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Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) Benefits to Boost Body & Brain Health Darrell Miller 12/17/18
Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants havebeen found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication VitaNet, LLC Staff 10/21/18
5 Adaptogens That Will Improve Your Brain Function VitaNet, LLC Staff 8/29/18
A review of the adaptogenic properties of Eleutherococcus Darrell Miller 10/24/13
What Are The Different Types Of Ginseng And What Is Ginseng Good For? Darrell Miller 12/16/11
Buckthorn Of The Sea Darrell Miller 8/5/09
Natural Vitamins Darrell Miller 6/26/09
Phytoestrogen Darrell Miller 3/27/09
Herbs Darrell Miller 10/8/08
Panax Ginseng Darrell Miller 9/22/08
Eleuthero Darrell Miller 5/28/08
10 Top Winter Cold & Flu Supplements Darrell Miller 1/14/08
Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens Darrell Miller 10/18/07
Supplements for Sexual health! Darrell Miller 4/17/07
Male Response - Male Libido Symptoms - Source Naturals Darrell Miller 7/9/05
Immune Health - Herbs to Maintain A Healthy Immune System Darrell Miller 7/1/05
Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles Darrell Miller 6/30/05
Depression Darrell Miller 6/30/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GINSENG and the Reproductive System Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GINSENG and Stress Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Physical and Mental Stamina Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Adaptogen Properties Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Cultivation and Export Darrell Miller 6/25/05
THE GINSENG PLAN Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Ginseng Varieties Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus) Darrell Miller 6/25/05
What is the difference between the types of Ginseng? Darrell Miller 6/17/05
Astra 8 - Boost immune system your primary defense against colds... Darrell Miller 6/15/05
Pep Up and Go! Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Acupuncture nutrient Connection Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Battle Fatigue! Don't passively accept chronic exhaustion and weakness.</ Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Mental Edge - Support proper Brain Function... Darrell Miller 6/3/05
Male Response - Re-align your body systems ... Darrell Miller 6/3/05
Gluco Sciense - Take Control of your Blood Sugar ... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX - Health Secrets from the Rainforest Darrell Miller 6/1/05
Calm Thoughts Kava - from Source Naturals Darrell Miller 6/1/05
Re: Boost Male Libido with Source Naturals Products Darrell Miller 5/20/05



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Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) Benefits to Boost Body & Brain Health
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Date: December 17, 2018 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) Benefits to Boost Body & Brain Health





Eleuthero is another name for Siberian Ginseng, an herbal remedy which has been used for at least 2000 years. It is distantly related to another, better-known herbal remedy, Asian ginseng. It is also sometimes called Devil's shrub, shigoka, touch-me-not, or wild pepper. Siberian ginseng is an adaptogen. Athletes use it to improve endurance and reduce fatigue. It is also used to treat chronic heart conditions, ADHD, high blood pressure, diabetes, kidney disease, colds and flu, among other conditions.

Key Takeaways:

  • Eleuthero, also known as Siberian ginseng, is a distant relative to the Asian ginseng, and it has been used medically for about 2,000 years.
  • The list of uses of eleuthero is very long. Athletes use it for endurance and reducing fatigue. It is also used for diabetes, kidney disease and flu.
  • The Siberian ginseng is native to Russia, northern China, Korea, and Japan. Other common names are Devil’s shrub, shigoka, wild pepper and Kan Jang.

"There are seven primary eleutherosides in eleuthero, with eleutherosides B and E being the most frequently studied. Siberian ginseng also contains complex polysaccharides, which are a main reason for its ability to boost the immune system."

Read more: https://draxe.com/eleuthero-siberian-ginseng/

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Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants havebeen found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication
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Date: October 21, 2018 12:52 PM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants havebeen found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication





Natural remedies for osteoporosis: Several medicinal plants have been found to improve bone health without the side effects of medication

Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, but common medicinal treatments can come with negative and unpleasant side effects. Osteoporosis means "porous bone" and refers to reduced bone density resulting in weakness. Recent research has identified a number of medicinal plants that appear to improve bone health, including black cohosh, Veld grape, Siberian ginseng, horny goat weed, soybean, Panax ginseng, Kwao Krua, and red sage. These treatments have shown promise in aiding bone formation and accelerating bone healing.

Key Takeaways:

  • It is incredible to think about the potential use cases there are of things in nature.
  • There is no way to determine as to why some of these things actually do have a medicinal affect.
  • Having the ability to slow down the deterioration of the body can be so useful.

"The medicinal plants that have been included in clinical studies showed potential in promoting bone formation and acceleration of bone healing in osteoporosis."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-09-23-natural-remedies-for-osteoporosis-medicinal-plants.html

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5 Adaptogens That Will Improve Your Brain Function
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Date: August 29, 2018 10:53 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Adaptogens That Will Improve Your Brain Function





5 Adaptogens That Will Improve Your Brain Function

Adaptogens help protect your brain from stress and keep it working at peak efficiency. Ashwagandha, for example, can bolster focus, memory and cognition, as well as promoting the growth of new dendrites. Rhodiola can make neurons more sensitive to dopamine and serotonin, which increases mental clarity and focus, and has great potential for fighting depression and inflammation. Turmeric is an even stronger anti-inflammatory, and may help depression as well. Siberian Ginseng can help speed up processes in the brain, and improve learning and retention of new information. Finally, maca root can stabilize moods, fight brain fog and help inhibit breakdown of neurotransmitters.

Key Takeaways:

  • Ashwagandha can help clear brain fog and promote the growth of dendrites, and may also help fight ADHD.
  • Rhodiola can cause neurons to be more sensitive to dopamine and serotonin, and also has antidepressant and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Siberian ginseng can speed up mental processes and aid learning and retention of new information.

"Adaptogens are substances that promote balance and negate the ill effects of stress in the body."

Read more: https://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-adaptogens-that-will-improve-your-brain-function.html

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A review of the adaptogenic properties of Eleutherococcus
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Date: October 24, 2013 09:24 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: A review of the adaptogenic properties of Eleutherococcus

 

What is elutherococcus

Siberian ginsengEleutherococcus, also called Siberian ginseng, is a medicinal plant that belongs to the ginseng family. It is normally found in forests that are located at regions that lie about 800 meters above the sea level. Male Eleutherococcus plants are characterized by violet flowers while their female counterparts bear yellow flowers. The leaves and berries of this plant has medicinal values and in fact, it is considered a perfect substitute to ginseng.

How does it work?

Its functioning is similar to that of ginseng. It possesses various properties that are known to bring amazing effects on the health. Basically, the extracts from this plant are used as therapeutic products. The y are know to have adaptogenic effects. It is normally prescribed to individuals who are battling with cardiovascular and energy problems. It is also a mood enhancing product. //www.drugs.com/npc/eleutherococcus.html

Since it is a good adaptogen, the plant is normally used to treat physical and mental stress. According to medical practitioners, adaptogens are substances that helps in adjusting to situations and scenarios that are stressful. In order to facilitate this, the substance nourishes adrenal glands that are designed to regulate various hormones in the body. It also works by increasing the functioning of the white blood cells. It has been identified that regular use of this product will enable an individual to improve his/her endurance thus resulting in improved mood. //www.tasteforlife.com/nutrition-plus/medicinal-herbs/eleuthero-powerful-adaptogen

Other benefits of this product include:

There are several benefits that accrue to any one who uses this product. For instance, it promote metabolism in the body. In addition, it is a good bone-strengthening herb and that is why it is recommended for those with weak bones.

The bottom line

Provided that it is used as recommended, any user should expect nothing less than the best results. It is one of the safest herbs that you will ever find.

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What Are The Different Types Of Ginseng And What Is Ginseng Good For?
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Date: December 16, 2011 06:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Different Types Of Ginseng And What Is Ginseng Good For?

Ginseng is a considered to be a perennial plant which is a member of the Panax genus under the family of Araliaceae. It is abundantly found in North America, East Asia and other places which have a cool climate. There are many types of ginseng. Though different in kind, all these species of ginseng contains the active ingredient known as ginsenosides. This chemical substance is the one responsible for the many health benefits of ginseng.

The types of Ginseng are:

1. PANAX GINSENG. This type of ginseng is also known as Asian ginseng. It is very rich in ginsenosides which proves that it is included among the types of true ginseng.

2. PANAX QUINQUEFOLIUS. This ginseng has an effective adaptogenic property. It is otherwise known as American ginseng. This herb is also considered as a true ginseng.

3. ELEUTHEROCOCCUS SENTICOSUS. The other name for this herb is Siberian ginseng. However, it is not considered as a true ginseng because it does not contain ginsenosides but eleutherosides. Also, ginseng has a fleshy root while this herb has a woody one. Despite their differences, Siberian ginseng also has similar effects to true ginseng herbs. It has an adaptogenic property which can effectively improve the overall health of the individual.

As mentioned above, ginseng has many benefits to human health. These include:

1. IMMUNE SYSTEM BOOSTER. Ginseng contains several vitamins and minerals which can be helpful in improving the immune system as well as the overall health of the individual. Studies have shown that ginseng has an ample amount of Vitamin C which can help maintain the health and strength of the body’s immune system. As a result, ginseng can effectively improve health especially those who are one the recovery phase of an illness.

2. LOWERS BLOOD GLUCOSE. Asian ginseng is noted for its potential ability to help regulate blood sugar levels. This is made possible because of its action in the stomach and intestine to control the absorption of glucose from the diet. In this connection, health experts highly recommend that individuals under diabetic therapy must use ginseng with extra care because it might cause hypoglycemia or low level of sugar in the blood.

3. AFFECTS BLOOD PRESSURE. Ginseng can produce an effect to the blood pressure of the individual, either high or low blood pressure. Depending on the dosage and the person’s response, ginseng can effectively maintain blood pressure within it normal limits.

4. IMPROVES THE OVERALL STATE OF HEALTH. Many ginseng consumers have reported that they experience an increased sense of well – being with their regular use of such helpful herb. It is also commonly used for the improvement of one’s stamina and endurance in performing many mental and physical tasks.

Ginseng can be consumed raw. Others use dried roots of this herb. Supplements are also available in the form of tablets, extracts and teas. Ointments and creams are also formulated for topical administration. If you plan to use ginseng for a particular health indication, make sure to talk to your doctor first since ginseng can have significant effect to the body as mentioned above. This will greatly prevent adverse effects and interactions with other medications you are taking.

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Buckthorn Of The Sea
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Date: August 05, 2009 04:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Buckthorn Of The Sea

Sea buckthorn is also known as sea berry or Siberian pineapple. It is a small shrub that can be found growing natively in a wild swath across Europe and Asia. This plant has been used by southeast Asians to treat various diseases for hundreds of years. The ancient Greeks are believed to have used the berries of the sea buckthorn plant in order to promote weight gain and shiny fur in horses.

After analyzing the orange berries of sea buckthorn, an abundance of vitamins C and E, carotenoids, flavonoids, glucose, fructose, several amino acids, and fatty acids have been found. The berries of this herb are used in order to produce juices, jams, liquors, and lotions. The oil that comes from the berries of sea buckthorn has been used to treat ailments that are related to inflammation. Included in these ailments are canker sores, esophagitis, cervicitis, peptic ulcers, and ulcerative colitis. Horticulturalists from the Soviet Union and East Germany came up with new varieties of sea buckthorn during the Cold War years that produce bigger berries and better nutrition.

Traditional Chinese medicine uses sea buckthorn to boost energy. Olympic athletes in the country have recently used sea-buckthorn-based sports drinks as part of their training. This herb is used in Russia in ointments to help shield cosmonauts from radiation damage while in orbit. The oil found in sea buckthorn contains high amounts of palmitoleic acid, which is a rare fatty acid that is found in skin fat. This fatty acid aids cell tissue and wound healing. Some U.S. cosmetic firms put this herb into their skin creams in order to provide protectant and anti-aging properties.

Sea buckthorn is recommended by herbalists in order to boost energy levels, promote wound healing, and shield the skin from the damage caused by ultraviolet rays. Some research on the wound-healing and tissue-protecting properties of this herb has provided positive results. The extract was shown to strengthen cardiac pump function and myocardial contractility in animal studies where dogs with heart failure were tested. The herb also seems to improve oxygen use in the hearts of dogs and animal heart cells in test tubes.

Generally, sea buckthorn oils are used externally for burns and other skin damage. They are also used internally for stomach and duodenal ulcers. Anecdotal reports of sea buckthorn extract have shown it being used to fight tumor growth, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

The berries of the sea buckthorn plant are used to provide anti-inflammatory properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are amino acids, carotenoids, fatty acids, flavonoids, fructose, glucose, and vitamins C and E. Primarily, sea buckthorn is extremely beneficial in treating burns, canker sores, cervicitis, colitis, lack of energy, esophagitis, skin protection, ulcers, and wounds. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by sea buckthorn, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Natural Vitamins
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Date: June 26, 2009 12:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Vitamins

Depression affects 22 percent of Americans between the ages of eighteen and older each year. It is one of the most common medical problems in the United States. Depression affects both young and old, and women twice as much as men. Depression is an illness of the whole body. It affects the nervous system, moods, thoughts, and behavior. It also affects the way you eat and sleep, the way you feel about yourself, and the way you react to and think about the people and things around you. Symptoms of depression can last for weeks, months, or years. There are various types of depression, which vary in the number of symptoms, the severity, and persistence.

People with depression generally withdraw and hide from society, losing interest in things around them and becoming incapable of experiencing pleasure. Symptoms of depression include chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, changes in appetite, headaches, backaches, digestive disorders, restlessness, irritability, quickness to anger, loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies, and feelings of worthlessness and inadequacy. Many people who are depressed think about death and consider suicide. Things appear bleak and time seems to pass slowly. Someone with depression can be chronically angry and irritable, sad and despairing, or display little or no emotion at all. Some people try to sleep off depression, while others do nothing but sit or lie around.

There are three main types of clinical depression: major depressive disorder, dysthmyic disorder, and bipolar depression. There are variations in the number of associated mental symptoms, severity, and persistence within these types. Dysthmic disorder is a chronic, but less severe type of depresses ion. It is characterized by milder, persistent symptoms that may last for years. It usually doesn’t interfere with everyday tasks. Bipolar disorders usually begin as depression but progress into alternating episodes of depression and mania, characterized by abnormally and persistently elevated mood, energy, restlessness, or irritability. Bipolar depression is commonly known as manic depression. It has other symptoms including inflated self-esteem, a decreased need for sleep, and increased talkativeness, racing thoughts, distractibility, physical agitation, and excessive risk-taking.

The causes of depression are not fully understood. However, it is assumed that there are most likely many and they are varied. Depression may be triggered by tension, stress, a traumatic life event, a hyper-stimulated immune system, chemical imbalances in the brain, thyroid disorders, nutritional deficiencies, poor diet, the consumption of sugar, mononucleosis, lack of exercise, endometriosis, any serious physical disorder, or even allergies. Whatever the factors that trigger it, depression starts with a disturbance in the part of the brain that governs moods. Most people can handle everyday stresses, with their bodies simply readjusting to these pressures. When stress is too great for a person and his or her adjustment mechanism is unresponsive, depression may be triggered.

The following vitamin nutrients are helpful for those who are suffering from depression: essential fatty acids, 5-HTP, L-tyrosine, SAMe, taurine, omega-3, vitamin B complex, zinc, choline, calcium, magnesium, chromium, GABA, lithium, NADH, and vitamin C with bioflavonoids. Additionally, the following herbs may be beneficial: lemon balm, ginger, ginkgo biloba, licorice root, oat straw, peppermint, Siberian ginseng, kava kava, and St. John’s wort.

Great vitamin supplements like the ones listed above are available at your local or internet health food store. When looking for natural vitamin supplements, always look for name brands to ensure that you receive a high quality and pure product.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Vitamins, minerals, and herbs are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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Phytoestrogen
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Date: March 27, 2009 01:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Phytoestrogen

Menopause is the time at which a woman stops ovulating and menstruation ceases, which indicates the end of fertility. Menopause is not a disease, but rather a natural progression in life, similar to puberty. Many years before a woman stops ovulating, her ovaries will begin to slow their production of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. Estrogen and progesterone are often thought of as the reproductive hormones.

Although estrogen is essential in reproduction, it is also extremely important in other non-reproductive organs and systems in the body. Cells in the uterus, bladder, breasts, skin, bones, arteries, heart, liver, and brain all contain estrogen receptors. These organs need this hormone in order to stimulate these receptors for normal cell function. Estrogen is needed to keep the skin smooth and moist and the body’s internal thermostat working properly. Estrogen is also essential for proper bone formation. Even though estrogen levels drop sharply after menopause, they do not disappear entirely. Other organs take over for the ovaries, continuing to produce a less potent form of estrogen. These organs, known as endocrine glands, secrete some hormones from fatty tissue in order to maintain bodily functions.

Progesterone works along with estrogen, stimulating changes in the lining of the uterus to complete the preparation for a fertilized egg during the second half of the menstrual cycle. If no egg is fertilized, the uterine lining is broken down and expelled, allowing the cycle to being again. Progesterone also has effects beyond the reproductive system, as it calms the brain and also affects other aspects of nervous system function. Testosterone is most important for both men and women, with women producing about 80 percent less than men do. However, it is the driving force for maintaining a healthy life and proper functioning organs.

The period when a woman’s body is preparing for menopause is known as perimenopause. For the majority of women, hormone production beings to slow down then they reach their thirties, continuing to diminish with age. Many women will experience few if any symptoms at this time, but others may suffer from anxiety, dry skin, fatigue, feelings of bloating, headaches, heart palpitations, hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, decreased interest in their significant other, loss of concentration, mood swings, night sweats, reduced stamina, urinary incontinence, uterine dryness and itching, weight gain, cold hands and feet, joint pain, hair loss, and/or skin changes.

Menopause occurs when a woman stops menstruating altogether. At this point, most of the acute problems a woman may have experienced are actually over and a new balance between all hormones should be established. However, women become increasingly vulnerable to other, potentially serious health problems at this time. Over the long term, the diminished supply of estrogen increased the likelihood of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and uterine atrophy. Osteoporosis especially is a major problem for women after menopause, with an estimated 80 percent of the hip fractures that occur in the United States every year being due to osteoporosis.

