SearchBox:

Search Term: " Egyptian "

  Messages 1-36 from 36 matching the search criteria.
Myrrh oil is worth more than gold when it comes to the healthbenefits it provides Darrell Miller 5/17/19
Bee pollen proven to be a "treasure trove of active naturalmetabolites" that benefit human health Darrell Miller 2/17/19
Here Are Some Health Benefits Of Garlic Darrell Miller 3/6/17
What Is Thymoquinone Found In Black Seed Oil? Darrell Miller 9/28/15
What Is Allium Cepa Good For? Darrell Miller 7/1/14
Thyme Garden Herb And Its Many Benefits Darrell Miller 4/20/14
Can Green Tea And Pomegranate cream Help The Skin? Darrell Miller 3/7/14
Thyme Oil Darrell Miller 2/26/14
Myrrh oil health benefits Darrell Miller 2/21/14
Sesame sticks - a choice full of health Darrell Miller 12/18/13
Health Benefits Of Chamomile Darrell Miller 12/3/12
Benefits of Olive Leaf Extract Darrell Miller 12/17/11
What is Myrrh and How Does it Boost My Health Darrell Miller 4/25/11
Does Aloe Vera Juice Help with Digestive Problems? Darrell Miller 3/28/11
Spearmint Is a Powerful and Natural Remedy for all who use its leaves Darrell Miller 9/9/10
Flaxseed Darrell Miller 10/23/09
Cinnamon Bark Darrell Miller 10/15/09
Horehound Herb Darrell Miller 9/21/09
Garlic Darrell Miller 8/27/09
Marshmallow Root Herb Darrell Miller 8/12/09
Honey from bee's Darrell Miller 7/1/09
Bee Pollen Darrell Miller 6/22/09
Bee Pollen Darrell Miller 5/20/09
Barley Grass Darrell Miller 5/14/09
Barberry Darrell Miller 5/13/09
Aloe Vera Darrell Miller 4/8/09
Apple Cider Vinegar Darrell Miller 8/13/08
Health Comes From The Honey bee Darrell Miller 8/8/08
Aloe Vera’s Healing Properties Recognized 1500 years before Christ Darrell Miller 4/21/07
Mangoni - Complete SuperFruit Food 1oz equals 3 servings of Vegetables Darrell Miller 12/27/06
HERBAL EXTRACTS FOR IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPORT Darrell Miller 12/23/05
Cinnamon may control sugar levels... Darrell Miller 7/8/05
HISTORY Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Scents of Balance Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Clearing the Air Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Garlic for the Ages - eat garlic because it's good for your heart... Darrell Miller 6/13/05



Sunny Green Ancient Egyptian Wheat Grass Powder
   90 Gram Powder $26.09 39% OFF $ 15.91
AMAZING HERBS Egyptian Black Seed Oil
   8 oz $42.00 20% OFF $ 33.60
AMAZING HERBS Egyptian Black Seed Oil
   16 oz $74.80 20% OFF $ 59.84
AMAZING HERBS Egyptian Black Seed Oil
   32 oz $130.00 20% OFF $ 104.00
AFRICAN RED TEA Egyptian Cold- Pressed Black Seed Oil Roll-On
   0.33 oz $9.95 31% OFF $ 6.87
AFRICAN RED TEA Egyptian Cold-Pressed Black Seed Oil
   2 oz $22.95 31% OFF $ 15.84
Heritage Store Egyptian Gold Butter
   4 oz Butter $22.29 37% OFF $ 14.04
YOGI TEAS/GOLDEN TEMPLE TEA CO Egyptian Licorice Spice Tea
   16 bags $5.49 34% OFF $ 3.62
YOGI TEAS/GOLDEN TEMPLE TEA CO Egyptian Mint Licorice Tea
   16 bags $5.49 34% OFF $ 3.62
Heritage store Egyptian Oil Extra Peanut Oil
   8 fl oz $12.29 34% OFF $ 8.11
Heritage store Egyptian Oil Original
   8 fl oz $12.89 34% OFF $ 8.51
Heritage Store Egyptian Oil w/Peanut Oil Sassafras
   1 gal $149.59 21% OFF $ 118.18
Now Foods GERANIUM OIL EGYPTIAN 1 OZ
   1 $19.99 45% OFF $ 10.99

Myrrh oil is worth more than gold when it comes to the healthbenefits it provides
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 17, 2019 04:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Myrrh oil is worth more than gold when it comes to the healthbenefits it provides





Essential oils are used for aromatherapy but that is just one of their myriad uses. They have been used by Chinese medicine and ayurvedic medicine for centuries due to their numerous health benefits. Now, science has backed many of the claims on health benefits. One of these oils is myrrh. Myrrh is produced from a steam distillation process by extracting the reddish brown sap from the Commiphora myrrha tree. The oil is amber in color and has an earthy aroma. It has a lot of healthy benefits. One of them is that it is used to eliminate harmful bacteria. Ancient Egyptians used this oil to embalm their dead and mummies because it slows down the process of decay. This is due to the antibacterial and antimicrobial properties of myrrh oil. Another advantage of this oil is that it can eliminate some parasites. Myrrh oil has been reported to cure infections such as trichomoniasis and giardiasis. Myrrh oil can also support oral health. It has been used by researchers to treat mouth sores with complete relief for the patients. Other benefits of this wonderful oil are highlighted in the blog.

Key Takeaways:

  • Myrrh is gotten from the plant, Commiphora myrrha, and is its reddish brown dried sap that was extracted using a steam distillation process.
  • One of the many benefits of myrrh which is amber color to the eyes is that it eliminates harmful bacteria from the body.
  • Myrrh was used by traditional Egyptians for the dead to embalm bodies which did not only make them not to smell but to delay decay.

"In fact, myrrh essential oil, which is often used in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine, has many science-backed health benefits."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-04-17-myrrh-oil-is-worth-more-than-gold.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6333)


Bee pollen proven to be a "treasure trove of active naturalmetabolites" that benefit human health
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 17, 2019 02:42 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bee pollen proven to be a "treasure trove of active naturalmetabolites" that benefit human health





The tiny balls of pollen that bees harvest from vegetation is known as bee pollen. Many people assume that allergies associated with bee pollen are fairly high, but research is showing this pollen can actually act as an antihistamine. Only two people in a six-year time period were shown to have genuine bee pollen allergies. On the other hand, the histamine reduction properties located within bee pollen have proven to be successful in reducing the risk of allergic reactions to other substances.

Key Takeaways:

  • The tiny balls of pollen that are harvested by bees is what is referred to as be pollen.
  • Only three actual cases of bee pollen allergies were recorded within a six-year time span.
  • Bee pollen actually reduces the presence of histamines within the system, making it somewhat of an anti-allergen.

"The ancient Greeks, Egyptians and Chinese all recognized the value of honey and bee pollen in medicine."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-14-bee-pollen-treasure-trove-of-active-natural-metabolites.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6037)


Here Are Some Health Benefits Of Garlic
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 06, 2017 10:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Here Are Some Health Benefits Of Garlic





Garlic is a plant in theonion family. It is closely related to onions, shallots and leeks. It grows in many parts of the world and is a popular ingredient in cooking due to its strong smell and delicious taste.However, throughout ancient history, the main use of garlic was for its health and medicinal properties Its use was well documented by all the major civilization including the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and the Chinese.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2og7kmK9Ww

Key Takeaways:

  • Garlic is a superfood for the human body.
  • Garlic can act as a sleep aid
  • Carry garlic wrapped in a napkin and carry it with you helps eliminate negative energy

"Garlic contains a compound called allisin, which has potent medicinal properties."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4081)


What Is Thymoquinone Found In Black Seed Oil?
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 28, 2015 08:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: What Is Thymoquinone Found In Black Seed Oil?

The black seed oil is obtained from the seeds of the Nigella Sativa plant. The black seeds, also known as the black cumin, were used by the ancient Egyptians because of their ability to cure a variety of health conditions such as toothaches, headaches. It was also used as a dietary supplement. Additionally, the black seed oil is effective in ensuring a stable immune system as well as combating diseases that affect the immune system. The medicinal power of this oil emanates from its active ingredient, thymoquinone.

Thymoquinone is an active compound that contains anti-inflammatory, anti-cancerous, and antioxidant properties. Research indicates that thymoquinone can thwart the cancerous cells in the colon, pancreases, and prostate. Because of the healing properties of this compound, black seed oil, therefore, remains useful as far as human health is concerned.

Black Cumin

Some of its benefits includes:

  • Treating cancer

The black seed oil has been used for a long time to treat cancer. According to the research from three Chinese researchers and four Arabian scientists, black seed oil contains the right anti-cancer properties. They noted that the black seed oil was used as a traditional medicine for many years. The active compound, thymoquinone, contained in the black seed oil is effective against many other diseases such diabetes, kidney, asthma diseases.

  • Fever and flu

Taking a teaspoon of the black seed oil can help cure fever or flu. It causes the body to sweat for it to recover from the illness.

  • Curing insomnia

Research indicates that black seed oil can help a person sleep well if suffering from insomnia. One teaspoon of the oil put in a warm drink before sleeping helps to eradicate the problem.

  • Curing arthritis

Studies show that the black seed oil responds positively to the treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies indicate that this oil helps reduce inflammation in the joints and the stiffness that occur in the morning.

  • Curing asthma and cough

Black seed oil is an anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory, and it is ideal for treating coughs and also addressing asthma symptoms. It achieves this by relaxing the bronchiole tube muscles.

  • Radiation treatment

According to researchers from Turkey, black seed oil is potentially helpful to people receiving radiation treatment for cancer.

The thymoquinone compound in black seed oil makes this oil essential to the health of human beings. Consumption of the black seed oil will keep you off from most cancer infection and diseases.


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3224)


What Is Allium Cepa Good For?
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 01, 2014 08:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Allium Cepa Good For?

allium cepaWhat is allium cepa?

Allium Cepa was originally native to central Asia; however, nowadays it has a global geographic range. It made its way to Egypt through trade, where it became an important food crop in the ancient world. Because the Allium cepa was a cheap food source, Egyptian slave workers, those who built the pyramids, ate them on a daily basis. Additionally, it was illustrated in the funerary images in tombs. Ancient Sumerians commonly cultivate and cooked Allium cepa 4,000 years ago.

Benefits of allium cepa

Allium Cepa is extremely valued for its healing qualities. It has been utilized as a food cure from time immemorial. Research illustrates that Allium Cepa may help protect against several chronic diseases. That is possible because the plant contains generous quantities of the flavonoid quercetin. Research has also shown that quercetin guards against cardiovascular disease, cancer and cataracts. Additionally, Allium Cepa contains various other naturally occurring chemicals called organic sulfur compounds, which have been associated with lowering cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Even though the plant is seldom used specifically as a medicinal herb, it has a wide variety of helpful actions on the body and when regularly consumed (particularly raw), it will help the body’s health.

When consumed frequently in the diet, Allium Cepa offsets tendencies towards arteriosclerosis, heart attack and angina. This is used mostly in the healing of individuals whose symptoms include running nose and eyes. Allium cepa’s ability to ease congestions particularly in the bronchial tract and lungs is hard to accept until you have truly seen the results. The drawing of congestion, infection and colds is also remarkable. The Allium Cepa will ease stomach upset as well as other gastrointestinal ailments and it will improve the appetite. The plant is found in every household and therefore is easily accessible. The purple-skinned plant tastes great. In addition, it has numerous health gains and is part of several beauty solutions and home remedies.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3143)


Thyme Garden Herb And Its Many Benefits
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 20, 2014 08:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Thyme Garden Herb And Its Many Benefits

What is a thyme

thyme plantOn the off chance that you have ever pondered about the numerous profits of thyme, then this article is for you. Thyme arrangement herb is an exceptionally flexible herb that has been utilized for quite some time for medicinal, fancy and culinary employments. Truth be told, thyme is such a staple to many people, to the point that they make a thyme herb arrangement developing the precise numerous sorts of thyme.

For antiquated civic establishments thyme was an unquestionable requirement for cooking as well as for a cluster of different things too. Case in point, the Egyptians utilized thyme as a part of their treating liquids and concerning the Romans; it was utilized for good fortunes. Truth is told, to many people, herbs including thyme were utilized as coin.

Thyme is a lasting plant with something like three hundred and fifty types of its thoughtful, and a large number of them make for extraordinary arrangement plants. The foliage of thyme is truly unique in aroma and is a plant that bumblebees cherish because of its nectar transforming capabilities.

Types of thyme

Enclosure or normal thyme is the most widely recognized. This herb is a light black greenish woody bush that transforms into purple, white or pink blooms local to the Mediterranean district and profoundly developed in France, Spain, European nations and the western U.S

Along these lines, as should be obvious there are numerous profits of thyme and this article simply shows a segment of its employments. Whether utilizing thyme for culinary, medicinal or decorative purposes there is all that anyone could need motivations to have new thyme close-by or even develop your unique thyme enclosure herb.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3099)


Can Green Tea And Pomegranate cream Help The Skin?
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 07, 2014 03:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Green Tea And Pomegranate cream Help The Skin?

What is pomegranate

pomegranate fruitPomegranate seed cream takes care of your skin from the outside and within. Pomegranate seed oil takes a shot at the outside to minimize the presence of lines and indications of maturing; inside, pomegranate seed oil is a dietary supplement rich in sound dietary fats and omega-3's. Regularly, an eating methodology rich in sound fats, vitamins, and hostile to oxidants gives skin the building squares it needs to look brilliant and adolescent.

The pomegranate has been in development for thousands of years. There is confirmation to help asserts that it has been in development since 3000 BC. And it has not gone unnoticed. The pomegranate appears in the Bible, in Egyptian tombs, and in eastern and western centerpieces.

