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  Messages 1-50 from 65 matching the search criteria.
Ashwagandha could be your next workout supplement VitaNet, LLC Staff 4/30/19
Women with acute uncomplicated cystitis can benefit from green tea Darrell Miller 4/27/19
Cranberries improve oral health, study concludes Darrell Miller 4/26/19
5 powerful reasons to start eating garlic TODAY Darrell Miller 4/23/19
Curcumin Targets Cancer Cells Darrell Miller 10/29/18
CV Sciences, Inc. Announces Landmark Publication on the Toxicology and Safety Assessment of ... VitaNet, LLC Staff 8/9/18
Omega-3 Fatty Acids Fighting Inflammation Via Cannabinoids Darrell Miller 8/8/18
Bitter melon extract found to help treat diabetes with its anti-obesity effects Darrell Miller 7/26/18
CV Sciences, Inc. to Exhibit at the 25th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine in Las ... Darrell Miller 12/16/17
Consuming nuts strengthens brainwave function Darrell Miller 11/21/17
This Chinese Herb (+ Iron) Kills Cancer Cells in 16 Hours Darrell Miller 3/18/17
Can an Apple a Day Keep COPD Away? Darrell Miller 2/27/17
National Academy of Sciences: Marijuana can be used as a medicine Darrell Miller 1/29/17
What is Oligonol Good for and How Does It Boost My Health? Darrell Miller 3/22/11
Turmeric Extract (Curcumin) Darrell Miller 2/10/09
Inositol And Choline Darrell Miller 12/11/08
Curcumin, Curcuminoids, and Curamin Darrell Miller 4/30/08
Pine Bark Extract Boosts Nitric Oxide Production Darrell Miller 1/17/08
Learn about Bone Health! Darrell Miller 4/20/07
Complete Liver Cleanse Darrell Miller 4/19/07
EpiCore Benefits Darrell Miller 4/9/07
Revita Darrell Miller 3/8/07
Med schools failing on nutrition teaching Darrell Miller 9/19/06
All Natural Hair Care Products - Salon Quality! Darrell Miller 9/1/06
Doctor’s Corner - Relora: Minimizes Stress-Induced Eating Darrell Miller 8/9/06
Night Health: A new approach to improving sleep. Darrell Miller 5/12/06
Benefits of L-Carnitine Darrell Miller 2/12/06
Omega-3’s Fight Postpartum depression Darrell Miller 1/23/06
Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK Darrell Miller 12/27/05
Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells Darrell Miller 12/20/05
Nattokinase Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/8/05
Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/7/05
- US Center for Disease Control, 2005 Darrell Miller 12/7/05
MSM - Natures Primary Sources of Organic Dietary Sulfur Darrell Miller 8/2/05
An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam - NEEM Darrell Miller 7/27/05
<b>ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS: CAUSE FOR WORRY</b> Darrell Miller 7/15/05
Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness - The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a ... Darrell Miller 7/14/05
References Darrell Miller 7/13/05
PYCNOGENOL - ITS REMARKABLE BENEFITS Darrell Miller 7/13/05
Quercetin and Bromelain - for better health. Darrell Miller 7/4/05
CHOLESTEROL RESCUE - Maintain Your Cholesterol Wellness Darrell Miller 6/29/05
Gamma E 400 Complex - Vitamin E with Powerful Tocotrienols Darrell Miller 6/29/05
Sources of Essential Fatty Acids Darrell Miller 6/25/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview Darrell Miller 6/25/05
How Does CLA Work? Darrell Miller 6/22/05
Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) and Mercury Cleansing Programs... Darrell Miller 6/21/05
Anti-Aging Nutrients Darrell Miller 6/18/05
Cancer fighter is found in broccoli Darrell Miller 6/14/05
The A Team Darrell Miller 6/14/05



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Ashwagandha could be your next workout supplement
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Date: April 30, 2019 04:04 PM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ashwagandha could be your next workout supplement





The journal Nutrients has recently published a study showing 500 mg of the supplement ashwagandha when taken over the course of twelve weeks enhances upper and lower body strength thanks to its anti-inflammatory, anabolic, and antioxidant effects. The study took place with a sample size of 38 active men, which were split into an ashwagandha group and a placebo group. Those taking the ashwagandha had improvements in both squat and bench press, while experiencing less muscle soreness after workouts.

Key Takeaways:

  • Current studies, regarding the natural supplement Ashwagandha, build on earlier ones, revealing the root to possess, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anabolic properties.
  • To test the premise that the root aids physical endurance, experts found 38 adult, male, human subjects, all of whom were known to be recreationally active.
  • Recruited subjects received either the herb, or a rice flour placebo, and were closely monitored regularly during observed exercise routines.

"Carried out by researchers from the Center for Applied Health Sciences and Lindenwood University, the study looked at the effects of aqueous extract of the roots and leaves of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) on strength training performance – which includes muscle strength, body composition, muscle endurance, power, and recovery."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-05-ashwagandha-could-be-your-next-workout-supplement.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6225)


Women with acute uncomplicated cystitis can benefit from green tea
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Date: April 27, 2019 10:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Women with acute uncomplicated cystitis can benefit from green tea





The health benefits of green tea have long been praised by scientists and health practitioners, and new research actually adds to the current body of knowledge regarding green tea. Recently, it has been found that green tea can aid in the symptoms of acute cystitis. Acute cystitis is categorized as inflammation in the bladder that is prompted by bacterial infection. Green tea has antimicrobial effects, which can help reduce symptoms of acute cystitis with the exception of blood in the urine. Other health benefits of green tea include weight loss, the prevention of cancer, lowering of stroke risk, and improved memory function.

Key Takeaways:

  • Acute cystitis, which affects many women, is a fast onset inflammation of the bladder, usually the result of a bacterial infection.
  • Recently, the publication, Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice printed data linking cystitis with the use of green tea.
  • Green tea's efficacy against cystitis makes sense, because green tea has catechins that have antimicrobial effect against the E-coli bacteria.

"For this study, researchers from Kerman University of Medical Sciences in Iran carried out a blinded randomized trial to assess the efficacy of green tea as adjunctive therapy to standard antimicrobial treatment in women with acute uncomplicated cystitis."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-06-women-with-acute-uncomplicated-cystitis-can-benefit-from-green-tea.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6207)


Cranberries improve oral health, study concludes
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Date: April 26, 2019 02:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cranberries improve oral health, study concludes





According to a study in Nutrition Research, cranberries can contribute to overall oral health by fighting the inflammation caused by gingivitis. If gingivitis goes untreated, it can lead to gum disease and periodontitis. In adults, both periodontitis and gingivitis can lead to tooth loss. To prevent these conditions, experts recommend consuming 750 ml of a cranberry functional beverage daily. Furthermore, according to a study in the European Journal of Oral Sciences, eating a serving of cranberries and blueberries daily can protect your teeth against S. mutans, a bacterial strand responsible for tooth decay.

Key Takeaways:

  • Although cranberries, Vaccinium macrocarpon, are usually eating during Thanksgiving, one should make it a habit to take them regularly due to its health benefits.
  • It has been discovered that cranberries are especially good for oral health. A new study found that it can help fight inflammation due to gingivitis.
  • Gingivitis is caused by the inflammation of the gums due to the buildup of bacteria that form plaque. If left untreated, it develops to periodontitis.

"The study, which was published in the journal Nutrition Research, suggests that cranberries consumed as a functional drink can be used as a safe and natural treatment for gingivitis."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-16-cranberries-improve-oral-health-study-concludes.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6192)


5 powerful reasons to start eating garlic TODAY
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Date: April 23, 2019 02:41 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 powerful reasons to start eating garlic TODAY





Garlic is an essential ingredient in many kitchens, and also demonstrates an impressive array of health benefits. For example, garlic can encourage higher production of hydrogen sulfide, which helps to keep your blood vessels open and supple, reducing your risk of heart disease. Garlic can help mitigate metabolic syndrome and reduce your risk of several types of cancer, including stomach cancer. By neutralizing enzymes that help break down bone, garlic may also help to ward off osteoarthritis, too.

Key Takeaways:

  • When one wants to follow a true Mediterranean diet or take on a savory Provencal meal, garlic has to be included among the ingredients.
  • It is good to eat garlic on a daily basis because it is good for the health and especially if one wants to avoid heart diseases or diabetes.
  • Garlic has been scientifically proven to protect cardiovascular health and this was demonstrated from a study published in the Proceedings from the National Academy of Sciences in 2007.

"Garlic, a member of the onion family, has a centuries-long history of medicinal use on a global scale."

Read more: https://www.naturalhealth365.com/garlic-heart-disease-2766.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6162)


Curcumin Targets Cancer Cells
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Date: October 29, 2018 01:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Curcumin Targets Cancer Cells





Curcumin is something that has received a lot of fan fare in recent months. While many people have never heard of it, there are scientists who have come out and said that it has some massive health benefits. Like many other compounds that are within foods, it is able to deliver things that some may not think is possible. It targets cancer cells and there are people who have reported that they think that it works for them.

Key Takeaways:

  • Curcumin is an antioxidant that has been shown to cut the growth rate in prostate, lung, and colon cancer.
  • Tumeric inhibits the DYRK2 enzymes, therefore interfering with the proteins that cause cancer cells to grow.
  • Researchers are working on developing a delivery system, as eating tumeric or taking supplements currently is not enough to treat someone with cancer.

"Recent studies highlight turmeric’s superiority by demonstrating its potential to target some of the deadliest forms of cancer while not harming any healthy cells, as published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."

Read more: https://www.worldhealth.net/news/curcumin-targets-cancer-cells/

CBD cane reduce inflammation and assist in fighting things that go wrong with the body. CBD can reduce stress and anxiety.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5805)


CV Sciences, Inc. Announces Landmark Publication on the Toxicology and Safety Assessment of ...
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Date: August 09, 2018 09:53 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CV Sciences, Inc. Announces Landmark Publication on the Toxicology and Safety Assessment of ...





CV Sciences, Inc. Announces Landmark Publication on the Toxicology and Safety Assessment of ...

The scientific study of the analysis of CBD oil got a major push recently. It's been almost 40 years since the last thorough toxicological safety assessment was run on a CBD oil. However, recently CV sciences had AIBMR Life Sciences Inc. perform a complete array of toxicological studies on Plus CBD oil, the company's consumer-lauded hemp cannabidiol oil. The study attested to the safety of oral consumption of the product.

The study conclusions, which have been shared in a peer-reviewed journal, attest to the fact that the oil was discovered to be non-clastogenic, non-mutagenic and non-genotoxic. A spokesperson for CV Sciences noted that the company was "thrilled" and would encourage all CBD companies to allow such studies to be conducted for their own base materials.

Key Takeaways:

  • CV Sciences Inc hired AIBMR Lifesciences Inc. to perform a full toxicological screening of CV's consumer-lauded CBD oil, specifically an extract from the base raw materials comprising it.
  • A peer-reviewed journal has published the findings, which indicate that the extract tested is non-mutagenic, non-clastogenic and non-genotoxic.
  • A spokesperson for CV Sciences indicated that the company was "thrilled" and also urged other CBD companies to have their base materials tested too.

"The toxicological assessment is the first known published data of its kind since the 1980 Rosenkrantz et al.’s publication with respect to toxicology data on CBD, Cannabichromene and hashish oil."

Read more: http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/cv-sciences-inc-announces-landmark-publication-on-the-toxicology-and-safety-assessment-of-base-material-of-its-pluscbd-oil-products-1027104828

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5701)


Omega-3 Fatty Acids Fighting Inflammation Via Cannabinoids
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Date: August 08, 2018 09:53 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Omega-3 Fatty Acids Fighting Inflammation Via Cannabinoids





Omega-3 Fatty Acids Fighting Inflammation Via Cannabinoids

Animal tissue trials suggest that humans can convert Omega 3 Fatty Acids into endocannabinoid compounds that fight inflammation without causing a high. These chemicals are distant relatives of the euphoria-inducing THC in marijuana. Enzymes in your body can process omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids into compounds that bind to the cannabinoid system to boost immunity and fight inflammation. This results in the same medical effects as marijuana without the high. More research is needed, as the cannabinoid system may end up being one of the major endocrine systems in the body.

Key Takeaways:

  • Foods such as eggs, meat, nuts, and fish contain omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that the body can convert into endocannabinoids.
  • The body has two cannabinoid receptors, one in the nervous system and another in the immune system.
  • In 1992, scientists discovered that the body naturally produces endocannabinoids and other endocannabinoids have been identified since that time.

"Cascading chemical reactions were revealed in animals tissues studies that convert omega-3 fatty acids into cannabinoids with anti-inflammatory benefits and lacking in psychotropic highs, as published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."

Read more: https://www.worldhealth.net/news/omega-3-fatty-acids-fighting-inflammation-cannabinoids/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5698)


Bitter melon extract found to help treat diabetes with its anti-obesity effects
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Date: July 26, 2018 09:09 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bitter melon extract found to help treat diabetes with its anti-obesity effects





Bitter melon extract found to help treat diabetes with its anti-obesity effects

Bitter melon may be an unusual thing to incorporate into your diet. But, you may want to look into some recipes. It turns out that there is a wealth of study data that shows that bitter melon is a potent health ally, particularly when it comes to individuals who are fighting a losing battle with weight and some of the chronic conditions that go with it.

There's scientific proof attesting to the fact that bitter melon aids the body in balancing its metabolism with lipid intake. It also benefits a syndrome marked by high levels if glucose in the blood and weight gain around the middle. It also tends to dampen the body's accumulation of adipose tissue. So, while it may not be a taste treat, it may be beneficial, nonetheless, to put some bitter melon on your plate.

Key Takeaways:

  • Recent studies by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and Hefei University of Technology support the benefits of bitter melon seed oil for metabolic health and lipid processing.
  • Chromatographic analysis of butter melon seed oil suggests that it contains compounds, including conjugated linolenic acid, that support inflammation control and protect against neurodegenerative dise
  • The study found that mice on a high fat diet given bitter melon seed oil had a decrease in weight relative to other mice, and were better at burning fat, with higher doses having higher effects.

"Bitter melons may taste unpleasant to some people, but its health benefits cannot be denied."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-06-13-bitter-melon-extract-found-to-help-treat-diabetes-with-its-anti-obesity-effects.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5679)


CV Sciences, Inc. to Exhibit at the 25th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine in Las ...
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Date: December 16, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CV Sciences, Inc. to Exhibit at the 25th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine in Las ...