A proper diet, nutritional supplements, and exercise can help to minimize or eliminate most of the unpleasant side effects of menopause. The following nutrients are recommended for dealing with this stage of life: beta-1, cerasomal, coenzyme Q10, DHEA, essential fatty acids, lecithin granules, a multi-enzyme complex, soy protein, vitamin B complex, vitamin D3, vitamin E, boron, calcium, magnesium, quercetin, silica, zinc, l-arginine, multiglandular complex, a multivitamin and mineral complex, vitamin C, aloe vera gel, slippery elm, damiana, amaranth, chickweed, dandelion greens, nettle, seaweed, watercress, anise, black cohosh, fennel, licorice, raspberry, sage, unicorn root, wild yam root, hops, valerian root, gotu kola, red clover, dong quai, St. John’s wort, and Siberian ginseng.

All these above listed vitamins and herbs are available in capsule, tablet, or powder forms. When looking for natural alternatives to help replace estrogen naturally, look to your local or internet health food store for name brand products that can help restore an imbalance over time.

--
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Herbs
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Date: October 08, 2008 09:41 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Herbs

Comfrey, one of the most valuable herbs known to botanical medicine, has been used for centuries to heal. It is full of amino acid, lysine, B12, and vitamins A and C as well as high in calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and protein. Additionally, it contains iron, magnesium, sulphur, copper, zinc, and eighteen amino acids. Echinacea is an herb that stimulates immunity within the body and increases its ability to fight infections. It includes vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron, iodine, copper, sulphur, and potassium. Fennel is used to help stabilize the nervous system and move waste material out of the body.

It also has properties to help against convulsions and mucous and contains potassium, sulphur, and sodium. Garlic acts to rejuvenate the body in all of its functions as it stimulates the lymphatic system to help rid the body of toxins. This herb contains vitamin A and C, selenium, sulphur, calcium, manganese, copper, vitamin B1, iron, potassium, and zinc.

Along with the above herbs, there are others that are good for helping with herpes. Ginger is very effective in its ability to cleanse the bowels, kidneys, and skin and contains protein, vitamins A, C, and B complex, as well as calcium, phosphorus, iron, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mullein loosens mucus within the body and moves it out of the body. It is high in iron, magnesium, potassium, and sulphur and also contains vitamins A, D, and B complex. Sweet birch cleanses the blood and is extremely high in fluoride. It also contains vitamins A, C, E, B1, and B2, and calcium, chlorine, copper, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and silicon. Thyme, which destroys fungal infections and skin parasites, has B complex, vitamins C and D, and iodine, sodium, silicon, and sulphur. White willow is also helpful in herpes, as it has a strong antiseptic ability for infected wounds, ulcerations, and eczema.

Along with all of the above herbs, there are many herbs that help protect and build the nervous system, which is closely related to the immune system. These herbs include: alfalfa, dandelion, fenugreek, gotu kola, hops, kelp, lady’s slipper, lobelia, parsley, passion flower, skullcap, wood betony, and red clover. Additionally, there are many herbs for circulation, which increase blood supply to the heart muscles and entire body. Good circulation is crucial for a healthy immune system and can be improved with capsicum, garlic, gentian root, hawthorn berries, kelp, licorice root, and lecithin.

Because the glands regulate many major body functions, these functions often interrelate with the circulatory and nervous systems. Some glandular herbs include: golden seal, Siberian ginseng, burdock, Echinacea, sarsaparilla, black walnut, chaparral, and red clover blossoms. Along with the above, there are several herbs that help with the skin, which can be extremely beneficial to those who are dealing with herpes.

Red marine algae is a natural algae that grows in the ocean. This algae is harvested by many countries including China, Japan, and the United States. Red marine algae contains polysaccharides that can boost the immune system. These special polysaccharides stimulate the immune system to fight viruses and disease which can help fight herpes.

Among these herbs is aloe vera, which helps to clean, soothe, and heal the skin as it contains calcium, potassium, sodium, manganese, magnesium, iron, lecithin, and zinc. Also, comfrey, golden seal, myrrh, bayberry, and oat straw are all good herbs for the skin. As you can see these herbs are loaded with vitamins, minerals and polysaccharides which are essential to the body to keep the immune system strong and the body able to fight off viruses and disease.



--
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Panax Ginseng
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Date: September 22, 2008 09:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Panax Ginseng

Panax is a type of perennial plant with fleshy roots, and grows in Eastern Asia. Ginsengs contain ginsenosides that are triterpene saponins, steroidal compounds that are found only in Panax ginseng. The effects of these saponins are difficult to establish, but they are believed to be behind the properties of ginseng.

Panax ginseng is found predominantly in Korea, China and Siberia, although a genus has also been found in Vietnam. Panax are adaptogenic herbs that help promote resistance to anxiety, fatigue and stress, and are said to adapt the body to resist a number of different stressors. It has been proposed that adaptogenic herbs can balance the endocrine hormones of the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal axis.

They also normalize the immune system, and increase the activity of phagocytes, the killer cells. Additionally, they not only help to maintain homeostasis, but are believed to go further and act as allostatic agents, adapting response to maintain system stability in a more dynamic fashion, by changing interactive functions as opposed to the individual adaption’s made in homeostasis.

Not all ginsengs are the same, and although Siberian ginseng is an adaptogen, it is not a true ginseng. Its roots are woody rather than fleshy, and it contains eleutherosides as opposed to ginsenosides. These also are triterpenoid saponins, but of a different adaptogen. The herb is actually Eleutherococcus senticosus as opposed to Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius, both true ginsengs. Siberian ginseng was misnamed as a marketing ploy.

American ginseng is Panax quinquefolius, sometimes referred to by the Chinese as Huaqishen. It, too, is an adaptogen and a true ginseng, containing ginsenosides. However, it contains much less ginsenonide Rg1 than panax. This ginsenonide appears to possess estrogen-like activity and improves spatial learning. The other forms of ginesonide found in panax ginseng are:

Ginsenoside Rb1: This appears in greatest concentration in American ginseng, and appears to have an effect on the reproductive system. It not only has an effect on the testicles, but is believed to increase testosterone production through its stimulating effect on luteinizing hormone. It also helps to rdeduce the incidence of angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels from old, and also a stage in the development of malignant tumors from dormant ones.

Ginsenoside Rc: this possesses sedative properties, and in a study on breast cancer was found to have an effect in inhibiting the growth of these particular cancer cells. Ginsenoside Rc might therefore have use in the treatment or prevention of breast cancer. Studies have also suggested that this ginsenoside could increase the motility of sperm: the motiliy of sperm was found to increase significantly in a solution of ginsenoside Rc.

Ginsenoside Rf: this is present only in panax ginseng, and studies have indicate that it has an inhibitory effect on the Ca2+ neural channels in the brain, and so cokld have an analgesic effect. Studies have as yet failed to explain this effect that is seen in animal tests, but are continuing on this ginsenoside.

Ginsenoside Re: this ginsenoside has strong antioxidant effects and has a significant antidiabetic effect in that is reduces insulin resistance, which is likely why ginseng is taken to treat Type 2 diabetes. Studies are ongoing into the properties of this ginsenoside, and also on the other 10 or more that are known to be present in Panax ginseng. The effects of ginseng are difficult to establish with certainity because they work through so many different pathways and it is difficult to isolate one. More than one ginsenoside, for example, affects the calcium channels in the brain, and it is difficult to determine which does what.

There are fewer ginsenosides in Panax quinquefoilius, and in the USA it is only the panax version that can be traded as simply ‘ginseng’. One of the main problems with all ginsengs is that although it is one of the most studied plants, the majority of the studies have been on animals, and due to this, and the difficulties caused by the multiple pathways described earlier, many of the postulations have not been proved in humans.

However, if the theory as it is know today is taken into consideration along with the traditional uses of ginseng in traditional Indian (ayurvedic), Chinese and Native American medicine, it would be fairly accurate to say that ginseng is useful in helping your body to recover after illness or surgery, and to help you to deal with stress. It has also been proved to lower your blood glucose (sugar) levels, and help in the treatment of Type II diabetes, as already mentioned. There is evidence that it helps to boost your mental performance, memory and might help to slow down the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Ginseng can also give a boost to your energy levels, and it is genarally accepted that panax ginseng is more effective than the American version. In traditional medicine, Asian ginseng is said to be warming, and the American variery cooling. Thus Panax ginseng is useful for people recovering from illness and trying to recover their strength, acts as a tonic, stimulant and supports the immune system. In other words it helps the body to get whole again after being depleted.

It should not be used if you get very hot and red, such as with heat stroke, unless you use it in combination with the American version, because these are conditions of high yang and this type of ginseng will increase the yang even further.

American ginseng, on the other hand, is good for those with fevers, hypertension (high blood pressure), and suffereing the effcts of heat. It helps build the yin and reduce the yang, so if you always feel flushed and hot or are hyperactive then go for the American, and if you easily get chilled or find your hands and feet get cold very easily, reach for the Asian ginseng to increase your yang.

You often find ginseng as an ingredient in soft drinks, but the concentration is so low that it has no metabolic or pharmacological effect. The dose to be taken should be as stated on the pack, since there is no specific standardization. It has been noted that the effects can be lost if an excess of ginseng is taken, but generally the herb is safe and if you feel a bit down or lacking in energy, ginseng can work wonders for you.




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Eleuthero
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Date: May 28, 2008 01:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eleuthero

Eleutherococcus, better known as Siberian Ginseng, is best known for increasing endurance and stamina in people who use it on a regular basis. It is also known for its properties that aid the body in fighting fatigue and stress. Keeping both of these physical stressors under control will improve the body’s ability to optimize physical and mental performance.

Eleutherococcus is an adaptogen. This means that it will help the body maintain a normal adrenal function in order to reduce stress and combat disease. This species of ginseng is generally used for boosting and maintaining the immune system. It plays a major role in increasing resistance to mild infections and colds.

How to Use Eleutherococcus

This herbal product should be taken by mouth. The dosage will depend on the source of the herb and the purpose of its use. As with any species of ginseng, Eleutherococcus may cause sleep difficulties. It is; therefore, wise to avoid taking the product near your usual bedtime. It is also recommended that you do not take Eleutherococcus for more than three weeks at a time continual use will reduce its effectiveness.

What Does it Work for?

* Fatigue (physical and psychological). Fatigue is one of the most common complaints of people in the general population. It often poses a problem for the patient, as well as the physician trying to treat them. It is usually caused by endocrine dysfunction of the thyroid and/or adrenal glands.

* Hypothyroidism. This is caused when there is low thyroid hormone function. The result is less energy production at the cellular level. This causes the metabolic rate of the body to plummet. The thyroid also controls growth, transcription of genes, carbohydrate and fat metabolism, heart rate, blood volume heartbeat, muscle contraction, digestion, gastrointestinal function and endocrine hormones.

* Low adrenal function. The adrenal glands secrete steroid hormones including cortisol, aldosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). An imbalance in these hormones can cause a wealth of other health problems. It can also activate a regular stress response in the body, which takes its toll on overall healthy function of the body and mind.

Side Effects

Common side effects of using Siberian Ginseng may include agitation, headache, nervousness and trouble sleeping. If you experience diarrhea, fast or irregular heartbeat, skin rash or unusual vaginal bleeding, discontinue use and contact your pharmacist or physician immediately.

Who Should Not Use Eleutherococcus

If you suffer from any of the following health problems, you should consult a physician before using Eleutherococcus:

* Cancer * Fever * High blood pressure * Low blood pressure * Diabetes * Heart problems * Allergies

If you have allergy issues with any species of ginseng, you should avoid all of them. Ginseng may lower blood sugar levels. Diabetic patients should carefully monitor their blood levels while taking this product. Liquid forms of this product may contain sugar and/or alcohol. If you suffer from diabetes, alcoholism or liver disease, use extreme caution. This product is not recommended for use by women who are pregnant or breast-feeding.

It is important to consult your pharmacist or someone you know is trained and educated in the use of Eleutherococcus. Some products have been found to contain additives and impurities that may be harmful to the consumer. Only use the purest forms of Siberian Ginseng that are available to you.

Aside from the specific conditions listed, Eleutherococcus can play an important role in the overall health of the mind and body. Every aspect of our physical health relies on the health and normal function of all of our internal systems. Our psychological health also relies on these systems all working in unison with each other. A healthy and balanced mental state requires an ever-present inner harmony.



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10 Top Winter Cold & Flu Supplements
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Date: January 14, 2008 10:01 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 10 Top Winter Cold & Flu Supplements

As the winter weather continues to keep people close together indoors, viruses causing influenza and the common cold are able to more easily multiply. However, there are ways to prevent these unwanted germs from invading your body. Here is a list of the top ten dietary supplements that help the immune system fight and repel cold and flu bugs.


AHCC (active hexose correlated compound) is made from mushrooms. This supplement was first developed in Japan in the late 1980s and has been used and studied for its effect on the immune system. Last year’s research showed that AHCC can boost the activity of natural killer cells, which destroy the cells that have become infected with a virus.

Andrographis has long been used in Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine to boost the immune system. Actually, andrographis was first used during the Indian flu epidemic of 1919, where it was credited with stalling the spread of the disease. According to research, andrographis works better than a placebo for reducing the symptoms of respiratory infections and it may even prevent the infection in the first place. These studies used a proprietary andrographis product which combines the herb with a Siberian ginseng.


Beta glucan is a fiber-like complex sugar that can be found in oats, barley, and the cell walls of mushrooms. It provides a boost to the immune system which enhancing resistance to viruses and bacteria. In fact, beta glucan has been shown to boost the activity of phagocytes, special immune system cells which engulf and destroy germs.


Echinacea has a long history of traditional use; with it actually being one of the most widely used herbs in Native American medicine. Instead of having a direct germ-killing effect, Echinacea stimulates the body’s own immune defenses. Many studies go back as far as 1970 have shown that Echinacea boosts the immune system so that it can protect against infections invaders. A new study has found that Echinacea can reduce the odds of developing a cold by 58 percent and shortens the length of a cold to 1.4 days.


Elderberry was considered in Roman times to be a flu remedy. Recently, elderberry extract has been researched for its role in treating influenza infections, especially when it is taken with in the first 24 hours of developing symptoms. One recent study proved that individuals who were taking elderberry recovered four days sooner from influenza than those taking a placebo. Additionally, the use of other medications was less for those who used elderberry.


Garlic improves resistance to disease by boosting immune function. Many studies have found that garlic stimulates immunity because it increases the number of white blood cells and other immune system team members. A recent study proved that a group of individuals taking garlic caught significantly fewer colds and recovered more quickly from the colds they did come down with than the other group which was taking a placebo.


Ginseng boosts immune function in all of its forms. A study of adults who were taking American ginseng daily during the winter months found that those people, compared to those taking a placebo, caught fewer colds and needed less sick days. Additionally, Siberian ginseng and Asian ginseng can also build defenses against winter germs.


Propolis is created by bees when resins from plants are mixed with wax. This propolis coats the inside of the beehive with an antiseptic layer and it can have similar benefits when taken by humans. Propolis stimulates the body’s immune system. It has been proven in studies that taking propolis extract can protect against colds and other upper respiratory infections. Children who take propolis daily for three winter months have been proven to catch fewer colds than those kids who are taking a placebo.


Many research reviews have found that Vitamin C does reduce the length of a cold episode and weaken the severity of an infection for the general population. For those individuals who are engaged in extreme exercise, vitamin C can also help prevent a cold.


Zinc lozenges, when they are taken within 24 hours of the first cold symptom, can keep cold viruses from taking ground in the respiratory tract. The use of a zinc lozenge every couple of hours also causes colds to resolve more quickly and symptoms to be less severe.


Our immune system is out first line of defense against the cold and flu, as well as the diseases we may come down with. Keeping our immune system in tip top shape is key to a happier and healthier life. The above herbs can help boost the immune system along with a dietary change and exercise plan one can reduce the length of or prevent sickness over a life time.



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Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens
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Date: October 18, 2007 11:13 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens

Life today places a number of different types of stresses upon us. There are the normal stresses of living, of facing problems at work, financial worries and family stresses. Schedules are becoming busier as we try to pack more and more into each day, and relaxation time is cut to a minimum. For many of us, the stress starts when we waken and rush through breakfast, if we have time for one, to catch the bus or train to work, or to slip into the morning traffic rush that takes us an hour to travel 10 miles or less.

Once at work we have problems to deal with that continue throughout a rushed lunch period, and then back to the stress of trying to return home in the evening to open the bills and check if we have enough in the bank to pay them. However, that is not all.

Our environment is continually changing, and our bodies are subject to the stresses of pollution from the planes, trains and automobiles, not to mention the pesticides, preservatives plastics and harsh lighting. The noise of air conditioning and the continual musak of the stores and shopping malls and everything else that goes to completely stress us out, weekdays and weekends.

That is ignoring the smog, the disappearing ozone layer and increased UV radiation, the greenhouse effect and global warming, El Nino and everything else that causes worry or affects the delicate balance of the body’s biochemistry. Rather than adapting to our environment we are continually striving to adapt the environment to suit our needs. We should develop a flexibility of mind and body so that we can survive these modern-day stresses, and this is where the substances known as adaptogens are important.

Adaptogens help us to adapt to the environment and withstand the stresses of modern life. The term was first used by Russian N.V. Lazarev in 1947 who defined an adaptogen as a substance meeting three specific criteria: it should cause a minimal disruption to the normal physiological function of the body, it must work by means of a range of chemical, physical and biochemical factors rather than through one specific action and must have an overall effect of normalization, so that no condition is aggravated to improve another.

There are a large number of identified adaptogens, among them several forms of ginseng: Panax, American, Siberian and Japanese; licorice, schizandra berries, rhodiola and others. These adaptogens tend to work in the body by improving the body’s availability and use of energy, improving the efficiency of removal of the metabolic waste and by-products, supporting the adrenal function so that the effects of stress are reduced or countered, improving the utilization of oxygen and helping to build up body tissue. In general the body works more efficiently in generating and using energy, muscle tissue and counteracting the effects of modern day stress, both environmental and psychological.

Of the ginsengs, Panax is very expensive for regular use, although many people prefer it. However, studies have shown that Siberian, or eleuthero ginseng, is a stronger adaptogen that Panax which is also called Korean or Chinese ginseng. In fact the other forms, including American and Japanese, tend to over-stimulate the body, and can also cause unwanted side effects such as constipation and over-excitement. The Siberian ginseng tends not to show these symptoms.

Siberian ginseng contains seven active substances known as eleutherosides A – F which are not present in the other ginsengs. These substances appear to have several properties that have been clinically proven. For example, they relieve insomnia, one of the symptoms of stress, high and low blood pressure, bronchitis, various forms of neuroses and, it is claimed, also some types of cancer. Siberian ginseng also allows humans to withstand noise, heat and extra stresses caused by severe workloads. It improves athletic performance and allows people to improve their work output under a variety of stresses. Athletes can train harder and recover quicker.