Pomegranate on skin

Pomegranate seed cream animates the handling of collagen and the multiplication of skin units. Collagen is a vital structural protein that is available in the connective tissues of skin cells. As collagen breaks down, skin begins to look thin and dry and scarce differences show up. Utilizing pomegranate seed oil as a major aspect of a saturating routine helps to modify collagen and fortifies skin units to process firm, young skin.

green tea leavesWhat is green tea

Green tea oil has numerous utilization, one of them being a skin mind item that offers some stunning profits, especially to tired, slack skin. You are dependably best to utilize characteristic items on your skin, on the grounds that large portions of the produced substance elements in advanced business skin mind planning can accomplish more mischief than great.

Numerous individuals wonder why characteristic items ought to be superior to uncommonly planned business synthetics that you can discover in your neighborhood store or drug store. One reason is that numerous business items hold savage chemicals, for example, surfactants and additives that can become scarce your skin and uproot its regular defensive oils. Green tea oil does neither of these things, yet delicately soothes tired skin without irritating the offset of your regular skin oils.

Many synthetics hold cleansers that are utilized as a part of cleaning up fluids and washing powders: might you rub cleaning up fluid into your face? Might you purify your physique with cleanser powder? Obviously not, however this is adequately what you are doing when you utilize some of these business "skin mind" items. And that is without actually saying the additives yet.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3050)


Thyme Oil
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 26, 2014 08:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Thyme Oil

What is thyme

thymeThyme is delicate herb with a highly penetrating fragrance. It has very many varied importance in culinary, medicinal and ornamental purposes. Thyme is an ancient herb that was used for medical purposes by Greeks and Egyptians. It has a sweet yet strong herbal smell and is reddish-brown to amber in color. Thyme essential oil is carefully extracted through distillation from Thymus Vulgaris that belongs to the Labiatae plant family. This oil is considered to have very many health benefits that range from curing some ailments to preventing as well as improving the general body health.

Benefits of thyme

To begin with, it is an excellent disinfectant that is highly regarded particularly in aromatherapy for the protection against infectious diseases. Thyme oil is an antiseptic as well as an expectorant. When diffused into the atmosphere, it can be really beneficial in the treatment and as well as revealing the symptoms of bronchitis, sinusitis, pneumonia, coughs, cold and flu.

The components in this volatile oil have also been proven to expel antimicrobial activity against a host of different bacteria and fungi. For thousands of years, this essential oil has been used to preserve foods; protecting them from microbial contamination. In this way, using the oil helps people avoid various health issue associated with contaminated food.

Thyme oil is also crucial in stimulating the formation of white blood cells as well as aiding in the oxygenation of cellular tissues; which helps in the removal of toxic wastes during illness. Thyme oil generally boosts your lymphatic system and builds your self-esteem and confidence in your ability to make quick recovery during illness.

For a vitamin or supplement, thyme oil taken by mouth and can be very helpful in curing arthritis, stomach pain and a sore throat. It has also been used to treat skin disorders, movement disorders (dyspraxia) as well as parasitic worm infections. This oil can also be applied directly to the skin for swollen tonsils, hoarseness and sore mouth.

In clusion

I would like to caution you. Please note that there are lots of cheap, synthetic copies of essential oils. You, therefore, need to be careful when purchasing thyme oil and ensure that you get it from a trusted supplier to avoid getting a counterfeit product that may not give you the expected results.

Sources

  1. www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266016.php
  2. www.experience-essential-oils.com/thyme-oil.html
  3. www.essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/thyme.htm
  4. www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=77
  5. www.wedmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-823-THYME.aspx?activeIngredientId=823&activeIngredientName=THYME

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3037)


Myrrh oil health benefits
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 21, 2014 05:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Myrrh oil health benefits

Know what Myrrh essential oil is

myrrh resinAs you have probably read somewhere else, Myrrh oil is an aromatic resin that comes from trees belonging to the genus commiphora. It has a unique sweet and smoky aroma. Myrrha, hirabol myrrh and bola are other alternative names that people use frequently when referring to myrrh oil. Known to contain cadinene, cuminaldehyde, a-pinene, acetic acid, m-cresol, eugenol and formic acid, this pale yellow oil has been the source of debate due to its many benefits which go back to the time of ancient Egyptians.

Why take myrrh oil?

Modern scientific research has found evidence suggesting that myrrh has a wide range of uses that are beneficial to boost the health condition of an individual. Myrrh is an amazing extract that can be used in aromatherapy to effectively treat colds, coughs, insomnia and sore throat. In the digestive system, the oil is widely used for indigestion and ulcers treatment. Women and young girls find it necessary to increase their menstrual flow using normal remedies but have failed. However, this sap-like oil does not only increase the menstrual flow but it also relieve painful periods and ease difficult labor in childbirth.

For all medical dental infections, the oil is included when mixing a mouthwash. On the skin, it has great success when wiping out bedsores, boils, cracked skin, skin ulcers, athlete's foot and eczema. As a matter of fact, it is sometimes used as an ingredient in many skincare products, creams and lotions.

Myrrh is also purported to treat certain cancers and tumors. The extract from Commiphora trees is highly effective against the gynecologic cancer cells. When used as an anti-oxidant, amazing results are achieved in protecting against lead induced hepatotoxicity.

When can you start taking myrrh resin?

It is recommended to take myrrh essential oil three times in a day or as needed. Pregnant and nursing women should start using it after consulting a qualified practitioner. It can be used as a dietary supplement for children when they reach the age of six years.

Sources

  1. //www.essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/myrrh.htm
  2. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-570-MYRRH.aspx?activeIngredientId=570&activeIngredientName=MYRRH
  3. //altmedicine.about.com/od/aromatherapy/a/Myrrh-Essential-Oil.htm
  4. //www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/267107.php
  5. //www.youngliving.com/en_US/products/essential-oils/singles/myrrh-essential-oil


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3030)


Sesame sticks - a choice full of health
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 18, 2013 04:03 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sesame sticks - a choice full of health

What is Sesame

sesameSesame (Sesamum indicum) is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world. The story of its amazing benefits, begins 3600 years ago in the ancient Egyptian times. Since those antique times, women used the sesame seeds to keep their beauty and their youth and the Roman soldiers ate them for energy and strength. In recent years, an abundance of scientific information was exposed to demonstrate that the sesame seeds and their components have over 36 therapeutic properties.

Sesame Seed

Sesame seeds are number one when it comes to the richness and complexity of nutrients. Sesame seeds are rich in calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc and these can be added in salads, sandwiches or over cereal in the morning.Another excellent choice are the sesame sticks. These are the real sources of health and in addition there are some excellent snacks.

Sesame Sticks

Sesame sticks consumption helps to detoxify the liver and kidneys, being highly recommended for cirrhotic patients. In addition, these snacks prevent arthritis and osteoporosis, asthma, migraines and headaches; have antirheumatic and anti-cancer effects; strengthen the immune system and decrease the level of cholesterol.All these properties put together, give your body energy and a great power to work.

Health Benefits of Sesame

So, as you can see, the sesame seeds have many health benefits and additionally, these keep your silhouette. Therefore, when you sit and watch your favorite show on TV, you can choose a healthy snack consisting of sesame sticks, instead of chips that will fill you with cholesterol and that will add you a few extra pounds.You can also consume sesame sticks during breaks or when you feel the need for a snack.Vitamins and minerals contained by sesame seeds will provide you the necessary energy and will create you a feeling of satiety.

References:

  1.  //www.ele.ro/sanatate/tratamente-naturiste/semintele-de-susan-scad-colesterolul-si-previn-multe-boli-complicate-24261 and ... a delicious bar with sesame and honey.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2928)


Health Benefits Of Chamomile
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 03, 2012 07:56 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Benefits Of Chamomile

It is believed that ancient Egypt saw Chamomile as an effective cure for most illnesses. In the modern world too, this golden herb retains its healing properties and is used for treating many a disease and discomforts of the body. Most commonly, German chamomile blossoms are infused to prepare 'Chamomile tea' which is a fragrant concoction full of medicinal properties. The tea can be combined with honey to enhance the taste.

Health Benefits Of Chamomile Tea Chamomile tea, supposedly, helps to bring about restful sleep. It is thus of great value for people suffering from insomnia and other sleep-related disorders. Due to its soothing and relaxing effects, it is generally taken before a person goes to bed. Since time immemorial, Chamomile has been considered a remedy for stomach ailments. Known to soothe gastric and bowel related problems, the herb is a blessing for people with stomach aches.

All in all, Chamomile helps facilitate the complete digestion process by promoting bowel movement. For women facing menstrual cramps and nausea every month, Chamomile tea comes as a welcome relief. Research indicates that regular consumption of Chamomile tea increases the level of glycine in the body. Glycine is a compound that controls muscular spasms, thus it tends to calm menstrual cramps. A healthy cup of golden chamomile tea has also been found to combat the morning sickness of pregnancy. However nothing has been proven till now to this effect. Some studies suggest that this wonder herb accelerates the wound healing process too.

Many researchers are of the belief that age-old Egyptians and Greeks used Chamomile flowers on wounds to speed up their healing time. Though there is no established evidence as such regarding this subject, history stands witness to the magical healing properties of Chamomile in more ways than one. Diabetes patients are also in for some good news concerning Chamomile tea. Many ongoing studies and surveys conducted worldwide are hinting at Chamomile playing a role in diabetes management.

Consumed regularly in the form of tea, the herb may arrest complications arising out of diabetes and may also prevent hyperglycemia. What's more, the golden herbal tea prepared from chamomile is caffeine-free and will not be addictive in any way. However, it is always a good idea to take professional advice before going all-out for Chamomile. Some people may display allergic reactions to the herb and suffer side-effects.

Therefore, it is best to try the herb first in small amounts before one decides to include chamomile tea in the daily routine of life. Besides its therapeutic uses, chamomile is being increasingly used as an ingredient in cosmetic products and is being considered a good friend of the skin. Since Chamomile is known to be a stress-buster, a cup of chamomile tea after a hectic work day might just prove to be the right beverage to save the evening. With its sedative, anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties and benefits, Chamomile is sure to become more popular by the day. Used wisely, the golden herb is no less than gold itself.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2743)


Benefits of Olive Leaf Extract
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 17, 2011 08:13 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of Olive Leaf Extract

Olive Leaf Extract

History of Olive Leaf Extracts (Olea Europaea) In Medicinal Use

Usage of Olive leaf for medicinal usage dates back to 2925 BC, with the ancient Egyptians. They regarded it as a symbol of power bestowed from the heaven for the benefit of humans. Later, in 776 BC, ancient Greeks awarded "olive leaf wreaths" to the Olympic Games winners, and it continues till today. It is believed in the Greeks mythology that Olive leaf was created by goddess Athena, who first planted it in Acropolis and endowed it with miraculous powers.

The first reported use of olive leaves for Fighting diseases was in year 1811 with Dr. Pallas using liquid extract from olive leaves to treat malaria. In the mid 1850's, olive leaf tea was used to treat fever and malaria in England. In the 1960's, in Italy, it was used to control blood pressure and treat heart problems and intestinal muscle spams.

Olive Leaf - An Inexpensive Solution For Diseases

Olive leaves are the leaves of olive tree (Olea europaea). Olive leaves are popular for their health benefits and flavor, and the leaves have been medicinally used in various places and times. Olive leaf Extracts (OLE) and natural olive leaf are in markets now as immunostimulator, anti-aging and antibiotic. It has been proven with clinical evidence that it regulates blood pressure and has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal properties. Recently, a liquid extract made from olive leaves got in international focus, when it was shown that its antioxidant capability was twice as powerful as green tea and much more that than vitamin C.

Health Benefits Of Olive Leaf Extracts

Olive leaf extracts are commonly used to fight viral infections like flu and cold, yeast infections, herpes and shingles. Olive leaves have also been shown to alleviate bad cholesterol or LDL (low-density lipoproteins). Researchers have established that olive leaf reduces blood pressure and increases blood flow by relaxing the arteries. Olive leaf extracts may also prove helpful in stroke, brain edema, infarct volume and other neurological disorders.

Olive leaf has strong antioxidant properties, which help the body from the harmful effects of free radicals. Free radicals can damage the cells due to their reactive chemical nature, if they are not eliminated. Interestingly, a recent research also shows that the antioxidant properties of olive leaf are also effective in treatment of tumors, and in the cancers of breast, skin, liver, colon and prostrate.

Olive Leaf Usage

Olive leaf extracts are available, and can be consumed in various forms. It is obtainable as dried leaf tea, liquid concentrate, capsule or powder form; however fresh leaves or leaf extract are considered more beneficial.

Medicinal Nature Of Olive Leaf Extracts

1. Anti-Inflammatory: It has anti-inflammatory properties, useful to treat gastritis, acidity and other stomach problems.

2. Immunity: It increases immunity power against diseases.

3. Reduce pathogens: It curbs over the generation and spread of pathogens in the body. It controls the growth of viruses and bacteria.

4. Treat obesity: Olive leaf tea reduces obesity when consumed regularly.

5. Acne treatment: The strong antioxidant content s of Olive Leaf Extracts (OLE) clean the skin from inside, and help the skin to remain wrinkle free and maintain a youthful look.

6. Good for Heart: Olive leaf extracts are helpful to control cholesterol and blood pressure.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2545)


What is Myrrh and How Does it Boost My Health
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 25, 2011 04:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is Myrrh and How Does it Boost My Health

Myrrh And Your Health

Myrrh is one of the oldest herbal remedies in the East and the West. It had a strong presence in many religious traditions of the ancient world. It was even compared to gold in value at some time in history. Early physicians noted its antibacterial properties and added it to poultices and health tonics. Modern medicine has started to look into its medicinal potential in lowering cholesterol and blood sugar.

Inhibits Pain Chemicals

Myrrh is obtained from the plant species Commiphora myrrha, though there are other related species that produce the same resinous gum. It is native to the Levant and the surrounding regions. As its use were quite common during the ancient times, it spread to eastern countries, eventually reaching India and China, where it remains an important part of folk medicine practices to this day.

In addition to its pleasant aroma, myrrh was prized for its antiseptic and analgesic properties in the old days. It was one of the ingredients used by ancient Egyptians in the mummification of their dead. Throughout the centuries, myrrh has been used primarily as a perfume or wound salve. It has a soothing effect on lesions of body surfaces that seem to remove the perception of pain.

