium in mineral salts is absorbed in ionic form. However, absorption of ionic minerals can be compromised by any number of factors, including: 1) Low solubility of the starting salt, which inhibits release of the mineral ion, and 2) Binding of the released ion to naturally occurring dietary factors such as phytates, fats and other minerals that form indigestible mineral complexes [18].

    A second absorption mechanism has been discovered for minerals. Experiments have shown that minerals chemically bonded to amino acids (building blocks of protein) are absorbed differently from mineral ions. This has given rise to the introduction of "chelated" minerals as dietary supplements. Mineral amino acid chelates consist of a single atom of elemental mineral that is surrounded by two or more amino acid molecules in a stable, ring-like structure.

    Unlike mineral salts, which must be digested by stomach acid before the desired mineral portion can be released and absorbed, mineral chelates are not broken down in the stomach or intestines. Instead, chelates cross the intestinal wall intact, carrying the mineral tightly bound and hidden within the amino acid ring. The mineral is then released into the bloodstream for use by the body. Research by pioneers in the field of mineral chelation and human nutrition indicates that the best-absorbed chelates consist of one mineral atom chelated with two amino acids. This form of chelate is called a "di-peptide." Compared to other chelates, di-peptides have the ideal chemical attributes for optimum absorption [19]. Dipeptide chelates demonstrate superior absorption compared to mineral salts. For example, a magnesium di-peptide chelate was shown to be four times better absorbed than magnesium oxide [20].

    Consumer Alert! Not all "amino acid chelates" are true chelates. In order for a mineral supplement to qualify as a genuine chelate, it must be carefully processed to ensure the mineral is chemically bonded to the amino acids in a stable molecule with the right characteristics. The magnesium bis-glycinate/lysinate in High Absorption Magnesium is a genuine di-peptide chelate ("bis" means "two"). It has a molecular weight of 324 daltons, considerably lower than the upper limit of 800 daltons stated in the definition of "mineral amino acid chelates" adopted by the National Nutritional Foods Association in 1996 [21].

    Bioperine® For Enhanced Absorption Bioperine® is a natural extract derived from black pepper that increases nutrient absorption.* Preliminary trials on humans have shown significant increases in the absorption of nutrients consumed along with Bioperine® [22].

    Scientific References 1. Abbott, L.R., R., Clinical manifestations of magnesium deficiency. Miner electrolyte Metab, 1993. 19: p. 314-22. 2. Durlach, J., Recommended dietary amounts of magnesium: Mg RDA. Magnesium Research, 1989. 2(3): p. 195-202. 3. Morgan, K.e.a., Magnesium and calcium dietary intakes of the U.S. population. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 1985. 4: p. 195-206. 4. Windham, C., Wyse, B., Hurst, R. Hansen, R., Consistency of nutrient consumption patterns in the United States. J AM Diet Assoc, 1981. 78(6): p. 587-95. 5. Pennington, J., Mineral content of foods and total diets: the Selected Minerals in Food Survey, 1982 to 1984. J AM Diet Assoc, 1986. 86(7): p. 876-91. 6. Marier, J., Magnesium Content of the Food Supply in the Modern- Day World. Magnesium, 1986. 5: p. 1-8. 7. Costello, R., Moser-Veillon, P., A review of magnesium intake in the elderly. A cause for concern? Magnesium Research, 1992. 5(1): p. 61-67. 8. Durlach, J., et al., Magnesium status and aging: An update. Magnesium Research, 1997. 11(1): p. 25-42. 9. Seelig, M., Increased need for magnesium with the use of combined oestrogen and calcium for osteoporosis treatment. Magnesium Research, 1990. 3(3): p. 197-215. 10. Zive, M., et al., Marginal vitamin and mineral intakes of young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study. J Adolesc, 1996. 19(1): p. 39-47. 11. McLean, R., Magnesium and its therapeutic uses: A review. American Journal of Medicine, 1994. 96: p. 63-76. 12. Graber, T., Role of magnesium in health and disease. Comprehensive Therapy, 1987. 13(1): p. 29-35. 13. Sueta, C., Patterson, J., Adams, K., AntiarRhythmic action of pharmacological administration of magnesium in heart failure: A critical review of new data. Magnesium Research, 1995. 8(4): p. 389- 401. 14. Classen, H.-G., Systemic stress, magnesium status and cardiovascular damage. Magnesium, 1986. 5: p. 105-110. 15. Stendig-Lindberg, G., Tepper, R., Leichter, I., Trabecular bone density in a two year controlled trial of peroral magnesium in osteoporosis. Magnesium Research, 1993. 6(2): p. 155-63. 16. Tucker, K., et al., Potassium, magnesium, and fruit and vegetable intakes are associated with greater bone mineral density in elderly men and women. Am J Clin Nutr, 1999. 69(4): p. 727-736. 17. Heroux, O., Peter, D., Tanner, A., Effect of a chronic suboptimal intake of magnesium on magnesium and calcium content of bone and bone strength of the rat. Can J. Physiol. Pharmacol., 1975. 53: p. 304-310. 18. Pineda, O., Ashmead, H.D., Effectiveness of treatment of irondeficiency anemia in infants and young children with ferrous bisglycinate chelate. Nutrition, 2001. 17: p. 381-84. 19. Adibi, A., Intestinal transport of dipetides in man: Relative importance of hydrolysis and intact absorption. J Clin Invest, 1971. 50: p. 2266-75. 20. Ashmead, H.D., Graff, D., Ashmead, H., Intestinal Absorption of Metal Ions and Chelates. 1985, Springfield, Illinois: Charles C. Thomas. 21. NNFA definition of mineral amino acid chlelates, in NNFA Today. 1996. p. 15. 22. Bioperine-Nature's Bioavailability Enhancing Thermonutrient. 1996, Sabinsa Corporation: Piscataway, N.J.