Another adaptogen is schizandra berries (also called schizandra chinensis and magnolia vine). Chinese herbalists class medicinal herbs by the five different flavors, sour, bitter, salty, acrid and sweet. Schizandra berries possess all five, and are therefore considered by the Chinese to balance all the systems of the body.

It is used in the West as a stress reducing adaptogen and is also included in sports and weight loss formulae. It helps insomnia and improves endurance and mental coordination. Schizandra is believed to be a good tonic for the liver and is often used in combination with Siberian ginseng (eleuthero) and licorice. The latter is another popular herb in China that is said to be a good tonic for the spleen. Licorice itself is a known anti-inflammatory since it contains flavanoids and saponins that promote the immune system. Licorice is thought be a useful supplement for HIV patients due to its effect on the immune system. It also increases corticosteroid levels by inhibiting the liver’s ability to break down adrenal hormone. However, people with high blood pressure should be careful with licorice since it can cause sodium retention. Like any other medication, you should seek your physician’s advice if you have any existing conditions.

Rhodiola, also referred as roseroot, is used for improved memory and enhanced vitality and it can also be used as a mood modifier. It is used by athletes of all types for increased strength and endurance, and improved cardiovascular and muscle recovery time. The Russians call it ‘Golden Root’ and it is a safe and effective adaptogen.

More and more people are turning to adaptogens to help them cope with the hustle and bustle of their daily lives, and they are becoming increasingly available from ordinary health stores. If you are finding it difficult to stay energetic and active then try them out. Not all work with every individual, but there is a large variety to choose from and most people are able to find an adaptogen that suits them and enables them to adapt to the stresses of daily life.



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Supplements for Sexual health!
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Date: April 17, 2007 02:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Supplements for Sexual health!

Improving Sexual Performance Naturally

Sex. It’s everywhere. It’s on TV (a lot!). It’s in the books we read and the movies we watch. Even the radio seems a veritable hot bed of sex. (what would hard rock, soft jazz, or Motown classics be without songs about sex?) Magazines are full of sex and it’s not just the “naughty” ones with glossy centerfolds. From Sports Illustrated to Good Housekeeping, sex makes for titillating headlines and cover stories. In fact, 21st Century America seems to be awash in sex, except where it counts – in the bedrooms and love lives of married Americans.

No one really knows for sure how many of the 113 million married Americans are living as couples with DINS (dual income, no sex). Estimates range from 15 to 50 percent. Even couples who have sex fairly often feel like they’re not having enough sex or that it’s not as enjoyable as it was in the past, or both. And while women are stereotyped as the sex refusers and avoiders, surveys show that both women and men decline spousal advances fairly equally.

What’s really interesting about this lack of sexual activity in America, is that the very same thing is happening to husbands and wives residing in Paris and London, as well as Lisbon and Madrid. Research has shown that married couples who reside within Western civilized countries are much more likely to have unhappy sex lives than their counterparts living elsewhere in the world. That’s because the married couples residing in the rainforests of Brazil, the streets of Beijing, and the mountains of Tibet have access to powerful plant medicines that keep their sexual relationships healthy and happy. In fact, in China and India alone, over one billion men and women routinely incorporate plant medicines for healthy and satisfying sex.

As a medicine hunter, I have discovered effective plants and herbs al over the planet that really do improve orgasms in women and erections in men. Now it’s your turn. I’m going to teach you how to enhance your sexuality and introduce you to an entire arsenal of libido lifting plants to help make sex fun, vibrant, and satisfying for both you and your partner.

 

Q. These plants sound too good to be true. Do they really work?

A. Yes, they do. Part of their success is their ability to work with your body’s innate mechanisms for healthy sex. Good sex is much more than just stimulated body parts. But it’s a good place to start!

A man needs an erect penis that remains firm past foreplay and on into intercourse. He also needs to sustain that erection and experience forceful and pleasurable ejaculation when he and his partner are both ready for his orgasm. A woman needs to feel desire and feel desired for her nipples to be aroused, her clitoris stimulated, and her vagina lubricated – the basics leading to her orgasm.

Plants that enhance sex can help men and women obtain these bare necessities of sex. And unlike other supplements, you’ll know if the medicinal plant you’ve purchased is actually doing what it promised to do. You can’t really tell if the calcium supplement you take each day is making your bones stronger. But you will be able to tell pretty soon if Catuaba, for example, is increasing your sexual desire.

Q. Night after night, my husband falls asleep on the sofa. And the honest to goodness truth is that I’m too tired for sex, too. I love my husband and once upon a time I loved sex. But my job, the kids, those never-ending errands, and trying to keep up with the laundry are too exhausting. Is there a plant that can rev us up?

A. Many women are in the same sexless boat you’re sailing around in and they don’t like it any more than you do. In fact, women all over the world put their family’s needs before their own, leading to some very tired moms and wives.

Life’s demands can also impair sexual performance in men. Work stressors, family demands, and home maintenance result in fatigue and lack of energy. Men find that they have no energy left to devote to to sex at the end of the day.

But, over 80 percent of married couples in the world have at their disposal a health care system that integrates sex into their personal health and well being. For centuries, millennia actually, practitioners of traditional medicine have prescribed Maca and Rhodiola to reduce “sexual fatigue” in women and men who are just too tired to make love.

 

Sex Enhancing Plants for Men and Women

How They Work

Maca (Lepidum meyenii)

For the past several years in Peru, where the Maca plant grows, physicians have prescribed extracts from this plant to men with low libido and diminished erectile function, which excellent results. Recently researchers studying Maca have discovered two compounds they think are responsible for improved sexual stamina, namely the macamides and macaenes. It is these same compounds that help men and women obtain more frequent and more powerful orgasms.

Rhodiola Rosea

This hardy plant grows high in the mountains of Europe and Asia, enduring cold and snow and lack of sunlight for much of the year. Hoping to gain some of Rhodiola’s energy and stamina for themselves, early Siberians used extracts of the plants to boost strength and stamina. Not only did they have more energy, they discovered they had more sexual stamina, too.

 

Rhodiola is an adaptogen, a plant that helps us adapt to changes in life and the stresses of everyday life. When we’re stressed, our bodies shift into high gear causing a cascade of hormones to prevent and reduce harm. In cases of trauma (like car accident or surgery (or simply nature at work (such as childbirth), these hormones are necessary. However, when we experience stress that’s caused by work (your boss), or family (your teen-aged children), or personal struggles (your weight), this hormonal cascade can do more harm than good –causing fatigue, added weight gain, poor metabolism, and impaired sexual function.

 

Rhodiola helps make sure the hormonal cascade occurs when it’s needed, to protect our health, not harm it. The result is better energy, better vitality, and better sex!

 

Q. Since I had a baby four months ago, I have no desire for sex. This is making my husband pretty frustrated and me too, actually. I’d love to want sex again.

A. A married woman with a baby and a toddler or two can feel that her body isn’t really hers. So much for feeling sexy! While this fact can be a source of great pride and joy, it can also drain desire.

As women enter perimenopause – those years when they are still menstruating despite fluctuating estrogen levels – they often have no desire for sex. Since estrogen is the engine that drives women’s reproductive function, when it starts to go, sex goes too. Women who have reached menopause may find their minds wandering during sex. Pondering the car’s need for an oil change or if the milk in the refrigerator has reached its expiration date makes for pretty blah sex. It also makes it nearly impossible to achieve orgasm.

Once more, traditional medicine has some answers:

Sex Plants for Women

How They Work

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

Just like Rhodiola, Ashwagandha is an adaptogen, possessing powerful sex-enhancing powers. And just like Rhodiola, Ashwagandha has been helping women boost their desire for sex. Long considered India’s most potent sex-enhancing plant, the country’s women have used Ashwagandha for years to rev up their sex drives.

Catuaba (Erythroxylum Catuaba)

Catuaba is a tree that grows in the dense, lush Brazilian Amazon, the largest tropical rainforest on Earth. For hundreds and hundreds of years, tribal peoples have used Catuaba bark to stimulate sexual desire. According to folk legend, the Tupi Indians discovered Catuaba bark’s sex-enhancing effects and passed the knowledge on to other rainforest tribes. Today, Catuaba is used worldwide by women desiring passionate sex.

Eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) extract

Sometimes called Siberian ginseng, Eleuthero is actually not a ginseng at all, only a distant cousin. This leafy shrub is native to Eastern Russia and the mountains of China and has been used by tribal peoples for over 2,000 years to eliminate sexual fatigue. Eleuthero is another adaptogen, invigorating sexual function and restoring balance to all body functions.

Q. My husband has a desire for sex, but sometimes it’s not enough. Even if we’re both in the mood, he can’t maintain his erection very long. It’s very frustrating for us both.

A. For men it’s often their equipment that lets them down. As men age, they find they can’t get an erection hard enough or keep an erection long enough to satisfy their partners and themselves.

While women can fake an orgasm if they’re tired, men have to perform every single time they have sex. Luckily, Mother Nature can help:

Sex Plants for Men

How They Work

Horny Goat Weed (Epimedium species)

This aptly named sex plant has been in use for over two thousand years, restoring sexual fire, treating impotence, and increasing production of semen. The green leaves of Horny Goat Weed are filled with numerous natural compounds, responsible for these sexual effects. Research shows that horny goat weed has activities very similar to the androgens, sex hormones that stimulate desire in men.

Yohimbe (Pausinystalia yohimbe)

Yohimbe is nature’s Viagra – it helps men attain firm erections. Not surprisingly, Yohimbe has been used for a long time as a fold medicine aphrodisiac. The bark contains Yohimbine, a compound known to stimulate engorged vessels within the penis and nerves of the lower spine. It’s no wonder Yohimbe has the well-deserved reputation as a superior sexual stimulant.

Panax ginseng

One of the most highly regarded plants in traditional Chinese medicine, Ginseng stimulates the central nervous system, invigorates the brain, increases resistance to stress and fatigue, and sharpens the mind. Ginseng is also used by millions of men to enhance libido and sexual vitality. In an erectile dysfunction study, men who took Ginseng had a 42% improvement in erectile function compared to placebo. Researchers theorize that ginseng increases nitric oxide in the penis, dilating the vessels of the corpus cavernosum - the very same mechanism that makes Viagra work.

Q. There are hundreds of supplements that claim to make men hard and women weak with desire. I’ve tried some of these, and they don’t do anything. When should I believe that the herbs and plan medicines you have discovered are nay better?

A. There are a lot of “snake oil” companies out there pitching products that promise to improve our sex lives but do absolutely nothing. One reason for this glut of useless supplements is simple demand. Men and women trying to make their sex lives better, are willing to give most products the benefit of the doubt and buy one or two. Sex sells – and even products that are purchased one time only will make big profits.

To get the most for your money, make sure the sexual supplement you are considering is from a well-respected manufacturer. Ask store staff, surf the Internet, and do some searching for the best nutraceutical companies. Make sure the herbs are standardized and that the extracts are concentrated fro optimal benefit.

Q. Are these sex-enhancing plants safe?

A. Despite years of use by practitioners of traditional medicine, significant adverse effects have not been reported for most sex-enhancing plants. However, men who have already been diagnosed with certain health conditions such as high blood pressure, thyroid disease, prostate problems, or other illnesses should use caution when selecting any health supplement. The same advice applies to women, especially women who are pregnant or nursing. And always remember to keep your doctor informed about the supplements you are using, especially if you are also taking prescription drugs. But the sex-enhancing plants have been traveling on planet Earth for a long, long time. And hopefully they’ll be here for lot longer, continuing to work effectively and go about their business of safely improving orgasms and erections and making sex great for men and women all over the world.

Q. OK, exactly how did early native healers figure out which plants improve sex? Was it just simple trial and error?

A. It does seem pretty remarkable that tribal peoples have discovered the right plants to treat diseases and improve health without modern day scientific advances.

From my many years as a “medicine hunter” in rainforests and grasslands and marshes and mountains, I’ve learned that healing plants exist for virtually every health need. It’s up to the medicine man or women to put the plant into practice. These healers have been able to do this successfully for thousands of people, by intensively studying and working with the plants. By putting themselves into the plant’s world, becoming part of the world around them, native healers have intuitively discovered which plant helps which disease. It wasn’t mere luck that brought all those plants and all those healers together. It was the natural and spiritual connection existing between the two.

Q. Are there other “natural” remedies we can use to improve our sex lives?

A. The easiest way to naturally enhance your sex life is to practice, practice, practice! Because if you don’t use it, you might lose it. Studies have shown that couples in the Amazon rainforest as well as couples in the concrete jungle of New York City have better sex lives if thy make sex a priority. All the sex-enhancing plants in the world are useless if the men and women taking them don’t put them to the test.

Men who smoke need to quit. Research has shown that cigarettes send men’s sex lives up in smoke. Men who smoke more than 20 cigarettes daily have a 60 percent higher risk of erectile dysfunction compared to men who never smoked. That’s because smoking decreases blood flow making it difficult for men to obtain an erection.

And finally, since sex is a visual and tactile endeavor, there are quite natural and creative ways to give it a boost. Visually stimulating images can arouse even the tiredest of the tired. Premiere Magazine recently compiled a list of the most erotic movie sex scenes ever. You don’t have to feel embarrassed when renting these movies (as you might with pornography) at the video store and they are guaranteed to light up your life:

1.      Diane Lane and Oliver Martinez making love in UNFAITHFUL (2002)

2.      Hilary Swank pleasuring Chloe Sevigny in BOYS DON’T CRY (1999)

3.      Brad Pitt and Claire Forlani making love in MEET JOE BLACK (1998)

4.      Leonardo DiCaprio drawing Kate Winslet in the nude in TITANIC (1997)

5.      Sharon Stone uncrossing her legs while she is being interrogated in a room full of en in BASIC INSTINCT (1992)

6.      Patrick Swazye and Demi Moore in the pottery secene early on in GHOST (1990)

7.      Michael Douglas and Glenn Close having sex in an elevator in FATAL A TTRACTION (1987)

8.      Mickey Rourke caressing Kim Basinger’s body with an ice cube in 9 1.2 WEEKS (1986)

9.      William Hurt and Kathleen Turner having sex in BODY HET (1981)

10.  Julie Christine and Donald Sutherland making love in DON’T LOOK NOW (1973)

11.  Rita Hayworth flipping back her hair and singing “Put The Blame on Mame” in FILDA (1946)

One Important Last Point

Sex always has consequences. And improving your sex life does not eliminate the requirement to practice it responsibly. Sexually transmitted diseases, hepatitis, and HIV/AIDS must be prevented, pregnancy must be considered and consent between partners must exist.

Conclusion

Sexual activity keeps us connected – both tangibly and spiritually to our heart’s desire. It helps us feel secure and well loved and adds to our self esteem. In other words, good sex is important to good life.

But all of us need a little help now and then. Sex-enhancing plants that have been used for thousands of years by millions of people provide that help. You can have actual sexual healing with effective sexual supplements and maybe find out what you’ve been missing.

After all, 80 percent of the world’s married couples can’t be wrong!



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Male Response - Male Libido Symptoms - Source Naturals
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Date: July 09, 2005 01:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Male Response - Male Libido Symptoms - Source Naturals

Read artical on Male Response...

Male Response is a Bio-Aligned Formula™

Multi-System Support: for Sexual Vigor Hormonal Function Nettle, Panax Ginseng, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Zinc, Vitamin B-5

Energy Generation: Ashwagandha, Damiana, Maca, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Siberian Ginseng, Zinc, Vitamins B-5 & B-6

Circulation: Ginger, Ginkgo Biloba, Panax Ginseng, Yohimbe, Vitamin E

Brain and Nervous System: Libido: Ashwagandha, Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Muira Puama, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Tribulus, Yohimbe, Copper, Vitamins B-5 & B-6

Prostate Gland: Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Nettle, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Selenium, Zinc, Vitamin E

M A L E R E S P O N S E™ Virility Complex - Healthy male response is more complicated than many people realize. There are a range of interrelated body systems that affect m a l e sexual function. M A L E R E S P O N S E helps support balance in these systems: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.
Hormonal Function Energy Generation Circulation Brain & Nervous System: Libido Prostate Gland
Action Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the m a l e sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. Fatigue and poor energy can take a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. This formula combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and invigorate the sexual r e s p o n s e. Proper circulation of blood is vital for the m a l e sexual r e s p o n s e. This formula contains several herbs traditionally used for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, reportedly stimulates selected portions of the nervous system and increases blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. In addition to providing supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, this formula contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and rejuvenating properties. A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support m a l e reproductive health and are essential for the proper functioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production.
CONTENT Nettle, Panax Ginseng, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Zinc, Vitamin B-5 Ashwagandha, Damiana, Maca, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Siberian Ginseng, Zinc, Vitamins B-5 & B-6 Ginger, Ginkgo Biloba, Panax Ginseng, Yohimbe, Vitamin E Ashwagandha, Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Muira Puama, Panax Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Tribulus, Yohimbe, Copper, Vitamins B-5 & B-6 Avena Sativa (Oats), Damiana, Nettle, Saw Palmetto, Tribulus, Selenium, Zinc, Vitamin E



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Immune Health - Herbs to Maintain A Healthy Immune System
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Date: July 01, 2005 04:21 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Immune Health - Herbs to Maintain A Healthy Immune System

Immune Health By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt The immune system has been receiving a lot of media attention, especially since the rise in recognized immune system deficiency diseases. The efficient functioning of the immune system is of paramount importance to everyone, adults and children alike, since it controls our ability to fend off illness, whether it is a common cold or more deadly disease. The immune system is made up of a combination of specialized cells, chemicals, tissues and organs. These include the lymph nodes, thymus gland, spleen, bone marrow and tonsils, as well as specialized white blood cells, which recognize and engulf invading microorganisms and cellular debris.

The ability of the immune system to function optimally is influenced by many factors. These include inherent genetic makeup, environmental influences (such as pollution, pesticides, hormones, artificial flavoring/colorings in food), obesity, stress levels, exposure to infective agents, etc. Specific research suggests that consuming excessive amounts of sugar interferes with immune function. We can aid our immune system by eating a high amount of organic green vegetables, whole grains and nuts, while cutting down on 'junk food' consumption. Stress reduction, through prayer, meditation, yoga and moderate exercise can also help.