Improves Insulin Resistance

Earlier studies have noted the benefits of myrrh to patients suffering from diabetes, drawing on its uses in Ayurvedic and Unani medicine. In India, physicians that practice both conventional and Ayurvedic medicine have ascribed certain species of myrrh with properties that remove disorders of the circulatory system, notably high blood sugar. Myrrh decoctions are the usual herbal preparations, but it is also available as liniments, balms, salves, tinctures, and incense.

In one laboratory study, myrrh extracts appear to lower serum glucose levels. It is postulated that it ameliorates symptoms of metabolic syndrome by enhancing the effects of the hormone insulin. It increases the sensitivity of cells to insulin, even promoting faster glucose metabolism. In the Middle East, it is one of the mainstays of treatment for diabetes type 2.

Reduces Total Lipid Levels

Myrrh has been the subject of decades-long research on its role in the management of cholesterol. In the latter half of the 20th century, it was discovered that low-density lipoproteins play a major role in many cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. The dichotomy of bad and good cholesterol hit the mainstream media to promote awareness of the lifestyle factors tied to cardiovascular diseases.

High-density lipoproteins are dubbed good cholesterol in contrast to low-density lipoproteins, or bad cholesterol. Low-density lipoproteins are actually involved in the formation of plaques within the blood vessel walls that leads to many complications. It has been observed that myrrh reduces total lipid levels in the blood by raising high-density lipoproteins and lowering low-density lipoproteins.

Give myrrh a try and experience its health beneficial properties for yourself!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2281)


Does Aloe Vera Juice Help with Digestive Problems?
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 28, 2011 02:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Does Aloe Vera Juice Help with Digestive Problems?

Aloe vera and your Colon

Aloe vera juice is one of the oldest herbal remedy for digestive problems that up to now remains in common use. It is extracted from the succulent plant aloe vera, which is known for its medicinal properties all over the world. Cultivation of this medicinal aloe predates written history, and its place of origin has eluded scholars for centuries. The fact that it is widely distributed across the globe today makes it a ready source of medicine in treatment of common digestive ailments. Also, large-scale production has contributed to its growing popularity worldwide.

You may have heard of aloe vera juice as a health tonic. Folk medicine practices in just every continent highly value this medicinal aloe for its cleansing properties, but the first recorded use for illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract is in an Egyptian medical papyrus. In Greek and Roman antiquity aloe vera extracts in the form of juice were prescribed by physicians who practiced humorism to patients afflicted with constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, and stomach cramps. Both De Materia Medica by Greek botanist and pharmacologist Pedanius Dioscorides and Naturalis Historia by the Roman natural philosopher Gaius Plinius Secundus made mentions of its medicinal powers known to cleanse not only the alimentary canal but also the blood.

Heals Ulcerations of the Gastrointestinal Tract

It is common knowledge that aloe vera promotes the healing of wounds and other skin lesions. Aloe vera juice works on the same principle when ingested. This medicinal plant contains phytochemicals that increases the rate of healing of skin lesions and damaged epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. There is a growing body of literature devoted to the effects of this medicinal aloe on inflammatory intermediaries present in the processes that are implicated in lesion of body surfaces, including the inner walls of the alimentary canal.

Inhibits Growth of Harmful Strains of Bacteria

Aloe vera juice has long been postulated to have antibacterial properties, and scientific evidence in support of this claim has surfaced in the past few years. One of the reasons why aloe vera speeds up the recovery of wounds is the fact that it is both bacteriostatic and bactericidal in nature, which means it inhibits the growth of bacteria and actively eliminates them at the same time. In addition, aloe vera contains polysaccharides that benefit probiotics, or friendly bacteria. By raising the number of helpful strains of bacteria such as lactobacillus, populations of harmful bacteria are curbed.

Induces Peristaltic Movement of the Intestines

There is strong scientific evidence that aloe vera juice is particularly beneficial for individuals afflicted with constipation. For one, anthroquinone glycosides found in aloe vera have been noted to accelerate defecation by adding bulk to the impacted feces and attracting water to soften the stool. Furthermore, aloe vera stimulates the muscle cells within the intestinal walls, which consequently produce contractions. The resulting peristaltic movement moves the ball of food, leading to the evacuation of the bowels.

Aloe vera is an excellent remedy to take daily to maintain good intestinal health as well as skin health. Take your aloe daily!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2260)


Spearmint Is a Powerful and Natural Remedy for all who use its leaves
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 09, 2010 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Spearmint Is a Powerful and Natural Remedy for all who use its leaves

spearmint leaf picThe spearmint is a species of mint that is native to a lot of Europe and southwest Asia. However, its exact natural range is uncertain because of extensive early cultivation. The herb can be found growing in wet soils. It is also an invasive species in the Great Lakes region. There, it was first sighted in 1843. The spearmint plant is an herbaceous rhizomatous perennial plant. It can be found growing thirty to one hundred centimeters tall. The leaves are five to nine centimeters long and have a serrated margin. The plant produces pink or white flowers that are slender spikes. The name ‘spear’mint comes from the pointed leaf tips.

The spearmint plant is grown for its aromatic and carminative oil. This oil is referred to as oil of spearmint and grows well in nearly all temperate climates. The plant is often grown by gardeners in pots or planters because of its invasive spreading roots. The plant prefers partial shade. However, it is still able to flourish in full sun or even mostly shade. The plant is best suited for loamy soils that have plenty of organic material. The leaves of the plant can be used whole, chopped, dried and ground, frozen, preserved in salt, sugar, sugar syrup, alcohol, oil, or dried. After the plant flowers, the leaves lose their aromatic appeal.

Spearmint is very similar to peppermint in the action that it provides. However, it is milder in its activity. Spearmint was the original mint that was used for healing. It should be noted that peppermint is actually a hybrid of spearmint. The Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans used the mint anciently for its medicinal value.spearmint flowers pics

This herb is very valuable. Most individuals are able to tolerate spearmint well. It is excellent for the gastrointestinal tract. One of its best helps is in soothing an upset stomach by soothing the stomach and intestines. Spearmint increases circulation in the stomach. It also helps to control vomiting that is a result of morning sickness during pregnancy. The oil that is found in spearmint leaves is responsible for working on the salivary glands to aid digestion. It also stimulates gastric secretions. The herb is a gentle and effective remedy for babies with colic. The herb also helps to relieve smooth muscle spasms, increase blood circulation, promote sweating, and relieve pain.

In short, the leaves of the spearmint plant are used to provide alterative, antiemetic, antispasmodic, aromatic, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, nervine, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iodine, iron, magnesium, potassium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B-complex, and C. Primarily, spearmint is extremely beneficial in treating colds, colic, flu, gas, nausea, and vomiting. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating bladder inflammation, chills, cramps, dizziness, edema, fever, indigestion, kidney inflammation, kidney stones, spasms, and inhibited urine. spearmint bulk dried

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by spearmint, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2184)


Flaxseed
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 23, 2009 11:10 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Flaxseed

flax seedsSince the beginning of civilization, flax has been around. The early Swiss used the fibers for weaving, while Egyptians decorated their tombs with carvings of the flax plant and wrapped mummies in linen due to the high esteem they had for this plant. The fibers of the flax plant were a main source of clothing in biblical times, with even Christ being believed to have been buried in linen. The use of flaxseed oil was recommended by Hippocrates for inflammations of the mucous membranes. Charlemagne required his subjects to eat the seeds to remain healthy during the early eighth century in France.

Flaxseed has many medicinal properties, as the oil has been used as a remedy for colds, coughs, sore throats, mucus, congestion, lung conditions, and as an expectorant. The herb is soothing to the mucous membranes and has been used to treat asthmatic conditions.

Additionally, this herb is a mild, natural laxative, providing roughage to aid the body when constipation is a problem. It is also healing on the stomach and intestines. Flaxseed oil can be very beneficial for gastritis, ulcers, and heartburn, while the tea can be used to help detoxify the liver and purify the blood. This herb is also believed to aid in reducing the clotting tendency of blood, potentially lowering the risk of heart attacks and reducing cholesterol levels in blood. It is also used for reducing inflammation and for urinary tract irritations. Crushed flaxseed, made into a poultice, is often used to treat sprains or bruises.

Unrefined, cold-pressed flax oil is considered to be the richest vegetable source of omega-3 and 6 oils, which are essential fatty acids. These oils are useful for balancing the hormones in the body and helping in the weight-loss process. Essential fatty acids help to improve the function of the glands, which in turn helps weight loss. Those individuals on low or no-fat diets often experience symptoms of fatigue and no weight loss which is partly due to the absence of essential fatty acids in the diet. A small amount of essential fatty acids actually helps one to lose weight. flax seeds This herb also contains lignans, which are a type of fiber that has anti-estrogenic activity. A study done at the National Cancer Institute followed vegetarian women. The study indicated a correlation between a high amount of lignans in the blood and a lower risk for breast cancer. It has also been discovered that people living in countries where flaxseed is consumed in high amounts have a lower risk for developing both breast and colon cancer. It should be noted that stabilized flaxseed has a higher content of lignans than any other food.

Flaxseed can also be helpful in preventing heart disease and lowering cholesterol. One study found that ground flaxseed, when added to the diet, can reduce the incidence of heart disease.

The seeds of the flaxseed plant are used to provide anti-neoplastic, demulcent, emollient, expectorant, mucilant, mild purgative, and vulnerary properties. Primarily, flaxseed is extremely beneficial in dealing with arthritis, cardiovascular health, high cholesterol, constipation, immune disorders, multiple sclerosis, and skin disorders.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating bronchitis, cancer, colds, gallstones, weak heart, jaundice, liver, lung disorders, muscular rheumatism, and tumors. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by flaxseed, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2105)


Cinnamon Bark
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 15, 2009 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cinnamon Bark

cinnamon treeThe cinnamon plant is a small evergreen tree that grows between thirty two and forty nine feet tall. This plant belongs to the Lauraceae family and is native to Sri Lanka. The leaves of the plant are ovate oblong in shape and approximately two to seven inches in length, while the flowers, which have a distinct odor, are greenish in color. The fruit is a purple berry about one-centimeter and contain a single seed. The flavor of cinnamon is the result of an essential oil which makes up about 1/2% to 1% of its composition. This oil can be prepared by roughly pounding the bark, macerating it in seawater, and quickly distilling the whole. The oil is of a golden-yellow color, with the characteristic odor of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste.

Cinnamon has been known from ancient times, with the first mention of particular spice in the Old Testament being of cinnamon. In this, Moses commanded the use of sweet cinnamon and cassia in the holy anointing oil. Additionally, cinnamon is also mentioned elsewhere in the bible. This herb was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was often looked upon as a gift fit for even God. Cinnamon was imported to Egypt as early as 2000 B.C. The herb is also alluded to by Herodotus and other classical writers. Cinnamon was too expensive to be commonly used in funerals of ancient Rome. However, the Emperor Nero is said to have burned a year’s worth of the city’s supply at the funeral for his wife in 65 A.D.

Cinnamon can be harvested by growing the tree for two years and then coppicing it. About a dozen shoots will form from the roots in the next year. These shoots are then stripped of their bark and left to dry. Only the thin inner bark is used, while the outer woody portion is removed. Each dried strip of cinnamon are then cut into lengths of about five to ten centimeters for sale.

Cinnamon has been around for thousands of years. It is revered as a spice and also as a healing agent. Cinnamon was included in embalming oils by the Egyptians. This herb was used in China to treat fever, diarrhea, and menstrual problems dating as far back as 2000 BC. Cinnamon was a major trade commodity during the ancient times. Cinnamon grew in the southern regions of Asia originally. cinnamon tree This herb is used to help relieve upset stomachs, reduce milk flow, stop excessive menstrual flow, and alleviate back pain. Research has also determined that cinnamon contains components that possess antifungal and antibacterial capabilities. This herb is found in some toothpaste, which allows it to help some decay-causing bacteria. Cinnamon is also helpful for promoting healthy blood sugar levels.

The dried bark of the cinnamon plant is used to provide alterative, analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, sedative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. Primarily, cinnamon is beneficial in treating abdominal pain, candida, diarrhea, gas, gastric disorders, and indigestion.

Additionally, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with arthritis, asthma, backaches, bloating, bronchitis, cholera, coronary problems, fevers, excessive menstruation, nausea, nephritis, parasites, psoriasis, rheumatism, upset stomach, vomiting, and warts. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by cinnamon, please contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2102)


Horehound Herb
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 21, 2009 11:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horehound Herb

Horehound has been around for thousands of years. The Romans used this herb in a combination as an antidote for poison. The horehound plant is a bushy plant that produces numerous annual branching stems. The plant is a foot or more in height and has whitish flowers. The leaves are much wrinkled, opposite, petiolate, and about an inch long. They are covered with white, felted hairs that give them a wooly appearance. The leaves have a strange, musky smell that can be diminished by drying the plant. Horehound is known to flower between June and September.

An ancient Greek physician by the name of Galen first recommended horehound for use in treating respiratory conditions. Early European physicians also used horehound to treat respiratory ailments. Early settlers in North America brought horehound with them to treat coughs, colds, and tuberculosis. The herb was also used to treat hepatitis, malaria, and intestinal worms. Horehound was also used to promote menstruation and sweating. Most commonly, the herb is used to treat colds and coughs, to soothe the throat and loosen mucus in the chest. Horehound is a well-known lung and throat remedy.

Warm infusions of horehound are able to relieve congestion and hyperemic conditions of the lungs. They do this by promoting an outward flow of blood. In large doses, horehound will work as a mild laxative. Applying the dried herb topically is a great way to treat herpes simplex, eruptions, eczema, and shingles.

The Romans praised horehound because of its medicinal purposes. Its Latin name Marrubium is derived from the word Maria urbs, which is an ancient town of Italy. The plant was called the ‘Seed of Horus” or the ‘Bull’s Blood,’ and the ‘Eye of the Star’ by the Egyptian Priests. Horehound was a main ingredient in Caesar’s antidote for vegetable poisons. It was recommended, in addition to its uses in coughs and colds, for those that had drunk poison or had been bitten by serpents. Horehound was once thought of as an anti-magical herb. Additionally, horehound is a serviceable remedy against cankerworm in trees. Some believed that if it is put into new milk and set in a place where there are a lot of flies, it will quickly kill all of them.