    *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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    Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen
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    Date: July 27, 2005 03:44 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

    Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

    You and your sweetie can turn up the heat by cooking together.

    Since the beginning of time, the pleasures of the table have been intertwined with those of the boudoir. (Remember the scene in the film Tom Jomes in which Tom and his amorata-of-the-moment wolf down a meal while staring lustily into each other’s eyes?) But when most of your kitchen time is spent trying to get everyone fed and out of the house in time for the night’s soccer game/ PTA meeting/ballet lesson, it can be tough keeping the pilot light lit on your love.

    That’s why one of the best ways to spice up your sex life is to prepare a sensuous meal together sans offspring (thank heavens for doting grandparents with spare rooms!). A little fourhanded cooking- preferably while sharing some suggestive banter- can create chemistry that allows your playful, non-parenting side s to emerge, enhancing intimacy and setting the stage for the seductive feast to follow.

    Just as the frenzied pace of modern living can often foster a sense of separation, cooking together as a couple can promote a sense of union. “Eventually you get a feel for your partner’s Rhythms and adjust yours accordingly,” says food TV personality Jacqui Malouf, author of Booty Food (Bloomsbury). “Before you know it you’re passing the coriander, peeling the potatoes and stirring the risotto at precisely the right moments.”

    With time, you can learn what each of you does best: Who has a flair for combining spices in just the right proportions? Who can chop carrots into perfect little matchsticks without taking all night? Since nothing kills the mood more than arguing over who misplaced the baker’s chocolate or the pasta platter, buy your ingredients earlier in the day and have all the necessary utensils out and at the ready. (Safety note: while two in a tiny kitchen can be steamily cozy, do be careful with hot pots and sharp knives.)

    Four hands can also be better than two, so why not make the most of it? Malouf suggests approaching your combined efforts with a sense of adventure: “Use more than three ingredients in a salad dressing! Be daring with your desserts! Try concocting something with squab or squid or quince or quail- the sky’s the limit.”

    Intriguing Ingredients

    One advantage of using exotic ingredients (or at least foods not normally found on your weekly shopping list) is that they can help you and your partner break through the limits of everyday experience by reawakening long-dormant senses. Go ahead- run your fingertips over the rough rind of a pomegranate before feeling the smooth, full seeds within. Inhale the sweet, perfumed scent of a dead-ripe apricot, and appreciate its downy skin. Admire the cool green beauty of a cut avocado, and share a spoonful with your sweetie.

    Avocado, in fact, is one of the foods known for inflaming passion based on its suggestive shape, along with artichoke and asparagus- and that’s just the AS! (Chocoholics rejoice: Chocolate, full of the same feel-good chemical released by the brain when one falls in love, also makes the ecstasy encouraging grade, even when obtained in standard shapes.) “coincidentally, many foods long considered aphrodisiacs are low in fat (avocado and chocolate are delectably healthy exceptions) and are high in vitamins and minerals,” write Martha Hopkins and Randall Lockridge in Intercourses: An Aphrodisiac Cookbook (Terrace Publishing). “A diet heavy in these foods, then, yields a healthy blood healthy body with the energy, blood flow and nutrients needed for a peak sexual experience.” (The way these foods feed the imagination- the ultimate smorgasbord of pleasure- is a bountiful bonus.) Other foods, such as honey, have been treasured for supplying the energy needed to fan love’s flames far into the night; no wonder the sweet, sticky stuff shows up in a number of naughty-night concoctions.

    Just as Venus, the Roman goddess of love, emerged fully formed from the sea, so do the foods that best encourage those under her spell. In addition to being chockfull of healthy protein, “seafood is elegant, clean and light enough to keep your sleek loving machine fully fueled but never weighed down,” says Jacqui Malouf. Oysters are famous- or infamous- for their amorous effects (Cassanova was fond of them) but aren’t for everyone; other romantic dining favorites include shrimp or scallops.