Herbs may be used in two different ways to help the immune system. Tonics strengthen the immune system over time, while strong immune system stimulants have a more immediate action, and are used during an acute infection.

Tonics

Herbal tonics work to help maintain a dynamic balance in the body and usually need to be taken long-term. Astragalus is said to build "Wei chi". "Chi" is the Chinese concept of life energy force. "Wei chi" is thought of as 'protection'. Current scientific studies confirm the positive benefits of Astragalus on the immune system. One study by the National Cancer Institute demonstrated Astragalus' ability to help strengthen resistance of the immune system, especially to viral infections. Reishi, called the "mushroom of immortality", has been used for centuries as an overall tonic. Chinese physicians have used Ligustrum berries specifically for their immune-enhancing activities. They are often combined with Astragalus for a synergistic effect. Coptis is another Chinese herb that contains the bitter yellow compound, berberine. This herb helps the immune system prevent infections. Many of these herbs can be found in the unique combination formula called Immunotonic™ (alcohol-free). Immunotonic™ offers the ideal way to experience the benefits of many herbs in one convenient supplement.

Other immune system tonic herbs include Siberian Ginseng and Schisandra. Siberian Ginseng is an adaptogen that helps to balance the immune system. It gives strength and fortitude, especially when dealing with environmental stress. Schisandra has been shown to build non-specific resistance, improve brain function, increase work capacity and build strength.

Immune Stimulants

Osha Root has been used traditionally by both Chinese and Native Americans (who called it Chuchupate) for colds and flues, sore throats and other health ailments requiring a higher level of immune support. Echinacea is a well-researched and respected immune system stimulant. (Refer to our Echinacea article for further information). It helps increase the activity of white blood cells, which engulf invading microorganisms. Thuja is an herbal extract from the Northern White Cedar tree. It is a strong immune stimulant that Native Americans used for colds, coughs, bronchitis and other respiratory infections. Possibly the mushroom with the greatest capability of stimulating the immune system is the Maitake. It is known as the "dancing mushroom" because it was so highly prized that whoever found some would dance for joy. Maitake contains specific chemical components that have been scientifically studied for their strong immune enhancing effects; (refer to Maitake Bio-Beta-Glucan™ article for further information). Nature's Answer® combines these herbs in Immune Boost™, a combination formula for use during acute illness and infections. Try it along with the combination formula Echinacea & Goldenseal. Nature’s Answer® offers a selection of all these herbs in liquid and/or capsule forms. Check with your local health food store, or visit www.naturesanswer.com, for more information.

For Kids

Children can often use a boost to their immune system to help ward off colds and flues. Nature's Answer® comes to the rescue with three alcohol-free formulas specifically designed for their special needs - E-KID-nacea™, E-KID-nacea Plus™, and NatChoo™. All of these outstanding formulas help promote a healthy immune system.

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Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles
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Date: June 30, 2005 09:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles

Ginsengs By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt

Different Ginsengs

What's the difference between Chinese (white root), Chinese (red root), Eleuthero and American Ginsengs? Which one is best for me? There are actually many different "ginsengs." We will discuss those mentioned above since they are the most widely available. All of these Ginsengs are considered to be potent adaptogens, which means that they are: 1) harmless to the body 2) non-specific in their actions 3) have balancing or normalizing effects. An adaptogen helps the body adapt to stress - both mental and physical. It is in this area that ginseng excels.

Chinese Ginseng (Panax ginseng) is what most of us think of when Ginseng is mentioned. It is indigenous to the forests of northeast China, Manchuria and Korea. Red Ginseng is often referred to as "Korean" Ginseng. In traditional Chinese Medicine Ginseng is used to tonify the "Chi" (vital energy or life energy force). Modern scientific studies indicate Panax Ginseng stimulates the immune system, has antifatigue, antistress, antitumor, anticancer and anti-aging properties, balances blood sugar levels, enhances mental performance and memory, lowers cholesterol, strengthens the heart muscle and protects against radiation damage. Panax ginseng has had a notorious reputation as a sexual rejuvenator which studies give some credence to; albeit not to the degree of its reputation. Ginseng "overuse syndrome", although rare, is characterized by irritability, insomnia and rapid heart beat, and is associated with using too much Chinese Ginseng, especially by healthy, active men.

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium) is indigenous to the eastern woodlands ranging from Georgia to Quebec and was used by many Native Americans. Jesuit Priests were reported to be trading American Ginseng to the Chinese as early as 1718. Ironically, American Ginseng is highly sought after in China, while Americans chase after Chinese ginseng. While having much the same adaptogenic qualities of Chinese Ginseng, American Ginseng is believed to have a more "yin" or cooler nature. What this means is that American Ginseng is excellent for the high-paced, stressed, not enough time culture that we live in. While still energizing the body, American Ginseng calms the central nervous system, quiets the brain and lowers blood pressure. Also, because of its more "yin" nature, it is generally better to use on a day-to-day, long term basis than Chinese Ginseng. American Ginseng is one of the best tonics for all-around health and vitality, particularly well suited for the hectic world we've created.

Eleutherococcus senticosus (known as Siberian Ginseng in Herbs of Commerce) is native to Siberia, Japan, Korea and China. Although not a "true ginseng", this variety is most highly prized. Eleuthero was traditionally used to promote longevity and general health. Many herbalists prefer Eluthero for helping with women's health issues. It is particularly useful with depression associated with PMS and menopause. Research, mostly from Russia, confirms this herb's ability to increase mental and physical performance, stimulate the immune system, increase phagocytosis (movement of white blood cells) promote circulation and enhance the benefits of medical radiation treatments while lessening its negative side-effects. (The dosage used in one Russian study was 4 milliliters in the morning and 2 milliliters at night.)

Which Ginseng is Right For Me Here's a simple guide for deciding which Ginseng to use. Chinese Ginseng is best suited as a tonic 1)for the fragile and weak 2) during convalescence, and/or 3) to support the immune system. American Ginseng is for regular daily use, specially suited for energetic personality types. Eleuthero is excellent for endurance and stamina, and well suited for athletes as well as for women's issues. If you're still confused, try Balanced Ginseng™ (alcohol-free) a high-powered liquid herbal extract supplement that blends several varieties of Ginsengs together to assure balanced tonic action.

It is important in purchasing Ginseng products to buy from a company you trust and one that has the technical capabilities to test and guarantee quality and activity. Unfortunately, the Ginseng market is prone to both adulteration and poor activity levels. Nature's Answer®, with its full pharmaceutical level in-house laboratory and years of experience, is proud to offer a variety of the finest quality of Ginseng formulations available in either liquid (alcohol-free or organic alcohol) or encapsulated (standardized or single) forms. The company also offers the herb in unique, proprietary blends. All products are Unconditionally Guaranteed.



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Depression
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Date: June 30, 2005 09:20 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Depression

Depression By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt Depression is a widespread health imbalance that effects many people at some point in their lives, and may be caused by a multifaceted list of factors. Depression can be triggered by personal tragedy, loss of a loved one, or changes in life situations (even if they are positive!). Some of the less recognized causes of depression may involve diet, including over-consumption of sugar, artificial sweeteners, chemical flavorings and preservatives, insufficient nutrition and foods that causes an allergic or sensitivity reaction in an individual. Lack of exercise and not enough sunlight, (i.e. Seasonal Affective Disorder), may be implicated as well. It is essential that those suffering from severe depression seek professional care. Since depression can arise from many different sources and operate on multiple levels, it is helpful to remember that “true healing” requires one to explore and address the root cause(s), not just attempt to cover up the symptom. Proper nutrition is essential. B vitamins can be helpful, such as Nature’s Answer’s B-Stress with Herbs, along with other nutrients such as the amino acids, GABA (particularly for anxiety), Tyrosine and Phenylalanine. Regular exercise, and a nice relaxing bath in lavender oil and sea salt are also enjoyable aids for lifting one’s spirits.

Herbs can be useful in relieving the symptoms of mild to moderate depression. Nature’s Answer offers many high-quality, single herb and combination formulas (liquid or capsule) that feature ingredients well-known for balancing emotional mood. Relora®* features a patented propriety blend of two herbs, Magnolia (standardized to 1.5% honokiol (3.75mg)) and Phellodendron (standardized to 0.1% berberine (0.25mg)) which, when combined according to a particular method, may help reduce the negative effects of stress, a factor that leads to depression as well as “stress overeating”. When the body is under stress, it causes the release of specific “stress hormones” that influence mood and emotional well-being. Relora® is unique because its active plant constituents work on the body’s natural chemistry to re-establish a normal equilibrium of stress hormones, while enhancing feelings of relaxation and cheerful outlook.

Another powerful, “all-in-one” proprietary herbal blend formula from Nature’s Answer® is Mood Balance 2™ (alcohol free liquid, vegetarian capsule). Mood Balance 2™ contains key ingredients well-recognized for their beneficial actions on emotional health, including St. John’s Wort, California Spikenard, Gotu Kola, Skullcap and Eleuthero root**. This combination of ingredients can help “lift the spirits”. (Note that these herbs are also available from Nature’s Answer® as single herb formulas in concentrated liquid herbal extracts and/or vegetarian capsules; Kosher).

Key ingredients in Mood Balance 2™include:

St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum), used for a range of nerve disorders and said to “chase away evil spirits.” Since 1996, it has become one of the most popular herbs in the US due to its use as a mild to moderate antidepressant. A number of current studies confirm its effectiveness, including a review in the British Medical Journal of 23 clinical trials, which reported that it worked nearly as well as the leading pharmaceuticals with far fewer side effects. Although more research is needed, it appears that the activity of St. John’s Wort is due to a variety of naturally occurring components, including Hypericin and Hyperforin. Nature’s Answer’s exclusive formula, Super St. John’s Wort (vegetarian capsule), is standardized to both 3.0% hyperforin and 0.3% hypericin. Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica), used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and to treat emotional upset, insomnia, stress, anxiety and memory problems. It is currently used along with meditation and yoga due to its abilities to both calm and energize nerves. Skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora) has the double action of relaxing nervous tension while building the central nervous system. As a mild bitter it will also help stimulate digestion and help the liver. Eleuthero root** (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is an “adaptogen” that helps to balance the entire system. It gives strength and fortitude, especially when dealing with stress; so often a factor in depression.

  • *Relora is a registered trademark of Next Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • ** Formerly known as Siberian Ginseng in Herbs of Commerce

    References for Educational Purposes:
    Bradwejn J, Zhou Y, Koszycki D, et al. A Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study on the Effects of Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica) on Acoustic Startle Response in Healthy Subjects. J Clin Psychopharmacol. Dec2000;20(6):680-4. Carney MW. Vitamin Deficiency and Mental Symptoms. Br J Psychiatry. Jun1990;156:878-82. Fulder SJ. Ginseng and the Hypothalamic-pituitary Control of Stress. Am J Chin Med. 1981;9(2):112-18. Linde K, et al. St. John's Wort for Depression--An Overview and Meta-analysis of Randomised Clinical Trials. BMJ. 1996;313m:253-58.



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    REFERENCES
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:11 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: REFERENCES

    REFERENCES 1Steven R. Schechter, N.D., Let’s Live. July, 1994, 60. 2Ibid., 58. 3Michael T. Murray, N.D., The Healing Power of Herbs, (Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1995), 266. 4Ibid., 266. 5Varro E. Tyler, Ph.D.., The Honest Herbal, (New York: Pharmaceutical Products Press, 1993), 156. 6Rob McCaleb, Better Nutrition, “Ginseng, Mental Booster,” July, 1993, 48. 7Claire Kowalchik and William H. Hylton, Editors, Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs, (Emmaus, Pennsylvania: Rodale Press, 1987), 226. 8“Ginseng,” The Lawrence Review of Natural Products. Sept. 1990, 1. 9Ben Charles Harris, Ginseng, What it is...What it can do for you, (New Cannan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1978), 6. 10Steven Foster, Asian Ginseng. Botanical Series No. 303, 1991, 4. 11Harris, 18-19. 12Jack Ritchason, The Little Herb Encyclopedia., (Pleasant Grove, UT: Woodland Publishing, Inc., 1994), 102. 13Ibid., 1. 14Louise Tenney, The Encyclopedia of Natural Remedies, (Pleasant Grove, UT: Woodland Publishing, Inc., 1995), 25. 15James F. Balch, MD.. and Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C., Prescription For Nutritional Healing, (Avery Publishing Group Inc.: Garden City Park, New York, 1990), 337. 16James Duke, Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. (Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, Inc. 1985), 174. 17Murray, 268. 18Arnold and Connie Krochmal, Garden Magazine, Sept.-Oct., 1978. 19Foster, 5. 20Ibid., 5. 21Murray, 268. 22Daniel B. Mowrey, Ph.D., The Scientific Validation of Herbs, (New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1986), 192. 23Ibid., 103. 24Janet Zand, OMD, L.Ac. Herbal Medicine (Internet), “Siberian Ginseng.” (Health World, 1996). 25Foster, 5. 26Simon Y. Mills, The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine, (London: Penguin Books, 1993), 531. 27Michael T. Murray, N.D., Male Sexual Vitality, (Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1991), 127. 28Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs. 228. 29Ibid., 228. 30Readers Digest Family Guide to Natural Medicine, (Pleasantville, New York: The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc., 1993), 310. 31Foster, 6. 32Murray, 270. 33Paul Pitchford, Healing With Whole Foods, (Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 1993), 393. 34Daniel B. Mowrey, Ph.D., Herbal Tonic Therapies., (New Cannan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1993), 48. 35Murray, 275. 36Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs, 229. 37Harris, 25. 38Murray, Male Sexual Vitality., 126. 39Mowrey, 152. 40Ibid., 266. 41The Lawrence Review, 1. 42Schechter, 60. 43Mowrey, Herbal Tonic Ther apies., 49. 44Tyler, 155.



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    GINSENG and the Reproductive System
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:07 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GINSENG and the Reproductive System

    Reproductive System

    There has been a lot of interest in the reported aphrodisiac effects of ginseng. It is often marketed as a sexual stimulant. Yet the results of most studies have been i n c o n c l u s i ve. Asian ginseng seemed to increase the sperm count in rabbits as well as the egg laying of hens in some studies. A Korean study found the mating behavior of rats to increase with ginseng consumption.36 Hormonal secretions are thought to be stimulated by ginseng which may be one reason for its use as an aphrodisiac. 37 Ginseng has also been found to influence the growth of the testes and testosterone levels.38 Studies on Siberian ginseng have found its tonic effect to help with sexual function. It was found to increase the sperm count in animals.39 Ginseng has been used for thousands of years to strengthen the male reproductive system. Clinical studies and historical use seems to support the claims of ginseng use for the reproductive system. It is highly recommended alone or in combinations for male and female health. However, it is generally not recommended that women take it over long periods of time.

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    GINSENG and Stress
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:04 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GINSENG and Stress

    Stress

    Re s e a rchers became interested in studying the Siberian ginseng after finding beneficial activity in the Panax ginseng. It was first found to contain adaptogenic properties. One study conducted during the 1960s in the former Soviet Union consisted of 2,100 adults, some normal and some considered to be under high stress. No adverse side effects were found and the results were positive with improvement in the stressed individuals.25 Stress is a condition that causes a disturbance in the body, whether it is from a physical or mental source.

    Asian ginseng helps to modify the effects of environmental and internal stresses from different forms such as chemical pollutants, toxins, radiation, weather, temperature changes, poor diet, physical trauma, exercise and emotional stress. Because of its adaptogenic properties, ginseng is able to adjust and balance the body functions when under stress.26 Ginseng can help to balance the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by normalizing the metabolic systems in the body when stress occurs.27

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    Physical and Mental Stamina
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:03 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Physical and Mental Stamina

    Many studies have been done to determine the effectiveness of ginseng in a variety of countries. Incomplete results have occurred in some instances. Long-term studies are most often recommended because ginsengs properties may not be seen in immediate experiments but are more effective when taken in small doses over a period of time. There have been enough credible studies done to now determine that high quality ginseng plants do contain active constituents known to be beneficial. Research has shown that the roots are effective against bronchitis and heart disease.16 Ginseng has been found to reduce blood cholesterol, build the immune system, improve brain function and memory, increase physical stamina, stimulate the function of the endocrine glands and strengthen disorders of the central nervous system.

    Physical and Mental Stamina

    A study down in the late 1950s and early 1960s by Brekhman and Dardymov in Russia involved an experiment with Soviet soldiers. They were studying the pharmacology and reactions of different varieties of East Asian ginseng. Some were given an extract of Asian ginseng and others a placebo before running a 3-kilometer race. Those given the ginseng ran faster with less fatigue than those given the placebo.17 Other tests performed by Brekhman involved gauging reading capacity after taking ginseng. It was noted that not only was the work and reading ability improved, but the effects continued for up to six weeks after the treatment.18

    Another study giving radio operators either an Asian ginseng extract or placebo. The group given the ginseng performed better with fewer mistakes. The ginseng helped to increase stamina and mental function.19 A study involving rats followed the results when they were put in extremely cold water and forced to swim for a long period of time. The rats given the Asian ginseng were able to swim longer than the control group which indicated anti-fatigue activity. It is also important to note that ginseng increased the recovery rate of the exposed rats. The process was initiated in order to see if the point of exhaustion could be increased with the addition of ginseng. The results were favorable.20

    Ginseng seems to be able to help slow glycogen utilization in the muscles when exercising. Fatigue accom-panying prolonged exercise is due in part to the depletion of glycogen and lactic acid build-up. Fatty acids are used as the energy source when there is enough oxygen available to reach the muscles reserving the glycogen stores to increase the body’s performance and reduce fatigue.21 Athletes may benefit from using ginseng to help improve and prolong their performance and abilities under stress during training and competition.

    Serious athletes throughout the world use ginseng regularly. Some Olympic athletes take ginseng daily to increase and enhance their physical performance. Siberian ginseng has been found to help improve mental abilities in geriatric patients.22 This may be of benefit to all individuals as they age especially those prone to senility and Alzheimer’s patients. It is also thought to help an aging heart and brain tissue under stress and sustained work.23

    Siberian ginseng has also been found to help increase energy and performance. Japanese medical researchers studied the extract of Eleuthero ginseng to determine anti-fatigue activity. The results showed increased physical performance and ability after taking the ginseng.24

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    Adaptogen Properties
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:02 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Adaptogen Properties

    Adaptogen Properties

    Research on the Panax ginseng was first done to determine the adaptogen properties. Siberian ginseng does possess adaptogenic qualities, but its action is thought to be milder than Asian ginseng. The American ginseng has not been well studied or documented as to its adaptogenic properties, but it is known to have adaptogenic activity. Each of the ginseng varieties are thought to work as a general tonic on the body, increase energy and increase mental and physical abilities. Ginseng has often been referred to as an adaptogenic herb. When taken for extended periods of time, it helps the body adapt to stress and brings the body into balance.