The marrubiin content of horehound is believed to be the responsible component, giving it its ability to stimulate bronchial mucosa secretions. This information was obtained by German research done in 1959. Horehound can be used as a safe and effective expectorant.

The entire horehound plant should be used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antitussive, aromatic, bitter, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, mild purgative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are iron, potassium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and F. Primarily, horehound is extremely helpful in dealing with asthma, colds, coughs, croup, lung ailments, excessive mucus, phlegm, and respiratory problems.

Additionally, this herb is beneficial in treating bronchitis, infectious diseases, earaches, external eczema, fevers, glandular problems, jaundice, absent menstruation, and external shingles. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horehound, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2084)


Garlic
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 27, 2009 02:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Garlic

Garlic is very popular because of its health benefits. A perennial plant and member of the lily family, the bulb of the garlic plant is used for many medicinal purposes. Garlic was used by the ancient Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, and Egyptians. The Chinese used this herb at least three thousand years ago to treat various ailments. The Egyptians ate garlic while building pyramids to increase their strength and endurance. Hippocrates suggested that this herb be used for treatment of uterine cancer. Native Americans used garlic to fight abdominal cancer, while the Europeans used this herb during the plague years to provide immunity. The main historical uses of garlic were to treat colds, coughs, toothaches, earaches, diarrhea, infection, arteriosclerosis, headaches, dandruff, tumors, worms, and hypertension.

Garlic is nature’s antibiotic. This herb is very effective in fighting bacteria which may be resistant to other antibiotics. The herb stimulates the lymphatic system in order to throw off waste material. Garlic is different from other antibiotics in the fact that it has the ability to stimulate cell growth and activity. This herb rejuvenates all body functions. Garlic opens up blood vessels, reducing hypertension. It is known as a health-building and disease-preventing herb.

Several studies have linked garlic to a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease. This herb has been found to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood, while lowering blood pressure, increasing immunity, and reducing the blood’s clotting ability. Research suggests that eating the equivalent of one-half to one clove of garlic daily can decrease total serum cholesterol levels by about nine percent. Anticoagulant capabilities have also been found in garlic by German researchers. Garlic is able to benefit those individuals who are suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease, which is better known as blood clots in the legs.

Garlic also contains antitumor properties, with studies showing it having the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer-causing nitrosamine. The National Cancer Institute even recommends adding more garlic, onions, and other similar vegetables to the diet. This would lower the risk of developing stomach cancer. Results from one study showed that garlic may be toxic to some cancer cells. It may encourage the immune system to spot the invaders and destroy them, allowing a natural immune process to destroy tumor cells.

Garlic is believed to stimulate the lymphatic system by ridding itself of toxins. The Russians consider garlic to be a natural antibiotic, which is why they consume it regularly. This herb is often used to prevent disease and heal the body. It is nourishing for the entire body, especially the heart, circulation, stomach, spleen, and lungs. Additionally, it has been used to stimulate circulation and to help the immune system function more effectively. Some believe that this herb may help prevent some forms of cancer, heart disease, strokes, and infections.

In summary, the bulb of the garlic plant is used to provide adaptogen, alterative, antibiotic, anticoagulant, antifungal, antineoplastic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, blood purifier, diaphoretic, digestive, expectorant, febrifuge, rubefacient, stimulant, and vulnerary properties. Primarily, garlic is extremely beneficial in dealing with asthma, blood impurities, high blood pressure, bronchitis, cancer, candidiasis, poor circulation, colds, colitis, coughs, infectious diseases, ear infections, fevers, flu, fungus, gastric disorders, heart disease, indigestion, infection, liver disorders, lung disorders, parasites, blood poisoning, prostate problems, respiratory problems, and staph/strep infections.

This herb is also good for treating acne, allergies, arthritis, childhood diseases, diabetes, diarrhea, edema, emphysema, gallbladder problems, hypoglycemia, insomnia, kidney ailments, pneumonia, rheumatism, sinus problems, ulcers, warts, and worms.

Garlic is a wonderful all purpose herb that can be found at your local or internet health food store. Always look for name brands when buying garlic to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2066)


Marshmallow Root Herb
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 12, 2009 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Marshmallow Root Herb

The marshmallow plant can be found in southern and western Europe, western Asia, and the northeastern region of North America. The plant originally grew in salty soils, but now it thrives in moist, uncultivated ground. The fleshy, upright stems of the marshmallow plant reach a height of three to four feet. The pale yellow roots are tapered, long, and thick. They have a tough, yet flexible, exterior. The short-stemmed leaves are round, with irregularly toothed margins and three to five lobes. The leaves and stem are covered with a soft and velvety down. The flowers have five reddish-white petals. The whole plant, especially the root, is filled with a mild mucilage.

Since ancient Egyptian times, marshmallow has been used as food and medicine. One of the herbs found in the grave of a Neanderthal man in a cave in Iraq was marshmallow. This herb was used anciently for irritated throats and intestinal tracts. The Europeans used marshmallow for bronchitis, colds, and coughs. This was because of its soothing and healing properties. Native Americans also used marshmallow to treat snakebites and wounds.

This herb is responsible for helping to expel phlegm and relax the bronchial tubes while soothing and healing. The herb aids in healing lung ailments such as asthma and inflammation. The soothing and healing properties that are found in the mucilage in marshmallow make it a valuable herb for many lung ailments. Also, it is useful on sore throats, infections, diarrhea, dysentery, skin irritations, and for coughs. This herb is a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant. This fact makes it good for both the joints and the gastrointestinal tract. Marshmallow is used as a poultice with cayenne, which allows it to help with gangrene, blood poisoning, burns, bruises, and wounds.

Studies have found that the mucilaginous properties of marshmallow yield a soothing effect on the mucous membranes. A study that was done on animals showed some indication of a reduction in blood sugar levels and hypoglycemia activity. This may be beneficial for diabetics.

The root of the marshmallow plant are used to provide alterative, anticatarrhal, anti-inflamamtory, antilithic, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, galactagogue, lithotriptic, mucilant, nutritive, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iodine, iron, pantothenic acid, sodium, and vitamins A and B-complex. Primarily, marshmallow is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, bed-wetting, bleeding, boils, bronchitis, emphysema, kidney problems, lung congestion, nervous disorders, pneumonia, urinary incontinence, urinary problems, uterine problems, whooping cough, and wounds. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with allergies, breast problems, burns, constipation, coughs, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery, sore eyes, gangrene, gastric disorders, glandular problems, inflammation, intestinal problems, kidney stones, absent lactation, liver disorders, irritated membranes, excessive mucus, and skin disorders.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by marshmallow, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2051)


Honey from bee's
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 01, 2009 12:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Honey from bee's

Bees make honey out of the nectar that they sip from flower blossoms. A long and tedious process is necessary to transform nectar into the thick, golden substance that we call honey. Like each product that is produced by the honeybee, care and a number of steps are essential in order to create this beehive food, with honey being no exception. This sweet, nutritious edible substance is a viscous fluid that is exclusively created by the honeybee. Even the most sophisticated modern techniques have failed to synthetically manufacture honey. Like royal jelly, propolis, and bee pollen, honey is only available from Mother Nature. It is a precious and coveted substance that has fascinated and pleased cultures throughout time.

The ancient Greeks called honey one of nature’s most precious gifts, while the Assyrians, Chinese, and Romans routinely prescribed it for its medicinal value. Numerous biblical references refer to the “Honeycomb” and the “Land of Milk and Honey,” as well as the “Enlightenment” that comes from eating honey. Hippocrates recorded that a honey drink cures phlegm and calms down a cough. He was one of the first known advocates for using Honey and Vinegar for fevers and other ailments. All of ancient cultures believed that the use of honey each and every day would insure health and longevity. All kinds of wines and foods were routinely mixed with honey, causing them to be viewed by all peoples as a treasure which the gods provided for health.

Of all the ancient cultures, Egyptians prized honey enough to use it as a form of money. Hieroglyphics often refer to honey as the universal healer and jars of honey were routinely placed in tombs of the dead. Because of its superior preservative properties, honey used to be an integral part of the formula that was used in the mummification process. Throughout all of history, honey has been used to treat open wounds and fight infection. Unfortunately, the advent of refined sugar caused honey to take a back seat to other more popular sweeteners. Thankfully, today honey is experiencing resurgence, as it was once an often overlooked beehive food that is full of nutritive and medicinal value.

When a bee lands on a flower, it sucks a tiny amount of nectar to its honey sac. It is within this sac that the transformation of nectar to honey begins. The nectar is mixed with acid secretions to eventually form the coveted honey that we consume. Substantial amounts of nectar are necessary to produce significant amounts of honey, making flying the distance of up to three miles necessary to obtain the amounts of nectar that is needed to fill the sac. Once the sac is full, the honeybee returns to the hive, where a receiving bee takes the nectar and continues the process, changing, enriching, and concentrating the nectar. Following this, the receiving bee drops the mixture into the empty cells of the honeycomb.

In order to produce a single pound of honey, bees must provide the hive with over 70,000 loads of nectar. A healthy beehive can produce about 300 pounds of honey each season. The health benefits of honey have now been captured by manufactures like Premier one and Montana big sky. Natural honey is available in liquid form at your local or internet health food store. Look for name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Honey is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

Fine Honey Products from Premier one are available at VitaNet ®, LLC Health Food Stores.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2027)


Bee Pollen
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 22, 2009 11:43 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bee Pollen

Even though bee pollen has received a good deal of attention over the last few decades, a lot of people still do not know exactly what it is. Pollen is technically the male seed of flowers and can be viewed as the male cells of a flowering plant. It is necessary for the plant to be fertilized. Every kind of flower on his plant produces pollen, which is created in the stamen of the blossom itself. Bee pollen is the pollen which is collected and stored by honey bees in their hives. While honey bees perform this activity, they actually pollinate more than 80 percent of green growing plants. Obviously, they are a vital component of plant propagation. Universally, bee pollen is praised for its notable nutrient content and extraordinary ability to provide energy.

Used for centuries, bee pollen has been considered a powerful healing agent, a source of regenerative power, and the secret to eternal youth for some ancients. As far back as 2735 B.C., the Chinese emperor compiled an impressive medical collection containing many beehive products. This compilation is still referred to today, with ongoing research continuing to support many of its claims. For millions of years, humans have made good use of beehive products. Before paper was even invented, ancient people commemorated their respect of the honeybee and beehive products. Honeybees were considered to be sacred at this time, with Egyptian papyri referring to bee pollen as life-giving dust and its use as a sacred offering to the gods. Roman legions use to carry bee pollen for sustenance, with ancient Romans even making Virgil the official poet laureate of the honeybee.

Even Hippocrates recommended bee pollen for several ailments, while the Hindus taught that eating honey and pollen could produce health, vigor, happiness, and wisdom. Honey and pollen were routinely used by orientals for medicinal purposes, while Ancient Greeks referred to honey and pollen as the food of kings, as they believed the food would give them youth and vitality. Bee pollen was also looked upon as a dietary staple by the Anglo-Saxons. People drank combinations of wine, honey, and pollen because they believed that it was a life-sustaining elixir.

In the following centuries, Charlemagne recorded that his subjects used pollen and honey on a daily basis. He even required that his people take an annual inventory of their honey and pollen supplies. Taxes were often paid in the form of honey and pollen and gifts of honey and pollen were looked upon with respect. Almost every recorded religious or historical record praises the honeybee and its products such as bee pollen. These books refer to the beneficial healing and nutritive properties that bee pollen possesses. Aztec and Mayans even worshiped the honeybee, which can be proved through numerous images of honeycombs and pollen. Early American settlers even became actively involved in honey production, so that it could be used at the table.

Because American scientists have shown little to no amounts of interest in European documentation that supports the therapeutic value of bee pollen, most modern day scientific investigation has taken place in Europe. Other researchers have already discovered that this wonderful food contains concentrations of just about every known nutrient, with reports from areas of Europe and Russia confirming the belief that this substance has infinite value for health maintenance and diseases treatment.

Bee pollen is available in capsule, tablet, and bulk powder forms at VitaNet ®, LLC. Always purchase a name brand bee pollen product to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.



--
Buy Bee Pollen at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2022)


Bee Pollen
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 20, 2009 12:00 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bee Pollen

Bee pollen is made up of the fine powder that is found in the male seed of a flower blossom. Bees transport this powder and mix it with nectar to create their own form of nourishment. The pollen grains are collected and eaten by the bees, but they are also used to pollinate the flowers. Since the beginning of time, bee pollen and honey have been recognized for their astounding healing benefits. Egyptian records going back thousands of years have references to honey and the potential for healing that it holds. Marathon runners of ancient Greece recognized the value that bee pollen held to increase their strength and endurance. Bee pollen was also revered by European nations and Asian countries for its medicinal value.

Bee pollen is considered to be a complete food due to the fact that it contains every chemical substance that is needed to maintain life. This makes it a great supplement to help build the immune system and provide the body with energy. Recent scientific research has found that bee pollen contains properties which are beneficial to healing, revitalizing, and protecting against radiation therapy. Bee pollen is also a rich source of protein and carbohydrates. This nutrient can not only be used as a food supplement, but also to correct body chemistry and normalize weight.

Scientists at the Institute of Bee Culture in Buressur-Yvette near Paris, in addition to other researchers throughout Europe, have studied the effects of honeybee pollen consumption on human beings. The study concluded that there are exceptional antibiotic properties in bee pollen. It was also found that bee pollen is helpful in treating conditions like chronic fatigue, hay fever, allergies, bronchitis, sinusitis, asthma, colds, balancing the endocrine system, and menopausal symptoms. Additionally, bee pollen can be helpful in treating other conditions such as prostate problems including prostates, infertility, indigestion, constipation, colitis, anemia, high blood pressure, premature aging, depression, and hair loss.