The American academy of Anti-Aging (A4M) is having it's annual world conference in Las Vegas and CV sciences, for the fourth year in a row, will be exhibiting there. CV Sciences specializes in natural treatments, using CBD oil to treat the effects of aging naturally, something researchers around the world have been focusing on lately. The CV Sciences booth will have experts available to answer any questions as well as discounts on products for attendees.

Key Takeaways:

  • CV Sciences will be exhibiting for the fourth time at the A4M conference in Las Vegas
  • One of the most predominant topics at A4M this year will be the use of CBD oil and it's benefits in aging patients
  • Cv Sciences will have professionals available to explain the benefits of their products to anyone who visits their exhibit.

"2017 marks the first year A4M has dedicated a specific education track related to cannabis as a modality."

Read more: http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/CV-Sciences-Inc-to-Exhibit-at-the-25th-Annual-World-Congress-on-Anti-Aging-Medicine-in-Las-Vegas-NV-December-14-16th-2017Company-Continues-to-Expand-Its-Distribution-Network-to-Health-Care-1011085942

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5438)


Consuming nuts strengthens brainwave function
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Date: November 21, 2017 03:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Consuming nuts strengthens brainwave function





A recent study has shown that people who eat nuts on a daily basis have better brain function than those who don't. Different nuts affected different brain frequencies including those involved with memory, learning and cognition. It has been well documented that eating nuts is healthy for you body but this study proves the benefits for brain health as well. Different subjects were given different nuts to eat and brain wave function was measured. This can hopefully lead to further research.

Key Takeaways:

  • Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center's research reveals that nuts can enhance brain function.
  • Adding nuts to your diet can provide a super boost to your brain activity.
  • Nuts strengthen your brain's ability in healing, learning and memory cognition.

"nuts are as good for your brain as they are for the rest of your body"

Read more: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171115091809.htm

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5408)


This Chinese Herb (+ Iron) Kills Cancer Cells in 16 Hours
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Date: March 18, 2017 08:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: This Chinese Herb (+ Iron) Kills Cancer Cells in 16 Hours





150 years ago cancer was almost non-existent, but with the inclusion of processed foods, low-quality meat and dairy, and refined sugars into the standard diet, disease and sickness sprung up in the body, and quickly became a human epidemic. Artemisinin has been used in the past as a powerful anti-malarial herb, but it now has been proven to be a cancer-fighter, too. French drugmaker Sanofi is expected to make 50 to 60 tons of Artemisinin each year, aiming to supply enough for global market demand.

Key Takeaways:

  • 150 years ago cancer was almost non-existent, but with the inclusion of processed foods, low-quality meat and dairy, refined sugars into the standard diet, disease and sickness in the body, and became a human epidemic.
  • To this day, most doctors and pharmaceutical companies dispel the notion that diet and lifestyle choices are related to Cancer, and it is for this reason almost 600,000 still die.
  • In a recent study published by Life Sciences, it was found that artemisinin (the derivative), coupled with Iron, can kill 98% of breast cancer cells in 16 hours.

"In a recent study published by Life Sciences, it was found that artemisinin (the derivative), coupled with Iron, can kill 98% of breast cancer cells in 16 hours."



Reference:

//www.healthnutnews.com/chinese-herb-iron-kills-cancer-cells-16-hours/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4201)


Can an Apple a Day Keep COPD Away?
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Date: February 27, 2017 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can an Apple a Day Keep COPD Away?





Eating lots of fruits and vegetables is good for everyone and may even help current and former smokers avoid chronic lung disease, a new investigation reveals. Apples, pears, green leafy vegetables and peppers appear to offer protection against COPD, said researchers led by Joanna Kaluza, of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences in Poland.

Key Takeaways:

  • Eating lots of fruits and vegetables is good for everyone -- and may even help current and former smokers avoid chronic lung disease
  • regardless of smoking history those who ate five or more servings of certain fruits and vegetables a day were 35 percent less likely to develop COPD
  • not all fruits and veggies were deemed protective

"Smoking is the main risk factor for COPD."



Reference:

//www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=201860

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4036)


National Academy of Sciences: Marijuana can be used as a medicine
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Date: January 29, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: National Academy of Sciences: Marijuana can be used as a medicine





Marijuana advocates all over the world rejoiced at the news, and for good reason, since it is yet another piece of scientific evidence that helps prove to naysayers that cannabis has considerable health benefits. Should cannabis be legalized, Big Pharma will take a drastic hit, which is guaranteed to leave them scrambling. Considering the fact that President Donald Trump has already waged a culture war against the pharmaceutical industry, it should come as no great surprise that they don't want their brand to be damaged any further.

Key Takeaways:

  • Marijuana advocates all over the world rejoiced at the news, and for good reason, since it is yet another piece of scientific evidence that helps prove to naysayers that cannabis has considerable health benefits.
  • Should cannabis be legalized, Big Pharma will take a drastic hit, which is guaranteed to leave them scrambling
  • The bottom line is that cannabis is a natural, healthy and effective alternative to chemical drugs that are created in a lab somewhere

"The bottom line is that cannabis is a natural, healthy and effective alternative to chemical drugs that are created in a lab somewhere"



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/2017-01-23-national-academy-of-Sciences-marijuana-can-be-used-as-a-medicine.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3844)


What is Oligonol Good for and How Does It Boost My Health?
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Date: March 22, 2011 03:42 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is Oligonol Good for and How Does It Boost My Health?

Oligonol is the first ever nutritional supplement to contain low molecule polyphenolic oligomers. These polyphenols are derived from the plant Litchi chinensis, also known as lychee in the vernacular. The name oliginol is a portmanteau for oligomer polyphenol, which is widely touted to display bioavailability far superior to high molecular weight polyphenols present in most antioxidant supplements and the plants that they are extracted from. It boasts the most recent innovation of producing higher biological activity by using the low molecule technology developed by the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Nagasaki University in collaboration with Amino Up Chemical Co. Ltd.

Polyphenols have long been known to create health effects that are antioxidant in nature. These organic compounds have been tied to quenching reactive oxygen species, or ROS, a natural by-product of oxygen metabolism. ROS like free radicals are in fact deployed by cells in response to potential threats such as invasive pathogens. Given the high reactivity of free radicals, each cell releases endogenous antioxidants to scavenge ROS. However, the body’s antioxidant defense becomes compromised with continued exposure to stress.

At the cellular level, an imbalance between ROS and antioxidants creates a chain reaction termed oxidative stress, which damages cellular organelles and even DNA. This is when antioxidant supplements come to the rescue. Plant-based polyphenols such as those found in teas is widely believed to neutralize free radicals. Those found in lychee are of special note in that they are particularly helpful against oxidative stress. The proprietary low molecule technology of Amino Up Chemical Co. Ltd. processes these already potent polyphenols into more effective monomers and short-chain oligomers.

Protects Cardiovascular Health

Since oligonol was made available nearly two years ago, there have been a number of studies looking into its medicinal potential. A few of the earliest researches were double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials that investigated its effects on the cardiovascular system. It has been observed that oligonol appears to lower platelet reactivity, contributing to dilation of peripheral vessels. By so doing, it effectively promotes blood flow, which results in an increase in body temperature.

Counteracts Physical Fatigue

Recovery to fatigue induced by physical exertion is one of the benefits of oligonol that have been well investigated. In one single blind, placebo controlled study involving 47 participants, intake of oligonol lowered post exercise fatigue. The oligonol group of amateur athletes between 18 and 22 of age took two 100-mg oligonol capsules in two 26-day periods with a 9-day wash-out period and saw a noticeable improvement in fatigue recovery in comparison with the control group.

Reduces Visceral Fat

Oligonol continues to excite researchers from around the world with the publication of the study on its effects on visceral fat. There are cell-signaling protein molecules released by adipose tissues that are considered deleterious to human health, and thus called bad factor. Adiposity has been tied to higher mortality, with people having larger waists especially susceptible to many known diseases. Supplementation of oligonol has seen a sharp decrease in abdominal circumference and overall subcutaneous fat.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2255)


Turmeric Extract (Curcumin)
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 10, 2009 01:18 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Turmeric Extract (Curcumin)

Curcumin is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory that has the potential to provide far-reaching health benefits. It has been shown to be helpful in rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer. All of these diseases share underlying inflammation that curcumin may help to diminish.

If you have ever eaten curry or cooked with the spice turmeric, you’ve consumed curcumin. It is obtained from the roots of Curcuma longa and consists of several curcuminoids. Turmeric is biologically related to ginger. Curcumin works as an antioxidant, boosting levels of glutathione S-transferase, which is one of the body’s principal antioxidants. This antioxidant blocks the formation of prostaglandin E2, which is a compound that promotes inflammation within the body. Curcumin also inhibits two inflammation-promoting enzymes: COX-2 and 5-LOX. Additionally, curcumin is able to prevent mutations to DNA, which is an effect that helps to maintain younger, healthier cells.

A study conducted at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson had researchers using a curcumin rich turmeric extract to treat rheumatoid arthritis in laboratory animals. The extract blocked joint inflammation as well as the breakdown of joint cartilage and bone. It did this by inhibiting the genes that are involved in inflammation. Curcumin also holds tremendous promise in preventing cancer, as well as an adjunct treatment. Studies on animals have found that curcumin can protect against colon, intestinal, oral, and skin cancers. Its benefits come from several mechanisms. First of all, it blocks the cell-growth cycle in cancer cells, which eventually leads to destruction. It also reduces free radicals and inflammation, both of which can lead to cancer-causing cell mutations.

Many studies have found that curcumin can protect the liver against a variety of toxic compounds, which is important news for those people who are suffering from liver diseases like hepatitis or cirrhosis. In a recent study, researchers reported that curcumin increased the clearance of creatinine and urea, which are signs of improved kidney function. Additionally, curcumin reduced liver damage from toxic chemicals and excess iron.

Another study found that curcumin has the ability to inhibit the activation and spread of the liver cells that play a role in the development of cirrhosis. Japanese doctors have recently used curcumin, drugs, or placebos to treat 89 patients that have ulcerative colitis. These doctors found that a combination of curcumin and conventional medications resulted in the greatest benefits over six months of treatment. Patients in this study took 1,000 mg of curcumin after breakfast and again after dinner.

Inflammation is the underpinning of all chronic degenerative diseases, making curcumin likely to be beneficial for many different conditions. So far, research has identified curcumin’s benefits for diabetic retinopathy, lung disorders, and skin problems such as psoriasis. A dose of 3.6 g of curcumin reduced PGE2 levels by two-thirds in only one hour. After consuming curcumin daily for one month, PGE2 levels were 57 percent lower than before supplementation began.

Turmeric has been used as a culinary spice for at least 2,000 years. It was listed in an Assyrian herbal in 600 BC, used by ancient Greeks, and widely recommended in Ayurvedic medicine. Native to India and other regions of South Asia, it may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and help maintain mental function. Curcumin is safe in amounts of 500 to 8,000 mg daily, with most supplements providing 500 mg of curcumin.

Turmeric has been proven safe in larger amounts, but is usually limited by taste as a spice. One should look for a standardized supplement that contains at least 90 percent curcumin. Standardized Turmeric can be found at your local or internet health food store.

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Inositol And Choline
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Date: December 11, 2008 12:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Inositol And Choline

Inositol is a member of the vitamin B complex family, being referred to as vitamin B8, but is not strictly a vitamin because it is biosynthesized in your body. Vitamins are essential substances that are not manufactured by your natural biochemistry, and must be taken in your diet. However, to all intents and purposes it works like a member of the vitamin B family.

The main function of myo-inositol (the commonest isomer of inositol) is in the health of cell membranes, particularly those that comprise the marrow, eyes, intestines and the brain. Without proper regulation of the cell membrane, the cell cannot function effectively. Some of its effects include healthy hair and controlling estrogen levels. It is also believed to help to reduce cholesterol levels in the blood.

A deficiency will result in hair loss, eczema, increased blood cholesterol levels and eye abnormalities. You might also suffer constipation, although this is not as serious a condition as those preceding. It is present at highest levels in the heart and brain, which indicates where it is mostly used, although it also helps the liver to break down fats and enables the nerves and muscles to operate as they should.

Those that are depressed are frequently found to have low inositol levels in their spinal fluid, so it is believed to play a part in that condition. It is known that the substance takes part in the function of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which is known to play a part in depression, and initial signs are that its use in the treatment of depression could be effective. Neurotransmitters are responsible for passing messages across the gap (synapses) between nerve cells, their messages being decoded by the neuroreceptors. A healthy nervous system depends on healthy neurotransmitters.

For these reasons, inositol has also been tried on other conditions of the nervous system. These include bipolar disorder, bulimia, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and attention deficit disorder. So far, results have been inconclusive as to its effectiveness, but it is early days yet and field tests are continuing.

A test carried out in Beersheva, Israel, in 1997, found that treatment with inositol produced significant improvement in the depression of 28 patients after four weeks on the Hamilton Depression Scale1, and 21 patients tested with panic disorder (with and without agoraphobia) showed significant improvements in their condition, including agoraphobia. Results on 13 patients with obsessive compulsive disorder also showed significant improvement. These were all double-blind tests.

However, not all tests have been so conclusive, and a study on 42 people with sever depression who did not respond to conventional antidepressant, also failed to respond when inositol was added to their medication.2 Results are therefore not conclusive.

Four hundred people took part in a double-blind test that indicated a possible improvement in the symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome when treated with inositol 3,4 and another that inositol treatment on patients taking lithium could help reduce the symptoms of psoriasis, a skin condition believed to be caused by a reaction of the immune system and nerves.5

The supplement has also been found to be just as effective as Luvox (fluvoxamine – similar to Prozac) after four weeks treatment. Although these results are good, they are inconclusive, and more data is need before any indisputable conclusions can be drawn. However, treatment with inositol might be worth considering if conventional treatment for these conditions has been unsuccessful.

The most common natural form of inositol is myo-inositol, an isomer of cyclohehexanehexol, a carbocyclic polyol that form the structural basis for secondary messengers in the cells of eukaryotes.

A secondary messenger system is one whereby a signaling molecule is released in response to a signal from a primary messenger such as a neuroreceptor, which then activates certain intracellular proteins known as effector proteins that exert a response from the cell. An example is cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) that is a secondary messenger that activates protein kinases and allows them to phosphorylated proteins.