    It helps normalize and adjust the body’s restoring and regulating natural immune response.14 The word adaptogen is derived from the Greek work adapto, to adjust, and the suffix gen, producing. It helps to produce adjustments as needed in the body. This function is done without side effects or harm to the body.15 Ginseng, as an adaptogen, has been used to help normalize blood pressure whether high or low. It helps to increase or slow output to restore equilibrium. Adaptogens help to modify the effects of environmental and internal stresses from different forms such as chemical pollutants, radiation, weather, temperature changes, poor diet, exercise and emotional stress. It is used for many ailments in the body and even thought of as a universal cure-all.

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    Cultivation and Export
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:01 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Cultivation and Export

    Cultivation and Export

    Ginseng is difficult to cultivate and requires a large capital investment. The plants need shade to thrive and are often grown among forest shade trees or under artificial shade. The Asian countries are not able to keep up with the demand for ginseng because of its popularity. The soil has been cultivated for so many years that some believe the nutrients have been depleted. This has increased the value of the American ginseng. The American variety is found growing wild in cool wooded areas with rich soil in the eastern United States.

    Ginseng is grown commercially in Wisconsin, Michigan and even as far south as northern Florida, Alabama, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Most of the commercial ginseng is grown in Marathon County, Wisconsin and cultivated under artificial shade. Marathon County seems like an ideal place for ginseng to grow as many serious athletes and marathon runners use ginseng to enhance their overall performance. In fact, many Olympic athletes take ginseng routinely. The soil in this area is welldrained acidic soil beneficial for growing ginseng. It is grown using fertilizers, pesticides and other chemicals to ensure adequate production and cultivation. Organically grown plants are available but may be hard to find. Wild ginseng grows in isolated patches in some areas of the country but most sources have been depleted. Some ginseng farmers in Wisconsin have been growing the plants for 90 years. Ninety-five percent of the American grown ginseng is sold to foreign markets, with most of it going to Hong Kong and then into China, Korea and Japan.

    About 45,000 kg. of the dried ginseng root and about the same amount of the wild root is exported annually.13 The American variety sells for about twice as much as the Asian variety because it is thought to be of a higher quality. The Americans import a large quantity of the Asian and Siberian ginseng, which seems ironic. Wild ginseng of any variety is not as common now, because it has been foraged in its wild state and huge quantities exported for large profits. A special license is now required to dig the wild roots.

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    THE GINSENG PLAN
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    Date: June 25, 2005 01:00 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: THE GINSENG PLAN

    THE GINSENG PLAN

    The Asian ginseng grows to approximately two feet in height. It has five foliate leaves with small clusters of green-white flowers that are followed by bright red berries. The plant usually flowers during its fourth year of growth. The roots can grow up to 3-4 milliliters in diameter and to 10 centimeters in length. The older roots are the most valued. As the root ages, it takes on a two legged shape. The wild plant roots can grow much larger but are rare because of overzealous harvesting for commercial gain. It originally grew naturally in the wild damp fertile woodlands of northern China and Korea.

    The American ginseng is found growing in shaded, wooded areas of the Northeast. Its natural habitat was under beech and maple trees, though those sources have been depleted and are now rare. The American ginseng plant grows from eight to fifteen inches. The plant consists of three large leaves and two small leaves originating from the same stem. It contains a cluster of yellow-green flowers, and red, edible berries follow. The root is usually two to three inches long and about an inch thick. The older roots take on a two-legged appearance.

    The Siberian variety is found in Russia, China, Korea and Japan. It is not a “true ginseng” but does contain similar adaptogenic properties. It grows in high elevations, up to 2500 feet, and in forest areas in lower elevations. Thorns cover the stems and its flowers are yellow (female) and violet (male). The flowers are followed by black berries. The roots of the Siberian ginseng are really underground stems.11

    The age of the root is thought to be essential. The older roots are thought to contain more healing properties and are highly valued and sought after. Folklore suggests that the very old roots glow in the dark, revealing an inner light.12

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    Ginseng Varieties
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    Date: June 25, 2005 12:56 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Ginseng Varieties

    Ginseng Varieties

    This valued plant known as ginseng can be purchased in different forms. White ginseng is what the root is called before any processing occurs. White is the natural color of the root after it is harvested and washed. When dried, the root becomes a light brown color. When the ginseng root is processed using steam and heat, it becomes red. This procedure is done in order to preserve the plant and its constituents. The heat process is thought to help stimulate the active properties in ginseng and some herbalists believe that the red ginseng is more stimulating than the white.2 There are a variety of types as well as grades of ginseng and ginseng products.

    This is due in part to differences in age, source, part of the root used and the preparation. The old wild plants are the most desirable because of their nutritional content which is believed to increase with age. The western world often treats the different ginseng varieties the same. But in traditional Chinese medicine, the various types are thought to possess distinct properties. They are each valued for their differences and used for divergent purposes.

    The Asian variety of ginseng (Panax ginseng) grows principally in Korea, Japan and China. Centuries ago the ginseng plant grew wild and was abundant. But because of the claims of its healthy properties, it has been depleted in its natural state almost to the point of extinction. Now it is grown commercially for export and local medicinal use. The Asian ginseng is often exported to the western world. It is unfortunate but most of the ginseng grown now is cultivated using pesticides to promote mass production. The Asian plant has similar composition to the American variety with some variations. It contains ginsenosides, the active ingredients, between one and three percent. There are at least thirteen of these different triterpenoid saponins, referred to as ginsenosides. The Asian contains Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Re, and Rg1.3

    The Wild American variety of ginseng is still found in its natural state. This variety grows naturally and organically but is hard to find. There is an increasing amount of American ginseng being cultivated and grown for commercial use. Fertilizers and pesticides along with modern farming equipment aid in the production and high yield of this variety of ginseng. The American ginseng is thought to be less stimulating than the Asian variety. The American ginseng contains primarily the ginsenosides Rb1 and Re and does not contain Rb2, Rf and sometimes not Rg1.4 Generally, the American ginseng is thought to possess more of a sedative effect than the Asian ginseng. Differences in the chemical structures of the ginseng roots makes the identification process between the varieties easier. Siberian ginseng, though not considered a “true ginseng,” contains similar properties to the other varieties.

    It was discovered in Siberia but is now cultivated around the world. Some of the saponins found in this variety are not the same as the Asian and American. But is known to have the same tonic and stimulant effect as the “true ginseng.”5 It is believed to be less potent than either the American or Asian ginsengs. Research has documented may of its valuable adaptogenic capabilities.

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    GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus)
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 12:54 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus)

    GINSENG

  • Asian or Korean (Panax ginseng)
  • American (Panax quinquefolium)
  • Siberian (Eleutherococcus senticosus)

    Ginseng and ginseng products are increasing in popularity. They have been highly valued for thousands of years in many different cultures for their medicinal properties. Ginseng is probably the most highly regarded tonic and adaptogenic herb in the world. There are many different varieties of the ginseng plant grown throughout the world that are used for traditional medicine. All of the most common species of plants known as ginseng have similar reactions in the body. Ginseng is often used to maintain and support health as a tonic rather than treating a particular disease in the body. Panax ginseng, also known as Asian, Korean or Chinese ginseng, is the type most often studied and the most abundant. The genus name for Asian ginseng is Panax ginseng from the Greek word meaning “all healing.” The Wild American variety, Panax quinquefolium, is thought to have properties similar to the Asian plant. Most consider it to be less stimulating than the Asian root. The Siberian ginseng, Eleutherococcus senticosus, grown in Russia originally and now throughout the world, is not considered to be “true ginseng,” though scientists have reported common pharmacological features to the Panax. The compounds in the Siberian variety, eueutherosides, are not the same as the ginsenosides found in the American and Asian, but they do have similar chemical activity. The American, Asian and Siberian ginsengs are all considered to be superior adaptogens.1

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    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?
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    Date: June 17, 2005 12:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    Ginseng has been used for thousands of years by the Chinese and Native Americans. The Chinese name, Ren Shen means "Man-Root" because it is shaped like a human. There have been over 3,000 scientific studies published on Ginseng. Studies have examined the anti-tumor, anti-infective, nervous system, lipid lowering, and anti-fatigue activity of ginseng. Experimental research indicates that Ginseng helps the body adapt to stress, protects the body against radiation, and increases sperm count, and stabilizes blood sugar levels.

    Ginseng can differ depending upon the species, the way it is prepared, and of course the dose administered. There are two main kinds of Ginseng: American and Asian. American Ginseng, Panax quinquefolium, grows wild in many states although it is cultivated mainly in Wisconsin. American Ginseng generates body fluids and is said to clear heat. Those who can benefit most from American Ginseng are individuals that are under stress, athletes, and people who feel hot and thirsty. They may also have coughing, or coughing up blood, which indicates heat according to traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Asian Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, is usually imported to the US from either China or Korea. It is traditionally used to treat cold syndromes, which include cold limbs, weak pulse, exhaustion, and shortness of breath. White Ginseng usually refers to untreated ginseng, and is said to be less warm than red Ginseng. Typically red Ginseng is steamed and cured with other herbs giving it a dark red appearance; most Korean Ginseng is red.

    A common substitute for Ginseng in the US and China is Codonopsis, known botanically as Codonopsis pilosula. It has similar effects to Asian Ginseng: it is not as strong and not nearly as expensive. Eleuthero Ginseng, sometimes referred to as Siberian Ginseng, is really not ginseng at all but is in fact a distant cousin. It belongs in a different botanical species: Eleutherococcus Senticosus. Eleuthero Ginseng grows in northern China and Russia. Although it is used to help the body adapt to stress, it is less specific as a medicinal herb than Asian or American Ginseng.

    Traditional herbalists rarely use ginseng by itself. Herbs are usually combined with other ingredients in order to increase clinical benefits and reduce negative reactions. For example, Generate Pulse Powder (Sheng Mai San) is a traditional combination, which often combines America Ginseng with herbs to moisten the lungs; therefore it can be used for chronic cough that is difficult to expectorate, and shortness of breathe. Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan is an ancient formula that has been used for at least one thousand years to treat patients who are exhausted, feel cold, and may have weak limbs and/or chronic loose stools. In this ancient formula, Ginseng is combined with Astragalus and other harmonizing herbs, which help the body assimilate ginseng. Modern formulas with Ginseng or Codonopsis, have been used to help people overcome serious conditions such as impotence, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and fibromyalgia. Modern Ginseng formulas have also been used in conjunction with western medical approaches to treating patients with HIV, and patients undergoing chemo and radiotherapy.

    Asian Ginseng is considered a "big gun" and should not be indiscriminately used especially by itself. Headache, elevated body temperature, digestive upset, rash, fever, irritability, and insomnia are possible signs that Ginseng is not appropriate. It should not be taken at the same time as caffeine or other stimulants. Good quality Ginseng is expensive. Superior grade Ginseng can run several thousand dollars per pound. For this reason, it makes no sense to shop for the cheapest Ginseng or Ginseng products.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Astra 8 - Boost immune system your primary defense against colds...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 15, 2005 10:29 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Astra 8 - Boost immune system your primary defense against colds...

    Astra 8 Defense Builder

    Defense Builder Herbal Formula is one of the most popular and effective herbal formulas available. It is the basis for many of the immune products found in natural food stores today. Astra 8 is the only one, however, recommended by name in books, on video, and in periodicals. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), these herbs are especially used for people who worry, think too much, eat sweets and feel cold and tired. In TCM terms, these herbs tonify Lung, Spleen and Kidney Qi and strengthen Wei Qi. Western medicine considers many of these herbs adaptogenic in that they help body adapt to stress. Astragalus, ligustrum, ginseng, and ganoderma (Reishi) found in Astra 8 are carefully balanced by additional herbs necessary to help you digest and assimilate these proven tonic herbs. For additional defensive system toning and energy enhancement, use with Power Mushrooms.

  • Ingredients: Astragalus, Ligustrum, Reishi (Ganoderma), Siberian (Eleuthero) Ginseng, Codonopsis, Schizandra, Oryza.

    Astra-8 Defense Builder

    Enhance immune system:
  • Boosts immunity
  • fight Colds
  • increase energy
  • Fight cancer



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Pep Up and Go!
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 14, 2005 05:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Pep Up and Go!

    Pep Up and Go!

    by Harris Parker Energy Times, February 2, 2000

    Feel your energy flagging?

    You've lost count of the number of phone calls you fielded all afternoon-the last was from your son, who missed the late bus home from school-and colleagues needing your decision are lined up outside your office. Your husband has invited clients home for dinner. You wilt like a new hairdo on a damp August day and pray for a miracle to jump-start your engine.

    Your pep quotient depends on three essential ingredients: nutrients you consume through your diet and supplements, how much you exercise and your sleep schedule.(Of course, if you're troubled by any kind of disabling, ceaseless fatigue accompanied by mental fuzziness, joint pain, sore throat, swollen glands, headaches and other chronic distress, consult your health practitioner.)

    Vitamins and Energy

    Certain nutrients are called vitamins because scientists consider them to be crucial for vitality. They generally function as coenzymes, partnering with the enzymes that are catalysts for the chemical reactions constantly taking place in our bodies. Our need to replenish our store of vitamins, which may merge with cell, muscle, enzyme, hormone, blood and bone structure once they have been absorbed, depends on their rate of utilization, according to The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery) by Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning.

    While a low-fat diet rich in raw fruits and vegetables helps supply important nutrients, a B complex supplement and a balanced multivitamin can guarantee daily vitamin levels.

    Be Energetic with B Vitamins

    Vitamins, especially the B vitamins, play extremely important roles in producing cellular energy. The chart on page 39 lists the key vitamins and describes their effects as well as the consequences of not getting enough of them. Their benefit is felt most profoundly in the energy producing process known as the Krebs cycle (which we'll explain in a moment).

    Vitamins B2 and B3, for example, supply the major building blocks for substances that are called flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and FADH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD and NADH), which are critical elements of energy production in the Krebs cycle as well as a process called oxidative phosphorylation.

    Hundreds of Reactions

    Even though you may never have heard of NAD and NADH, these molecules are found in very many places throughout your body; they play a role in hundreds of biochemical reactions in all kinds of cells. B vitamins also combine with other materials to build coenzymes, chemicals which help form other chemicals necessary for cellular energy. B vitamins are crucial: miss out on one or more and you may break these metabolic chains necessary for peak energy.

    Energy to Spend

    The main energy currency of every cell single cell is ATP: a chemical called adenosine triphosphate. This material is used by cells for every imaginable task including reproduction, growth, movement and metabolism. Specialized metabolic cycles within the cell are designed to generate ATP.

    Consequently, the more ATP our cells create, the more energy can be generated. The raw materials used to make cellular energy are glucose (blood sugar) and "free" fatty acids. The best way to supply your cells with the sugar they need is to consume complex carbohydrates which also supply fiber and other nutrients. When you eat carbohydrates, they are made into glucose which is stored as a starch called glycogen in muscles and the liver. Your body can rapidly turn glycogen into glucose for extra energy. (The process of making energy from glycogen yields carbon dioxide and water as well as ATP.)

    Making Energy

    The first step in making glucose into energy is called glycolysis. This complicated process requires nine different steps. During these steps, glucose is made into a substance called pyruvate. The process of glycolysis requires ATP, but yields twice as much ATP as is present when it starts.

    From here, the process gets a little more complicated as pyruvate enters into a complex chain of events in tiny cellular structures called mitochondria. (Many metabolic events take place in the mitochondria.) The pyruvate molecules are converted to a molecule known as acetyl coenzyme A and eventually made into carbon dioxide, water and more ATP.

    This process is known as the Krebs cycle or citric acid cycle. It also involves a series of events known as oxidative phosphorylation in which NADH formed during the Krebs cycle is oxidized to form ATP.

    Why is fat such a concentrated source of energy? Free fatty acids enter the Krebs cycle to help generate ATP much more efficiently than glucose - producing roughly six times more energy per gram than glucose.

    And Don't Overlook. . . . . .other supplements that may aid energy production: • Alpha Lipoic Acid, an antioxidant that works in the fatty tissues of cell membranes and in cells' watery interiors • Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone as it exists everywhere in the body, acts like a vitamin because it stimulates some reactions. CoQ10 protects cell membranes, especially of the heart, against oxidation and toxins.

    Ginsengs: Energy Generators

    With their legendary and slightly mysterious characteristics, the ginsengs are greatly respected natural energy boosters. " Perhaps no herb has excited so much interest in medical circles as ginseng, and yet, strangely, it does not actually 'cure' any one particular ailment," reports Michael Hallowell, the author of Herbal Healing (Avery) and a frequent lecturer on botanic medicine. "Rather, its virtue lies in its tremendous power as a tonic and invigorator. Russian athletes are prescribed large amounts of ginseng because researchers in Moscow have shown that it not only improves stamina, but also increases the efficiency with which blood is pumped to the muscles."

    What are the physiological mechanisms that allow ginseng to bolster your get up and go? In order to unravel the legend and lore of ginseng, the first step is understanding the intricacies of the three types: • Asian (Panax ginseng), which produces the strongest and most profound stimulation; • American (Panax quinquefolium), which soothes at a more subtle level; • Siberian (Eleutherococcus senticosus), a stamina booster embraced by a wide range of athletes. All three varieties are treasured for their ability to help people adjust to stress.

    Biologically Active

    The ginsengs are adaptogens, "biologically active substances found in certain herbs and plants that help the body and mind adapt to the changes and stress of life," says Stephen Fulder, MD, author of The Book of Ginseng and Other Chinese Herbs for Vitality (Inner Traditions). "Stress is not an illness in itself. Stress is change, our ability to adapt to all the changes that occur in life, emotional or physical, from exercise, work, chemicals, drugs, food, radiation, bacteria, disease, temperature, or simply too many late nights or too much fun."

    The body reacts to stress by producing the hormone adrenaline, which throws the whole body into a state of alert. Metabolism, blood pressure and circulation accelerate; immunity and resistance drastically decline; performance suffers.