Bee pollen has also been shown to improve one’s concentration and mental function. A study found that a group of students’ mental performance improved drastically when supplementing with bee pollen. This nutrient also reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels. It does this by preventing plaque buildup in the arteries. This supplement is often used by athletes to increase strength, endurance, and speed.

The pollen of bees is used to provide both alterative and nutritive properties. The primary nutrients found in bee pollen are twenty-one amino acids, enzymes, essential fatty acids, and variable vitamins and minerals. These vitamins and minerals depend on the region that the bee pollen is harvested in. Primarily, bee pollen is extremely beneficial in dealing with aging, allergies, hay fever, loss of appetite, lack of endurance, exhaustion, fatigue, a weak immune system, infection, multiple sclerosis, and pregnancy problems.

Additionally, bee pollen can be extremely helpful in treating asthma, high blood pressure, cancer, depression, hypoglycemia, indigestion, liver diseases, prostate disorders, and radiation. Bee pollen is available in capsules, tablets, and bulk powder forms for easy consumption. Always look for name brands to ensure quality and purity of the bee pollen product you purchase. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by bee pollen, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2010)


Barley Grass
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 14, 2009 01:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Barley Grass

Barley is a cereal grain that is derived from the annual grass known as Hordeum vulgare. This nutrient serves as a major animal feed crop, but also is used for malting and in health food. Barley is also used in the making of beer and whisky. In a 2005 ranking of cereal crops in the world, barley was ranked number four in both quantity produced and area of cultivation. It is still used as a major food in the middle east. Barley is a member of the grass family, descending from and inter-fertile with wild barley. For this reason, the two forms are often treated as one species. The main difference between the two forms is the brittle spike on the seeds of the wild barley, which help with dispersal.

Barley tends to be more tolerant of soil salinity than wheat, which potentially explains the increase of barley cultivation in Mesopotamia from the 2nd millennium BC and forward. Although barley is not as cold tolerant as the winter wheat, fall rye, or winter triticale, it can be planted as a winter crop in warmer areas of the world like Australia. It is important to note that barley not only as a short growing season, but it is also relatively drought tolerant, making it an easier plant to grow.

Barley was valued by the ancient Egyptians and Greeks for its immense health benefits. Because of this, it was cultivated. Hippocrates even wrote of the benefits of gruel that is made from barley. New World settlers planted barley in order to sustain both health and vitality. Barley juice contains antiviral properties that help to strengthen the immune system. This herb can help cleanse the body on a cellular level. It can also normalize metabolism and neutralize heavy metals in the body, such as mercury. Barley can benefit the body by lowering cholesterol levels, aiding digestion, and relieving constipation. This herb also strengthens the entire body as a whole.

One study done in Japan separated a new antioxidant that has been found in barley leaves called 2-0-GI. This antioxidant was found to be effective in the preservation of food. 2-0-GI was also found to have anti-inflammatory and antiallergenic activity. Another Japanese study found beneficial results in barley’s ability to inhibit the AIDS virus.

Both the juice and powder made from the young leaves and grass of barley are helpful in producing adaptogen, alterative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, blood purifier, demulcent, emollient, immunostimulant, nutritive, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients in this herb include calcium, chlorophyll, iron, live enzymes, magnesium, potassium, protein, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and vitamins B1, B2, and C with bioflavonoids. Primarily, barley is beneficial in helping to treat anemia, arthritis, and impurities in the blood, boils, cancer, and metal poisoning. However, this nutrient also offers great benefits with acne, AIDS/HIV, allergies, hay fever, bronchitis, candidiasis, eczema, herpes, infection, kidney problems, leprosy, liver disorders, lung disorders, psoriasis, skin conditions, syphilis, tuberculosis, and ulcers. For more information on the many benefits that barley has to offer, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Barley is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

--
Buy Barley Grass At Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2007)


Barberry
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 13, 2009 12:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Barberry

The barberry plant is a shrub that has gray, thorny branches. This shrub can grow up to nine feet tall. The flower of the barberry plant are bright yellow and bloom between the months of April and June. These flowers then become dark, drooping bunches of red berries in the fall.

The use of barberry dates back approximately three thousand years, originating in China in India where it was used for the treatment of diarrhea and intestinal infections. The barberry plant was used by Native Americans for treating liver conditions like jaundice. Additionally, Egyptians mixed the berries of the plant with fennel seed to protect themselves from the plague. Barberry is made up of an alkaloid known as berberine, which can also be found in other medicinal herbs such as goldenseal and Orgeon grape. The therapeutic effects of barberry can be attributed to its berberine content.

Studies have concluded that berberine contains properties that are effective against a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. These studies also found that berberine was much more effective in treating some bacteria than even a strong antibiotic. Other studies have found that barberry has the potential to kill microorganisms including staphylococci, streptococci, salmonella, Giardia lamblia, Escherichia coli, shigella, and Candida albicans. The berberine in barberry has been noted to contain antidarrheal properties. This alkaloid is also recommended for stimulating the immune system.

The effects of barberry include helping against cancer, liver problems, kidney problems, coughs, cholera, diarrhea, fever, inflammation, hypertension, and tumors. Barberry has also been recommended to increase bile secretions and stimulate the appetite. This herb may also help in cases of anemia and malnutrition. Barberry stimulates bile production for liver problems and also dilates blood vessels to lower blood pressure.

Barberry is used in easing inflammation and infection of the urinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts, as well as candida infections of the both the skin and vagina. Barberry extract has also been shown to improve symptoms that are associated with certain skin conditions, such as psoriasis. However, more research is still needed on determining the reliability of these findings. Barberry is shown to be an extremely effective treatment for diarrhea. A few studies have found that barberry is able to improve symptoms faster than antibiotics. This is possibly because of its astringent properties. However antibiotics are still thought to be more effective at killing bacteria in the intestines. For this reason, it is best to use barberry to ease symptoms, along with a standard antibiotic, as bacterial diarrhea can have extremely serious consequences.

The bark, root, and berries of the barberry plant are used to provide alterative, antibacterial, antineoplastic, antiseptic, aromatic, astringent, blood purifier, cholagogue, diuretic, hepatic, hypotensive, purgative, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients provided by this herb include iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamin C. Primarily, barberry can be beneficial in dealing with loss of appetite, high blood pressure, impurities in the blood, candidiasis, constipation, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, indigestion, infections, jaundice, liver disorders, pyorrhea, and sore throat. However, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with anemia, arthritis, boils, breath odor, cholera, gallstones, heart problems, heartburn, hemorrhages, itching, kidney problems, migraines, rheumatisms, ringworm, and skin conditions. For more information on barberry or to make a purchase, along with its many beneficial effects, feel free to contact a representative at your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2006)


Aloe Vera
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 08, 2009 07:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Aloe Vera

There have been few herbs throughout history that have been valued as highly as the aloe vera plant. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years because of its medicinal value and therapeutic benefits. Today, it is widely used and cultivated all over the world. The aloe vera plant is a member of the lily family. However, it looks much more like a cactus plant. This perennial produces yellow flowers and has tough, stiff, spiny, and triangular leaves. This plant may grow up to twenty inches long and five inches across, while the leaves grow in a rosette with three layers.

Historically, aloe has been used by many people. This includes the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Hebrews, Chinese, Indians, Algerians, Moroccans, Tunisians, and Arabians. Records of folklore have indicated many medicinal uses of aloe, with recent research adding validity to the many beneficial uses of the aloe plant.

Traditionally, aloe vera has been used to treat wounds, frostbite, burns, radiation burns, and external pain. This herb also aids in digestion and combats constipation, inflammation, ulcers, kidney stones, and tissue damage from X-ray exposure and other forms of radiation. Aloe vera can prevent scarring and heal minor scars because it contains enzymes, saponins, hormones, and amino acids that can be absorbed into the skin. Aloe vera can also promote the growth of living cells. Aloe contains many substances that are referred to as uronic acids. These uronic acids are natural detoxicants which take part in the healing process by stripping toxic materials of their harmful effects.

Aloe vera is best known for its soothing and external healing effect on burns, wounds, and rashes. According to modern research, when aloe is applied externally, it can help speed healing and restore skin tissue. This is primarily because of the plant’s moisturizing effects. Aloe is easily absorbed into the skin, preventing the air from drying damaged skin tissue and helping to relieve the pain that is associated with both burns and wounds.

Many studies have found the positive effects that are linked to the use of aloe juice in the digestive process. Used in the digestive process, this herb can treat stomach disorders, ulcers, colitis, constipation, and other colon-related problems. Aloe can also help to soothe, reduce inflammation, and heal the digestive tract. One study found that ulcer patients can be completely healed with the use of aloe juice just as effectively as anti-ulcer drugs and without the chance of toxic side effects.

Aloe gel is made up of acemannan, which is a complex carbohydrate that possesses immune-stimulating and antiviral properties. The acemannan in aloe has shown antiviral activity against HIV-1, as it inhibits the reproduction of HIV-1. Aloe gel has also been found to be effective in fighting the spread of some viruses, like herpes, measles, and rhinotracheitis.

The primary applications of aloe vera are to treat insect bites, burns and scalds, hemorrhoids, body odor, gastric disorders, and scar tissues. However, aloe vera has also been shown to be extremely beneficial in dealing with abrasions, acne, anemia, constipation, heartburn, poison ivy/oak, psoriasis, ringworm, sores, sunburn, tapeworm, tuberculosis, wrinkles, leg ulcers, and peptic ulcers.

Aloe vera is available in capsule, tablet, liquid and powder forms. Always purchase a liquid form to ensure freshness. When looking to purchase this product, always stick to name brands that you can find in your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Aloe vera is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1989)


Apple Cider Vinegar
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 13, 2008 03:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is an old folk remedy claimed to be beneficial in treating a long list of ailments. It is sold today by "health food" companies and others who claim it has remedial properties. Apple cider vinegar is a type of vinegar made by the fermentation of apple cider. Unlike white vinegar, apple cider vinegar is a light yellow-brown color and is often sold unfiltered and unpasteurized with a dark, cloudy sediment called mother of vinegar (consisting mainly of acetic acid bacteria) settled at the bottom of the bottle.

Over the centuries, vinegar has been used for countless purposes: making pickles, killing weeds, cleaning coffee makers, polishing armor, and dressing salads. While many of the folk medicine uses of vinegar are unproven (or were disproved), there is some medical research backing them up.

The main ingredient of apple cider vinegar, or any vinegar, is acetic acid. Apple cider vinegar is also said to contain an abundance of complex carbohydrates and dietary fiber. Do not use a metal container when making vinegar or storing it; acid in the mixture will corrode metal or aluminum objects making the solution unfit for consumption.

When it comes to losing weight, experts say you are what you drink. Apple cider vinegar has recently found new use as a weight loss and weight management aide, and has been included in many over the counter weight loss nutritional supplements. Anecdotally, ancient Egyptians used apple cider vinegar for weight loss. The acetic acid in this vinegar can curve the appetite which benefits those trying to loose weight and keep it off.

Some say apple cider vinegar can help arthritis, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, and assist in digestion. It is also thought to help the body maintain a healthy alkaline level. The acidic nature of this vinegar has been said to help scalp problems such as dandruff, itchy scalp, baldness and thinning hair. Apple cider vinegar can also help gastric problems as well.

Civil War, soldiers used vinegar to prevent gastric upset and as a treatment for various ailments including pneumonia and scurvy. Research suggests that this vinegar can delay gastric emptying. Ten patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic gastro paresis were studied; when the study was over the patients were able to demonstrate a significant delay in already delayed gastric emptying after the ingestion of vinegar. So delaying the rate at which the stomach empties can keep a sense of fullness for those looking to loose weight.

The effect of vinegar on blood glucose levels is perhaps the best researched and the most promising of apple cider vinegar's possible health benefits. Several studies have found that vinegar may help lower glucose levels. For example, a small study compared the effect of vinegar with white bread on blood glucose and insulin levels. Keeping blood sugar lower is important to diabetic patients which can help reduce the use of insulin. Subjects with type 2 diabetes showed a slight improvement in insulin sensitivity, but postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels were not affected when apple cider vinegar was added to a meal.

In conclusion, apple cider vinegar could theoretically interact with diuretics, laxatives, and medicines for diabetes and heart disease so you must be careful. Apple cider vinegar should always be diluted with water or juice before swallowed. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor before using apple cider vinegar. Furthermore, blood glucose must be monitored more frequently in patients with diabetes treated with insulin experiencing gastro paresis to prevent adverse hypoglycemic episodes. All those taking medications should consult a doctor because the acid in this vinegar can enhance absorption and increase Side effects.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1865)


Health Comes From The Honey bee
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 08, 2008 04:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Comes From The Honey bee

The substances found in the beehive have held a treasured place in history among the ancient cultures of Egypt, Greece, Rome, China, Middle East, and the Slavic and Native American peoples. Experts have long theorized that bees came into being when flowering plants first began blossoming in abundance. The fossilized remains of pollen, leaves, and even flowers have been dated back to when dinosaurs roamed the land back when time began.

Bees collect pollen from flowers and mix it with their nectar, which transforms it into a nutrient-dense super food with bioactive ingredients numbering in the thousands including enzymes, bioflavonoids, essential fatty acids, free amino acids, natural chelated minerals, and whole vitamin complexes. Ancient Egyptians, Orientals, Hebrews, and South American natives often applied a combination of honey mixed with bee pollen to wounds, burns, and boils, while Orientals used honey and bee pollen mixed with fruit or vegetable juice as a health drink. Norse mythology even states that honey and bee pollen were the secret to the eternal life of their gods.

Whether bee pollen is the secret to eternal life or not, there have been many studies done which show the connection between its consumption and healthy longevity. Bee pollen is seen as an immune system enhancer due to its ability to strengthen the body against viral infections. It is also effective in relieving fatigue, improving concentration, the treatment of asthma and of allergies, and in confronting skin problems and inhibiting wrinkles.