Eukaryotes are organisms that contain cells composed of complex components contained within a cellular membrane, and that also contain a nucleus. Examples are fungi, plants and all animals. Examples of non eukaryotes include the bacteria family.

It is frequently recommended that inositol is most effective when taken with an equal amount of choline, although this might be due to the fact that when inositol deficiency is detected, choline is also frequently deficient. Both are vitamin B family like, and both are lipotropic, in that they aid the breakdown of fats in the body. It is not clear whether this is true or not, but taking both would certainly not harm you, and might be of great benefit.

Inositol is not essential, because it can be obtained from beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains, cantaloupe, brewer’s yeast, liver and vegetables. Bacteria in the gut also act on the phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate) contained in citrus fruits to form inositol.

However, be careful if you drink a lot of coffee. It destroys inositol, and if you are taking the supplement medicinally, steer clear of coffee during your period of treatment because it will lose its effect. Excessive coffee drinking can also result in a general depletion of inositol from your diet, and hence a deficiency. In such a case you are advised to take a supplement, preferably along with choline that might also be deficient.

Although there have been no adverse side effects reported, no specific longer term safety studies have been carried out on inositol. Because of the way it works, inositol should be avoided by people with liver or kidney disease, and also by expectant or nursing women. It should be avoided by young children until safety tests have been carried out, and it is believed that it can cause manic effects in those suffering bipolar disorder.

Other than for these specific cases, trials with many times the average daily intake of the substance, it currently appears safe to take inositol as a long-term supplement. However, as with all such supplements intended for specific disorders, you should seek the advice of your physician.

References: 1. Levine J: Ministry of Health Mental Health Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev,Beersheva, Israel ur Neuropsychopharmacol, 1997 May, 7:2, 147-55

2. Nemets B, Mishory A, Levine J, et al. Inositol addition does not improve depression in SSRI treatment failures. J Neural Transm. 1999;106:795-798.

3. Gerli S, Mignosa M, Di Renzo GC. Effects of inositol on ovarian function and metabolic factors in women with PCOS: a randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2003;7:151-9.

4. Gerli S, Papaleo E, Ferrari A, et al. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial: effects of myo-inositol on ovarian function and metabolic factors in women with PCOS. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2007;11:347-354.

5. Allan SJ, Kavanagh GM, Herd RM, et al. The effect of inositol supplements on the psoriasis of patients taking lithium: arandomized, placebo-controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. 2004;150:966-969.

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Curcumin, Curcuminoids, and Curamin
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Date: April 30, 2008 10:40 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Curcumin, Curcuminoids, and Curamin

Curcumin, a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory, possesses many potentially far-reaching health benefits. After many studies preformed on humans, animals, and in-vitro, it has been found that curcumin may be helpful in rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer. All of these previously listed diseases share an underlying inflammation, which can be diminished by curcumin.

If you have ever eaten curry or cooked with the spice turmeric, you’ve consumed curcumin. Curcumin, which consists of several curcuminoids, is the active constituent of turmeric, which is used in curry. Turmeric is biologically related to ginger. Curcumin works as an antioxidant by boosting levels of glutathione S-transferase, which is one of the body’s main antioxidants. It also blocks the formation of the prostaglandin E2, which is compound that promotes inflammation within the body. Curcumin also inhibits the activity of nuclear factor kappa beta, which is another substance that is involved in inflammation. Additionally, it reduces the activity of COX-2 and 5-LOX, which are two more inflammation-promoting enzymes. Lastly, curcumin prevents mutations that can result in DNA, which helps to maintain healthier, younger cells.

Curcumin taken as a supplement can help with any conditions and diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, liver and kidney protection, ulcerative colitis, and other inflammatory diseases. A study using a curcumin-rich turmeric extract done at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson, treated rheumatoid arthritis in laboratory animals. The results showed that this extract blocked joint inflammation as well as the breakdown of joint cartilage and bone by inhibiting the genes that are involved in inflammation. Curcumin also holds a great amount of promise in preventing cancer and also as an adjunct treatment.

Animal studies have shown that curcumin can protect against colon, intestinal, oral, and skin cancers as its benefits come from several mechanisms. First of all, it blocks the cell-growth cycle in cancer cells, which leads to cell destruction. Additionally, it reduces free radicals by its antioxidant properties, which can lead to cancer-causing cell mutations. Studies have also found that curcumin can protect the liver from a variety of toxic compounds. One recent study left researchers reporting that curcumin increased the clearance of creatinine and urea, which are signs of improved kidney function. It also reduced liver damage from toxic chemicals and excess iron.

Japanese doctors have recently used curcumin to treat patients with ulcerative colitis. A combination of curcumin and conventional medications has led to the best benefits over six months of treatment. Since inflammation is the root of all chronic degenerative diseases, curcumin is likely to be beneficial for many different conditions. So far, research has identified curcumin’s benefits for diabetic retinopathy, lung disorders, and skin problems including psoriasis.

Turmeric, which is the source of curcumin, has been used as a culinary spice for the past 2,000 years, was used by ancient Greeks, and is now a widely recommended Ayurvedic medicine. It is native to India and other regions of South Asia. By eating a lot of curry, which is rich in curcumin, you may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and help to maintain mental function. One study proved that people who often ate curry had half the risk of becoming mentally impaired. By eating curry on occasion, the risk of mental decline can be reduced by a little more than a third. Curcumin can be safely taken in amounts from 500 to 8,000 mg daily. Look for a standardized supplement containing at least 90 percent curcumin.

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Pine Bark Extract Boosts Nitric Oxide Production
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Date: January 17, 2008 03:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pine Bark Extract Boosts Nitric Oxide Production

A recent study has found that Pycnogenol, which is an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, helps individuals by enhancing the production of nitric oxide (NO), which in turn leads to an increase in blood flow and oxygen supply to muscles. Nitric oxide is a key cardiovascular chemical that is produced by the body. It increases blood flow which allows more nutrients and oxygen to be delivered to the muscles. This helps muscles to cope with increased physical activity. The study also suggests that taking Pycnogenol provides more NO in response to neurotransmitters which allows for better expansion of arteries, which can then carry more blood. This process meets the enhanced oxygen demand of muscles and helps to avoid anaerobic metabolism. The results of this study also lead researchers to believe that Pycnogenol can be a natural alternative therapy in diseases involving oxidative stress.

The study was held at the Hiroshima University Graduate School of Bio-medical Sciences in Japan. Each day for two weeks, healthy, young men were given either 180 mg of Pycnogenol or a placebo. In order to identify Pycnogenol's effect on the release of nitric oxide, patients were infused with an inhibitor of L-arginine, which restricts arteries from expanding in response to the neurotransmitter acytelcholine. After two weeks of supplementation, the results revealed that blood flow had increased by forty two percent. Additionally, the group receiving a placebo did not show a significant blood flow increase at all. NO causes the muscle surrounding the arteries to relax, resulting in an increase in the diameter of the blood vessel, while acetylcholine stimulates the cells of arteries to produce NO from L-arginine faster. When the subjects being tested had taken Pycnogenol, the arteries relaxed and blood flow increased by Fourty two percent, as compared to the placebo group.

Although more research is warranted, this breakthrough is especially encouraging to athletes since Pycnogenol seems to allow people to move faster when they are exercising. It does this by satisfying the enhanced muscle oxygen demand and also increases the blood flow to the active muscles. People who are performing heavy physical activity experience the release of acetylcholine by nerves to arteries that are supplying the active muscles. This acetylcholine makes them expand, while the whole process requires that there is an enhanced production of nitric oxide.

A great variety of studies about Pycnogenol and sports nutrition have been conducted over the past years. The most recent one occurred a year ago. In this study, Pycnogenol was found to improve blood circulation even in extended aerobic muscle activity. Pycnogenol also enhanced sports endurance be alleviating the cramping and muscular pain that occurs in the majority of athletes. To sum it up, Pycnogenol is not only effective for enhancing and prolonging the performance of muscles during support, but it also supports muscle adaptation to a higher workload and allows the body to recover from physical faster.

When shopping for a good pycnogenol supplement, look for a standardized extract that guarantees that each capsule or tablet contains a specific amount of active ingredients per serving, otherwise you might be purchasing something that is ineffective.



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Learn about Bone Health!
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Date: April 20, 2007 12:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Learn about Bone Health!

Bone Health

Approximately 44 million American women and men aged 50 and older have osteoporosis (severe bone loss) or osteopenia (mild bone loss), with women being affected about twice as often as men. At least 1.5 million fractures of the hip, vertebra (back or neck), or wrist occur each year in the United States as a result of osteoporosis, and the annual cost of treating this disorder is nearly $14 billion and rising. Unfortunately, the toll in human suffering and loss of independence is even greater.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor, we will discuss the risk factors for osteoporosis and some key nutrients you can add to your diet that can minimize bone loss and reduce your chances of developing this disease.

Q. What are the risk factors for osteoporosis?

A. Small body frame, underweight, Caucasian or Asian race, a sedentary lifestyle, cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol or caffeine intake, high intake of carbonated beverages (especially colas), and having other family members with osteoporosis all increase personal risk of developing the disease. Certain medical conditions, including diabetes, celiac disease, hyperthyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive lung disease, hyperadrenalism, and hyperparathyroidism, are all associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis. Some medications increase the rate at which bone is lost; these include drugs prescribed for the treatment of seizures, drugs used for blood thinning, steroids such as prednisone, aluminum-containing antacids, and loop diuretics (furosemide {Lasix}).

Q. Isn’t bone loss just a normal consequence of aging?

A. Although bone mass normally declines after the age of 35, bone loss severe enough to cause fractures after just minor trauma (such as bump or fall) seems to be a relatively new phenomenon. Osteoporosis was rare in the late 19th century, and it was not until around 1920 that the condition began to attract attention among doctors. Since that time, the percentage of people who develop osteoporosis has continued to increase. For example, the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis in England and Sweden double between 1950 and 1980. In addition, the percentage of elderly people with osteoporosis in some developing countries is lower than that of elderly Americans, despite lower calcium intakes in the developing countries, further suggesting that osteoporosis is a disease of modern civilization.

Q. Can osteoporosis be prevented?

A. Engaging in regular weight bearing exercise, avoiding excessive consumption of alcohol and caffeine, and quitting smoking will slow the rate of bone loss. Eating adequate, but not excessive, amounts of protein also enhances bone health. In addition, a growing body of research has shown that supplementing with various vitamins and minerals may not only help prevent, but in some cases actually reverse, bone loss. At least 15 different nutrients have been found to play a role in bone health.

Q. What type of calcium is best?

A. For most people, calcium salts are absorbed about the same, between 30% and 40% of the administered dose. People who low stomach acid (hypochlorhydria) should not use calcium carbonate, because that form of calcium is absorbed poorly in the absence of stomach acid. Calcium phosphate may be preferable for many older people, because phosphorus is necessary for normal bone formation, the phosphorus intake of older people is often low, and calcium supplements inhibit the absorption of phosphorus.

Also, calcium bound to phosphorus is the form in which calcium in the bone is stored, and it has a much greater bone activity than other forms.

Q. How much vitamin D is needed to promote strong bones?

A. Because vitamin D is produced when the ultraviolet rays from the sun hit skin, people who stay out of the sun, wear sunscreen, or live in a northern latitude (such as Boston or Seattle) where less ultraviolet light reaches the skin, are at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. In addition, aging decreases a person’s ability to synthesize vitamin D in the skin. Results from five research trials on vitamin D found that supplementation with 700-800 IU of vitamin D per day decreased the number of hip fractures by 26%, but 400 IU per day was ineffective. In addition to enhancing bone health, vitamin D improves nerve and muscle function in older people, thereby reducing their chances of falling down. Supplementation of elderly women with 800 IU of vitamin D per day has been shown to decrease the number of falls by about 50%.

Q. Is that much vitamin D safe?

A. The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine established a “safe upper limit” of 2,000 IU per day in 1997. More recent research suggests that up to 4,000 IU of vitamin D per day is safe for the average person. However, you likely don’t need nearly this much to address most bone issues.

Q. Why would nutrients besides calcium and vitamin D is important?

A. Bone is living tissue, constantly remodeling itself and engaging in numerous biological functions. Like other tissues in the body, bone has a wide range of nutritional needs. The typical refined and processed American diet has been depleted of many different vitamins and minerals, some of which play a key role in promoting bone health. Not getting enough of one or more of these micronutrients may be and important contributing factor to the modern epidemic of osteoporosis. In addition, supplementing with calcium may cause a loss of magnesium, zinc, silicon, manganese, and phosphorus, unless these nutrients are also provided.

Q. What nutrients besides calcium and vitamin D promote healthy bones?

A. Magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, vitamin K, boron, strontium, silicon, folic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, phosphorus, and vitamin C have all been shown to play a role in bone health. Following is a brief description of the role that each of these 15 nutrients play in building healthy bones.

Calcium: A component of the mineral crystals that make up bone.

Vitamin D: Enhances calcium absorption, prevents falls by improving nerve and muscle function.

Magnesium: Important for bone mineralization (accumulation of minerals which form bones). Magnesium deficiency is associated with abnormal bone mineral crystals in humans. In an open clinical trial, magnesium supplementation increased bone mineral density by an average 5% after 1-2 years in postmenopausal women.

Copper: Laboratory research has found that copper promotes bone mineralization and decreases bone loss, and that osteoporosis can develop if the diet is deficient in copper. Western diets often contain less copper than the amount recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. In a 2-year double-blind trail, copper supplementation reduced bone loss by 90% in middle-aged women, compared with a placebo.

Zinc: Like magnesium, zinc is important for bone mineralization, and also has been shown to decrease bone loss. Low dietary zinc intake was associated with increased fracture risk in a study of middle-aged and elderly men. The zinc content of the diet is frequently low; a study of elderly low-income people found they were consuming only half the Recommended Dietary Allowance for this mineral.

Manganese: Plays a role in the creation of the connective-tissue components of bone. Manganese deficiency in laboratory tests resulted in low bone mineral density and weak bones. Manganese deficiency may be associated with the development of osteoporosis.

Boron: Supports creation of bone-protecting hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, and DHEA. Boron supplementation prevented bone loss in experimental studies. In human volunteers consuming a low-boron diet, boron supplementation decreased urinary calcium excretion by 25-33%, a change that may indicate reduced bone loss.

Silicon: Plays a role in the synthesis of the connective-tissue components of bone. Silicon deficiency has been associated with bone abnormalities. In an observational study, higher dietary silicon intake correlated with higher bone mineral density. In a clinical trial, administration of an organic silicon compound increased bone mineral density of the femur (or thigh bone) in postmenopausal women.