    Top-Notch Tonics

    Enter the ginsengs, with their varied, subtle tonic qualities. The Greek name for this herb, "panax," means "panacea" or cure-all. But the Chinese, who first referred to it 2,000 years ago, more literally called it "ren shen" or "person root," in reference to its physical resemblance to a miniature human form.

    " Most exhibit medicinal properties, but each species has a different chemical makeup and has a unique application in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)," says Kim Derek Pritts, author of Ginseng: How to Find, Grow and Use America's Forest Gold (Stackpole). "In general, all true ginseng contains biologically active saponins (chemicals similar to human hormones), essential oils, carbohydrates, sugars, organic acids, nitrogenous substances, amino acids, peptides, vitamins and minerals."

    Building Vital Energy

    All the ginsengs strengthen, nourish and build Qi, the TCM concept describing basic vital energy circulating through our bodies. Every physical and mental function, from breathing, thinking, nutrition and circulation, is regulated by Qi. Although many of the Native American tribes used the abundant, indigenous Panax quinquefolium ginseng extensively, particularly to increase mental acuity and boost fertility, the herb never has been as popular in North America as it is in Asia. American ginseng traditionally has been a lucrative export crop to China, where the wild native variety suffers from overharvesting. Even today, according to Paul Bergner in The Healing Power of Ginseng & the Tonic Herbs (Prima), 95% of the American ginseng crop is exported to China, where XiYang Shen, or "western sea root," as it is called, is immensely valued and costs double what it does here.

    Energy Boost

    Jacques MoraMarco, author of The Complete Ginseng Handbook: A Practical Guide for Energy, Health and Longevity (Contemporary), as well as a licensed acupuncturist and doctor of Eastern medicine, suggests American ginseng for a slight energy boost. The moderate effect of American ginseng is considered a more appropriate tonic to the intensity of our pace and diet.

    Variations on a Theme

    In TCM terms, American ginseng cools and moistens, as well as lubricates and strengthens the body. It is reputed to reduce fevers and night sweats and alleviate hot, dry lung problems like smoker's cough. With its emollient qualities, American ginseng is considered to treat dry, wrinkled skin effectively.

    The Bolder Energizer

    Asian ginseng, which includes red Korean panax, is a bolder energizer taken by those who feel depleted from anemia, blood loss, cardiovascular weakness, injury, shock or trauma, as well as the disabling effects of age. In general, Asian ginseng is warming and stimulating, urging the body to run faster.

    Siberian ginseng, though botanically not a true ginseng, still acts similarly to Asian ginseng in its reputed power to control stress, boost energy, support the immune system, enhance performance and increase longevity. Called Wu Cha Seng in Chinese, Siberian ginseng is perceived by natural practitioners as an ideal herb for the healthy who want to lift both stamina and endurance. Experts believe it counteracts the effects of cortisol, the stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands in response to injury, pain or emotional turmoil.

    Natural Energy Boosters

    The herbal pharmacopeia includes several other natural energy boosters available in various forms-shakes and bars for those on the run-loaded with nutrition absent from commercial snacks. Some choices: • Ginkgo biloba-used in Chinese medicine to heat the body and increase sexual energy. Ginkgo enthusiasts take this herb to increase the supply of oxygen to the brain and generally increase circulation. • Gotu kola-may stimulate the central nervous system and help eliminate excess fluid, thereby reducing fatigue. • Astragalus-a Chinese herb that enhances energy and builds the immune system. It is credited with strengthening digestion, improving metabolism, increasing appetite, combating diarrhea and healing sores. • Schisandra-also a Chinese herb, treats respiratory illness, insomnia and irritability and rejuvenates sexual energy. Its mild adaptogens help the body to handle stress. • Licorice-is a favored endocrine toner in Chinese medicine. It is reputed to support the adrenals, the pair of small glands directly above the kidneys that secrete steroidal hormones, norepinephrine and epinephrine, the "fight or flight" hormones. People with high blood pressure or edema, or pregnant women, should avoid it. • Ashwagandha-an Ayurvedic herb used for thousands of years in the traditional healing of India as a potent strength builder for men and women.

    Experienced herbal practitioners acquire an impressive and fascinating store of knowledge and experience-you'll find it helpful to visit one as you begin your course of ginseng or other energy-boosting herbs.

    TCM Visitation

    When you visit a TCM practitioner, you'll notice that she evaluates your body's condition through an extremely careful examination of all the different systems: Several pulse points are felt in order to ferret out and detect troubling abnormalities. The condition and color of the tongue is observed to decipher digestive disorders. In addition, your urine may be examined to determine other imbalances and specific health problems.

    In many cases, your TCM practitioner will recommend ginseng as an adaptogen that can give you an overall boost. When taking ginseng, follow the directions on the package. Note: in some cases, you may want to consume a little bit less if you suffer headaches, insomnia or high blood pressure. Consult your health practitioner if you are afflicted with either acute inflammatory disease or bronchitis.

    Then take comfort in the eternal soothing wisdom of Chinese Traditional Medicine. In the first century A.D., the Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing (The Divine Husbandman's Classic of the Materia Medica) effusively described ginseng and the tonic herbs in this beguiling and intriguing manner: "The first class of drugs...are considered to perform the work of sovereigns. They support human life and they resemble heaven. They are not poisonous regardless of the quality and duration of administration."



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Acupuncture nutrient Connection
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    Date: June 12, 2005 05:53 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Acupuncture nutrient Connection

    Acupuncture nutrient Connection by Robert Gluck Energy Times, November 1, 1998

    The theory behind the practice of acupuncture confounds western science. This therapy, originating in Asia, is based on the concept that currents of energy called meridians flow through your body. However, no one has ever been able to conclusively demonstrate the existence of these meridians.

    Despite the evasiveness of these energy streams, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) holds that alterations in these energy flows can disrupt health and cause pain. Consequently, an acupuncturist punctures your skin with specialized needles to redirect the body's vital energy.

    Alleviating Illness

    Despite the fact that western scientists have not been able to find satisfactory evidence of the existence of these energetic meridians, studies show that acupuncture works and is especially effective at relieving pain. This therapy has been used to alleviate a variety of conditions including chronic pain, nausea and even mental illness. In addition, some practitioners apply it to those trying to shake off the chains of drug addiction. (More recently, many practitioners now also successfully use acupuncture to relieve physical problems in animals.)

    Of course, no matter what your perspective on this therapy, acupuncture's no panacea. While you might use acupuncture to relieve the discomforts of chemotherapy, you wouldn't use this technique as your primary weapon against a dangerous disease like cancer. Still, this reliable therapy occupies a welcome spot as an adjunct to many mainstream therapies. Consequently, many mainstream practitioners accept the validity of using acupuncture and many managed care companies reimburse this therapy. Some HMOs even keep a list of approved acupuncturists that they make available to enrollees.

    Acupuncture East and West

    The practice of acupuncture dates back at least 2200 years ago in Asia. Only during the last forty years has it become well-known and widely available in the United States. Today, 29 accredited acupuncture schools train practitioners in North America. In addition, traditional healers in Belize (south of Mexico) have been found to use a form of acupuncture derived from traditional Mayan medicine.

    Is the use of acupuncture by Mayan shamans coincidence? Or further evidence that acupuncture meridians really exist? No one knows for sure, although some experts believe the Mayan use of this therapy supports the notion that the original ancestors of the Mayans migrated from Asia.

    Needle Relief

    Acupuncturists insert needles into the body to relieve pain or enhance bodily functions. TCM holds that acupuncture, and the manipulation of these tiny needles, moves and manipulates qi (pronounced chee), the body's energy force.

    "Acupuncture is a method of balancing the body's energy," says Carol Alexander, an acupuncturist at the North Jersey Health and Pain Relief Center in Hackettstown, New Jersey. "Disease occurs because of an imbalance...Insertion of the acupuncture needles into meridians will bring about the balance of qi." Alexander has practiced acupuncture for 10 years and studied at the Tri-State School of Traditional Acupuncture in Stanford Connecticut.

    Alexander says patients sometimes suffer a blockage of qi or display too much or too little qi. The manipulation and placement of the acupuncture needles vary according to the need for adjusting meridian energy flow.

    Acupuncture can be used to prevent disease and, if disease is already rampant, it can be used to help the body correct the problem.

    In conjunction with her use of acupuncture needles, Alexander rarely prescribes single herbs but uses combinations of whole herbs that are very specific for different diseases and disease patterns. "Certain herbs, such as ginseng, are very prized in Chinese medicine," Alexander notes.

    "Astragalus is an herb used in China and around the world to tonify the qi and increase qi energy as well as stimulate the immune system."

    Licorice Root

    Alexander uses licorice root for assisting digestion and for helping women with menopausal discomforts. On the other hand, she recommends whole food concentrates like bee pollen granules for enhancing the immune system, peppermint for treating gastro-intestinal problems plus fiber supplements as well as the antioxidant/antihistamine quercetin, coenzyme Q10 and melatonin.

    "In terms of classes of nutrients, I use a lot of whole food concentrates: the green concentrates like barley greens, wheat grass powder, spirulina and blue-green algae," Alexander says. "These are high in minerals, antioxidants, nutrients and fatty acids. I also use some soy products because the isoflavone concentrates are very much anti-cancer."

    The Fine Points of Acupuncture

    Acupuncture needles are very fine, as thin as hairs. They are available in a variety of diameters and lengths. When an acupuncturist inserts these needles, the sensation is that of mild pinpricks. (The needles enter the body at depths of only 1/8th inch to two inches.) In many cases people experience mild pleasure during needle manipulation.

    "From a Western point of view it's important to explain that there is a distinct function of acupuncture treatment and that is to increase circulation," Alexander says. "We do stimulate nerves and we know that with the stimulation of nerves many neurochemicals and neurotransmitters are released. They move through the nerves and find receptor sights, some in the brain, some in other parts of the body."

    By stimulating nerves, acupuncturists can calm inflammation and deaden pain. These effects are believed to be linked to the release of endorphins and dinorphins, powerful painkillers and anti-inflammatories that the body produces for itself. Most acupuncturists use this therapy as part of an overall, multi-faceted treatment plan.

    Unique Energy

    "Qi is what makes you different from a sack of chemicals," points out David Molony, an acupuncturist at the Lehigh Valley Acupuncture Center in Catasaqua, Pennsylvania who studied at the Nanjing Traditional Medicine Hospital in China and has lectured at Cornell University.

    What You Need

    "You can manipulate qi with acupuncture, herbs and diet. Because people's bodies work differently, there are different approaches. When you ask the question what nutrients and herbs are effective at enhancing acupuncture, it depends on what the person needs, according to an Oriental Medicine diagnosis."

    An Oriental Medical examination, Molony says, begins with a long list of health questions designed to reveal factors that contribute to disease. A practitioner measures your pulse in several different places along your arm, inspects your tongue, may press on your stomach, sniff your general odor and closely examine your nails and skin for signs of problems.

    "You take in everything you can," adds Molony, a board member of the Acupuncture Society of Pennsylvania and former board member of the American Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. "This gives you clues that you need in order to make your diagnosis."

    Acupuncturists use nutrients and herbs that complement the treatment, as well as dietary and lifestyle counseling. Some acupuncturists don't specialize in herbal remedies, so these practitioners might go to a specialist like David Winston for advice. Winston, an herb expert skilled in Cherokee, Chinese and Western eclectic herbal medicine, works as an instructor, lecturer and consultant.

    "In China, acupuncture is considered a complementary therapy; you generally don't go for treatment and get purely acupuncture," says Winston who is working on a book about saw palmetto. "Herbal medicine, diet and qi gong are important therapies in their own right and acupuncture is one of those therapies. Qi gong is a form of martial arts that focuses on unique breathing and visualization methods. Qi is not exactly energy, it's energy in movement; it's what makes the blood move."

    Open Blockages

    Acupuncture is used to open blockages that sometimes build up in what TCM practitioners characterize as excessive heat or cold. These hot and cold spots do not always literally refer to the temperature of the body but are meant to depict changes in the character of the body's vital energy.

    Chinese acupuncturists don't necessarily treat diseases, but target clusters of physical discomforts. Winston says, "Herbal formulas change depending on the 'symptom pictures.' Somebody could have acute appendicitis but the symptom picture could vary. Usually Chinese acupuncturists use herbs like isatis (a very cold, drying herb that's a powerful anti-bacterial agent) and coptis (a powerful anti-bacterial herb)."

    Americans often visit acupuncturists complaining of back pain or some type of musculoskeletal problem-a wrenched knee, a ligament that hasn't healed properly or perhaps a torn rotator cuff. "If the injury is hot to the touch, it's red, it's inflammatory-that's a condition where there's excessive heat and in that condition the acupuncturist would give herbs that are cooling and anti-inflammatory such as the root of large leaf gentian."

    Pain that Moves

    If someone suffers pain that moves, pain that is sometimes exacerbated by damp or humid conditions, acupuncturists often prescribe clematis root, a wild variety of the garden plant that is an anti-spasmodic, or acanthopanax, a relative of Siberian ginseng used for damp pain.

    "If there's pain with excessive dampness," Winston says, "acupuncturists might use duhuo, a drying herb that opens the meridians."

    Molony agrees with Winston that when it comes to choosing herbs to enhance acupuncture, accurate analysis of the root cause of the health problem is paramount to making the right decisions. For example, if a person is qi deficient and her tongue is thickly coated, she may not be processing her energy properly. Phlegm builds up, decreasing energy. "What you want to do is give them herbs that move phlegm, like citrus peel, and combine that with acupuncture points that move phlegm also," Molony says.

    For stimulating metabolism, Molony uses lactoferin-processed colostrum from cows. He uses ginseng and atractylodes as qi tonics and he adds herbs like magnolia bark or atractylodes alba.

    Helpful Antioxidants

    He believes antioxidants are helpful too, as preventive medicines, including vitamins C and E. These valuable nutrients disarm the harm that reactive molecules can wreak within the body.

    So how important are herbs and nutrition to enhance acupuncture's effectiveness? Acupuncturists seem to agree that healthy doses of antioxidants (such as vitamins C and E plus antioxidants from grapeseed extract) as well as specialized herbs, turn this therapy into a highly effective healing tool. Those wanting to benefit from this penetrating technique should stock up on nutrients. Then sit back, relax, kick off your shoes and let the acupuncturist do her stuff.



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    Battle Fatigue! Don't passively accept chronic exhaustion and weakness.
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    Date: June 10, 2005 10:06 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Battle Fatigue! Don't passively accept chronic exhaustion and weakness.

    Battle Fatigue! Don't passively accept chronic exhaustion and weakness. by Joanne Gallo Energy Times, December 6, 1999

    Most folks wouldn't seek the distressing distinction of suffering chronic fatigue syndrome. Aside from a dizzying array of discomforts associated with the malady, the lack of a definitive cause, and few remedies offered by the medical establishment, scornful skeptics lob accusations of laziness or boredom or just plain moodiness. "Snap out of it!" they say, with little sympathy or understanding. "Just get moving!"

    But if you're one of more than 3 million Americans affected by chronic fatigue, you know your problem is not all in your head. Your symptoms are real and they extend far beyond mere tiredness. In addition to a debilitating sense of fatigue that can make everyday existence feel like an overwhelming struggle, you may suffer from impaired concentration and memory, recurrent sore throats, nagging headaches, muscle and joint pain, swollen lymph nodes and fitful sleep. The persistence of any one of these effects alone could be debilitating, but the overall diminished capabilities of the chronic fatigue sufferer can become the most discouraging aspect of the disease.

    But before you give up hope on kicking this energy-sucking ailment, look to natural ways to boost your immune system and regain your stamina for a more healthy and productive life. New research points to powerful, energy enhancing supplements which, combined with a nutritious diet and stress reducing techniques, can help you reclaim your body from a swamp of sluggishness.

    Yuppie Flu?

    Part of the public's misconceptions about chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) may stem from vague definitions of exactly what it is and its causes.

    In the '80s, CFS was often mentioned in the same breath as the Epstein-Barr virus, which garnered much notoriety as the "yuppie flu": a state of chronic exhaustion that often plagued young, overworked professionals, as the media trumpeted. CFS was initially thought to be the result of the Epstein-Barr virus, and the two were often considered to be the same thing. Since the Epstein-Barr virus causes mononucleosis, the term "chronic mono" was also thrown around to refer to long-lasting states of fatigue.

    Today, CFS is defined as a separate disorder from the Epstein-Barr syndrome. Researchers have found that CFS is not caused exclusively by the Epstein-Barr virus or any other single infectious disease agent. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, CFS may have multiple causes, in which viruses or other infectious agents might have a contributory role. Some of these additional possible culprits include herpes simplex viruses, candida albicans (yeast organisms), or parasites.

    According to the CDC, a person can be definitively diagnosed with CFS when she or he experiences severe chronic fatigue for six months or longer that is not caused by other medical conditions, and must have four or more of the following problems recurrently for six consecutive months: tender lymph nodes, muscle pain, multi-joint pain without swelling or redness, substantial impairment in short-term memory or concentration; sore throat, headaches, unrefreshing sleep and postexertional malaise lasting more than 24 hours.

    Even if you are not diagnosed with CFS, you could still probably use some help in fending off fatigue. You may suffer from another poorly understood condition like fibromyalgia, which causes similar symptoms of exhaustion and pain with additional stomach discomfort. You may cope with another ailment like hypoglycemia or low thyroid function that zaps your energy. Or you could be like almost every stressed-out American adult trying to do it all at the expense of your well-being. Though researchers still search for a definitive cause for CFS, one thing is certain: Constant stress and poor nutritional habits weaken the immune system's ability to ward off a host of debilitating viruses and organisms. So before you run yourself down and succumb to a chronic condition, learn how you can build up your defenses now.

    Nutrient News

    Some of the most exciting new research in CFS treatments focuses on NADH or Coenzyme 1, an energy-enhancing nutritional supplement. This naturally-occurring substance is present in all living cells including food, although cooking destroys most of it. Coenzymes help enzymes convert food and water into energy and NADH helps provide cellular fuel for energy production. It also plays a key role in cell regulation and DNA repair, acts as a potent antioxidant, and can reportedly improve mental focus and concentration by stimulating cellular production of the neurotransmitters dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin.

    A recent study conducted at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, DC, and reported in the February 1999 issue of The Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, showed that chronic fatigue sufferers improved their condition significantly by taking Enada, the stabilized, absorbable, oral form of NADH. The researchers found that 31% of those who took the supplement achieved significant improvement in relief of their symptoms, and a follow up study showed that 72% achieved positive results over a longer period of time.