Bee pollen has also helped many women with painful menstrual cramps or hot flashes. It can also relieve headaches and heart palpitations as well as increase sexual potency, fertility, and benefit the prostate. Bee pollen can be used to regulate colon problems and as a diuretic for the kidney and bladder. Evidence has even been found for bee pollen’s effectiveness on children with ADD.

Bee pollen is packed with many different nutrients including amino acids, antibiotic factors, DNA/RNA, enzymes, glucosides, hormones, minerals, vitamins, and other ingredients that have not yet been determined. There are a total of 22 amino acids in bee pollen, including all of the essential ones, which makes it an extremely usable and complete source of protein. It is higher in protein than steak, eggs or cheese weight for weight, without large amounts of fat.

Bee pollen is rich in phytochemicals such as flavonoids, carotenes, and phytosterols, which allows it to provide important antioxidants including lycopene, selenium, quercetin, and beta carotene. Bee pollen also has the ability to regulate intestinal bacterial, which neutralizes toxic waste and improves blood health. Bee pollen contains 18 different enzymes including amylase, diastase, phosphatase, pepsin, and tryspin. Because bee pollen is such a rich source of enzymes, it greatly assists the body since they are required for all bodily functions.

Glucosides, which are natural sugars, are involved in the creation of energy within the body, can be found in bee pollen, as they promote better healing and coagulation and also control hypertension by regulating blood flow. Bee pollen contains plant hormones which activate and assist the body’s own endocrine glands, allowing them to function better, which can lead to an increased sperm count for men.

Twenty-seven different kinds of minerals can be found in bee pollen including calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, boron, chlorine, copper, iodine, molybdenum, phosphorus, selenium, silicon, sodium, sulfur, titanium, and zinc. All known vitamins, from A through K, are found in concentrated amounts in bee pollen. With all of these nutrients present, bee pollen is an excellent addition to the diet which will ensure healthy functioning of all your body’s processes.



--
Bee Pollen Available at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1859)


Aloe Vera’s Healing Properties Recognized 1500 years before Christ
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 21, 2007 01:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Aloe Vera’s Healing Properties Recognized 1500 years before Christ

Fifteen centuries before the birth of Christ, Egyptian writings acclaimed the miracle plant we know as Aloe Vera, even then referred to as an ancient cure. Cleopatra, Alexander the Great and Aristotle were fans of this strange succulent prized for its soothing, healing and analgesic ability. Indians in central and South America used it to treat burns, kidney and bladder infections, dysentery, stomach and intestinal disorders.

The pulp of the plant has been used to reduce swelling and pain from injuries, while in Mexico its used to treat arthritis and gout. For many years people have kept aloe plants around for emergency burns.

We took a good look at this fascinating botanical wonder. Of the 200 plus varieties, we quickly found that only five or six fit the enzymatic structure for the cosmetic and so-called “medicinal properties” mentioned.

Then while we were studying these succulents in their natural desert setting, we observed the roadrunner bird drinking the juice of the aloe vera, passing up many aloe plants to get to a particular variety, Aloe Barbadensis Miller. We then studied acre after acre and found the roadrunner “peck marks” only on one particular species. The other aloe plants were untouched. In studying this species of plant more carefully, our Houston lab found that, indeed it had much different gel than other aloes.

The products now labeled as Georges Always Active Aloe are exclusively from Aloe Barbadensis Miller, the Roadrunners’ choice. George Warren, an Independent research chemist in Houston, Texus developed the special processing method that prevents the spoilage without diminishing the essential properties of the Aloe Vera plant. This new method completely eliminates the anthraquinones that are mildly toxic and can cause irritation to the digestive tract. Aloins are also removed, which give a bitter taste (and the Greenish color) to Aloe Vera juices along with the starches and sugars from the polysaccharide molecular chain and thus, George “Always Active” Aloe requires no refrigeration, and will not spoil in its natural state. This method adds no water, no preservatives and no chemicals of any kind. The finished product looks and tastes like spring water.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1524)


Mangoni - Complete SuperFruit Food 1oz equals 3 servings of Vegetables
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 27, 2006 12:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Mangoni - Complete SuperFruit Food 1oz equals 3 servings of Vegetables

Mangoni SuperFruit Antioxidant Cocktail

NOW Mangoni is the one-of-a-kind “SuperFruit” antioxidant cocktail that unites 8 of the most antioxidant rich, hi-ORAC fruits on the planet. This completely unique formula boasts 3 times the polyphenol levels of even the most popular mangosteen products and has an ORAC value of over 80,000. Working together within the body, this unique arrangement of hi-ORAC fruit extracts offers unparalleled antioxidant support.*

Mangosteen

The Mangosteen’s rind and white inner fruit are rich in some of the most powerful antioxidants ever discovered. Among them are Xanthones—highly bioactive polyphenols that have been shown to possess remarkable antioxidant properties.*

Acai berries are high in anthocyanins, a powerful class of flavonoids with well established free radical fighting abilities. One serving can contain as much as 33 times the anthocyanin content as a glass of red wine!*

Goji Berry

For nearly 2,000 years this fire-red berry has been a staple in Tibetan medicine. Goji’s diverse nutrient profile includes antioxidants and phytonutrients, linoleic acid, polysaccharides, all 18 amino acids, vitamins A, E, C and B, and 21 trace minerals!*

Pomegranate

Ancient Egyptians called it the “Fruit of Immortality.” Today, we know it as one of the most effective antioxidants ever discovered. Pomegranate has been shown in numerous studies to support healthy cardiovascular and optimal cellular function.*

Noni

With a nutrient profile that includes anthraquinones, organic acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals, the fruit from Morinda citrifolia has been consumed throughout the ages to boost stamina and promote good health.*

CoffeeBerry

Before they find their way to your favorite barista, coffee beans display bright red berries that are teeming with polysaccharides, nutrients, and polyphenols—a hi-ORAC plant antioxidant that quenches free radicals and fights oxidation.*

VitaBerry is bursting with antioxidant phytochemicals such as anthocyanins, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, quinic acid and resveratrol. When combined, these hi-ORAC fruit antioxidants work synergistically to prevent oxidation and free radical attacks.*

Raspberry

Rich in Vitamin C, manganese, fiber, and ellagitannins, raspberries possess strong antioxidant properties that help healthy cells from the damage caused by free radicals.*

  • Over 80,000 ORAC Value per 32 oz Bottle
  • Competitive Products Typically Have an ORAC Value of 17,000 - 35,000 per Bottle
  • 300% Higher Polyphenol Content
  • Superior Antioxidant Protection
  • Exotic, Tropical Taste
  • Each 1 oz Serving is Equivalent to 3 Servings of Fruit

Mangoni SuperFruit Antioxidant Cocktail
Mangoni SuperFruit Antioxidant Cocktail
Mangoni SuperFruit Antioxidant Cocktail
Mangoni SuperFruit Antioxidant Cocktail



--
Buy Now Foods Mangoni at Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1440)


HERBAL EXTRACTS FOR IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPORT
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 23, 2005 12:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HERBAL EXTRACTS FOR IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPORT

Nature’s Apothecary

"HERBAL EXTRACTS FOR IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPORT AND DETOXIFICATION"

For years, Nature’s Apothecary’s reputation for producing high quality natural products, specifically multi-herb and single herb extracts and aromatherapy products, has been unparalleled. This family-owned, environmentally-conscious herbal extract company has laid deep roots on the front range of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, and in the natural products industry as well. NOW® is proud to continue their tradition of excellence in providing only the highest quality natural herbal extracts with the purchase of this premier liquid herbal extract supplier. We’re committed to using the same processes and procedures that have made the Nature’s Apothecary line one of quality and longevity.

Nature’s Apothecary herbal extracts are created with pure herbs grown on small organic farms, or herbs that have been ethically hand-harvested with respect for the earth, just as herbalists have done for thousands of years. While the various herbs used in these formulations offer a broad range of health benefits, two of the most important are immune system enhancement and detoxification. Herbs have a long history of usefulness in these categories. There is evidence of the use of herbs by Stone Age humans, who either cultivated or gathered hundreds of herbs and plants for a variety of uses. The histories of various cultures are filled with references to the use of herbs. Ancient Sumerians, Egyptians, Romans, Greeks, Chinese, Europeans, and American Indians – all used herbs to heal and to nourish. Herbs that support the immune system and provide detoxification benefits were, and still are, very popular. Two of the most effective are Astragalus and Shiitake Mushroom.

Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus) is a member of the legume family and is considered an adaptogenic herb in traditional Chinese medicine, where it has been safely used for centuries. Native to central and western Asia, specifically China, Korea and Taiwan, Astragalus offers a unique benefit found in very few herbs - it seems to selectively support immune system function by stimulating certain immune functions and depressing others. One reason is that Astragalus has a high selenium content, a trace element with documented immune system benefits. It also contains polysaccharides and flavonoids, which support healthy immune system function as well as minimizing the effects of free radicals on various membranes. The mechanisms of action through which Astragalus supports immune system function are varied. It has shown promise as a means to stimulate “resting” immune system cells, increasing their activity. Research shows that Astragalus supports the body’s production of immunoglobulins, macrophages, T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, the grunts of the immune system’s army. Astragalus has been shown to support healthy cardiovascular function by protecting membranes from oxidative stress as a result of free radical damage.

Shiitake Mushroom (Lentinula edodes) is a culinary delight with some serious health benefits. The name Shiitake is from a combination of shiia, the Japanese word for a variety of chestnut tree, and take, the Japanese name for mushrooms.

Shiitake is also referred to as the Forest Mushroom and the Black Forest Mushroom. Indigenous to Eastern Asia, primarily Japan and China, Shiitake is Japan’s leading agricultural export, accounting for about eighty percent of the world’s Shiitake production. While it’s culinary reputation is well-known, Shiitake is also a medicinal herb with a long history of use. In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Shiitake is well-regarded and has been used to treat a variety of ailments. Modern research has shown that Shiitake supports healthy immune system function and cardiovascular health, primarily due to the naturally-occurring nutrients found in Shiitake. It contains an excellent B vitamin profile, as well as amino acids, protein, iron, and beta glucan, a major structural component in the cell walls of most fungi, including Shiitake. Beta glucan has been shown to support healthy immune system function by stimulating the activity of phagocytes, white blood cells and NK (natural killer) cells, vital components of the body’s immune system defenses. Astragalus and Shiitake Mushroom are just a few of the immune supporting herbal extracts to be found in the Nature’s Apothecary line. With over 250 SKU’s, Nature’s Apothecary is your best source for high-quality, effective herbal extracts.

References:
1) Balch, Phyllis A. Prescription For Herbal Healing, Avery, Penguin Putnam, 2002
2) Astragalus membranaceus. (Monograph), Thorne Research Inc., The Gale Group, 2003
3) Halpern, Georges M. & Miller, Andrew H. Medicinal Mushrooms: Ancient Remedies for Modern Ailments, M. Evans and Company, Inc. 2002
4) Longe, J.L. Shiitake Mushroom, Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine, 2001



--
Boost immune system at Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1071)


Cinnamon may control sugar levels...
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 08, 2005 10:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cinnamon may control sugar levels...

Best Cinnamon

  • Use as Part of Your Diet to Help Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*
  • HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS
  • Cinnamon,
    a staple ingredient in apple pie, has remained one of the
    world's favorite spices throughout recorded history. The
    evergreen cinnamon tree (Cinnamomum verum), considered to be
    true cinnamon, is native to Sri Lanka. Chinese cinnamon
    (Cinnamomum cassia or Cinnamomum aromaticum), the cinnamon most
    commonly sold in the U.S., goes by the name “Cassia.” Usage of
    cinnamon in Chinese medicine is said to date back over 4,000
    years. Mentioned in the Bible, cinnamon was imported to Egypt
    and Europe from the Far East by 500 B.C. In addition to its
    value as culinary spice, cinnamon has traditionally been
    utilized as a folk medicine for colds and minor digestive
    complaints. True cinnamon and cassia are very similar; cassia
    has a more pungent flavor. Cassia buds can be found in potpourri
    and used as a flavoring agent in sweets and
    beverages.1

    Recent research has revealed that constituents in
    cinnamon bark called procyanidin Type-A polymers help maintain
    the body's ability to metabolize glucose in a healthy way.* Best
    Cinnamon Extract is Cinnulin PF®, a patented, water extract of
    Cinnamon that contains Type-A polymers. Cinnulin PF® is a
    registered trademark of Integrity Nutraceuticals International
    and is manufactured under US Patent #
    6,200,569.

    Benefits

    Use as Part of Your Diet to Help
    Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*

    In Vitro and Animal
    Studies

    Research has revealed that a number of herbs and
    spices have insulin-like activity.2 In a study by the U.S.
    Department of Agriculture (USDA), cinnamon demonstrated the
    greatest ability to stimulate cellular glucose metabolism among
    49 botanicals tested.3

    In a 2001 study, researchers at the
    USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center showed that bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon trigger an insulin-like response in fat
    cells.4 These compounds stimulated glucose uptake into cells and
    increased glycogen (stored glucose) production via activation of
    the enzyme, glycogen synthase.

    The bioactive compounds in
    cinnamon appear to potentiate insulin activity at the level of
    the cell receptor for insulin. It has been shown that insulin
    resistance involves down regulation of “insulin signaling”
    characterized by dephosphorylation of the receptor.5 Enzymes
    called “protein tyrosine kinases” (PTPases) are believed to
    decrease receptor phosphorylation, and increased PTPase activity
    has been observed in insulin resistant rats.6 Cinnamon compounds
    have demonstrated the in vitro ability to inhibit PTP-1 and
    increase autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor.7

    In a
    recent animal study, cinnamon (cassia) extract was administered
    to rats for three weeks. Following this, the rats were infused
    with insulin and glucose to assess their insulin response.
    Increased phosphorylation of the insulin receptor was observed
    in skeletal muscle of these rats, suggesting that cinnamon has
    the ability to potentiate insulin function by normalizing
    insulin signaling, leading to improved uptake of glucose into
    skeletal muscle.8

    Until recently, the precise molecular
    structure of the bioactive compounds in cinnamon had not been
    clearly defined. The USDA has now determined that the bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon are water-soluble procyanidin Type-A
    polymers of catechin and epicatechin. In a 2004 study, type-A
    polymers were isolated from cinnamon and characterized by
    nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Type-A
    polymers were found to increase in vitro insulin activity by a
    factor of 20. Type-A polymers also exhibited antioxidant
    activity, as measured by inhibition of free radical production
    in platelets. These results suggest that, in addition to
    regulating glucose metabolism, cinnamon may help protect cell
    membranes by controlling the lipid peroxidation associated with
    disruptions in insulin function.9

    HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS

    The effect of cinnamon on glucose and blood lipids
    levels on people with type 2 diabetes was tested in a recent
    randomized, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 60 subjects
    were divided into six groups administered 1, 3, or 6 grams of
    cinnamon daily, in 500 mg capsules, or equal numbers of placebo
    capsules.