    Time to Eat

    Once you’ve worked your kitchen magic together, it’s time to move the action into the dining room. Again, a little preparation can keep the evening at a slow, sensuous boil. Use the best china you have, along with matching silverware, cloth napkins and nice glasses (sippy cups don’t count). The warm glow of candlelight can both set off your tantalizing table and set your hearts aflame, along with a rose or two in the most decorative vase you own. Music (from Mozart to Motown, depending on your taste) is another surefire mojo mover. But please guys- catch up with CNN or ESPN some other time.

    When you do finally sit down to dinner don’t rush, even (especially) if fast-forward eating is the norm in your house. “Treat the food as if you are making love for the first time,” advises Kerry McCloskey in The Ultimate Sex Diet (True Courage Press). “Before putting any in your mouth, inhale its aroma to get your digestive juices flowing…Cut your food into small, bite-sized pieces, (which) will ensure that you enjoy each bite.” The idea is to enhance all of your senses, which will come in handy later on in the evening.

    You can make your couple dining experience even more intimate by feeding each other; some foods. Like asparagus spears and shrimp, beg for finger-feeding. McCloskey recommends also trying chopsticks: “Because it will take longer to maneuver your food when using them, you will feel full sooner with less food.” That’s important since you don’t want to overeat- passing out right after dessert is not the way to impress your partner (they’ve seen you snoring away on the couch a hundred times before).

    In the wee hours, happily exhausted, you can ponder this: No matter how hectic your lives get, you should always make time for each other. You already share a mortgage and kids. Cooking together is a great way to share sensuality, too.
    -Lisa James

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    Maintaining Healthy Veins
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    Date: July 25, 2005 09:36 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Maintaining Healthy Veins

    More than 40 million Americans have varicose veins, a term in Latin meaning “twisted and wollen blood vessel.” Although the condition is rarely disabling, it is disfiguring, causing discomfort and embarrassment to those afflicted.

    many cases, genetic predisposition and gender determine who will develop varicose veins. A full 75% of Americans with the condition ar e women. At risk some women who may experience the beginning of this condition during pregnancy as the enlarging womb presses on the veins in the abdomen, increasing the pressure in the veins of the legs.

    Age is another factor as the skin becomes less elastic, lessening vein support. Some individuals are genetically edisposed to a malfunction of the one-way valves that may cause a back low of blood to pool in super ficial veins, stretching and swelling them.

    some health care professionals believe that our Western diet, high in refined carbohydrates and fat and low in fiber, may cause straining during bowel movement leading to hemorrhoids (anal varicose veins) and increase pressure on the leg veins. Our Western diet also eads to obesity and cardiovascular conditions such as plaque deposits in the arteries, abnormal clotting and platelet aggregation, cardiac dysfunction or failure, all leading to a weakened venous system that could increase the chance of developing varicose veins and edema (swelling in the legs). Those who ar e predisposed to varicose veins and who stand for long periods of time, especially on hard floors, may develop them more quickly.

    If you are at risk of developing this condition as you age, emphasizing a diet high in fiber, legumes and grains, fresh fruits and vegetables will improve your chances of maintaining good vein health. Other nutritional supplements that may be beneficial are horse chestnut seeds, Centella Asiatica, Milk Thistle, Butcher’s Broom and bioflavonoids.

    Horse chestnut seeds have a long historical use in the treatment of varicose veins and hemorrhoids. One active ingredient that has been researched is a saponin mixture called Aescin. In a recent study, Aescin was as effective as compression stockings in reducing leg swelling in patients with chronic venous insufficiency.

    Centella Asiatica is a common edible herb also known as Gotu Kola in India. When grown in Madagascar, it has a higher content of a compound called triterpenic fraction (TTFCA) than the same herb has when grown in other parts of the world. This compound has been used for many years in the treatment of venous hypertension. In a study conducted in 1989, 120mg dosage was safely used in patients with poor venous blood flow and it improved the condition after one or two months.

    Often, inflammation is a component of varicose veins. Milk Thistle, another herb commonly used for the treatment of liver disorders, was also found to reduce inflammation and edema in a recent Spanish study.

    A bushy ever green perennial found throughout much of the Western world is Butcher’s Broom. Its saponin glycosides ar e anti-inflammatory and helped contract blood vessels, especially veins thus making it an important component of any natural for mulation used to improve venous conditions.

    Certain bioflavonoids, such as quer cetin and rutin, have also been shown to be useful in the natural tr eatment of varicose veins as a strengthener of capillary and vein walls.

    There are other nutritional supplements including vitamins and minerals that may help maintain vein health as we age. They are listed in my new book “A Doctor’s Guide to Natural Medicine.” To improve vein health and to decrease your chance of developing varicose veins: do not stand for long periods of time especially on hard sur faces such as concrete. If you can’t avoid this, make sure your shoes are well cushioned. If you are sitting for long periods of time either working or traveling, take walking breaks. Stop crossing your legs and exercise regularly to incorporates Rhythmical contraction of the leg muscles. Rest with your legs elevated when taking a break. W earing good support hose and avoiding tight knee-highs will promote good blood flow.