    Coenzyme-A and Coenzyme Q-10 (Co-Q10) are related coenzymes also necessary for energy production.

    According to Erika Schwartz, M.D., and Carol Colman, authors of Natural Energy: From Tired to Terrific in 10 Days (G.P. Putnam's Sons) CoQ10 in combination with the nutrient carnitine enhances cellular energy production, thereby boosting energy levels. Coenzyme-A is required to initiate the chemical reactions that involve the utilization of CoQ10 and NADH for the production of energy at the cellular level.

    Another important energy-enhancing nutrient is D-ribose, a simple sugar that is crucial to many processes in your body. D-ribose stimulates the body's production of adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, an energy-rich chemical compound that provides the fuel for all body functions. D-ribose is essential to the manufacture of ATP and maintaining high levels of energy in the heart and skeletal muscles.

    Vitamin Power

    In addition to these new nutrients, a host of more familiar vitamins and minerals can help banish fatigue. According to Susan M. Lark, M.D., author of the Chronic Fatigue Self Help Book (Celestial Arts) nutritional supplements help stimulate your immune system, glands and digestive tract, promote proper circulation of blood and oxygen, and provide a calming effect. Some of Lark's recommended nutrients for building and regaining strength include:

    Vitamin A: Helps protect the body against invasion by viruses that could trigger CFS, as well as bacteria, fungi and allergies. Supports the production and maintenance of healthy skin and mucous membranes, the body's first line of defense against invaders. Also supports the immune system by boosting T-cell activity and contributing to the health of the thymus, the immune-regulating gland.

    Vitamin B Complex: Depression and fatigue can result from the body's depletion of B vitamins, which can occur from stress or drinking too many caffeinated beverages. Studies have provided preliminary evidence that CFS patients have reduced functional B vitamin status (J R Soc Med 92 [4], Apr. 1999: 183-5). The 11 factors of B complex are crucial to glucose metabolism, stabilization of brain chemistry and inactivation of estrogen, which regulate the body's levels of energy and vitality. n Vitamin C: Helps prevent fatigue linked to infections by stimulating the production of interferon, a chemical that can limit the spread of viruses. Helps fight bacterial and fungal infections by maintaining healthy antibody production and white blood cells. Also necessary for production of adrenal gland hormones which help prevent exhaustion in those under stress.

    Bioflavonoids: Help guard against fatigue caused by allergic reactions; their anti-inflammatory properties prevent the production of histamine and leukotrienes that promote inflammation. Bioflavonoids like quercetin are powerfully antiviral.

    Vitamin E: Has a significant immune stimulation effect and, at high levels, can enhance immune antibody response.

    Zinc: Immune stimulant; improves muscle strength and endurance. Constituent of many enzymes involved in metabolism and digestion. n Magnesium and Malic Acid: Important for the production of ATP, the body's energy source. Magnesium is also important for women who may develop a deficiency from chronic yeast infections.

    Potassium: Enhances energy and vitality; deficiency leads to fatigue and muscle weakness.

    Calcium: Combats stress, nervous tension and anxiety.

    Iodine: Necessary to prevent fatigue caused by low thyroid function, as it is crucial for the production of the thyroid hormone thyroxin.

    Herbal Helpers

    In addition to nutrients to bolster your immunity, herbal remedies can also help suppress viral and candida infections. Garlic is a powerful, natural antibiotic, while echinacea and goldenseal have strong anti-infective abilities. Other botanicals help combat tiredness and depression: stimulating herbs such as ginger, ginkgo biloba, licorice root and Siberian ginseng can improve vitality and energy. For anxiety, moodiness and insomnia try passionflower or valerian root, which both have a calming effect on the central nervous system.

    Eating For Energy

    Supplements can only do their best if you eat a nutritious diet. Start by cutting out large quantities of sugar, caffeine, alcohol, dairy products, red meat and fat.

    But what are the best foods when trying to restore energy or recover from illness? "High nutrient content foods with a good balance of proteins and carbohydrates," answers Jennifer Brett, ND, interim clinic director and chair of botanical medicine at the University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine.

    "You want foods with high nutritional value-that's where vegetables end up looking better than fruit."

    Brett enthusiastically pushes that "universal food," as she calls it: chicken soup.

    "In China," she says, laughing, "they do make chicken soup, and they do think of it as healing, because they add astragalus and shiitake mushrooms. Vegetable soups with chicken or fish have high nutritional value and are easy to digest."

    The same principle applies to juices, Brett says. Juices are a good way to tastefully get more phytonutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. Toss in protein powder, and you can make a complete meal in your blender.

    "You get more energy from juicing," she explains, "more accessible nutrients and carbohydrates that are not bound up in fiber." Brett's additional recommendation: oatmeal.

    "It's got protein and carbohydrates combined with a lot of minerals, which you may not get from a sugary cereal," she says. "Sure, they spray some vitamins on them, but if you don't drink the milk in the bottom of the bowl, you'll miss out on them. You might as well take a multivitamin."

    Fabulous Fiber

    Look to fiber for superior energy enhancement. Natural Energy author Schwartz calls it downright "miraculous": "In terms of conserving precious energy, fiber-rich foods are your cells' best friends," she writes. "It takes smaller quantities of them to give you a full, satisfied feeling. They release all their benefits slowly, which allows the cells to extract nutrients with much less effort. Then these fiber-rich foods graciously leave the body with ease and efficiency." Among these "slow burn" foods that Schwartz says raise blood sugar slowly and steadily and maintain energy evenly:

    Alfalfa sprouts-high in fiber and low in cholesterol.

    Apples-one medium unpeeled provides 10% of the recommended daily fiber dose; unlike sweeter fruits, which are rich in healthful fiber, they help regulate blood sugar.

    Broccoli-along with such greens as cauliflower, cabbage, kale, collard greens and broccoli rabe, it's packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals n Brown rice, wild rice, other whole grains-fiber treasure troves, including barley, quinoa, millet and buckwheat.

    Corn-excellent fiber source.

    Lentils and other legumes-high in fiber, delicious beans are rich in culinary possibilities.

    Oat bran and wheat bran-mix into yogurt or add to cereal for the best available access to fiber.

    Popcorn-an excellent snack.

    Citrus for More Energy

    If constant colds and infections are draining your energy, healthy helpings of citrus fruit may be the pickup you need. According to Robert Heinerman, in Heinerman's Encyclopedia of Healing Juices (Parker), citrus fruit have been used for more than a thousand years as natural remedies for a wide variety of ailments:

    Kumquat juice is supposed to help clear up bronchitis. Lemon juice with a pinch of table salt eases a sore throat. Lime juice in warm water soothes aches and cramps from the flu. Tangerine juice can break up mucous congestion in the lungs. Along with citrus' vitamin C, these fruits also supply carotenoids, antioxidants that provide disease-preventing benefits. Citrus also often contain calcium, potassium, folate (a B vitamin that fights against heart disease), iron and fiber.

    Fruits are loaded with phytochemicals, naturally occurring chemicals that give fruit their vibrant colors. Yellow, red and orange fruits are also high in flavonoids, like quercetin, a substance which fights cancer. Quercetin also aids in prevention of cataracts and macular degeneration, according to author Stephanie Beling, MD, in her book Power Foods (Harper Collins).

    Even the US Department of Agriculture agrees on this flavonoid's benefits, noting in its phytochemical database that quercetin is an "antitumor promoter, antiasthmatic, anticarcinogenic, antiplaque, cancer-preventive, capillariprotective." (Quercetin is also available as a supplement.)

    Don't Avoid Avocados

    For a vitamin rich food, few items beat the avocado which holds vitamins E and C as well as some B vitamins (B6, niacin, riboflavin). A significant source of beta carotene, though not nearly as much as carrots or sweet potatoes, avocados also contain high amounts of the minerals potassium, magnesium, copper and zinc.

    Just 15 grams of avocado delivers about 81 international units of vitamin A as beta carotene. Beta carotene, a carotenoid in fruits and vegetables, is converted to vitamin A in the body. This vitamin, aside from providing antioxidant protection from damaging free radicals, is necessary for good eyesight, healthy skin and healing.

    In addition, the avocado, like all of these healthy foods, tastes great. Which means that you can pep up and not have to sacrifice taste for zest.

    Healthy Mind, Healthy Body

    Remember that the path to wellness begins in your mind. Stress-reducing activities like yoga, meditation and massage and aromatherapy can have a great rejuvenating effect on your body. If you can learn to handle stress effectively instead of letting it control you-and strengthen your system with the right nutrients and diet-you'll find that fatigue can be a sporadic visitor rather than a chronic companion.



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    Mental Edge - Support proper Brain Function...
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    Date: June 03, 2005 06:07 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Mental Edge - Support proper Brain Function...

    Mental Edge

    Aging and nutritional imbalances can disrupt the multiple body systems that affect healthy brain function. The result: cognitive symptoms* such as forgetfulness, inability to focus, and mental fatigue. MENTAL EDGE® is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ that supports the interdependent body systems involved with healthy brain function. These include neurotransmitter production, myelin sheath generation, stress response, energy metabolism, and antioxidant defense.

    Mental Edge®: A Bio-Aligned Formula™

    Many scientists believe that only a small portion of the brain is fully utilized. MENTAL EDGE is a literal multivitamin for your brain. This comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula optimizes brain function by addressing the multiple body systems involved with cognitive health.

    Neurotransmitter Production

    Neurons (nerve cells) communicate with each other when neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) cross a small gap called a synapse to convey a message from one neuron to the next. Second messengers help transmit the message from the membrane of a receiving neuron to its inner environment. MENTAL EDGE supports neurotransmitter production with L-glutamine, L-phenylalanine, L-pyroglutamic acid, taurine, L-tyrosine, manganese, vitamins B-1 and B-6, and inositol.

    Acetylcholine Production

    Acetylcholine is one of the most important neurotransmitters. It is vital for memory and muscle movement. The ingredients DMAE, phosphatidylcholine, L-pyroglutamic acid, vitamin B-5 and choline are precursors to acetylcholine. DMAE is particularly important because it crosses the protective blood-brain barrier more easily than the others. DMAE also enhances mental concentration.

    Stress Response

    Adaptogenic herbs help provide the brain with the support and energy it needs to deal with the physical and mental stresses of an ever-changing environment. MENTAL EDGE supports stress response with the botanicals gotu kola, schizandra, and Siberian ginseng, and with the nutrients taurine, calcium, magnesium, potassium, vitamins B-5 and C, and inositol.

    Energy Metabolism

    Just as every cell needs the proper nutrients to survive, so do neurons. The brain accounts for 2% of our body weight, yet uses 15% of our total energy supply. Adequate levels of energy-generating nutrients are vital to the high-powered functioning of this organ. MENTAL EDGE supports energy generation with ginkgo biloba, L-glutamine, calcium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc, B-vitamins, biotin and folic acid.

    Myelin Sheath Generation

    Myelin, composed of fat and protein, makes up the myelin sheath that forms a protective insulating covering around certain nerve fibers. Properly formed myelin increases nerve impulse conduction. MENTAL EDGE contains vitamins B-5 and B-12, which are needed for myelin sheath generation.

    Lifestyle Tips for Cognitive

    Health: A Strategy for WellnessSM Eat Well: Recent research suggests that diets rich in beta-carotene and vitamins C and E help reduce memory problems, probably by lessening oxidative stress. And new animal research at the University of Toronto found that a highfat diet slowed the ability of rats to learn new tasks. Use Your Brain: Learn a foreign language or new hobby, do crossword puzzles, read books, and cut back on TV. Scientists at Case Western found that people who were less mentally active in middle age were three times more likely to experience memory decline as they got older. Stay Active: Vigorous walking can improve mental processes in aging individuals, according to research. Aerobic exercise increases oxygenation and blood flow to the brain, resulting in improved memory, organization, and the ability to juggle intellectual tasks. Manage Stress: Long-term anxiety or depression can make a person more forgetful. Try to regulate stress, increase social contacts, and, if necessary, seek professional help. Get Organized: Make the most of your cognitive abilities through the use of memory aids such as “to-do” lists, notes, or calendars.

    Neurotransmitter Production: L-Glutamine, L-Phenylalanine, L-Pyroglutamic Acid, Taurine, L-Tyrosine, Manganese, Vitamins B-1 & B-6, Inositol

    Acetylcholine Production: DMAE, Phosphatidylcholine, L-Pyroglutamic Acid, Vitamin B-5, Choline

    Antioxidant Defense: DMAE, Ginkgo Biloba, Zinc, Vitamin C

    Stress Response Gotu Kola, Schizandra, Siberian Ginseng, Taurine, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Vitamins B-5 & C, Inositol

    Energy Metabolism: Ginkgo Biloba, L-Glutamine, Calcium, Magnesium, Manganese, Potassium, Zinc, Vitamins B-1, B-2, B-3, B-5, B-6, & B-12, Biotin, Folic Acid

    Myelin Sheath Generation: Vitamins B-5 and B-12

  • *The term symptom as used above refers to the effects of nutrient shortages or imbalances and is not related to the diagnosis, treatment, cure, or prevention of any disease.



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    Male Response - Re-align your body systems ...
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    Date: June 03, 2005 12:00 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Male Response - Re-align your body systems ...

    Male Response

    Between 10 and 15 million American men experience challenges to libido and sexual performance, according to the National Institutes of Health. Fatigue, stress, inactivity and an unhealthy diet can result in decreased vigor and desire. In addition, the normal aging process may result in a slowing of response, according to the National Institute on Aging. MALE RESPONSE is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ that helps bring alignment to a range of interrelated body systems that can negatively impact male sexual function: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.

    Bio-Aligned Formula™

    MALE RESPONSE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula that supports the multiple, interconnected systems involved with male sexual function.

    Hormonal Function

    Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the male sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. MALE RESPONSE contains herbs and nutrients that may support hormonal function, including nettles, Panax ginseng, saw palmetto, tribulus, zinc, and vitamin B-5.

    Energy Generation

    Fatigue and poor energy can takes a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. MALE RESPONSE combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and/or invigorate the sexual response. These include ashwagandha, Panax ginseng, Siberian ginseng, zinc, and vitamins B-5 and B-6.

    Circulation

    Proper circulation of blood is vital for male sexual response. MALE RESPONSE contains several herbs known for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbe contains yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, which can stimulate selected portions of the nervous system and increase blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Additional ingredients that support healthy circulation include ginger, ginkgo, and vitamin E.

    Brain and Nervous System: Libido Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. MALE RESPONSE provides supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, including copper, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. In addition, it contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and/or rejuvenating properties. These include ashwagandha, avena sativa (oats), Panax ginseng, tribulus, and yohimbe.

    Prostate Gland

    A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support male reproductive health and are essential for the proper functioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production. Additional support is provided by nettle, saw palmetto, and tribulus.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Male Response: A Strategy for WellnessSM

  • • Eat well: Diet is perhaps the most significant single factor in generating virility. A diet rich in whole foods, with adequate protein from sources such as fish, chicken, turkey, lean beef, tofu or legumes, is crucial. The prostate gland contains high amounts of zinc, which is needed for sperm production and healthy testosterone levels. Foods high in zinc include seafood, meat, root vegetables, legumes, pumpkin seeds, nuts and whole grains. It is also important to follow a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, since elevated cholesterol levels and the resulting buildup of plaque in blood vessels, can affect male reponse by impairing blood flow.
  • • Stop using tobacco. Nicotine, tobacco’s active ingredient, constricts the small blood vessels, interfering with healthy circulation.
  • • Use alcohol in moderation and avoid illicit drugs. Alcohol is a nervous system depressant, which can interfere with sexual function. Steady drinking can inhibit male response by inhibiting blood flow.
  • • Get moving. Moderate, but not extreme, amounts of exercise help you relax, boost your energy levels, increase your physical awareness and ultimately stimulate your sexuality. Regular exercise has an impact on vasocongestion, raising blood supply to the organs, while walking, stretching, swimming and resistance exercise help raise testoterone levels.
  • • Contact a counselor. Counseling can help reduce the anxiety often associated with male performance. It can also address issues at work or home that may be contributing factors.

    Male Response is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ Multi-System Support for Sexual Vigor

    References
    Comas, M. et al. Bromatological study of maca. (Lepidium meyenii). Alimentaria 1997, 35(286): 85-90. Dini, A. et al. Chemical composition of Lepidium meyenii. Food Chemistry 1994, 49(4):347-9. Kapoor, L.D. Tribulus—indications and use. CRC Handbook of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton: FIAC/FASP; 1990. Physicians’ Desk Reference, 52 ed. Montvale, N.J.:Medical Economics Co.; 1998. Physician’s Desk Reference Medical Dictionary. Baltimore:Williams & Wilkins; 1995.



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    Gluco Sciense - Take Control of your Blood Sugar ...
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    Date: June 02, 2005 10:51 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Gluco Sciense - Take Control of your Blood Sugar ...

    Gluco Sciense for Blood sugar

    Sedentary lifestyles, obesity, and sugar-rich diets are prevalent in our society. The result: challenges to your multiple, interdependent body systems involved with blood sugar levels and insulin activity. Now is the time to learn how a healthy diet and lifestyle can help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. For further support, Source Naturals offers you GLUCO-SCIENCE™, a breakthrough formula. GLUCO-SCIENCE is uniquely effective because it is a Bio-Aligned Formula™. Source Naturals evaluates the underlying causes of system imbalances. Then we design formulas that provide targeted nutrition to bring your interrelated body systems back into balance. GLUCO-SCIENCE can help bring your body’s systems for carbohydrate metabolism back into alignment.

  • GLUCO-SCIENCE™ Maintains Healthy Blood Sugar Levels When Used as Part of Your Diet

    A Bio-Aligned Formula™

    GLUCO-SCIENCE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula, based on the newest clinical research into key herbs and special ingredients. Source Naturals studied the scientific research, and then designed GLUCO-SCIENCE. This Bio- Aligned Formula provides targeted nutrition to five different body systems involved with healthy blood sugar levels and insulin activity.

    Glucose/Carbohydrate Metabolism

    GLUCO-SCIENCE supports glucose/carbohydrate metabolism with a range of nutrients. B-vitamins are required for glycolysis and the Krebs cycle, the metabolic pathways by which the body converts glucose into cellular energy. Chromium is believed to work closely with insulin to facilitate the uptake of glucose into cells. Manganese is also involved in glucose uptake. The formula also features herbs from several traditions, such as Gymnema sylvestre.