    The cinnamon or placebo capsules were consumed for
    two periods of 20 days each. Serum glucose, triglyceride,
    cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol were measured
    after 20 days, 40 days and again at the end of a 20-day wash-out
    period, during which neither cinnamon nor placebo was
    consumed.

    In all three cinnamon groups, statistically
    significant reductions in blood glucose levels occurred, with
    decreases ranging from 18 to 29 percent. Interestingly, glucose
    levels remained significantly lower after the 20-day wash-out
    period (60 days from the study start) only in the group that
    took the lowest cinnamon dose (1 gram daily). The placebo groups
    showed no significant changes.

    Decreases in triglyceride
    levels ranging from 23 to 30% were observed in all three
    cinnamon groups after 40 days. When the study ended at 60 days,
    triglyceride levels remained lower than at the study start in
    the 1 and 3 gram cinnamon groups, but not in the group taking 6
    grams daily. Cholesterol reductions also occurred with the three
    cinnamon doses, with decreases ranging from 13 to 25% that were
    maintained at the study end. For LDL, the 3 and 6 gram cinnamon
    groups showed significant reductions from 10 to 24%, while in
    the 1 gram cinnamon group, non-significant reductions occurred
    after 40 days; LDL levels continued to decrease, reaching
    statistical significance at 60 days. With respect to HDL,
    significant increases were seen only in the 3 gram cinnamon
    group after 20 days; non-significant changes occurred in the 1
    and 6 gram groups after 40 days.

    The overall results of this
    trial demonstrate that cinnamon exerts a beneficial effect on
    blood glucose and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes,
    at daily intakes of 1 gram, and that this low dose is equally
    efficacious as are the higher doses of 3 and 6
    grams.10

    Safety

    The various species of cinnamon are
    classified as GRAS (generally regarded as safe) herbs.11 The
    Botanical Safety Handbook lists Cinnamomum cassia a “Class 2b”
    herb; not to be used during pregnancy.12 The water-soluble
    cinnamon extract is largely free of the lipid-soluble components
    of cinnamon most likely to be toxic at high dose of cinnamon and
    long-term consumption of the herb.9

    *This statement has not
    been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product
    is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any
    disease.

    Scientific References

    1. Manniche, L. An Ancient
    Egyptian Herbal. 1989, Austin , TX : University of Texas
    Press.

    2. Khan A, Bryden NA, Polansky MM, Anderson RA.
    Insulin potentiating factor and chromium content of selected
    foods and spices. Biol Trace Elem Res 1990;24(3):183-8.

    3.
    Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM, Anderson R. Insulin-like biological
    activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in
    vitro. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48(3):849-52.

    4. Jarvill-Taylor
    KJ, Anderson RA, Graves DJ. A hydroxychalcone derived from
    cinnamon functions as a mimetic for insulin in 3T3-L1
    adipocytes. J Am Coll Nutr 2001;20(4):327-36.

    5. Nadiv O,
    Shinitzky M, Manu H, et al. Elevated protein tyrosine
    phosphatase activity and increased membrane viscosity are
    associated with impaired activation of the insulin receptor
    kinase in old rats. Biochem J. 1998;298(Pt 2):443-50.

    6.
    Begum N, Sussman KE, Draznin B. Differential effects of diabetes
    on adipocyte and liver phosphotyrosine and phsophoserine
    phosphatase activities. Diabetes 1991;40(12):1620-9.

    7.
    Imparl-Radosevich J, Deas S, Polansky MM, et al. Regulation of
    PTP-1 and insulin receptor kinase by fractions from cinnamon:
    implications for cinnamon regulation of insulin signalling. Horm
    Res 1998;50:177-182.

    8. Qin B, Nagasaki M, Ren M, et al.
    Cinnamon extract (traditional herb) potentiates in vivo
    insulin-regulated glucose utilization via enhanced insulin
    signaling in rats. Diabetes Res Clin Pract
    2003;62(3):139-48.

    9. Anderson R, Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM,
    et al. Isolation and characterization of polyphenol type-A
    polymers from cinnamon with insulin-like biological activity. J
    Agric Food Chem 2004; 52(1):65-70.

    10. Khan A, Safdar S,
    Muzaffar M, et al. Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of
    people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care
    2003;26(12):3215-18.

    11. Duke, JA. Handbook of Phytochemical
    Constituents of GRAS Herbs and Other Economic Plants. 1992. Boca
    Raton, FL: CRC Press.

    12. Botanical Safety Handbook. American
    Herbal Products Association. McGuffin M, et al., eds. 1997; Boca
    Raton , FL : CRC Press.

    Acting as a biochemical
    "super-thiamin," it does this through several different cellular
    mechanisms, as discussed below.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=565)


    HISTORY
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 09:58 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: HISTORY

    HISTORY

    For thousands of years amazing magical and medicinal powers have been attributed to garlic. Prized as a legendary protectant against vampires in Transylvania, it has also been used to enhance sexual prowess and fight off infections. Referred to as “the stinking rose,” it is mentioned in Bible, the Talmud, and in the Odyssey by Homer as well. The Egyptians looked to garlic as a tonic which boosted physical strength and consumed it while building the pyramids. The Greeks utilized its laxative properties, and the Chinese prescribed it for high blood pressure. Vikings and Phoenicians alike extolled the virtues of garlic and used it both for flavoring foods and treating disease.

    Garlic is a hardy, perennial bulb which is native to the Mediterranean regions of Africa and Europe. Along with onions, leeks, chives and shallots, garlic is a member of the lily family. The botanical name for garlic, allium sativum may have been derived from the celtic word all which refers to “pungent.” The edible portion of the garlic plant grows underground and consists of a cloved bulb.

    Hippocrates believed that garlic could treat uterine cancer and Native Americans used it for stomach cancer. During the Bubonic Plague years in Europe, garlic was used to boost immunity against the infectious organism responsible for so many deaths. Several accounts relate that survivors of the plague were frequently those who had routinely ingested large amounts of garlic. A sixteenth- century herbalist writes, referring to garlic, “The virtue of this herb is thus. It will unbind all wicked winds within a man’s body.”1

    During the eighteenth century, Russians utilized garlic to treat influenza. Eventually, garlic would become known as “Russian penicillin.” American colonists regarded garlic for its ability to kill parasites.

    In the nineteenth century, Louis Pasteur finally proved scientifically that garlic contains antibiotic properties. His discovery led to the initiation of hundreds of studies which have substantiated his findings. What was thought to be nothing more than a culinary ingredient has medicinal value. Garlic can effectively kill bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. In the late nineteenth century, garlic was routinely used by physicians as an effective treatment for typhus, cholera and whooping cough. It was highly recommended by medical practitioners and considered as staple treatment for infection. Albert Schweitzer used garlic for treating amebic dysentery in Africa. Early in this century, tuberculosis was treated with garlic and it was also used as an antibiotic/antiseptic for wounds during World War II. American and European doctors alike noted a remarkable high cure rate in tuberculosis patients treated with garlic.

    2 Septic poisoning and gangrene, which can so quickly develop in battlefield wounds were prevented to a significant degree by using garlic. During the 1950’s Chinese scientists used garlic to successfully treat influenza. Subsequently, western studies found that garlic was an effective treatment for the common cold. Today the widespread use of antibiotics have relegated garlic to the back burner of medicinal therapies for infection. The discovery of penicillin resulted in classifying garlic as nothing more than a folk remedy. Unfortunately, for several decades its medicinal potential was no longer taken seriously by scientists. Over the last decade, scientific interest in garlic has dramatically escalated. In 1990, the First World Congress on the Health Significance of garlic and Garlic Constituents was held in Washington D.C. Herbalists have always considered garlic as an effective treatment and preventative agent against colds, flu and other infectious diseases. The present focus on garlic as a medicinal agent promises to support the notion that garlic should be utilized by medical practitioners much more than it currently is.

    Recently, medical research has focused on garlic’s potential value in treating cardiovascular disorders and as an anti-cancer agent. This renewed interest in garlic has contributed to the development of the “Designer Foods Program” which is sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.3 This agency investigates foods that may be effective cancer preventatives. Garlic is one of those foods which may have profound cancer prevention potential.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=427)


    Scents of Balance
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 14, 2005 11:54 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Scents of Balance

    Scents of Balance by Rosemary Sage Energy Times, January 5, 2005

    Life can feel like an emotional rollercoaster, with the high-stress jitters following the low-mood blues. But aromatherapy-the healing power of scent-can restore equilibrium.

    The use of volatile plant oils, including essential oils, for psychological and physical well-being dates back thousands of years. The ancient Chinese, Egyptians, Greeks and Romans used infused oils and herbal preparations for medicinal, fragrant, cosmetic, even spiritual reasons.

    During the late 20th century, people started to relearn the benefits of aromatherapy and these days, aromatherapy's reputation as a soothing, healing art continues to grow. Once you've experienced the odiferous power of aromatherapy's essential oils, you'll keep coming back for more: These gently wafting odors have the power to stimulate or calm, invigorate or relax.

    When you enter this scented world, "there you will find nature in one of its most powerful forms-aromatic liquid substances known as 'essential oils,'" says Valerie Ann Worwood in The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy (Thorsons). Essential oils form what Worwood refers to as the "fragrant pharmacy," a collection of concentrated substances used in pharmaceuticals, foods and cosmetics.

    When you sniff the aromas of essential oils, "they enter and leave the body with great efficiency, leaving no toxins behind," Worwood points out. "The most effective way to use essential oils is...by external application or inhalation. The methods used include body oils, compresses, cosmetic lotions, baths-including sitz, hand and foot baths-hair rinses...perfumes...and a whole range of room [scenting] methods."

    Plant Essences

    As Worwood explains, essential oils are produced in various parts of different plants. As a result, it takes a great deal of specialized work to extract essential oils. About 60,000 rose blossoms are consumed in the production of an ounce (!) of rose oil.

    Just as the antioxidant phytonutrients we eat in vegetarian foods link our bodies to the health-promoting chemistry of plants, the penetrating nature of essential oils are thought to connect our souls to the essences of flora. "From inside comes the voice and from inside comes the scent," observed the 19th century German doctor Gustav Fechner, quoted by Robert Tisserand in The Art of Aromatherapy (Healing Arts Press). "Just as one can tell human beings in the dark from the tone of voice, so, in the dark, every flower can be recognized by its scent. Each carries the soul of its progenitor."

    Fechner believed that the power of essential oils to stir our deepest emotions derives from their function as a vital means of communication in the plant world. As Tisserand asks, can't we imagine that flowers "communicate with each other by the very perfumes they exude, becoming aware of each other's presence?"

    The Science Behind the Scent

    While alternative medical practitioners have acknowledged the effectiveness of aromatherapy for thousands of years, only recently have conventional medical researchers begun seriously looking into how this technique works.

    For instance, a study of estragole, a chemical found in basil, fennel and tarragon, determined that it could potentially ease back pain by inhibiting inflammation of the sciatic nerve. (The sciatic nerve, the longest nerve in the body, runs from the back down the leg.) The researchers discovered that estragole is "active on nerves," a conclusion that aromatherapy practitioners, who employ the scent of these oils to soothe pain, already knew. Science is verifying another piece of information long known to practitioners-that while certain essential oils can calm you down, others prod your alertness. In a study performed at the University of Northumbria in England, scientists found that sniffing the scent of lavender lulls the human brain into a comfortable, rather stupefied state, while rosemary, in contrast, can sharpen recall.

    As the English researchers noted, lavender "produced a significant decrement in performance of working memory, and impaired reaction times for both memory and attention-based tasks." That's probably why the odor of lavender is noted for enhancing sleep. On the other hand, the scientists found that rosemary "produced a significant enhancement of performance for overall quality of memory and secondary memory factors." However, they did point out that under the influence of both of these oils, performance slowed when tackling a battery of memory tests. Apparently, the oils mellowed people so that they had little motivation to rush through the paperwork.

    As Frazesca Watson notes in Aromatherapy Blends & Remedies (Thorsons): "The aroma of the oils directly affects our moods and emotions and sometimes our short- and long-term memory. Together with a wide range of physiological benefits, the aroma can help with emotional upsets such as depression, anxiety, nervous tension, anger, apathy, confusion, indecision, fear, grief, hypersensitivity, impatience, irritability, panic and hysteria."

    Essential oils are especially helpful at defusing stress. Watson notes, "Treatments with essential oils are therefore very helpful for all sorts of stress-related problems, so common in our modern life."

    As scientific research into the effects of these oils continue, conventional medical practitioners are sure to embrace them in increasing numbers. But before there were scientists around to confirm the effects of these wonderful scents, the ancient medical practitioners in Egypt and Greece attributed the origins of aromatherapy to the gods. For many people in today's overstressed world, the relaxing assurance of essential oils certainly seems heaven-s(c)ent.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=347)


    Clearing the Air
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 13, 2005 10:34 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Clearing the Air

    Clearing the Air by Robert Gluck Energy Times, August 1, 1999

    One crisp winter morning in Vermont, Alan hoisted his skis over his shoulder and tracked through the dazzling snowpack to the lift about a quarter-mile away. He had trekked this gently uphill route many times and valued it as an invigorating warmup for a day on the ski trails. The path seemed to grow steeper, however, and the winter sun more blazing as Alan struggled for breath, sweat dampening his woolen cap. Weak and wheezing, he paused for what seemed like an eternity and finally turned back, plodding arduously through the ice.