    These things can be very important if you ar e genetically pr edisposed to varicose veins. Starting nutrients early may help diminish or delay venous problems.

    Micromedex, Inc. Volume 96, 1974-1998. Diehmetal. Microcirculation Laboratory, Cardiovascular Clinic, Chieti, Italy.

    Efficacy of Centellase in the Treatment of Venous Hypertension Evaluated by a Combined Micro circulatory Model. G. Belcaroetal. Current Therapeutic Research, Vol. 46, No. 6, Dec. 1989.

    Effect of Silymarin on Different Acute Inflammation Models and on Leukocyte Migration. R. de la Puertaetal, J. Pharm. Parmacol. 1996, 48: 968-970 Merck Sciential Review, no. 10, 1995-04-30, pp. 2



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    Pain - Post Op and Relaxation
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    Date: July 13, 2005 09:24 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Pain - Post Op and Relaxation

    Relaxation, Music Reduce Post-Op Pain. New research has found that relaxation and music, separately or together, significantly reduce patients' pain following major abdominal surgery. The study, published in the May issue of the journal Pain, found that these methods reduce pain more than pain medication alone. Led by Marion Good, PhD, RN, of Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, the study is supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), at the National Institutes of Health. "This is important news for the millions of Americans who undergo surgery and experience postoperative pain each year," said Dr. Patricia A. Grady, director of the NINR.

    "Better pain management can reduce hospital stays and speed recovery, ultimately improving patients' quality of life." Dr. Good and her research team studied three groups of patients undergoing abdominal surgery. In addition to the usual pain medication, one group used a jaw relaxation technique, another group listened to music, and a third group received a combination of relaxation and music.

    Findings revealed that, after surgery, the three treatment groups had significantly less pain than the control group, which received only pain medication. "Both medication and self-care methods which involve patient participation are needed for relief," said Dr. Good.

    "These relaxation and music self-care methods provide more complete relief without the undesired side effects of some pain medications." The findings have important implications for the 23 million people who undergo surgery and experience postoperative pain annually in the United States. Pain can hamper recovery by heightening the body's response to the stress of surgery and increasing tissue breakdown, coagulation and fluid retention. Pain also interferes with appetite and sleep and can lead to complications that prolong hospitalization.

    Dr. Good and her research staff worked with 500 patients aged 18-70, who were undergoing gynecological, gastrointestinal, exploratory or urinary surgery. Prior to surgery, those in the music, relaxation or combination groups practiced the techniques. The relaxation technique consisted of letting the lower jaw drop slightly, softening the lips, resting the tongue in the bottom of the mouth, and breathing slowly and Rhythmically with a three-Rhythm pattern of inhale, exhale and rest. Patients in the music group chose one of five kinds of soothing music--harp, piano, synthesizer, orchestral or slow jazz.

    On the first and second days after surgery, all patients received morphine or Demerol for pain relief by pressing a button connected to their intravenous patient controlled analgesia pumps. The groups receiving the additional intervention used earphones to listen to music and relaxation tapes during walking and rest, while the control group did not. The research team measured the patients' pain before and after 15 minutes of bed rest and four times during walking to see if the sensation and distress of pain changed.

    Dr. Good found that during these two days postsurgery the three treatment groups had significantly less pain than the control group during both walking and rest. "Patients can take more control of their postoperative pain using these self-care methods," says Dr. Good. "Nurses and physicians preparing patients for surgery and caring for them afterwards should encourage patients to use relaxation and music to enhance the effectiveness of pain medication and hasten recovery."

    Dr. Good's findings have implications for future research into the effectiveness of self-care methods on other types of pain, including chronic pain, cancer pain, and pain of the critically ill.

    -----------------------------

    Vitamin D Lack Linked to Hip Fracture. Vitamin D deficiency in post-menopausal women is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass. In a group of women with osteoporosis hospitalized for hip fracture, 50 percent were found to have a previously undetected vitamin D deficiency. In the control group, women who had not suffered a hip fracture but who were hospitalized for an elective hip replacement, only a very small percentage had vitamin D deficiency, although one-fourth of those women also had osteoporosis. These findings were reported in the April 28, 1999, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    The study, conducted by Meryl S. LeBoff, MD; Lynn Kohlmeier, MD; Shelley Hurwitz, PhD; Jennifer Franklin, BA; John Wright, MD; and Julie Glowacki, PhD; of the Endocrine Hypertension Division, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, was supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR. These investigators studied women admitted to either Brigham and Women's Hospital or the New England Baptist Hospital, both in Boston, between January 1995 and June 1998.