    Insulin/Pancreatic Activity

    Insulin is secreted by the pancreas in response to high blood glucose levels after meals. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter cells to provide fuel for cellular energy. Certain nutrients (see chart) support these vital metabolic processes, including mediation of insulin release and activity, and enhancing insulin sensitivity. N-acetyl cysteine protects pancreatic beta cells from oxidative damage in animal studies. In addition, vanadium, zinc, and selenium are notable for their insulin-like actions.

    Heart and Circulatory System

    Vitamin E supports a healthy lipid status, while myricetin has been shown in animal studies to influence triglyceride levels. Gymnema sylvestre and vitamin C are involved with lipid metabolism. Additional heart-healthy ingredients include CoQ10, garlic, fenugreek, and hawthorn.

    Nervous System

    Antioxidants are important for a healthy nervous system. Lipoic acid helps prevent lipid peroxidation, which can impact nerve function. Many B-vitamins are vital to the metabolic processes of the nerves or are present in the phospholipids of cell membranes. Methylcobalamin, an active form of vitamin B-12, supports the central nervous system. Other supportive ingredients are included (see chart).

    Vision

    GLUCO-SCIENCE provides antioxidants, nutrients and herbs with an affinity for eyes and the physiological processes involved in sight. Alpha-lipoic acid, quercetin, and vitamin C support healthy lens function. Bilberry, shown to support microcirculation in animal studies, is widely recognized for supporting vision.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Blood Sugar Levels: A Strategy for WellnessSM

  • • Eat a Glucose-Healthy Diet: Fiber: Soluble fiber helps modulate glucose absorption and lowers plasma cholesterol levels. Adding 50 grams per day to your diet could help lower blood sugar up to 10%. Foods high in soluble fiber include oranges, grapefruits, raisins, zucchini, oatmeal, oat bran, strawberries and apples. Viscous fibers, including guar gum, psyllium, and galactomannan can be helpful— they should be taken with liquid and mixed with carbohydrate foods. Protein: A high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet is associated with healthy blood sugar levels. Fat: Too much fat may increase your risk for heart disease and/or hardening of the arteries, which compromises circulation. Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, however, are helpful for managing blood sugar. Glycemic Index: Avoid sugar and other foods with a high glycemic index. Different carbohydrates evoke different glycemic responses. Beans, peas, and oats, for example, raise blood glucose levels much less than bread and potatoes. The Glycemic Index, a useful educational tool in choosing foods to help modulate blood glucose levels, is available in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [1995;62:871S-93S (88)], or go to the Internet at www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm.
  • • Maintain a Healthy Weight: If you are overweight, lose weight. Although a Body Mass Index (BMI) between 18.5 and 22 is considered “healthy,” problems arise at a BMI of 22, especially for women.
  • • Exercise: Exercise lowers blood sugar and helps reduce risks associated with elevated levels, such as nerve and eye damage. Exercise also improves insulin sensitivity, and supports heart function and circulation. Try to get 20-45 minutes of aerobic exercise at least 3 days per week.
  • • Maintain Healthy Blood Pressure Levels: If your blood pressure is 140 over 90 or higher, you are more likely to experience challenges to healthy blood sugar levels. Eat a “DASH Diet” containing 8-10 servings of fresh fruits and vegetables, 2-3 servings of low-fat dairy products and less than 2,400 mg of sodium per day.
  • • Stop Smoking: Smoking raises glucose levels and aggravates related health problems.
  • • Manage Stress: During stress, the level of many hormones increases and stores of glucose are released into your bloodstream, clogging and weakening vessels and capillaries. You can relax and reverse the hormonal response to stress by practicing deep breathing, meditating or doing yoga, exercising regularly, or talking with friends, family, or a support group.

    Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar levels with Gluco-sciense.

    Glucose/Carbohydrate Metabolism American Ginseng, Bitter Melon, Blueberry, Fenugreek, Gymnema sylvestre, Maitake, Myricetin, Pterocarpus marsupium, Chromium, Magnesium, Manganese, Vitamins B-1, B-2, B-5, B-6 & B-12, Biotin, Inositol, Niacinamide Insulin/Pancreatic Activity alpha-Lipoic Acid, Bitter Melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Maitake Fruit Body, Myricetin, N-acetyl-L-Cysteine, Pterocarpus marsupium, Taurine, Chromium, Manganese, Selenium, Vanadium, Zinc Heart and Circulatory System Bilberry, Blueberry, CoQ10, Fenugreek, Garlic, Grape Seed, Gymnema sylvestre, Hawthorn, Myricetin, Taurine, Siberian Ginseng, Magnesium, Selenium, Vitamins B-6, C & E, Folic Acid, Niacinamide Nervous System alpha-Lipoic acid, Glutamine, Magnesium, Taurine, Vitamins B-1 & B-6, Biotin, Choline, Inositol, Methylcobalamin Vision alpha-Lipoic Acid, Bilberry, Quercetin, Taurine, Zinc, Vitamins B-6, C & E



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    CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX - Health Secrets from the Rainforest
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    Date: June 01, 2005 09:59 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX - Health Secrets from the Rainforest

    CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX

    Standard pharmaceutical drugs came into common use only around the turn of the century. Before that, herbal preparations were administered for health concerns. Today, in nearly every country in the world, herbs are used by health care practitioners as the focal point of health care. Only in the United States is the otherwise widespread use of herbs missing in mainstream culture. But now modern scientific investigation is confirming the benefits of herbal supplementation, which is paving the way for us to reclaim and implement herbs into our everyday lives.

    The primary need for preserving the rainforests

    Rain Forest Herbs

    Scientists’ knowledge of the varied rain forest flora is far from complete. The plants which have been thus far identified are so elaborate in molecular structure that it’s difficult to understand how these molecules function, let alone how to reproduce them. What is known is that the biodiversity of the rain forest yields numerous biologically active plant constituents which can have a profound influence on supporting the body through times of imbalance. Preserving the rain forest means preserving these precious herbs and the unique constituents contained within them.

    Cat’s Claw Defense Complex contains powerful rainforest herbs

    A Synergistic Blend

    Source Naturals CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX harnesses the power of some of the most complex botanicals on earth into a synergistic blend of defense-enhancing herbs, each with a unique set of compounds which complement the body’s natural physiology. Source Naturals CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX is the first step in the rediscovery of a long-standing herbal tradition. Source Naturals was the first full-line supplement company to introduce the herbal superstar, Cat’s Claw, and the first to offer it in a combination formula. CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX provides 2000 mg of Cat’s Claw per four tablets – more than many companies’ single ingredient Cat’s Claw products! It combines powerful rain forest herbs like Pau D’Arco and Western herbs such as Aloe Vera and St. John’s Wort with legendary Chinese herbs (Reishi Mushroom and Astragalus). Source Naturals Cat’s Claw Defense Complex also includes two categories of antioxidants for broad spectrum support.

    How we ensure quality and potency

    Cat’s Claw & Pau D’Arco – Peruvian Jungle Discoveries

    Cat’s Claw was discovered in the depths of the Peruvian Amazon jungle. Researchers have discovered that components extracted from the herb can bolster the body’s innate defenses, address discomforts associated with stress, and support intestinal health. Source Naturals uses only the highest quality Cat’s Claw inner bark – which is at least twenty years old, the amount of time it takes the bark to reach its peak biological activity– and uses a careful process to insure that harvesting the bark doesn’t weaken or destroy the plant. Like all of our herbs, each shipment of Cat’s Claw is also routinely inspected and tested by a trained herbalist to ensure maximum quality and potency. Pau D’Arco is also native to the South American rain forest and, like Cat’s Claw, has a high concentration of active constituents – a combination of anthraquinones and naphthoquinones, primarily lapachol – in the bark of the plant. Each daily dosage of CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX contains 100 mg of Pau D’Arco bark and 100 mg of concentrated Pau D’Arco bark extract for broad spectrum support.

    Herbs — Adaptogens for Balance

    Of the Chinese herbs, Siberian Ginseng is one of the best known adaptogens. Adaptogens have a balancing effect, helping us adapt to increased stress levels and other changes, like different altitudes or time zones. Thus, supplementation with Siberian Ginseng can help prevent stress-related health concerns. Schizandra, a small creeping vine with red berries, is a Chinese adaptogen which helps regulate the body’s functions and cleanse it of toxins.

    Herbs that energize the body and build resistance to impaired bodily function

    The trio of Chinese mushrooms – Reishi, Shiitake, and Maitake – has been used by Chinese herbalists for centuries, and provides the highest quality natural support for the body’s defenses. Modern science has revealed the true power behind Reishi, Shiitake, and Maitake: high levels of polysaccharides – long chain sugar macromolecules which are known for their protective and cleansing abilities. CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX utilizes only the mycelia biomass of Reishi (200 mg), Shiitake (200 mg), and Maitake (150 mg) to ensure the highest level of activity. Astragalus is the premier tonic – or internal strengthener – of Chinese herbalism. In addition to helping energize the body, Astragalus also builds resistance to weakness and to impaired bodily function. Isatis is a cooling herb which has been shown to have a broad spectrum inhibitory action in in-vitro studies, and helps support normal liver function. Used for thousands of years, the aloe plant has been treasured for its varied uses both externally and internally. Aloe Vera juice is high in mucopolysaccharides, which have been found to have powerful protective capabilities. CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX provides 200 mg of aloe (200:1 concentration) extracted from the whole leaf of the plant.

    Why St. John’s Wort is powerful and useful

    It is generally agreed that hypericin and pseudohypericin, two bioflavonoids which are the active constituents in St. John’s Wort, probably act as monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, which current research has shown are powerful as internal cleansing agents. St. John’s Wort is particularly useful because of its ability to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier, through which many elements are unable to pass.

    The liver’s health is essential because of its responsibility for over 500 different functions

    Antioxidants and Plantioxidants – Supporting Complete Health

    Source Naturals CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX includes key liver-supporting antioxidants like Zinc, Beta Carotene, and Vitamin C – nutrients that help protect the liver from stress and pollution induced free radical damage. These three nutrients are also wellknown for their ability to help strengthen the body’s resistance and move through imbalances quickly. The liver is responsible for over 500 functions, including converting vitamins to their active forms, and processing and eliminating waste products from the body; therefore its health is vital. Plantioxidants™ is Source Naturals’ term for Plant-Derived Antioxidant Bioflavonoids. Though most people are only aware of the vitamin and mineral antioxidants, the latest scientific research has indicated that the plant kingdom may provide the most potent antioxidants in the world. Plants, trees, and citrus fruits all contain bioflavonoids (also called polyphenols) – a large group of restorative compounds with similar chemical structures which help protect the body from the ravages of oxidative damage due to free radicals. Some of the Plantioxidants included in CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX are: Quercetin, which helps inhibit the body’s sensitivity to dangerous particles in the air; Proanthodyn, which promotes tissue repair by helping to strengthen collagen and elastin, the two primary structural components in cartilage; Silymarin, which promotes liver-tissue regeneration and optimizes liver-cell function; Green Tea, a remarkably potent antioxidant; and Ginkgo, which is renowned for helping transport oxygen to the brain.

    The way to naturally bolster the body’s defenses

    A Holistic Natural Answer

    The natural world provides us with a seemingly endless supply of complex herbal compounds with unreplicable and unique constituents so varied and numerous that most doctors aren’t even aware of their existence. Source Naturals would like to change that with CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX – the natural way to bolster the body’s innate defenses. All the ingredients included are at optimal potencies, and in the forms best absorbed by the body. The result? The most powerful, holistic product available to help maintain the structure and function of the natural defenses – Source Naturals CAT’S CLAW DEFENSE COMPLEX.



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    Calm Thoughts Kava - from Source Naturals
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 01, 2005 09:31 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Calm Thoughts Kava - from Source Naturals

    Calm Thoughts

    Stress: it disturbs your serenity. Ultimately it takes a physical toll on your health. And it seems to be an unavoidable part of the hectic modern lifestyle. Source Naturals CALM THOUGHTS KAVA is a comprehensive formula designed to help you stay calm in the face of stress and anxiety—without sacrificing the clarity and focus you need to function effectively. CALM THOUGHTS is centered around a standardized extract of kava kava, the relaxing herb of choice for generations of South Pacific Islanders. But CALM THOUGHTS goes further, with soothing herbs and nutrients, rejuvenating ingredients and neurotransmitter support.

    Soothing Herbs

    CALM THOUGHTS is centered around the renowned calmative kava kava. Used for generations by South Pacific Islanders, kava is known traditionally for its ability to help a person achieve a tranquil, meditative, yet focused state. Kava is an integral part of the spiritual and social fabric of Pacific Islanders’ life, used to help people relax and socialize. In Europe, where kava has been the subject of a number of double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, science has confirmed its beneficial effects, and made kava a popular alternative for reducing stress. Those studies found reduced anxiety levels in individuals given standardized kava extracts. CALM THOUGHTS enhances kava’s calming properties with a number of supporting herbs. One of these is bacopa, known commonly as Brahmi in Indian herbalism and used extensively as a nervous system tonic. The formula also includes St. John’s wort, the most extensively studied herb in the market today, and the well-known calmatives lemon balm and valerian.

    Rejuvenating Factors

    Several of the botanicals in CALM THOUGHTS are tonic herbs, helping to promote overall well-being. These include the adaptogens schizandra, ashwagandha and Siberian ginseng, all of which help the body deal with external stresses. Also featured are warming ginger, energizing licorice, and Ginkgo biloba, to promote circulation.

    Neurotransmitter Support

    CALM THOUGHTS includes ingredients which influence brain neurotransmitters involved in the body’s reactions to stress. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter which may have regulatory effects on the nervous system. Tyrosine is a precursor to the catecholamines norepinephrine and dopamine, which play an important role in mood balance and may have a role in emotional feelings and behavior. Dopamine is a precursor to norepinephrine, an “activating” type neurotransmitter which is involved with attention, arousal, the sleep-wake cycle, and appetite regulation.

    Supporting Nutrients

    CALM THOUGHTS contains a range of vitamins, minerals and amino acids. Calcium is essential for the healthy functioning of nerves and muscles. Magnesium is mildly relaxing to the muscles, while taurine modulates certain nerve impulses. Vitamins C and B-5 are important for healthy functioning of the adrenal glands and help in the body’s response to stress. Vitamin B-6 is important for healthy functioning of nerves and aids in the metabolism of tyrosine and taurine. For calmness with clarity and focus, choose Source Naturals CALM THOUGHTS KAVA. This groundbreaking formula is available in 45 and 90-tablet bottles.

    References

  • • Kinzler, E., et al. 1991. Arzneim.-Forsch./Drug Res., 41(I):6, 584-88.
  • • Holm, E., et al. 1991. Arzneim.-Forsch, 41:673-83.
  • • Lindenberg, V.D., & Pitule-Schödel. 1990. Fortschr. Med., 108(2):31-34.
  • • Nicholls, John G. et al. From Neuron to Brain, 3rd ed. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Assoc., Inc. 1992.
  • • Shukia et al. 1987. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 21:65-74.
  • • Volz, H.-P. & Kieser, M. 1997. Pharmacopsychiatr, 30:1.5



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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 20, 2005 05:33 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    Between 10 and 15 million American men experience challenges to libido and sexual performance, according to the National Institutes of Health. Fatigue, stress, inactivity and an unhealthy diet can result in decreased vigor and desire. In addition, the normal aging process may result in a slowing of response, according to the National Institute on Aging. MALE RESPONSE is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ that helps bring alignment to a range of interrelated body systems that can negatively impact male sexual function: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.

    Bio-Aligned Formula™ MALE RESPONSE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula that supports the multiple, interconnected systems involved with male sexual function. Hormonal Function Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the male sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. MALE RESPONSE contains herbs and nutrients that may support hormonal function, including nettles, Panax ginseng, saw palmetto, tribulus, zinc, and vitamin B-5. Energy Generation Fatigue and poor energy can takes a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. Male Response combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and/or invigorate the sexual response. These include ashwagandha, Panax ginseng, Siberian ginseng, zinc, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. Circulation Proper circulation of blood is vital for male sexual response. MALE RESPONSE contains several herbs known for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbe contains yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, which can stimulate selected portions of the nervous system and increase blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Additional ingredients that support healthy circulation include ginger, ginkgo, and vitamin E. Brain and Nervous System: Libido Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. MALE RESPONSE provides supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, including copper, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. In addition, it contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and/or rejuvenating properties. These include ashwagandha, avena sativa (oats), Panax ginseng, tribulus, and yohimbe.

    Prostate Gland A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support male reproductive health and are essential for the properfunctioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production. Additional support is provided by nettle, saw palmetto, and tribulus. Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Male Response: A Strategy for WellnessSM • Eat well: Diet is perhaps the most significant single factor in generating virility. A diet rich in whole foods, with adequate protein from sources such as fish, chicken, turkey, lean beef, tofu or legumes, is crucial. The prostate gland contains high amounts of zinc, which is needed for sperm production and healthy testosterone levels. Foods high in zinc include seafood, meat, root vegetables, legumes, pumpkin seeds, nuts and whole grains. It is also important to follow a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, since elevated cholesterol levels and the resulting buildup of plaque in blood vessels, can affect male reponse by impairing blood flow. • Stop using tobacco. Nicotine, tobacco’s active ingredient, constricts the small blood vessels, interfering with healthy circulation. • Use alcohol in moderation and avoid illicit drugs. Alcohol is a nervous system depressant, which can interfere with sexual function. Steady drinking can inhibit male response by inhibiting blood flow. • Get moving. Moderate, but not extreme, amounts of exercise help you relax, boost your energy levels, increase your physical awareness and ultimately stimulate your sexuality. Regular exercise has an impact on vasocongestion, raising blood supply to the organs, while walking, stretching, swimming and resistance exercise help raise testoterone levels. • Contact a counselor. Counseling can help reduce the anxiety often associated with male performance. It can also address issues at work or home that may be contributing factors.

    References Comas, M. et al. Bromatological study of maca. (Lepidium meyenii). Alimentaria 1997, 35(286): 85-90. Dini, A. et al. Chemical composition of Lepidium meyenii. Food Chemistry 1994, 49(4):347-9. Kapoor, L.D. Tribulus—indications and use. CRC Handbook of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton: FIAC/FASP; 1990. Physicians’ Desk Reference, 52 ed. Montvale, N.J.:Medical Economics Co.; 1998. Physician’s Desk Reference Medical Dictionary. Baltimore:Williams & Wilkins; 1995.

  • Male Response 45 tab

  • Male REsponse 90ct



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