    Fit and athletic, the 42-year-old Alan heard the alarming news from his health care practitioner: asthma. The therapy: inhaled steroids.

    Breathing Uneasy

    The incidence of asthma-a chronic condition characterized by narrowing of the bronchial tubes, swelling of the bronchial tube lining and mucus secretion that can block the airway, making breathing difficult-has ballooned to alarming rates.

    In the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control, the number of people reported to suffer from asthma increased from 10.4 million in 1990 to 15 million in 1995. In 1998, the epidemic cost about $11.3 billion.

    Worldwide, experts estimate that the prevalence of asthma increased approximately 50% over the last 10 to 15 years. Nations with the highest rates are the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia; lowest are Indonesia, Albania, Romania and Georgia.

    Deaths from asthma have doubled in the last decade and, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, asthma is the seventh most common chronic health condition in the United States. Children constitute the most disturbingly burgeoning segment of the asthma explosion, its sufferers numbering five to six million. The rate of asthma among children five to 14 years old increased 74% between 1980 and 1994; the rate for preschool kids skyrocketed 160%. Asthma is the number one chronic childhood illness and the third leading cause of hospitalization for children under age 15. More than 5000 Americans die from asthma annually; the fatality rate among children five to 14 years old more than doubled from 1979 to 1995, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation.

    Waging War on the Wheeze

    Asthma is indeed chronic, but it can be prevented and controlled and its effects reversed. Mainstream MDs command an arsenal of pharmaceuticals, some of which are essential for severe or urgent conditions. Consult your health care practitioner about any breathing difficulties.

    Because of its complexity, however, asthma requires a balanced therapeutic approach: careful attention to diet, exercise and stress reduction while taking supplemental nutrients and botanicals can help ease asthma's discomforts. Antioxidant nutrients like vitamins C and E, fruits and vegetables rich in phytochemicals plus herbs like echinacea and garlic, all possess the potential for helping the body fight asthma.

    Induced by an array of inherent physiological vulnerabilities, some of which may not manifest until adulthood, as well as environmental factors, asthma benefits from extra sleuthing into its causes and planning for relief.

    Triggers and Therapies

    Asthma is derived from the Greek word meaning panting or breathing hard, which pretty much sums up the malady: Wheezing and shortness of breath typify the attack.

    In bronchial asthma, the commonest variety, the passages that carry air from the throat to the lungs narrow as a result of muscle contraction, local inflammation or production of excess mucus. Breathing becomes difficult and wheezy as air is expelled.

    "Asthma symptoms are triggered by various factors such as allergens, irritants, infections, pollutants, medications, and emotions," says Anthony Rooklin, author of Living with Asthma: A Comprehensive Guide to Understanding and Controlling Asthma While Enjoying Your Life (Penguin). "Triggers are substances or situations that would be quite harmless to people with ordinary airways, but that bring on asthma symptoms in susceptible individuals."

    According to Ellen W. Cutler, nutritionist, enzyme therapist, chiropractor and author of Winning the War Against Asthma & Allergies: A Drug-Free Cure For Asthma and Allergy Sufferers" (Delmar), asthma is an allergic disease that is always triggered by allergens. "These allergens include not only foods, pollens and environmental factors such as perfume, animal dander and chemicals but also bacteria, climactic conditions and emotions," says Cutler.

    "When these allergies are active from birth, asthma can be diagnosed early in life, even in infancy," she adds.

    Cutler believes every individual with asthma should be able to lead a normal, drug-free life.

    "Most asthmatics have been told that asthma is a chronic problem they will have to contend with for the rest of their lives. Asthma can be cured, not miraculously and instantaneously, but inevitably and permanently, once the allergies that cause it have been eliminated," she adds.

    Dilating on Nutrients

    Although it is vitally important for folks with asthma to develop a treatment plan with a trusted health care provider, that plan, according to experts, may lend itself to a rich variety of complementary options, especially nutrients, phytochemicals, minerals and enzymes.

    According to Ruth Winter, author of A Consumer's Guide to Medicines in Food: Nutraceuticals That Help Prevent and Treat Physical and Emotional Illnesses (Crown), researchers in Nottingham, England, linked magnesium and lung function.

    "Magnesium is involved in a wide range of biological activities, including some that may protect against the development of asthma and chronic airflow obstruction," Winter says. "Dr. John Britton and his colleagues at Nottingham University measured the magnesium in the diets of 2,633 adults aged 18 to 70 and they found that low magnesium was associated with reduced lung function and wheezing" (The Lancet 344, 1994: 357-62).

    Magnesium actually boasts a long history as a bronchial relaxant, first demonstrated in 1912 on cows. Its potential was eclipsed, however, by pharmaceutical antihistamines and bronchodilators until its recent rediscovery.

    Defending the Lungs

    Antioxidants, with their ability to bolster the lungs' defense mechanisms by battling oxidizing free radicals that constrict bronchial tissue, wield tremendous force in the anti-asthma offensive. Michael T. Murray, ND, and Joseph E. Pizzorno, ND, in their Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (Prima), connect the steady decrease in dietary intake of antioxidants to the burgeoning incidence of asthma.

    Among the top asthma-busting antioxidants:

    Vitamin C. Murray and Pizzorno note that C is the major antioxidant present in the lining of the airway and cite generous evidence that when vitamin C is low, asthma incidence is high (Annals Allergy 73, 1994: 89-96). Vitamin C, taken over time, effectively suppresses histamine secretion by white blood cells.

    Flavonoids. Also credited with reducing histamine production, flavonoids, notably quercetin and the extracts from grape seed, pine bark and ginkgo biloba, are key asthma-fighting antioxidants (J Allergy Clin Immunol 73, 1984; 769-74).

    Carotenes. They limit production of allergy-related compounds (called leukotrienes) and bolster the lining of the respiratory tract (Biochem Biophys Acta 575, 1979: 439-45).

    Vitamin E and selenium. Both reduce secretion of leukotrienes (Clinical Exp Allergy 26, 1996: 838-47).

    Vitamin B12. Murray and Pizzorno cite the work of Jonathan Wright, MD, whose clinical trials with supplemental vitamin B12 proved strongly effective, especially for children with asthma.

    A Bundle of Botanicals

    Herbal remedies for asthma date back more than 5000 years to the Chinese emperor Shen-nung. The ancient Egyptians treated respiratory ailments with herbs as well; the Greeks favored mint, garlic, cloves and myrrh for pulmonary problems.

    Today, the power of plants has been validated by clinical research and standardized for predictability. (Always consult a health care practitioner when seeking complementary therapies, and read the package labels carefully for dosages and cautions.)

    In their book, Asthma: An Alternative Approach (Keats), Ron Roberts and Judy Sammut provide a concise guide to asthma-easing botanicals: Garlic: acts as antiviral, antibacterial and antihistamine; enhances immune response; contains the antioxidant selenium. Garlic also is an expectorant.

    Echinacea: a traditional treatment for immune disorders and infections of the upper respiratory tract, known to shorten the duration of colds, coughs and flus.

    Ginkgo biloba: inhibits the chemical responses that induce asthma discomfort (Br J Clin Pharmacol 29, 1990: 85-91).

    Ginseng: stimulates immunity and the production of steroid-like hormones; helps chronic coughs.

    Licorice: an expectorant, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergenic that also inhibits leukotriene production (Acta Med Okayama 37, 1983: 385-91).

    Tylophora asthmatica: an Ayurvedic treatment that many respected experts believe can act both as an antihistamine and antispasmodic (Planta Med 57, 1991: 409-13).



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=327)


    Garlic for the Ages - eat garlic because it's good for your heart...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 13, 2005 09:58 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Garlic for the Ages - eat garlic because it's good for your heart...

    Garlic for the Ages by Phyllis D. Light, RH Energy Times, January 1 , 2004

    If you eat garlic because it's good for your heart, you swallow a plant renowned through human history: Garlic was eaten by Roman soldiers for courage; Egyptian slaves ate it to build strength; Christians, Moslems and Hindus include it in their sacred books. Others have used it as an aphrodisiac, a vampire deterrent and a magical charm.

    Garlic has a long history as a culinary and medicinal herb that people either love or hate. Its pungent aroma and warming flavor captivates or repels, but its wealth of natural chemicals does great things for your heart.

    Garlic (Allium sativum), a member of the onion family, is native to Siberia but, in modern times, has become a treasured naturalized citizen grown all over the world. Garlic's use in folk medicine dates back about 7,000 years, making it one of the oldest known medicinal foods or herbs.

    In modern times, garlic is generally used as a condiment lending a unique, pungent flavor to dishes, but in medieval times, garlic was cooked and eaten as a vegetable in its own right. Today you can revel in a wealth of garlic choices, consuming garlic raw, cooked in various recipes, as a dried concentrated powder, as a fresh liquid extract or as aged garlic powder.

    Powerhouse Herb

    Each little clove of garlic is a powerhouse of good-for-you natural compounds, vitamins and minerals. The biologically active constituents of garlic include allyl sulfur compounds as well as the minerals germanium and selenium.

    When you chop up raw garlic and allowed it to stand for about 10 minutes or more, the herb's fragments release an enzyme that converts its compounds from allyl sulfur to another natural chemical called allicin.

    Although some allicin is found in garlic before it is cut apart, the yield multiplies considerably when the garlic clove is chopped or pressed and exposed to water (Garlic Conference, Newport Beach, 11/15/98; Penn State).

    Many researchers believe that the more allicin produced, the better the health benefits. (Although this is still being debated among the garlic cognoscenti.)

    But garlic's benefits don't end meekly on the kitchen counter with its allicin content rising.

    Cooked garlic and aged garlic contain other helpful chemicals called diallyl sulphides. Consequently, in any form, garlic produces beneficial health effects.

    Fortunately, since raw garlic juice or oil can often irritate the stomach lining, especially in people with sensitive stomachs and delicate digestive systems, garlic supplements and cooked garlic are both helpful for heart health.

    Aged Garlic Extract

    Aging garlic significantly reduces its irritating compounds and makes it easier on the stomach.

    In the aged form, all of garlic's healthy sulfur-containing compounds are converted to water- soluble compounds that retain garlic's natural health benefits. In addition, the pungent odor of the garlic is greatly reduced, an outcome many people desire.

    When a group of researchers at Brown University studied the effects of aged garlic extract on people's cholesterol levels, they found that after six months, cholesterol dropped about 6% (Am J Clin Nutr 1996; 64:866-70).

    In another study from Brown, researchers found that aged garlic extract reduced platelet adhesion, a sticky blood problem that can cause vessel blockages (New Drug Clin 45(3):456-66). When platelets are less sticky, they are less likely to form blood clots that can cause heart attacks.

    Garlic and Heart Disease

    A growing body of research shows that a clove of garlic a day can significantly reduce your risk of heart disease.

    A four-year study of 280 people who took dried garlic powder three times a day found a striking reduction in the types of arterial plaque blockages that threaten the blood supply to your heart. Interestingly, in this particular study, women displayed a greater reduction in plaque than men (Atherosclerosis 2000; 150:437-8).

    Another study found that garlic may also keep important blood vessels more supple and less likely to spasm. Arterial spasms have been linked to heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems in women.

    Aortic Complications

    As you age, the aorta, one of the main arteries that carries blood, may harden, reducing blood flow from the heart and placing damaging stress on a number of other bodily organs. In research at Ohio State University, people who took garlic supplements had 15% less aortic stiffness than people who avoided garlic (Circulation).

    In this study, scientists found that the older people enjoyed the greatest cardiovascular benefits from daily garlic use.

    Researchers believe this extra benefit is linked to the fact that as you age, the endothelial tissue in the linings of the aorta and other blood vessels become less responsive to the need to dilate (expand). As a result, when more blood flow is required, and the heart pumps faster, these vessels take more of a beating from the friction of blood passing through them.

    That restriction in dilation has two damaging consequences: In one instance, vessel walls can be injured. In response to these injuries, cholesterol collects on artery walls, plaque forms and the blood supply to the heart muscle can be restricted, leading to a heart attack. In other cases, arteries can restrict blood flow to the heart simply because of the inability to expand sufficiently.

    The Ohio State researchers found that arteries in folks aged 70 to 80 benefited the most from taking garlic. But those in their 60s also benefited significantly.

    Garlic's natural antioxidant properties can also help protect the heart from damage after surgery (BMC Pharmacology 9/02).

    In a study performed on lab animals, researchers found that oxidative stress, a source of cell damage that takes place after surgery, dropped when the animals ate a diet that included garlic.

    Oxidative stress can seriously reduce cardiac function, limit the amount of blood the heart can pump and cause permanent damage to the heart muscle.

    Garlic Against Blood Clots

    Under normal circumstances, blood clots serve a useful purpose: Cut yourself and a blood clot stops the bleeding. Without this clotting ability, you might bleed to death. But if your blood is too prone to clotting, these clumps can cut off blood supply to your heart and other organs, endangering your life.

    In a study of apparently healthy individuals whose relatives had already suffered from heart disease, researchers found that their blood formed thick, tangled blood clots, increasing their risk of heart problems (Circulation rapid access 9/23/02). These blood clots are made of a substance called fibrin, a protein in the plasma that can form elastic threads that cut off blood flow.

    While these researchers recommended aspirin as an anti-clotting measure for people at risk of heart disease, garlic can also help break up fibrin and possibly lower your chance of heart problems (Pharmatherapy 5(2): 83).

    The fibrin that forms clots is produced by blood cells called platelets. Other scientists who have looked into garlic's benefits believe that one of its natural chemicals called ajoene may keep platelets from producing excessive fibrin and gumming up the flow of blood through arteries.

    If you've rarely indulged in garlic, you may need a period of adjustment in growing accustomed to its unique taste and aroma. But its heart benefits confirm the long-ago observation by Pliny, an ancient Roman naturalist, that "garlic has powerful properties."



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=320)



    VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.