B vitamins (folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12): These three B vitamins have been shown to lower blood levels of homocysteine, a breakdown product of the amino acid methionine. An elevated homocysteine concentration is a strong and independent risk factor for fractures in older men and women. Homocysteine levels increase around the time of menopause, which may explain in part why bone loss accelerates at that time. In a 2-year double-blind trial, supplementation of elderly stroke patients with folic acid and vitamin B12 reduced the number of hip fractures by 78%, compared with a placebo.

Strontium: This trace mineral is incorporated into bone and appears to increase bone strength. It also stimulates bone formation and inhibits bone breakdown. Controlled trials have demonstrated that strontium supplementation of postmenopausal women increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture risk.

Vitamin K: Best known for its effect on blood clotting, vitamin K is also required for the creation of osteocalcin, a unique protein found in bone that participates in the mineralization process. The amount of vitamin K needed for optimal bone health appears to be greater than the amount needed to prevent bleeding. Vitamin K levels tend to be low in people with osteoporosis. In randomized clinical trials, supplementation of postmenopausal women with vitamin K prevented bone loss and reduced the incidence of fractures.

Q. Which form of vitamin K is best?

A. Two forms of vitamin K compounds are present in food: vitamin K1 and vitamin K2. Vitamin K1 (also called phylloquinone) is present in leafy green vegetables and some vegetable oils, and vitamin K2 is found in much smaller amounts in meat, cheese, eggs, and natto (fermented soybeans).

To make things a little more complicated, Vitamin K2 itself can occur in more than one form. The two most important to this discussion are menaquinine-4 (MK-4, also called menatetrenone), which is licensed as a prescription drug in Japan, and menaquinone-7 (MK-7), which is extracted from natto.

Research suggests that MK-7 from natto may be an ideal form of vitamin K. The biological activity of MK-7 in laboratory studies was 17 times higher than that of vitamin K1 and 130 times higher than that of MK-4. After oral administration, MK-7 was better absorbed and persisted in the body longer, compared with MK-4 and vitamin K1. Although both have shown ability to prevent osteoporosis in laboratory research, a much lower dosage (600 times lower) of MK-7 is required, compared to MK-4, to obtain beneficial effects.

Thus, MK-7 has greater biological activity, greater bioavailability, and possibly more potent effects on bone, compared with other forms of vitamin K. The potential value of MK-7 for bone health is supported by an observational study from Japan, in which increasing natto consumption was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture. While additional research needs to be done, the available evidence suggests that the best forms of vitamin K for long-term use at physiological doses are MK-7 and vitamin K1.

Q. Why is strontium so important in building strong bones?

A. Strontium is of great interest to bone health researchers and has been studied in very high doses. Surprisingly, lower doses are not only safer for long-term supplementation, but may in fact have a greater impact on bone health than very high doses. Too little, and bone density is impaired; too much and health may be impaired. This is a case where dosing needs to be just right for optimal impact. Therefore, until more is known, it is wise to keep supplemental strontium at less than 6 mg per day.

Q. Can people taking osteoporosis medications also take bone-building nutrients?

A. Because nutrients work by a different mechanism than osteoporosis drugs, nutritional supplements are likely to enhance the beneficial effect of these medications. Calcium or other minerals may interfere with the absorption of biphophonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) or etidronate (Didronel). For that reason, calcium and other minerals should be taken at least two hours before or two hours after these medications. Also, it is always best to discuss the supplements you are using with your healthcare practitioner to create an integrated health plan.

Final thoughts…

Bone health ramifications extend beyond osteoporosis and fractures. Bone health is essential for freedom of movement, safety, comfort, independence and longevity. Weak bones do not heal well – sometimes they never heal at all. Osteoporosis-related fractures rob us of our mobility and consign thousands of Americans to walkers and wheelchairs every year. In fact, 40% of people are unable to walk independently after a hip fracture, and 60% still require assistance a year later. The most terrible consequence of fractures related to osteoporosis is mortality. The impairment of the ability to move around freely can cause pneumonia and skin damage leading to serious infections. It is estimated that suffering a hip fracture increases the risk of dying almost 25%. Making bone health a priority now will allow you to reap health dividends for many years to come.



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Complete Liver Cleanse
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Date: April 19, 2007 04:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Complete Liver Cleanse

Complete Liver Cleanse

Technical Data Sheet

 

DESCRIPTION:

The liver performs over 500 functions, including metabolizing carbohydrates and proteins, synthesizing and storing vitamins, and regulating hormones – naming just a few. To do this job, the liver is also required to be exposed to potentially harmful toxins and chemicals, every day.

One way to support the liver is through periodic supplementation with the proper balance of herbal ingredients, phytosterols, and fiber. Complete Liver Cleanse is a convenient, multi-ingredient formula that supports overall liver health and detoxification.

Complete Liver Cleanse:

Includes ingredients for various aspects of liver and gallbladder support:

-Herbal ingredients that support liver and gallbladder health

-Detoxifying ingredients that keep bound toxins from being reabsorbed

-Phytosterols to block cholesterol absorption in the intestines

-Fiber that moves cholesterol and toxins out of the body

-Oat beta-glucan fiber with up to 4 times higher viscosity than other beta-glucan

Fibers

-Simple, two week liver cleanse program

FORMULA:

Each 3 capsules contain:

Calcium (as calcium D-glucarate) 13 mg

Proprietary PuraFiber Blend: 1 mg

Viscofiber Oat B-Gucan Concentrate, phytosterols

(beta sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, brassicasterol,

and other plant sterols), and glucomannan

Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum) Fruit Phytosome 220 mg

One part Milk Thistle Extract, standardized to contain 80%

Silymarin bound to two parts phosphatidylcholine (soy) using

a patented process

Burdock (Arctium lappa) Root Extract 4:1 100 mg

Calcium D-Glucarate 100 mg

Boldo (Peumus boldus) Leaf Extract 2:1 75 mg

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) Rhizome Extract 50 mg

Standardized to contain 90% curcuminoids

Dandelion (Taraxacum offinale) Root Extract 4:1 50 mg

Artichoke (Cynara scolymus) Leaf Extract 30 mg

Standardized to contain 13-18% caffeylquinic

Acids calculated as chlorogenic acid

Contains no: sugar, salt, yeast, wheat, dairy products, artificial coloring, artificial flavoring, ingredients of animal origin, or preservatives. This product contains natural ingredients; color variations are normal.

Other ingredients: See label for most current information

Viscofiber is a registered trademark of Cebena Bioproducts, Inc. The use and composition of the Viscofiber proprietary formula is protected by patients and patent applications filed in the U.S., Canada and internationally.

This product contains calcium D-glucarate, the use of which is licensed from Applied Food Sciences, LLC, and protected by U.S. patent 4,845,123.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

The Liver

Every day, the liver must process an almost unbelievable amount of blood – at a rate of three pints every minute. All the while, the liver performs over 500 physiologic functions, including protein and glucose synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, vitamin and mineral storage, synthesis of clotting factors, urea formation, metabolism of medications, and the production of bile. The liver also assists in hormonal regulation, blood glucose control, and other regulatory functions.

Harmful substances that have been neutralized by the liver are carried to the intestines and kidneys for excretion. They are transported by bile, a greenish, watery solution that is synthesized, and continuously being excreted, by the liver. Stored in the gallbladder, a small sac cupped in the under surface of the liver, bile is also required for the digestion of dietary fats. However, in the case of toxins, bile is primarily an early transporter of the toxic compounds to the intestines, where they can be bound to fiber that helps transport them out of the body. Environmental toxins, including lipid (fat) soluble toxins, are broken into water-soluble components by bile to be excreted through the kidneys or colon.

Liver Detoxification

Detoxification refers to the process of excreting potentially harmful compounds that are both generated by the body and acquired through exposure to the environment. In the body, toxins are generated as by-products of cellular metabolic processes. Examples include dead and digested bacteria, hydrogen peroxide, cellular debris, and carbon dioxide.

The Environmental Protection Agency has determined that the amount of environmental toxins in the air, groundwater, and soil has increased significantly in the last 40 years. In fact, the use of pesticides has doubled every ten years since 1945. Americans are increasingly exposed to heavy metals, pesticides, fossil fuel emissions, sulfur oxides, hydrocarbons, and other harmful chemicals. The Environmental Protection Agency reports that traces of toxic chemicals can now be found in nearly every American.

Herbal Liver Support

One of the major components in Complete Liver Cleanse is its milk thistle extract, standardized to contain 80% silymarin, the plant’s most bioactive compound. Milk Thistle provides support, at a cellular level, for healthy liver function. A patented delivery system, known as the Phytosome process, provides superior absorption of the milk thistle extract.

Silymarin, a key compound found in milk thistle, is a mixture of flavonoids with a long history of liver support. Silymarin supports the health of Kupffer cells, specialized liver cells responsible for removing bacteria, old blood cells, and other foreign matter from the liver’s blood supply. Silymarin scavenges free radicals (superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide) produced by activated Kupffer cells, supports healthy leukotriene levels, and supports glutathione production that is used in detoxification.

Silymarin also supports the health of hepatocytes, highly versatile liver cells with unique physiologic functions. Studies of silymarin have demonstrated that it supports the health of the hepatocyte outer membrane, which is crucial to the liver’s detoxification processes. Silymarin also supports the healthy regenerative ability of the liver through support of protein synthesis in the hepatocytes.

Phytosome Process

A special, patented proves known as Phytosome enhances the absorption of milk thistle in Complete Liver Cleanse. The Phytosome process pairs herbal ingredients with phosphatidylcholine molecules. Phosphatidylcholine is a naturally occurring substance found in soybeans, egg yolks, and some vegetables. In the body, phosphatidylcholine is an important building block of cell membranes.

When milk thistle (or other herbs) are bound with phosphatidylcholine, the phosphatidylcholine molecule facilitates absorption through the intestines into the bloodstream. Research has shown increased blood and serum levels for phytosome herbs in comparison to the individual herb alone.

To test whether binding an herb with phosphatidylcholine increased its bioavailability, researchers gave volunteers identical amounts of either milk thistle alone, or milk thistle phytosome. The researchers then took blood sample from the participants and measured the level of silybin (a key compound in milk thistle). The measurements showed that silybin levels in participants taking the phytosome form of milk thistle were higher, and that silybin was detected for a longer time, than those who took milk thistle without the phytosome delivery system.

Other Herbal Liver Supportive Ingredients

Herbal extracts are often at their best when they are working synergistically – that is, when different constituents of each plant work together and support each other. Complete Liver Cleanse contains a variety of herbal extracts that have noted benefits for supporting the body’s healthy bile flow and free-radical scavenging effects. These ingredients provide a wide spectrum of liver supportive benefits.

For instance, dandelion root extract supports healthy bile flow from the gallbladder.

Burdock Root:

Burdock is originally native to Europe and Asia, but was introduced to North America, probably during colonial times. The plant is commonly found in the northern United States, and is very recognizable, with large, heart-shaped leaves. It has a long history of traditional use for gastrointestinal support.

Burdock root (Arctium lappa) supports the natural physiologic processes of organs involved in detoxification and elimination: notably, the liver, kidneys, and intestines.

Boldo:

Bolodo (pemus boldus) is a small evergreen native to South America, but naturalized to southern Europe. The leaves are considered the health supportive part of the plant. This herb has a long history of use in Chile, and became known in Western countries in the late 19th century.

In scientific studies, boldo appears to have strong free-radical scavenging ability, mostly attributed to the catechin and flavonoids content of its leaves. In a clinical study, boldo also appears to relax smooth muscle and support intestinal transit time.

Artichoke Leaf extract specifically supports healthy bile production in the liver and healthy gastrointestinal function in general. Research into artichoke’s gastrointestinal supportive properties has included at least three clinical trials. Artichoke’s role in supporting healthy cholesterol levels within normal limits has also been investigated.

Turmeric:

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a perennial shrub native to southern Asia with a long history as both a food ingredient and for health support.

More recently, turmeric has been investigated for its support of healthy bile secretion, and pancreatic and gastric function.

In a scientific study, dietary curcuminoids derived from turmeric supported healthy lipid metabolism and cholesterol levels already within normal limits.

Curcumin has also been shown in scientific studies to enhance the activity of glutathione S-transferase - an enzyme responsible for linking glutathione (one of the body’s natural antioxidants) with toxins to help remove them from the body. In this way, it provides additional support for healthy liver function.

Detoxification

Calcium d-glucarate:

The process of detoxification is the breakdown and excretion of substances that are no longer needed or may be harmful to the body. One of the ways in which the body excretes hormones and toxins is by binding them to glucuronic acid in the liver, and then excreting this compound in the bile.

However, this process can be disrupted by B-glucuronidase, an enzyme that is produced by intestinal bacteria. This enzyme has the ability to break (uncouple) the chemical bond established by glucuronic acid. This action releases the bound toxins, which are then reabsorbed into the body instead of being excreted.

Calcium D-Glucarate is the calcium salt of d-glucaric acid. It is found in both the human body, and in some plant sources, including broccoli and oranges.

Calcium d0glucarate enhances the body’s detoxification systems by inhibiting the actions of beta-glucuronidase. This helps decrease the portion of active compounds that could be hazardous to the body.

Phytosterols

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is vital to fat digestion, cell structure, nerve insulation and hormone production. Cholesterol comes from two sources: dietary or “exogenous” cholesterol absorbed in the intestine, and “endogenous” cholesterol formed mostly by the liver and stored in the gallbladder.

Cholesterol occurs in two forms known as lipoproteins. Lipoproteins act as transports that carry fat s to and from the cells.

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) carries low lipid density cholesterol (LDL) away from arterial walls and returns it to the bloodstream. LDL then travels back to the liver, which processes and eliminates it. While high levels of HDL cholesterol is desirable, high amounts of LDL cholesterol is not supportive of optimal health.

LDL-cholesterol is both synthesized in the body, or absorbed into the bloodstream through receptor sites in the intestines. Think of these receptors as “parking spaces” for cholesterol. As it happens, the liver can receive up to 500 mg per day of cholesterol from intestinal absorption. (It can also produce as much as 1000 mg per day).

One way to help reduce the absorption of LDL cholesterol molecules it to occupy their “parking places” in the intestines. Phytosterols in Liver Cleanse are essentially the “fat” of plants. They’re found in nuts, corn and rice and are some of the “good” fats associated with the benefits of olive oil, flaxseed oil and other healthy oils.