    A group of 98 postmenopausal women who normally reside in their own homes were chosen for the study. Women with bone deterioration from other causes were excluded from the study.

    There were 30 women with hip fractures caused by osteoporosis and 68 hospitalized for elective joint replacement. Of these 68, 17 women also had osteoporosis as determined by the World Health Organization bone density criteria. All the participants answered questions regarding their lifestyle, reproductive history, calcium in their diet, and physical activity.

    Bone mineral density of the spine, hip, and total body were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) technique, as was body composition. Blood chemistry and urinary calcium levels were analyzed. The two groups of women with osteoporosis did not differ significantly in either time since menopause or bone density in the spine or hip. They did, however, differ in total bone density.

    The women admitted for a hip fracture had fewer hours of exercise than the control group. Fifty percent of the women with hip fractures were deficient in vitamin D, 36.7 percent had elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels (a hormone which can stimulate loss of calcium from bone), and 81.8 percent had calcium in their urine, suggesting inappropriate calcium loss. Blood levels of calcium were lower in the women with hip fractures than in either elective group.

    These researchers propose that vitamin D supplementation at the time of fracture may speed up recovery and reduce risk of fracture in the future. Current Dietary Reference Intake Guidelines contain a daily recommendation of 400 IU of vitamin D for people aged 51 through 70 and 600 IU for those over age 70.

    "We know that a calcium-rich diet and regular weight-bearing exercise can help prevent osteoporosis. This new research suggests that an adequate intake of vitamin D, which the body uses to help absorb calcium, may help women to reduce their risk of hip fracture, even when osteoporosis is present," observed Dr. Evan C. Hadley, NIA Associate Director for geriatrics research.

    "Osteoporosis leads to more than 300,000 hip fractures each year, causing pain, frequent disability, and costly hospitalizations or long-term care. "Prevention of such fractures would greatly improve the quality of life for many older women and men, as well as significantly reduce medical costs." The bones in the body often undergo rebuilding. Some cells, osteoclasts, dissolve older parts of the bones. Then, bone-building cells known as osteoblasts create new bone using calcium and phosphorus.

    As people age, if osteoporosis develops, more bone is dissolved than is rebuilt, and the bones weaken and become prone to fracture. Also in many older persons, levels of vitamin D in the blood are low because they eat less or spend less time in the sun, which stimulates the body's own production of vitamin D.

    Experts do not understand fully the causes of osteoporosis. However, they do know that lack of estrogen which accompanies menopause, diets low in calcium, and lack of exercise contribute to the problem. Eighty percent of older Americans who face the possibility of pain and debilitation from an osteoporosis-related fracture are women. One out of every two women and one in eight men over the age of 50 will have such a fracture sometime in the future. These fractures usually occur in the hip, wrist, and spine.

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    Sleep Apnea, Diabetes Link Found. Adults who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea are three times more likely to also have diabetes and more likely to suffer a stroke in the future, according to a new UCLA School of Dentistry/Department of Veterans Affairs study published today in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Sleep apnea, a serious condition marked by loud snoring, irregular breathing and interrupted oxygen intake, affects an estimated nine million Americans. The culprit? Carrying too many extra pounds.

    "The blame falls squarely on excess weight gain," said Dr. Arthur H. Friedlander, associate professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery at the UCLA School of Dentistry and associate chief of staff at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Los Angeles. Surplus weight interferes with insulin's ability to propel sugars from digested food across the cell membrane, robbing the cells of needed carbohydrates. Diabetes results when glucose builds up in the bloodstream and can't be utilized by the body. Being overweight can also lead to obstructive sleep apnea, according to Friedlander.

    "When people gain too much weight, fatty deposits build up along the throat and line the breathing passages," he explained. "The muscles in this region slacken during sleep, forcing the airway to narrow and often close altogether." Reclining on one's back magnifies the situation. "When an overweight person lies down and goes to sleep," Friedlander said, "gravity shoves the fat in the neck backwards. This blocks the airway and can bring breathing to a halt."

    Friedlander tested the blood sugar of 54 randomly selected male veterans whom doctors had previously diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. He discovered that 17 of the 54 patients, or 31 percent, unknowingly suffered from adult-onset diabetes. Using the same sample, Friedlander also took panoramic X-rays of the men's necks and jaws. The X-rays indicated that 12 of the 54 patients, or 22 percent, revealed calcified plaques in the carotid artery leading to the brain.

    These plaques block blood flow, significantly increasing patients' risk for stroke. Seven of the 12, or 58 percent, were also diagnosed with diabetes. In dramatic comparison, the 17 patients diagnosed with diabetes showed nearly twice the incidence of blockage. Seven of the 17 men, or 41 percent, had carotid plaques. Only five of the 54 patients who displayed plaques did not have also diabetes. If he conducted this study today, Friedlander notes, he would likely find a higher number of diabetic patients. After he completed the study in 1997, the American Diabetes Association lowered its definition for diabetes from 140 to 126 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood.

    "This is the first time that science has uncovered a link between sleep apnea and diabetes," said Friedlander. "The data suggest that someone afflicted with both diabetes and sleep apnea is more likely to suffer a stroke in the future." "Persons going to the doctor for a sleep-apnea exam should request that their blood be screened for diabetes, especially if they are overweight," he cautioned. More than half of the individuals who develop diabetes as adults will need to modify their diet and take daily insulin in order to control the disease, he added.

    ------------------------------

    Stress, Surgery May Increase CA Tumors. Stress and surgery may increase the growth of cancerous tumors by suppressing natural killer cell activity, says a Johns Hopkins researcher.

    Malignancies and viral infections are in part controlled by the immune system's natural killer (NK) cells, a sub-population of white blood cells that seek out and kill certain tumor and virally infected cells. In a study using animal models, natural killer cell activity was suppressed by physical stress or surgery, resulting in a significant increase in tumor development.

    These findings suggest that protective measures should be considered to prevent metastasis for patients undergoing surgery to remove a cancerous tumor, according to Gayle Page, D.N.Sc., R.N., associate professor and Independence Foundation chair at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. "Human studies have already found a connection between the level of NK activity and susceptibility to several different types of cancer," says Page, an author of the study.

    "We sought to determine the importance of stress-induced suppression of NK activity and thus learn the effects of stress and surgery on tumor development. "Many patients undergo surgery to remove cancerous tumors that have the potential to spread. If our findings in rats can be generalized to such clinical settings, then these circumstances could increase tumor growth during or shortly after surgery." The research was conducted at Ohio State University College of Nursing and the Department of Psychology at UCLA, where Page held previous positions, and at Tel Aviv University.

    Results of the study are published in the March issue of the International Journal of Cancer. In laboratory studies, Page and her colleagues subjected rats to either abdominal surgery or physical stress, and then inoculated them with cancer cells. In the rats that had undergone surgery, the researchers observed a 200 to 500 percent increase in the incidence of lung tumor cells, an early indicator of metastasis, compared with rats that had not received surgery.

    The experiment also showed that stress increased lung tumor incidence and significantly increased the mortality in the animals inoculated with cancer cells. "Our results show that, under specific circumstances, resistance to tumor development is compromised by physical stress and surgical intervention," says Page.

    "Because surgical procedures are life-saving and cannot be withheld, protective measures should be considered that will prevent suppression of the natural killer cell activity and additional tumor development. "Researchers do not yet know how to prevent surgery-induced immune suppression, but early animal studies have shown increased use of analgesia reduces the risk."

    The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, and the Chief Scientist of the Israeli Ministry of Health. Lead author was Shamgar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D., and other authors were Raz Yirmiya, Ph.D., and Guy Shakhar.

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    Natural Health for a Healthy Heart
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    Date: July 13, 2005 09:17 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Natural Health for a Healthy Heart

    Natural Health for a Healthy Heart

    Cardiovascular disease is on the rise. Heart disease, stroke, and related disorders kill more Americans than any other ailments combined. In 1990 approximately one million Americans died form cardiovascular disease. Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) is the leading cause of heart attacks and strokes. Fat and cholesterol accumulate around the heart and inner walls of the arteries. This causes blood flow to slow and blood pressure to rise. Blood clotting is also a problem when the arteries are clogged which, if a clot breaks loose, can cause strokes or heart attacks according to where they end up. Heart disease is usually advanced before a problem arises. Prevention should be the first goal.

    Heart disease is much less common in “primitive” societies. This is due in part to the lifestyle and diet choices of Americans. Diet is viewed as the most important factor in heart related disorders. An increased intake of sugar, refined flour and simple carbohydrates may also be contributing factors. Other risk factors include a family history of heart disease, cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, type A personality, stress, diabetes, obesity, high blood cholesterol levels, physical inactivity and coronary artery disease. Changes must be made in diet and life-style in order to prevent heart disease.

    DIET

    Following a diet low in animal fat and refined sugars but high in fiber is highly recommended. Whole grains, almonds, fresh fruits and vegetables, a variety of legumes, skinless turkey, chicken and fish should be the main dietary elements. Brown rice, garlic, onions, olive oil, raw fruits and vegetables, sprouts, asparagus, apples, bananas, beans, buckwheat, seeds, whey powder, and yogurt are especially good for the heart. Avoid caffeine, alcohol, red meat, refined carbohydrates, and white flour. Limit intake of dairy products which contain high amounts of fat. Homogenized dairy products contain an enzyme called xanthine oxidase which is believed to cause artery damage and could lead to arteriosclerosis. Use olive oil and canola oil when using fat. Avoid palm oil, coconut oil, peanut oil and cottonseed oil.