The structure of phytosterols is so similar to cholesterol that they fit perfectly in the specially-shaped intestinal parking spaces that LDL-cholesterol would normally occupy.

Taken with, or just before meals, phytosterols block the cholesterol receptor sites so that cholesterol is excreted from the body rather than absorbed. Phytosterols also have the additional role of helping promote healthy bile salt excretion in the intestines.

The phytosterol blend in Complete Liver Cleanse can help minimize the absorption of cholesterol from high-protein food sources, help retain healthy cholesterol levels that are within normal limits, and move bile sat through the digestive system.

Fiber and detoxification

Fiber plays a key role in the removal and excretion of intestinal toxins in detoxification. Only fibers that can effectively bind toxins will be successful in eliminating these harmful substances. Due to the unique benefits of individual fibers, the best binding, removal, and elimination effects are noted when combining different fiber types. Complete Liver Cleanse contains a combination of oat beta-glucan and konjac fiber that has been shown in scientific studies to bind to bile salts.

Dietary fibers are complex mixtures of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, mucilage, and gums, which are resistant to digestive fluids or enzymes – that is, they aren’t absorbed into the bloodstream. So, while fiber itself doesn’t necessarily provide nutrients, it does promote laxation and modulate gastric and intestinal physiology. Intestinal flora that normally reside within the colon utilize fiber as a medium for microbial fermentation, resulting in the synthesis of the vitamins, vitamin K and biotin, and the formation of short chain fatty acids, or SCFA.

SCFA have a simple, but important job: to be absorbed by the colon mucosa, increasing fecal matter bulk and providing energy. Fiber has been demonstrated in numerous clinical studies to provide support of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immune, and endocrine function health.

Complete Liver Cleanse also features two unique fibers to promote detoxification – konjac and oat beta-glucan.

Konjac:

Konjac, (Amorphophallus Konjac) is a tuber native to Asia, rich in glucomannan polysaccharide. This viscous material is made into a jelly, noodles and other foods. It has been used in Japan for at least a thousand years.

As a fiber, konjac has shown positive results maintaining healthy cholesterol levels within normal limits in clinical studies. This beneficial effect is due to konjac’s ability to boost excretion of bile acid.

Oat beta-glucan:

Oat beta-glucan has been a widely studied fiber source for supporting healthy cholesterol levels within normal limits.

In a randomized clinical study, oat beta-glucan showed support of healthy HDL/LDL ratios already within normal limits in individuals over a three week trial.

Closely linked to cholesterol, oat beta-glucan has also been studied for its support of healthy bile excretion.

Fiber has benefits beyond maintaining healthy cholesterol levels already within normal limits. It also contributes to healthy blood sugar levels already within normal limits. In a double-blind, clinical study, the oat beta-glucan fiber used in Liver Cleanse was shown to have 4 times higher viscosity than another high concentrate beta-glucan fiber.

Viscosity – the resistance to flow – is an important factor in beta-glucan, and all fiber. Water, for instance, would have a low viscosity, because it provides very little resistance to movement. Fiber, on the other hand, should have a higher viscosity in order to maximize its transit time through the GI tract, providing a gentle “scrubbing” on the intestinal walls. Therefore, the higher the viscosity, the greater the potential benefit.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

Three capsules in the morning and three capsules at bedtime for 14 days.

LABEL PRECAUTION:

Warnings: Do not use if you know or suspect you have an obstructed bile duct or problematic gallstones. If pregnant, nursing or taking prescription drugs, consult your healthcare practitioner prior to use. Keep out of reach of children.



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EpiCore Benefits
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Date: April 09, 2007 05:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: EpiCore Benefits

Benefits

EpiCor® is a unique and novel dietary supplement used for support of immune health, with a fascinating history of discovery. In 1943, a company in Cedar Rapids, Iowa called Diamond V Mills, Inc. began manufacturing and selling a fermentation product from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same yeast used in bread and beer making. The product was and still is used as an additive for animal feed to help improve digestion as well as overall health in animals. It has been on the market for over 60 years.

Interestingly, when the company became self-insured, they became aware of unusually low rates of illness in employees that worked in the manufacturing plant for this animal product. This led to very low increases in their insurance premiums over the years compared to other companies, saving them quite a lot of money. Hence they began to investigate what might be the cause of the “healthfulness” of the employees at the fermentation plant. This investigation and subsequent research studies led to the formation of a new company called Embria Health Sciences, which now produces EpiCor® as a supplement for humans to support immune system health.1 Doctor’s Best® is proud to now offer the benefits of EpiCor® to its customers.

Beneficial Support of the Immune System and Activation of Natural Killer (NK) Cells in vitro*

A comparison study was performed on blood from 10 fermentation plant workers compared to that from 10 age and gender matched controls. The fermentation plant workers had several immune cell parameters that appeared superior to the control group. These included decreased levels of CD8 cells resulting in significantly increased CD4 to CD8 ratios, significantly improved cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cell activity even though total NK cells were decreased in number, higher killing efficiency of NK cells, significantly increased levels of secretory IgA, increased numbers of EpiCor™ specific antibodies, higher levels of red blood cell intracellular glutathione, and significantly lower levels of immune complexes. These results represent benefits on various cellular players of both the specific and innate parts of the immune system.1,3,4

NK cells are one of the first lines of defense used by the immune system. An in vitro study performed on human cells showed that NK cells were activated after incubation with EpiCor®, as evaluated by expression of the CD69 activation marker. The CD25 marker (IL-2 receptor) was also induced in the NK cells, although to a lesser degree.1,2 B cell activation was also noted through increased expression of CD80 and CD86 markers.2 Immediate increases in calcium levels were evident in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after exposure to EpiCor®, suggesting increased activation through calcium regulation.2

High Metabolite Immunogen*: Nutrient Make-up

Production of EpiCor® utilizes the common and harmless bakers or brewers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a patented process called MetaGen4™, a multi-stage fermentation and drying process. It differs from other yeast products in that it contains both the yeast itself as well as the metabolites or “nutrilites” formed by the fermentation process, which are present in the media.1 Together the media containing the metabolites and the yeast are dried to form EpiCor®. Analysis of EpiCor® reveals that it contains a mixture of natural polyphenols, phytosterols, beta-glucans, mannan oligosaccharides, fiber, trace amounts of B vitamins and minerals, as well as a host of other nutritional compounds.1,2

Beneficial Antioxidant Activity*

EpiCor® was tested for antioxidant activity in an in vitro assay called the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity assay (ORAC). In this assay, EpiCor® was shown to have a total ORAC antioxidant level of 610 micromol TE (tocopherol (vitamin E) equivalents) units (ORAC units) per gram dry weight, which soared above other high antioxidant level foods such as cranberries (93 ORAC units per gram dry weight) and blueberries (62 ORAC units per gram dry weight).1,3,5

In another study, freshly isolated human neutrophils were treated with EpiCor® followed by the free radical generator hydrogen peroxide. Cells were treated with a dye that fluoresces when attacked by free radicals. Those cells treated with EpiCor® showed decreased fluorescence intensity compared to control cells not treated with EpiCor®, verifying antioxidant activity in vitro.2

Safety

Numerous safety tests have been conducted on EpiCor®, revealing an extremely safe profile. Animal studies performed by a leading toxicology laboratory showed no indication of any toxic effects of EpiCor®. An acute oral toxicity study on 20 rats showed that the product was safe when given to rats at a single oral dose of 2000 milligrams per kilogram of body weight (equivalent to a human ingesting 280 capsules at once). After 2 weeks the rats showed no clinical symptoms, no deaths, no abnormalities in body weight, and no gross pathological changes. The same safety results were found in a subchronic toxicity study where rats were given up to 1500 milligrams daily for 90 days (equivalent to a human ingesting up to 210 capsules daily for 1.5 years). Again, absolutely no signs or symptoms of toxicity were noted in these animals.1,3

In addition, a standard bacterial reverse mutagenicity test (AMES test) as well as a mammalian cell mutation assay using mouse lymphoma cells revealed no evidence of any increase in mutation rates after exposure to EpiCor®. EpiCor® also showed no evidence of mitogenicity (inducing increased cell division) in a human lymphocyte proliferation assay. This suggests that EpiCor® does not cause over-reactivity of cells1,3.

The effect of EpiCor® on specific liver enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 (enzymes involved in metabolizing certain drugs and other compounds) was assessed. Immortalized hepatocytes (liver cells) were treated with various concentrations of EpiCor® and compared to both positive and negative controls. EpiCor® did not increase the expression or activity of the liver enzymes, suggesting that it may not affect the metabolism of other substances or medications metabolized by these enzymes if they are taken simultaneously. It also did not appear to be toxic to the cells as measured by lactate dehydrogenase assays and microscopic analysis.1

Lastly, EpiCor® was tested for safety in humans in an open label study on 15 adult men and women given a single 500 milligram dose for 30 days. On various days throughout the study vital signs were monitored, and blood and urine samples were analyzed. No clinically relevant abnormal effects on the participants were found1.

 

EpiCor® also currently has received self-affirmed Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) status by an expert panel that included eminent toxicologists1.

 

EpiCor® is a novel compound with an incredibly unique composition that has been shown to enhance immune system function.*

Suggested Adult Use: Take one capsule daily with or without food.

 

 

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

Scientific References

1. Embria Health Sciences

2. Hart et al. A new Saccharomyces cerevisiae based product has anti-inflammatory effects while specifically activating human NK and B lymphocyte subsets. Unpublished study, personal communication.

3. Schauss AG, Jensen G, Vojdani A, Financsek I. After decades of ingestion by farm animals, the discovery of a yeast fermentate with unexpected significant immune modulatory activity when consumed by humans. [abstract] Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 2006; 25(5): 465.

4. Schauss AG, Vodjani A. Discovery of an edible fermentation product with unusual immune enhancing properties in humans. [abstract] FASEB J, 2006; 20(4):A143.

5. Wu X, Beecher GR, Holden JM, Haytowitz DB, Gebhardt SE, Prior RL. Lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidant capacities of common foods in the United States. J Agric Food Chem 2004 Jun 16;52(12):4026-3



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Revita
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Date: March 08, 2007 12:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Revita

Revita, the most efficient hair growth stimulating shampoo available in the market is the final result of DS Laboratories efforts on cutting edge research. Revita is a powerful and unique SLS/SLES free combination of active ingredients specially designed to maintain scalp vitality and act on folicle dysfunctions in order to achieve best results in short periods of time. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate, commonly used low cost detergents in shampoos and cleansers, are linked to skin irritation, skin drying and hair loss due to follicle attack. Revita is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate free, providing a high quality scalp skin safe shampoo product.

Revita was developed with a cost-no-object approach. Revita’s compounds have been chosen based exclusively on their properties, quality and efficacy (in the opposite of the majority of available products, which are usually developed with production costs in mind). The final result is a very high quality shampoo product with absolutely no equivalent competitor in the market. Revita combines costly first line compounds at high concentrations like Caffeine at 4.0%, Pyrus Malus (Apple) Seed Extract at 1.0% and Spin Traps (SOD Mimic) at 0.1% with other top level ingredients which make Revita a unique product in its class.

To improve the efficacy of this synergic combination, DS Laboratories developed a unique “chemical free” extraction process that keeps original properties and clinical efficacy of final components. Through gentle mechanical compression, Revita’s compounds are obtained as pure and chemically preserved active molecules.

Revita starts acting on your scalp and hair follicle since the first day of use. The time you will need to note the first results will depend of the severity and duration of your hair loss. No matter how long or how intense your hair loss is, using Revita on daily basis will improve the vitality of your scalp, maintaining the quality of your hair and stimulating new hair growth.

Through the synergic interaction of very effective compounds, Revita brings you a highly effective product designed to maintain scalp vitality and act on hair loss. By combining an antioxidant effect, anti-DHT properties, powerful hydrating molecules, hair growth stimulants and structural amino acids, Revita brings you the most effective hair growth stimulating shampoo available.

Apple Polyphenol (procyanidin B2 and C1) - phytochemical concentrate found in the skin of unripe apples that acts as potent antioxidant. It protects cells against free radicals, reactive atoms that contribute to tissue damage in the body. These chemical compounds are being studied extensively in labs around the world for their health effects in major diseases including treatment of hair growth. Studies showed that after sequential use, an increase of almost 80% of hair diameter and an increase in number of total hairs was shown, with no side effects.

In 2000, Japanese researchers presented their findings to the international community on the hair growth effects of apple polyphenols - specifically one known as procyanidin B-2. They identified two successful compounds- one from chardonnay grapes, and one extracted from unripe apples. The procyanidin B-2 fraction clearly outperformed the grape extract. "Procyanidin B-2 purified from apples," stated the research team, "shows the highest activity of more than 300% relative to controls."

In the same year, in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial, nineteen men with male pattern baldness were studied with a daily topical application of a 1% procyanidin B-2 solution, extracted from apples. Ten other balding men served as controls, receiving a placebo solution. After 6 months, the study concluded:

• The increase in number of total hairs and terminal hairs in the procyanidin B-2 group subjects was significantly greater than controls.

• 78.9% of subjects showed an increased mean value of hair diameter.

• "Procyanidin B-2 therapy shows promise as a cure for male pattern baldness."

Following the revelations, an attempt was made to further understand the mechanism by which the remarkable hair growth effects occurred. The results were published in the prestigious British Journal of Dermatology: Procyanidin B-2, extracted from apples, promotes hair growth: a laboratory study, Br J Dermatol. 2002 Jan;146(1):41-51. In this study, the researchers concluded that procyanidin B-2 acts to diminish protein kinase C isozymes, which play an important role in the hair growth cycle. Procyanidin B-2 seems to promote hair growth by down regulating PKC in both the anagen (active growth phase) and telogen (resting phase) of the hair follicle. When the anagen phase is prolonged, and the telogen phase is shortened, increased hair growth results.

Two more clinical trials and a total of seven published studies have now confirmed the surprising hair growth-promoting effects of apple procyanidins. Here is a summary of those findings:

• Total Number of Hairs: Significantly Increased

• Total Number of Terminal Hairs: Significantly Greater

• Increase in Hair Diameter: 78.9% Positive • Ratio of Thicker (terminal) Hairs: Significantly Higher

• Hair Follicle Activation: Intensive

In the most exciting development yet, Japanese researchers released a new study late in 2005. Once again, procyanidin therapy was proven successful in regrowing hair in subjects with male pattern baldness. The new study, published in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, confirmed the findings of earlier studies, showing clear improvement in the number of hairs and the density of hairs in the treated area. Building on the success of earlier trials, the study was extended to 12 months in the procyanidin group, and proved that longer term procyanidin therapy was even more successful than prior 4 and 6 month trials.

Cooper Peptides - Cooper Peptides have two main properties: (1) potent tissue protective anti-inflammatory agents that limit oxidative damage after tissue injury, and (2) tissue remodeling activation agents, that is, the processes for removal of damaged protein and scar tissue and their replacement by normal tissue. Studies at numerous universities and research institutes have found copper-peptides to improve hair transplant success, increase hair follicle size, stimulate hair growth and reduce hair loss.

Research scientists at the University of San Francisco Wound Center stumbled upon very interesting results. Their discovery was made while applying a synthetically formulated compound, Copper Peptide, to severe wound areas on several patients. During this process something unusual happened. Not only did the wounds heal about 30 percent faster, but a significant stimulation of the follicular cells occurred. As a side effect, these tripeptide complexes actually grew hair around the wound area.

The discovery was so startling that they then applied the same Copper Peptide complex to a female patient who had suffered roughly 90 percent alopecia (hair loss) for years. After about six months of use, she had recovered almost 100 percent of her hair. Dr. Loren Pickart, the leading authority in Copper Peptide technology, describes it as being like a protein injection to the scalp.

Tests were then conducted with chemotherapy patients and recent hair transplant recipients, all with great success in stimulating newer and stronger hair follicles.

Spin traps – are very special compounds that were originally utilized in measuring free radical activity because they react with free radicals both in vitro and in vivo, producing stable complexes. The most commonly used spin trap and the standard which measures new ones is PBN - alpha-phenyl- N-tert butyl nitrone. Hundreds of studies have been conducted over the last ten years that have tested PBN and other “spin traps” in numerous conditions. Later it was discovered that these spin traps had powerful free radical quenching abilities in living systems and could treat a variety of conditions. Spin traps could provide unique protection against free radical damage that complements and enhances the activities of the classical antioxidants such as vitamin C and vitamin E.

Spin traps modulate NF kappa-B regulated cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthases that are implicated in pro-inflammatory disease conditions. A method for ameliorating a cellular dysfunction of a tissue such as the treatment of hair loss and stimulation of hair growth comprises administering a nitroso or nitrone spin trap to the affected tissue. These agents inhibit the reaction of superoxide and nitric oxide to produce peroxinitrite. Scientists discovered that nitrone and nitroso spin traps have properties in the body for ameliorating cellular dysfunction in tissue attributed, in part, to high energy oxygen and hydroxyl free radicals, and enhancing recuperation of the tissue. Alpha-phenyl-N-tert butyl nitrone (PBN) can be administered, for example, as an anti-alopecia agent to stimulate hair growth.

Spin traps can be administered to the skin to be treated, such as the scalp. Depending on the type of hair loss or alopecia being treated and the conditions thereof, the stimulation of hair growth can usually be obtained by topical application, preferably repeated daily application. The utility of topically applied spin traps is not limited thereto, however, and the stimulation of hair growth can include an increased rate of growth, increased hair diameter, follicular neogenesis, and the like; inhibiting hair loss or alopecia from progressing.

Ketoconazole - Topical ketoconazole shows itself to have an anti-DHT binding effect in the scalp. Nevertheless, it is likely that ketoconazole exhibits other methods to its anti-hair-loss effect. One such theory of ketoconazole anti-alopecia effects may be on its activity upon the removal of sebum, a fatty substance that accumulates in the scalp around the hair follicles. In addition, ketoconazole is an antifungal medication and is significant for people combating hair loss since acting as an antifungal agent it reduces scalp irritation caused by fungal colonization or infection. Reduction of the inflammatory process that occurs in male pattern alopecia is crucial.

If we first examine the role of androgens, specifically dihydrotestosterone (DHT), we find that this hormone has been thought to slowly "choke" the growth of the hair follicle by inhibiting the function of an enzyme in the hair follicle called adenylate cyclase. Suffice it to say that when DHT concentrations remain high in the scalp, we see terminal (thick, coarse) scalp hair become reduced to vellus hair (fine, thin peach fuzz). On March 04, 2001, at the American Academy of Dermatology Meeting in Washington DC, scientists presented the findings of a study done on 1% ketoconazole shampoo which had good news for hair loss sufferers. In the study presented, one hundred male volunteers with mild to moderate dandruff and somewhat oily scalp, were using in a double-blind fashion either a 1% ketoconazole shampoo or a 1% zinc pyrithione shampoo, 2-3 times a week for 6 months.

Analysis of the different parameters set up in the study shows that the hair diameter gradually increased with ketoconazole use (+8.46%) over a 6 month period, whereas the diameter showed a trend to decrease with zinc pyrithione use over the same period (-2.28%). The sebum excretion rate was reduced with ketoconazole (-6.54%) while it increased with zinc pyrithione (+8.2%) over the same period of time. The number of hairs shed over a 24-hour period was reduced by 16.46% with ketoconazole and 6.02% with zinc pyrithione after 6 months. Finally, the percentage of hairs in the anagen phase increased by 6.4% and 8.4% respectively during the study.

The results are similar to a previous study done on 2% prescription strength Ketokonazole where it was shown that use of 2% ketoconazol yielded an increase in hair shaft diameter similar to what was achieved by the control group using 2% Minoxidil and a non-medicated shampoo.

Rooibos - Rooibos or Red Bush Tea - a hardy shrub indigenous to the North Western Cape of South Africa – is an exciting new botanical ingredient with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties well documented in medical literature. In alternative medicine Rooibos is often prescribed for nervous tension, allergies, stomach and digestive problems. Results from an independent study also showed a significant improvement in hair loss. Studies were initiated at an independent laboratory (Dermascan, France) to study the effect of the use of Rooibos in a hair lotion on a group of healthy persons who were suffering from the problem of hair loss. A 90 day trial was conducted comparing a hair lotion containing Rooibos with a placebo lotion.

After 90 days results showed a significant increase of the hair growth in the lotion containing Rooibos compared with the placebo. An increase in the hair growth was observed with 89% of the volunteers with no undesirable reactions (irritation or allergy). The participants were next asked to fill in a questionnaire. When the results were tallied, 67 percent rated their hair loss as zero or low, 78 percent saw a low to medium improvement, 45 percent saw a low to medium regrowth of hair, and 63 percent considered their hair had become smoother and shinier.

Conclusion: results show that most of the volunteers had a remarkable improvement in both the increase of hair growth and the decrease in hair loss.

MSM - Sulphur is present in protein-rich foods containing high levels of the amino acids methionine and cysteine. These foods include meat, fish, legumes, nuts, eggs, and vegetables, especially onions. However, sulphur has recently become a popular nutritional supplement and topical treatment thanks to the discovery of methylsulfonylmethane, or MSM.

The use of MSM as a nutritional supplement and topical application is relatively recent. An American chemist named Robert Herschler, began studying MSM in 1955. However, another man, Dr. Stanley Jacob with Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, is considered by many to be the father of MSM. Dr. Jacob found that simple marine life like algae and plankton convert inorganic sulphur to organic sulphur compounds. These compounds are known as dimethylsulfonium salts. These salts are transformed into dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is released into the atmosphere and is converted by ultraviolet light into dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). When DMSO oxidizes, it turns into MSM and is absorbed by plants that become food for animals and humans. MSM is a white, crystalline powder that is odorless and nearly tasteless. When taken as a dietary supplement, MSM proved to have the same health benefits as DMSO without side-effects such as bad breath, itchy skin, nasal congestion, and shortness of breath. Why does MSM help with the development of stronger hair? Various scientific studies have proven that MSM contributes a definite normalizing effect on body functions. The sulfur normally provided to the body by MSM is required for healthy collagen and keratin which are essential for healthy hair, skin and nails. MSM also has proven antioxidant benefits which can disrupt or alter damaging chain reactions of lipid peroxidation in the cell membranes.

MSM has been widely used as a dietary supplement without any reports of allergy or intolerance related to its use. Supplements of MSM are comfortably assimilated without side effects. There are no known contraindications.

Caffeine 4% - Active caffeine ingredient helps to regulate the effects of testosterone levels. Male pattern baldness is known to occur in individuals with sensitivity to testosterone, causing damage to hair follicles that eventually leads to baldness. Caffeine is a xanthine alkaloid compound that acts as a stimulant in humans. Caffeine is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant, having the effect of warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness.

The independent study at the University of Jena used hair samples from the scalps of young men entering into the first stages of hormone-related hair loss. The study relied on a hair organ culture that used four different types of testing samples. The first was a nutrient-based sample, the second a testosterone only sample, the third was a caffeine only sample and the fourth a mixture of caffeine and testosterone.

According to the research, the results showed that the samples containing the caffeine nutrient helped to stave off hair loss and encouraged new hair growth, while the sample that relied on testosterone only led to increased hair loss. But perhaps the most impressive was the testosterone and caffeine sample, which helped to prevent further hair loss.

The results showed that using the caffeine treatment average growth was increased by around 46 per cent and the life cycle of the hair was extended by 37 per cent, when compared to the control study.

Carnitine Tartrate - L-Carnitine, a vitamin-like nutrient, occurs naturally in the human body and is essential for turning fat into energy. Active energy metabolism is an essential prerequisite for the growth of strong and healthy hair. In biological systems ATP acts as the universal energy currency. One of the most potent bio-actives that significantly increases cellular ATP content is carnitine tartrate.

Statistical evaluation demonstrated a significant increase in ATP equivalents in human hair roots treated with carnitine tartrate, showing that carnitine tartrate is an ideal ingredient for hair care formulations, providing energy for the optimal environment to produce strong and healthy hair. Throughout the test period ATP content within plucked hair follicles was determined twice daily using a commercially available test kit. Statistical evaluation of baseline adjusted values demonstrated a significant increase in ATP equivalents in human hair roots treated with carnitine tartrate. These effects were absent in the placebo group, thus underlining the stimulating activity of carnitine tartrate.

The outstanding bio-activity of carnitine tartrate was furthermore demonstrated in a second study, assessing the effects after a single application of a shampoo formulation supplemented with carnitine tartrate. Again, ATP levels in plucked human hair follicles were significantly increased.

Amino Acids: Ornitine, Taurine, Cysteine - Amino acids are the building blocks of protein, from which hair is created. They are assembled in the correct sequence by stem cells to form keratin, a complex and immensely strong hair protein. Vital amino acids have to be replaced consistently, as damage is accumulated over time. We can replace a combination of these lost amino acids directly into the hair, where they are shown to provide significant tensile benefits to the hair shaft.

Hair is composed primarily of proteins (88%). These proteins are of a hard fibrous type known as keratin. Keratin protein is comprised of what we call "polypeptide chains.” The word, polypeptide, comes from the Greek word "poly" meaning many and "peptos" meaning digested or broken down. In essence, if we break down protein, we have individual amino acids.

Many (poly) amino acids joined together form a "polypeptide chain". Two amino acids are joined together by a "peptide bond", and the correct number of amino acids placed in their correct order will form a specific protein; i.e. keratin, insulin, collagen and so on. The "alpha helix" is the descriptive term given to the polypeptide chain that forms the keratin protein found in human hair. Its structure is a coiled coil. The amino acids link together to form the coil and there are approximately 3.6 amino acids per turn of the helix (coil). Each amino acid is connected together by a "peptide bond". The peptide bond is located between the carbon atom of one amino acid extending to bond with the nitrogen atom of the next amino acid. In many individuals the extremities, including the top of the head, are the most difficult places to maintain blood flow. Follicles which are constantly deprived of blood, and therefore nutrients, cannot produce hair properly. Lack of proper nutrients, amino acids, minerals and vitamins can certainly hamper hair growth.

L-Arginine is a semi-essential amino acid synthesized by the body from L-Ornithine. Arginine + Ornithine support protein synthesis because they are involved in the transport and storage of nitrogen. The usage of taurine corrects the "rigidification" of the connective sheath that surrounds the Pilosebaceous unit and hair follicles, specifically those affected by pattern hair loss. This is a novel and previously undisclosed angle on hair loss treatment that has yet to be touched upon in any of the medical literature or prior publications.

The amino acid, l-cysteine speeds up hair growth and increases hair shaft diameter resulting in fuller hair. L-cysteine has been reported to facilitate longer hair growth, beyond what is genetically programmed. L-cysteine also provides potent antioxidant protection to the hair follicle. Users of topical n-acetyl-cysteine have reported hair regrowth.

Emu Oil - The emu, dromaius nova hollandiae, is a flightless bird part of a group called ratites which also includes the ostrich and the kiwi. Modern Australians learned early on from the Aborigines the many valuable qualities in the emu and its oil. The earliest research studies in emu oil come from Australia, and Australia continues to export emu oil to this day.

In the United States today there is a growing network of research labs interested in emus and their incredible oil. Emu oil is rendered from a thick pad of fat on the back of the bird that was apparently provided by nature to protect the animal from the extreme temperatures in its Australian homeland. Emu oil is deep penetrating and super hydrating to the skin - an all-natural tissue nutrient. Michael Hollick, MD, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine, Physiology, and Dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine conducted a study involving emu oil and hair growth. His study found that there was a 20% increase in growth activity of skin that received emu oil compared to skin that received corn oil. Looking at the hair follicles Dr. Hollick realized they were much more robust, the skin thickness was remarkably increased suggesting that emu oil stimulated skin growth and hair growth. Additionally, the study showed that over 80% of hair follicles that had been "asleep" were woken up, and began growing.

Emu oil is anti-inflammatory, which may be in part why it stimulates hair growth. Emu Oil has also been shown to be a 5 alpha reductase inhibitor in target tissues when topically applied, which likely contributes significantly to its hair growth properties. A third important property of emu oil is that it is bacteriostatic.

Emu Oil contains a multitude of Essential Fatty Acids (EFA) which helps to "feed" the skin. Consumers who suffer from natural forms of baldness have reported hair re-growth. Since Alopecia Areata only suppresses the hair follicle (vs. killing the hair follicle), emu oil may have an effect to assist with hair regrowth.

Biotin – Biotin is a member of the B-vitamin family and a major component in the natural hair manufacturing process -- it is essential to not only grow new hair, but it also plays a major role in the overall health of skin and nails. The beneficial effects of biotin on hair may be linked to its ability to improve the metabolism of scalp oils. Biotin when absorbed by the scalp may promote hair growth and it is able to penetrate the hair shaft making it expand which actually thickens the hair cuticle.