    SUPPLEMENTS

    Choline, inositol and lecithin: These act as fat emulsifiers in the bloodstream and can help prevent plaque buildup.

    Chromium: Chromium is known for recent studies linking it to a reduced risk of heart disease. It may help prevent plaque buildup in the arteries. Low levels of chromium are thought to be a risk factor for developing heart disease. It also may help increase the beneficial HDL cholesterol and aid in lowering the LDL cholesterol.

    Coenzyme Q10: This can help oxygenate the heart muscle helping to prevent additional heart damage. Coenzyme Q10 can help the body break down fatty acids converting them to energy. This is often lacking in individuals with heart problems. Essential Fatty Acids: These can help prevent hardening of the arteries by preventing the blood cells from clumping together and forming clots. They also help with the assimilation of fat soluble vitamins.

    Germanium: Germanium has been found to lower high blood pressure and improve circulation in the body. Calcium and Magnesium: Both of these minerals contribute to the muscular contraction and relaxation of the heart. They are essential for the proper function of the heart muscle and maintaining normal heart Rhythm and blood pressure. Low levels of calcium have been linked to high blood pressure.

    L-Carnitine: This is an amino acid that can help the heart by reducing fat levels in the blood. Vitamin C with bioflavonoids: Vitamin C helps prevent blood clots and strengthens the capillary and blood vessel walls. It may help prevent high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis, lower cholesterol, repair arterial walls, and contribute to reversing heart disease.

    Vitamin E: Vitamin E is well known for its beneficial effect on the heart. Selenium: Low levels of selenium have been associated with heart disease.

    HERBS

    Hawthorn: This herb is great for cardiovascular health. Garlic: Garlic is one of the most studied herbs for cardiovascular health. Several recent studies link garlic to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease.

    Cayenne: This is also known as capsicum and is beneficial on circulation and cleaning and nourishing the blood vessels.

    Ginkgo: Ginkgo relaxes the blood vessels and improves the flow of blood even in constricted arteries. Rosemary Tea: This is a traditional heart tonic that helps to promote circulation and lower blood pressure. Chinese Mushroom (auricularia polytricha): This is a natural blood thinner.

    EXERCISE:

    It is important to include exercise in the daily routine. Aerobic exercise is known to help improve the heart1s pumping ability, reduce serum cholesterol levels, decrease the risk of heart disease, and reduce the risk of high blood pressure as well as many other ailments. Exercising an average of three to five days a week for thirty minutes will benefit the body. Actually any amount of exercise is beneficial for the body, so try and do something each day.

    REDUCE STRESS:

    Include relaxation techniques to reduce stress. Stress can increase the risk of heart disease. Stress releases adrenaline which causes the heart to work harder. If you feel resentment, fear or anger, find ways to deal with these in a positive way. Pursuit serenity and peace in life. Exercise, self hypnosis, biofeedback, meditation, yoga and prayer can all help develop inner peace.

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    Vitanet ®

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    5-HTP - The Science of Sleep
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    Date: June 29, 2005 02:22 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: 5-HTP - The Science of Sleep

    5-HTP for Sleep

    Sleep is especially important in today’s world. It’s the time when your body repairs, rebuilds and replenishes the tissues and compounds that have been damaged or depleted by the demands of your life. But when there is too much stress, imbalances occur that can keep you from getting enough sleep.

    Source Naturals, the science company, introduces 5-HTP to help promote healthy sleep cycles. 5-HTP, or L-5-Hydroxytryptophan, is created when the tryptophan in your body is converted into serotonin. 5-HTP can cross the blood-brain barrier and is associated with increasing active serotonin levels as well as serotonin production. And those increased serotonin levels are associated with healthy sleep regulation, increased melatonin production for 24-hour sleep cycle regulation, mood regulation, and appetite control. Source Natural’s 5-HTP capsules are safely and naturally derived from Griffonia simplicifolia seeds.

    How 5-HTP Works

    5-HTP works because it supports your body’s balanced production of two important sleep regulating hormones, serotonin and melatonin. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that helps regulate sleep, moods and appetite. But you need adequate serotonin levels to maintain this balance. 5-HTP is the serotonin precursor that is formed when tryptophan is converted into serotonin in your body. In clinical research, 5-HTP increased the amount and availability of serotonin produced by the body. It is able to cross the blood brain–barrier to increase both serotonin levels and serotonin production in your brain so you can regain a healthy balance when you are sleeping, feeling emotions, or eating.

    Eventually, the serotonin in your body is converted into melatonin, the hormone that helps regulate healthy 24-hour sleep cycles known as circadian Rhythms. Aging and various forms of physical or emotional stress can decrease your melatonin levels and disrupt your sleep cycle. Fortunately, that balance can be regained. When 5-HTP increases serotonin production, melatonin production is also increased, which can help you regain a healthy circadian Rhythm.