Biotin is used in cell growth, the production of fatty acids, metabolism of fats and amino acids. It plays a role in the Krebs Cycle, which is the process in which energy is released from food. Biotin is so important to hair health, that many dermatologists prescribe biotin supplements to their patients as part of their medical treatment for hair loss.

After applying Revita with a gentle massage, you should leave it on the scalp from 1 – 2 minutes before rinsing. Then repeat and leave on the scalp for 3 – 5 minutes. If desired, follow with a high quality conditioner. For optimal results, Revita should be used at least 5 times per week.

This formulation is contraindicated in individuals with a history of sensitivity reactions to any of its components. It should be discontinued if hypersensitivity to any of its ingredients is noted.

Q. Is Revita safe ?

A. Revita primarily contains compounds that are not only safe in topical use, but actually dramatically enhance overall skin health. The other active ingredients such as Ketoconazole have been tested in clinical studies and have been shown safe.

Q: Can I use hair sprays, mousses, gels, etc.?

A: Hair spray, gel, and other styling aids are not recommended since they tend to clog the hair shaft. However, you can use them while using Revita.

Q: Can I have my hair colored or permed while using Revita ?

A: While there is no evidence that coloring or perming hair can lead to or even worsen hair loss, it is generally not recommended for people with hair loss. If you are experiencing hair loss then perming and coloring hair is not recommended. However, this will not interfere with Revita.

Q: What is SLS/SLES free ?

A: SLS means Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and SLES means Sodium Laureth Sulfate, commonly used low cost detergents in shampoos and cleansers. They are linked to skin irritation, skin drying and hair loss due to follicle attack. Revita is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate free, and that means that Revita does not irritate you scalp and preserves your hair follicale health.

Q: Can I blow dry my hair after using Revita ?

A: Extreme heat damages the proteins in the hairs making them fragile. Nevertheless, if you need or want to blow dry your hair, you can do it after using Revita.

Q: Who is a candidate for Revita ?

A: Ideal candidate is someone with little hair loss or at the beginning stages of hair loss, since it is much easier to prevent hair loss then to grow new hair. Someone who is concerned with hair loss prevention should start using Revita immediately.

Q: What type of results should I expect with Revita ?

A: When deciding to use Revita, it is important to have realistic expectations. Depending of severity and duration of your hair loss, it could take some time to see hair growth. In fact, during the first 2 weeks of treatment you may actually notice increased hair loss as old hairs are being pushed out and the hair follicles start growing new hair. Do not become alarmed with this and just stick to the treatment.

Q. Does Revita have any systemic side effects ?

A. No, when used as directed, Revita active ingredients have a long history of use both orally and topically.

Q. Does Revita work for women?

A. Yes. In most cases, the cause of hair loss in women is surprisingly similar to men. Fortunately for women, estrogen helps to protect the hair follicle from the destructive effects of DHT. However, many women develop thinning hair and loss due to fluctuation of estrogen levels and/or over production of DHT. Revita can help protect the hair follicle from DHT resulting in a thicker, fuller and healthier hair.

Q. I am using other topical treatments. Can I use Revita at the same time ?

A. Yes. Revita has no side effects and does not cross react with other topical treatments. You can safely opt to use Revita with other products, and we strongly recommend the association with Spectral.DNC for more severe hair loss or Spectral.RS for thinning hair.

Q. Do I need to use Revita for a long time ?

A. Once you have reached the desired results, you should continue to use Revita as your regular shampoo to maintain the revitalized hairs and a healthy scalp.

Q: Is stress a factor in hair loss?

A: When the body is under significant physical and emotional stress it is possible that the immune system will produce anti-bodies that attack hair follicles, and this results in bald patches or diffuse loss. Stress-induced loss will respond very well to Revita and you should keep using Revita as your regular daily shampoo to keep your scalp healthy.

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Med schools failing on nutrition teaching
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Date: September 19, 2006 05:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Med schools failing on nutrition teaching

Almost 60 percent of US medical schools do not meat recommendations for nutrition education for med students, producing physicians – the first port of call for nutrition advice for many consumers – who may have inadequate nutrition knowledge.

Twenty years ago the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) reported that 21 hours of education in nutrition was required but found that many medical schools did not offer nutrition courses.

Surveys show that hasn’t changed much, so it appears we are producing a pool of physicians who feel largely unprepared to counsel their patients about nutrition.

“Sooner or later, everyone sits down to the banquet of consequences.” Robert Louis Stevenson.

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All Natural Hair Care Products - Salon Quality!
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Date: September 01, 2006 01:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: All Natural Hair Care Products - Salon Quality!

New from Jason Natural Salon and Fragrance Free Hair Care

Jason Natural Salon Hair Care: Perfectly Styles, Perfectly Beautiful, All Natural.

This new line features a full range of functional products for healthy, style-conscious women.  Jason has combined its expertise in developing natural and effective formulations with contemporary fashion to create luxurious styling and treatment specific products. Four specialized hair care systems offer a line of shampoos, conditioners, styling and finishing products to volumize, moisturize, naturalize, and style—for bold, sexy chic to soft, silky bounce.  All the products are enriched with conditioning essential oils and botanical extracts to nourish and revitalize radiantly beautiful, stylish hair.

  • Paraben-Free
  • No sodium lauryl/laureth sulfates
  • No animal by-products or testing
  • No harsh chemicals to strip hair, damage or irritate the scalp & harm the environment

Jason Fragrance Free: Pure and Natural

Studies indicate that 15-30% of the population reports some sensitivity to fragrance.  More than 80% report that exposure to fragrances is bothersome*.  Fragrance chemicals can cause health effects, primarily in the skin, lungs and brain.

Jason Fragrance Free is a line of hair and body care products formulated for individuals with fragrance or skin sensitivities and those who just want to steer clear of fragrance, dyes and synthetics.  Many “unscented” products mask the odor of the formula with fragrance so they remain a potential source of skin irritation.  Synthetic fragrances often contain phthalates which have been linked to birth defects and health related issues.

Unlike “unscented” products-which often contain fragrance to mask the scent of the formula—Jason Fragrance Free is truly sans fragrance. Stock up on Jason Naturals complete product line.

  • Great for use on sensitive skin
  • No sodium lauryl/laureth sulfates
  • Fragrance, phthalate and paraben free
  • No animal by-products or testing

*”scents and Sensitivity,” Environmental Health Perspectives, the research journal of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, www.herc.org, Nov. 1998

 



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Doctor’s Corner - Relora: Minimizes Stress-Induced Eating
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Date: August 09, 2006 01:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Doctor’s Corner - Relora: Minimizes Stress-Induced Eating

Relora is a proprietary all-natural botanical product developed by Next Pharmaceuticals, Inc. it contains ingredients extracted from two plant species that have been used in traditional Chinese herbalism for over 1500 years. These are patented extract from Magnolia officinalis (US Patent No: US 6,582,735) and a patent-pending extract from Phellodendron amurense.

Relora helps relieve stress, anxiety and minimize stress-induced eating, which in turn may help to produce weight loss when used as part of a healthy diet and exercise plan. The research and development of Relora involved sophisticated testing and screening for ingredients that have anti-anxiety properties, but no daytime sedative effects. Initially, investigators tested the Magnoliaceae plant family as a lead source of new anti-anxiety products. Scientists first focused on two phytochemicals on constituents in the plant that have “bio-activity” (work positively on the body)—magnolol and honokiol. Through a series of studies, it became clear that Relora was a safe and effective formulation.

Relora works with the body’s natural chemistry to maintain normal levels of stress hormones. These hormones not only affect emotional well-being, but can also have a major impact on appetite and how the body stores and metabolizes fat. By working to re-establish a stable balance of these hormones, relora can help break the stress/weight cycle and restore optimum health to the mind and body.

In addition to normalizing stress hormones, Relora has been shown to control anxiety and the symptoms associated with it: irritability, emotional ups and downs, restlessness, tense muscles, poor sleep, fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Daytime sedation often occurs with products that induce relaxation. Not with Relora! This breakthrough botanical provides all the anti-anxiety benefits without inducing daytime sedation. In central nervous system receptor binding assays, the plant extracts in Relora bind to several important targets associated with anxiety. Also if interested, the bark of magnolia officinalis has been used in traditional Chinese herbalism for centuries for stress induced muscular tension.

Relora, Stress and Weight Loss

Stress is reported to play a significant role in a wide variety of health conditions. Recent work with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other major research centers has demonstrated that stress is a significant contributor to immune dysfunction, cardiovascular challenges, other age-related imbalances, and excess body fat. This type of fat is related to stress-induced hormone imbalances, especially imbalances of the hormones cortisol and DHEA. Until now, the only course of action for losing this fat has been stress reduction with exercise and diet, and anyone who has attempted diet and exercise alone often encounters a long, troublesome road. Relora may help the body normalize cortisol and DHEA levels in stressed individuals while inducing relaxation, and act as an aid in controlling weight and stress-related eating.

The increase in cortisol levels signals the brain that the body is in stress, causing food cravings, especially for high-fat, high-sugar foods. These foods, in turn, cause additional stress, thereby fueling the stress-cortisol cycle. Eventually, more fat is stored than the body needs unless sufficient exercise is in place to compensate, or the stress is reduced.

The ingredients in Relora are key supplements that help the adrenal glands to “come back to life” by reducing the excessive stress hormone response in the body and reducing carbohydrate craving behavior.

Results from Human Trials with Relora

Relora was tested at the Living Longer Institute in Cincinnati, OH and found to be safe, effective, rapid acting, non-sedating dietary supplement that helps control occasional mild anxiety. Three hundred forty five female subjects were administered Relora for 2 weeks. The dosage was 200mg of Relora three times daily. Eighty nine percent of the subjects reported that Relora helped them relax, while 78% found Relora to help prevent stress-related eating.

A second trial was undertaken at the Living Longer Institute to measure cortisol and DHEA levels in patients with mild to moderate stress. Elevated cortisol levels and depressed DHEA levels are associated with chronic stress. A two week regimen of Relora produced a significant increase in salivary DHEA (227%) and a significant decrease in morning salivary cortisol levels (37%). These findings support Relora’s ability to relieve stress and its potential role in weight control and stress-related eating behavior.

A third study was completed in late 2002 that evaluated Relora on its ability to improve snacking habits in people who snack on sweets or eat salty snacks when they are under excessive stress. Forty nine subjects were evaluated and it was found that Relora cur sweet snacking in the sweet cravers by 75%! It cut snacking on salty snacks by 50%. Seventy three percent of all individuals in the study reported feeling less stressed while taking Relora.

A double-blind placebo-controlled study was completed in January, 2004. forty premenopausal women were evaluated for stress, anxiety, food intake and weight management. Relora significantly reduced anxiety and prevented weight gain. A significant weight gain occurred in the placebo group while either now weight gain or weight loss occurred in the Relora group.

Suggested Use and Safety

Relora is designed for adults. The suggested daily dose is 1 capsule (250mg) 2 – 3 times per day. Relora is not recommended for persons under the age of 18. if you are pregnant, nursing or taking a prescription drug, consult a health practitioner prior to use.

Dr. James B. LaValle, R.Ph., N.M.D., C.C.N. is a licensed pharmacist (University of Cincinnati College of Pharmacy), certified clinical nutritionist (International & American Associations of Clinical Nutritionists), and doctor of naturopathic medicine (Central States College of Health Sciences, IAACN), with more than 18 years clinical practice experience in the field of natural therapeutics and functional medicine. Dr. LaValle is in clinical practice at the Living Longer Institute, a comprehensive wellness, prevention, and early detection program he co-founded. He sits on various scientific advisory boards within the dietary supplement industry. LaValle is also an adjunct professor in the college of pharmacy at The University of Cincinnati and serves as a preceptor in the Department of family Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

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Night Health: A new approach to improving sleep.
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Date: May 12, 2006 05:41 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Night Health: A new approach to improving sleep.

Our night health, including the quality of our sleep and dreams, may be the most critical overlooked factor contributing to both emotional and physical illness in modern times. For millions, night is a time of growing frustration and deepening struggle with insomnia as well as compromised and insufficient sleep. Mounting data has confirmed that sleep problems are strongly associated with virtually all major illnesses ranging from cardiovascular disease to diabetes, infections and cancer, and obesity to depression.

Night health refers to a new approach to sleep and dreams that integrates complementary and alternative medicine with effective conventional perspectives. It is essentially a comprehensive body-mind approach to sleep. The first in a series of articles introducing the concept of night health, this article begins with a closer look at the limitations of the simulated sleep offered by sleeping pills. It then examines the basic alternative of supplemented sleep: the place of natural sleep-supporting supplements. Finally, it offers suggestions for increasing the utilization of such alternatives by supplementing supplements with essential information, education and guidance offered by a new and unique software program and the first book about integrative sleep health.

Simulated Sleep

As the public becomes increasingly aware of the health ramifications of sleep disturbances, more and more people are turning to sleeping pills. In fact, according to the IMS Health research, about 42 million prescriptions for sleeping pills were filled last year in the U.S. This represents a nearly 60 percent increase over the past five years alone. Some projections anticipate that the current $2.7 billion in annual sleeping pill sales will more than triple by 2010.

But instead of solving the problem, sleeping pills often make sleep problems worse. Sleeping pills commonly result in dependence. They can alter normal sleep architecture, cause amnesia and residual daytime “hangovers,” and they often result in rebound insomnias when discontinued. Some sleep specialists argue that sleeping pill use is further associated with significant increases in mortality. Given the sense of desperation that can accompany insomnia, even such very serious concerns have not prevented sales of sleeping pills from skyrocketing in recent years.

We are currently witnessing an unprecedented advertising campaign on the part of the pharmaceutical industry designed to convince the public that sleep medications are indeed a safe and effective strategy for addressing sleep problems. Despite clever and seductive advertising, however, it remains highly questionable whether sleeping pills can truly offer us sleep. I believe it is more accurate to say that they result in a kind of artificial or simulated sleep. Compared to natural slumber, sleeping pills cause a chemical knockout. Unfortunately, so many people have slept poorly for so long, they have forgotten what it is like to experience truly restorative, deep and refreshing natural slumber. Instead, many people now hold a naïve, limited sense of healthful sleep, confusing it with being knocked out. And sleeping pills satisfy that very naïve notion of sleep.