    Naturally Promoting Healthy Sleep

    Source Naturals 5-HTP is safely derived from Griffonia simplicifolia seeds and is available in 50 and 100 mg potencies. Innovative natural products, such as 5-HTP, are part of a new paradigm in health care. You can join this revolution in preventive wellness, long before it becomes mainstream, by taking charge of your health with products that are only available at natural food and nutrition outlets. Support your healthy moods, eating habits and sleep cycles with the science of Source Naturals 5-HTP today.

    Three Tips for a Healthy Sleep Cycle

  • • Have a small portion of a high carbohydrate snack (such as a few crackers or a banana) just before bedtime. That small amount of simple carbohydrates will trigger the release of extra serotonin to help you get to sleep.
  • • Exercise. Regular exercise helps to promote healthy sleep cycles. But stop exercising a few hours before bedtime so your body has time to switch to a relaxed state for sleeping.
  • • Supplement with 5-HTP, MELATONIN and our Bio-Aligned™ NIGHT REST™ formula. These supplements can help you maintain healthy sleep cycles.

    References
    Birdsall, T. (1998). 5-Hydroxytryptophan: a clinically effective serotonin precursor. Alt Med Rev 3(4): 271-280. Magnussen, T., et al. (1981). Plasma accumulation and metabolism of orally administered single dose L-5- Hydroxytryptophan in man. Acta Pharm et Tox 49: 184-189. Magnussen, T., et al. (1980). Bioavailability and related pharmacokinetics in man of orally administered L-5- hydroxytryptophan in steady state. Acta Pharm et Tox 46: 257-262.



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    Vitanet ®

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    Caffeine - a nervous system stimulant
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    Date: June 21, 2005 12:14 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Caffeine - a nervous system stimulant

    Caffeine

    Caffeine when used in moderation, acts as a mild stimulant to the nervous system and is harmless but potentially addictive to most persons. Caffeine increases the heart rate and Rhythm, affects the central nervous system, and increases urination. It also stimulates secretion of stomach acids and is therefore harmful to individuals with ulcers.

    Caffeine helps restore mental alertness or wakefulness when experiencing fatigue or drowsiness. The recommended dose of this product contains about as much caffeine as a cup of coffee. Limit the use of caffeine-containing medications, foods, or beverages while taking this product because too much caffeine may cause nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness and occasionally rapid heartbeat.

    Do not give to children under 12 years of age. For occasional use only. Not intended for use as a substitute for sleep. If fatigue or drowsiness persist or continues to occur, consult a physician. Do not use if you are diabetic.

  • Do not use if you have high blood pressure, heart or thyroid disease, diabetes, depression, difficulty in urination due ot prostate enlargement, seizure disorder, or if taking a MAO inhibitor or 2 weeks after stopping the MAO inhibitor, any other prescription drug, or if you are using any OTC drug containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or phenylpropanol ingredients found in certain allergy, asthma, cough-cold, and weight products. Discontinue use and call a health care professional if you experience rapid heart beat, nervousness, tremor, dizziness, severe headache, sleeplessness, or nausea occur. Improper use of this product may be hazardous to your health.



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    Vitanet ®

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    Enhancer for Youthful Vitality
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    Date: June 16, 2005 08:20 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Enhancer for Youthful Vitality

    NEW PRODUCT ANNOUNCEMENT

    Enhancer for Youthful Vitality

  • •Bio-Aligned Formula? supports multiple body systems involved with healthy levels: release, fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and neurotransmitter support.
  • •Contains ingredients shown in published research to stimulate the body’s production and release.

    Five tablets contain:
    Niacin (as inositol nicotinate) 400 mg
    Chromium 200 mcg
    (as chromium polynicotinate [ChromeMate(r)] & chromium picolinate)
    l-Arginine l-Pyroglutamate 1g
    l-Lysine HCl 750 mg
    l-Glutamine 500 mg
    Acetyl l-Carnitine 450 mg
    Glycine 400 mg
    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) 350 mg
    Velvet Bean Standardized Extract 15% 300 mg
    Yielding 45 mg l-Dopa
    l-Ornithine HCl 250 mg
    Ornithine Ketoglutarate 250 mg
    l-Citrulline 250 mg
    DMAE (as bitartrate) 100 mg
    Ginkgo Leaf Extract (50:1) 100 mg
    5-HTP (l-5-Hydroxytryptophan) 50 mg
    Toothed Clubmoss Standardized Extract 1% 5 mg
    Yielding 50 mcg Huperzines A & B

    Suggested Use: 5 tablets before exercise and/or at bedtime with plenty of water at least two hours after the last meal. Discontinue use or reduce dosage if any of the following symptoms are present: nausea, excessive salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle spasms, cramps, excessive urination, insomnia, headache, cardiac arRhythmias, high blood pressure, or changes in mood or emotional balance.



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    Vitanet ®

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