Supplementing sleep

Rather than artificially simulating sleep with chemical knockouts, sleep-promoting supplements such as melatonin, valerian, and other botanicals support that body’s own sleep-facilitating mechanisms more naturally. Such products work in greater harmony with nature and, unlike conventional drugs, they do not stimulate sleep, they supplement sleep. I think of natural supplements inviting us to sleep. The very potency of many natural products lies in their very gentleness, which works cooperatively with both body and mind to induce healthful sleep.

I believe that the potential benefits and markets for such supplements remain largely untapped. Consumers’ expectations that sleep aids should knock them out rather than gently assist them in letting go into sleep must be addressed through targeted education and information campaigns. Consumers also need to learn how to use alternative sleep supplements in the context of a healthy sleep lifestyle or positive night health.

Supplementing supplements

As helpful as they can be in promoting night health, sleep supplements alone will not do the trick. In fact, I believe many people get discouraged and discount the potentially positive benefits of sleep supplements after using them without proper guidance and understanding. Sleep supplements work best when they are geared to work synergistically as a part of a larger night health promotion program.

The availability of a wide range of over-the-counter health supplements offers an important freedom in healthcare choices. But with increased freedom comes increased responsibility. Consumers need to become significantly more informed. Particularly with regard to night health, such supplements need to be personalized and prescriptive. When it comes to sleep health, one size does not fit all. Whether we choose melatonin or valerian or a specific blend depends upon who we are and exactly what we need. By prescriptive I do not mean ordered by a physician, but specifically tailored to the needs of the individual.

Because of a significant shortage of health care professionals knowledgeable about sleep and the alarming trend towards increased use of sleeping pills, I have assisted in the development of a unique software program that provides sleep solutions that are both personalized and prescriptive. After more than a decade in development, the sleep advisor—an expert software system that thoroughly evaluates and provides personalized comprehensive recommendations for improving sleep—is now available.

More recently, I completed the first truly integrative book on night health. Healing night: the science and spirit of sleeping, dreaming, and awakening offers a new, comprehensive perspective on night health that complements the sleep advisors high pragmatic approach. Together, healing night and the sleep advisor offers essential supplements to sleep supplements.

Rubin R Naiman is a psychologist and clinical assistant professor of medicine at the university of Arizona’s health Sciences center. He is also the sleep and dream specialist for dr. Andrew weil;s world renowned program in integrative medicine. Currently he serves as the sleep specialist at Miraval Resort, and is in private practice in Tuscon, AZ.

The above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider. The information in this article has not been evaluated by the food and drug administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Rubin R. Naiman, PhD
Integrative Sleep and Dream Psychology
Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine
Program in Integrative Medicine
University of Arizona
Sleep and Dream Specialist
Miraval Resort
Tucson, Arizona
520-770-1003
rrnaiman@cox.net
www.drnaiman.com
www.thesleepadvisor.com



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Benefits of L-Carnitine
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Date: February 12, 2006 03:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of L-Carnitine

Benefits

Helps the body burn fat for energy*

L-Carnitine promotes energy production in cells by transporting fatty acids into the mitochondrion. Its primary function is to transfer long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Fatty acid molecules are activated to coenzyme A (CoA) esters in the cytoplasm of the cell, and then esterified to L-Carnitine. The combination of a fatty acid molecule and L-Carnitine is called “acyl-carnitine.” Much of the body's L-Carnitine content is stored in the form of acyl-carnitine.1

The mitochondrion is the cell’s energy-generating furnace. Called an “organelle,” the mitochondrion is a self-contained structure inside the cell. Like all cellular structures, the mitochondrion is surrounded by a membrane. This membrane is an impenetrable barrier to acyl-CoA esters; passage across the membrane requires L-Carnitine as a transporter. On the inside of the mitochondrial membrane, the acyl-CoA esters are made available to be metabolized through the process of beta oxidation. One of the key metabolic byproducts of this process is acetyl-CoA, also called “active acetate,” which enters the Krebs cycle (also known as the “citric acid cycle”) to supply fuel for production of ATP, the cell’s primary energy “currency.” L-Carnitine shuttles excess fatty acid residues out of the mitochondrion, and in this role is essential for preventing toxic buildup of fatty acids inside the mitochondrion.

Evidence suggests that L-Carnitine and short chain acyl-carnitine esters can protect the mitochondrion from adverse effects of drugs and toxic chemicals. L-Carnitine has been shown to protect animals form cardiotoxins and decrease mortality rate in animals with diphtheria, due to this cardioprotective effect.2

Helps maintain a healthy heart and cardiovascular system*

Muscle tissue contains a high concentration of L-Carnitine. With its constant energy needs, heart muscle tissue is especially rich in L-Carnitine. If the body’s ability to biosynthesize L-Carnitine is compromised, energy production in muscle tissue is impaired, and a toxic buildup of fatty acids can occur.3 Defective production of L-Carnitine by the body can result from a variety of factors, including kidney or liver malfunction, increased catabolism or the inability of tissues to extract and retain L-Carnitine from the blood.

Along with glucose and lactate, fatty acids are the primary oxidation fuel for the heart. A considerable amount of scientific data from animal experiments indicates that L-Carnitine protects the heart under conditions of hypoxia, or low oxygen. In addition to the oxidation of fat for energy in the cell, L-Carnitine is involved in the metabolism of glucose.4 Evidence of L-Carnitine’s role in glucose metabolism was uncovered in a small trial on 9 diabetic individuals. Given intravenously, L-Carnitine improved insulin-mediated glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity.5

Depletion of the body’s L-Carnitine supply is linked to various abnormal states, especially of the heart muscle. The effect of L-Carnitine on hypoxic (oxygen-starved) isolated heart muscle tissue has been studied.6 At high concentrations, L-Carnitine demonstrates a clear-cut ability to potentiate the contractility of isolated heart muscle tissue, indicating the L-Carnitine has a strengthening effect on the heart. L-Carnitine has been shown to improve the performance of rats subjected to fatigue test.

Research has revealed that in animals and humans with defective heart muscle, the amount of free L-Carnitine (not bound to fatty acids) is reduced. Administration of L-Carnitine to hamsters prevents damage to the heart muscle. Given to humans with angina, L-Carnitine was found to improve exercise tolerance. In a small study, patients with congestive heart failure showed gains in heart function with oral consumption of L-Carnitine, reportedly by restoring normal oxidation of fatty acids.7 In heart valve replacement patients, L-Carnitine has been shown to increase the valve tissue levels of ATP, pyruvate and creatine phosphate, which are key cellular energy substrates. In a controlled study, L-Carnitine was administered to 38 patients prior to open heart surgery. Prior to surgery, heart circulatory function, as assessed by measurements of hemodynamics, was “good” in all 38. While there was evidence of a “preserving” effect of L-Carnitine on heart cells, no differences in cardiac performance were observed. These results suggest that noticeable improvements in heart muscle performance with L-Carnitine are most likely to occur in people with compromised hearts.8

It has been suggested that L-Carnitine favorably influences blood lipids. Preliminary evidence of this was seen in a small open trial on 26 patients who took 3 grams of L-Carnitine daily for 40 days. Blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides dropped substantially, while the ratio of total to HDL cholesterol–– a known marker of cardiovascular health––markedly improved.9

While L-Carnitine is not a treatment for heart disease, (nor should it be used as a substitute for medical treatment) the results of these and other studies suggest that oral consumption of L-Carnitine has a beneficial influence on maintaining a healthy heart and cardiovascular system.



Safety

Suggested Adult Use: Take 1 to 4 capsules daily without food.

L-Carnitine is considered to be very safe for oral consumption. L-Carnitine is generally well tolerated, even at doses as high as 15 grams daily. Toxicity or overdosage has not been reported.10



Scientific References
1. Wagenmakers, A. L-Carnitine supplementation and performance in man. Brouns, F. ed. Advances in Nutrition and Top Sport. Med Sport Sci. Basel, Karger, 1991;32:110-27.
2. Arrigoni-Martelli, E., Caso, V. Carnitine protects mitochondria and removes toxic acyls from xenobiotics. Drugs Exptl. Clin. Res. 2001;27(1):27-49)
3. Pepine, C.J. The therapeutic potential of carnitine in cardiovascular disorders. Clinical Therapeutics 1991;13(1):2-21.
4. Calvani, M., Reda, E., Arrigoni-Martelli, E. Regulation by carnitine of myocardial fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Basic Research in Cardiology 2000;95(2):75-83.
5. Capaldo, B. et al. Carnitine improves peripheral glucose disposal in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 1991;14:191-96.
6. Fanelli, O. Carnitine and acetyl-carnitine, natural substances endowed with interesting pharmacological properties. Life Sciences 1978;23:2563-2570.
7. Kobayashi, A., Masumura, Y., Yamazaki, N. L-Carnitine treatment for congestive heart failure-experimental and clinical study. Japanese Circulation Journal 1992;56:86-94.
8. Pastoris, O. et al. Effect of L-Carnitine on myocardial metabolism: results of a balanced, placebo-controlled, double-blind study in patients undergoing heart surgery. Pharmacological Research 1998;37(2):115-22.
9. Pola, P. et al. Carnitine in the therapy of dyslipidemic patients. Current Therapeutic Research 1980;27(2):208-16.
10. L-Carnitine. PDR for Nutritional Supplements. First Ed. 2001.Montvale, NJ:Medical Economics.



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Omega-3’s Fight Postpartum depression
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Date: January 23, 2006 02:42 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Omega-3’s Fight Postpartum depression

Omega-3’s Fight Postpartum depression

Tucson, AZ—Marine-sourced omega-3 essential fatty acids (N-3 EFAs) combat postpartum depression (PPD), according to a study published online in acta Psychiatrica Scandinavia (www.blackwell-synergy.com).

In the eight-week trial, test subjects were randomized to receive 0.5 g/d (n-6), 1.4 g/d (N-3) or 2.8 g/d (n-7) n-3 EFAs (as EPAX omega-3 oil provided by Epax AS, Previously a division of Pronova Biocare AS [www.provona.com]). All groups had reductions in mean scores on Edinburgh Postnatal and Hamilton Rating depression scales (51.5 percent and 48.8 percent, respectively); changes from baseline were significant within each group and when combining groups. The researchers concluded results of the study support further study of n-3 fatty acids as a treatment for PPD.

“Omega-3 fatty acids were assessed in a double-blind dose-ranging trial,” said Marlene Freeman, M.D., director of the Women’s Mental Health Program and assistant professor of Psychiatry, Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. “A combination of omega-3 EPA and DHA fatty acids provided by EPAX AS was utilized. Among all three doses, patients with postpartum depression improved substantially during the trial. Scores on depression measures decreased by approximately 50 percent and differences were statistically significant.”



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Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK
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Date: December 27, 2005 09:49 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK

Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK

  • 1000 mg of Vitamin C Per Serving
  • Helps Restore Vital Electrolytes
  • Includes CoQ10 and Alpha Lipoic Acid
  • High in Energy-Producing B Vitamins
  • 4 Great Tasting Flavors

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is unquestionably one of life’s most important nutrients. Everyday we unknowing rely on it to help protect cells, produce energy, repair tissue and replenish lost electrolytes. Ironically, humans are just one of a handful of living creatures unable to produce our own supply of this vital nutrient. In fact, your dog can naturally manufacture upwards of ten times the amount of vitamin C that you might obtain in an entire day from food.

To make matters worse, vitamin C can be a terribly stubborn nutrient. Not only are we incapable of producing it, but getting adequate amounts from the diet is a task all in itself. Today’s typical diet has become just that, typical. The convenience of fast food, sodium-rich snacks and over-processed heart bombs has reduced our once healthy society to a scrambling cluster of time-pressed professionals who’ve somehow forgotten what it’s like to actually prepare balanced, nutritious meals. This makes obtaining the nutrients we so desperately need, next to impossible.

As if that wasn’t enough, vitamin C has a short halflife. Half lives measure the amount of time that it takes for one-half of a nutrient to be depleted from the bloodstream. In the case of vitamin C, it has a half life of just 30 minutes. For the sake of argument, let’s assume that your 7:00 AM breakfast includes an orange that contains a modest 70 mg of vitamin C. By 8:00, you’re left with only 35 mg. By 9:00, a mere 17 mg. And by the time lunch rolls around, you’ll be lucky to have any vitamin C in your system at all. This should be of great concern to anyone who doesn’t carry a bushel of oranges around at all times. Because aside from the fact that the body rapidly depletes its reserve of vitamin C, it also depends on what remains to carry out an long list of biological tasks. When it’s not there, everything suffers - energy, metabolism, immune response, cartilage integrity and so on.

So how does one contend with this taxing concoction of unceasing stress, high-throttle lifestyle, endless toxins and pathetic dietary habits? It’s actually much simpler than you might imagine. Thanks to new technology in the nutritional Sciences, getting the C you need no longer requires carrying around bottles of capsules or huge sacks of fruit. Effer-C™ from NOW® is an effervescent vitamin C unlike any other, and was designed to quickly replenish the vital electrolytes needed to keep you running strong. With a nutritional profile superior to other fizzy C drinks, a taste that won hands-down in blind tests and an exceptional grade of ascorbic acid, Effer-C™ is clearly the smart choice.

Vitamin C

Starting with a exceptional grade of Vitamin C was the first step in formulating this superior drink. Fueled by 1000 mg of highly absorbable, gentle vitamin C, you can be assured that you’re getting enough C to keep you tip-top for hours. By utilizing a buffered, non-acidic vitamin C, Effer-C™ offers fast assimilation to boost energy and restore vital electrolytes without causing gastric irritation.

B-Complex

Busy lifestyles rob you of so much more than just time. Physical stress and mental anxiety can drain even the healthiest individuals of energy producing, mood supporting B vitamins. As these reserves diminish, so does the ability to stay motivated, focused, patient, responsive and energetic. Effer-C™ is bursting with a full B profile that contains as much as two times the amount of certain B-vitamins found in other brands.

Calcium/Magnesium

Calcium and magnesium have become synonymous with strong, healthy bones. Aside from their structural supporting properties, these two minerals work synergistically to help support the body’s adenosine triphosphate (ATP) energy reserves. Individually, magnesium is present in virtually every human biological process. Many of today’s most common elements (alcohol, fluoride, processed foods) can hinder your ability to retain optimal levels of this vital nutrient. Effer-C™ brings them right back!

Chromium

This essential trace mineral is a primary component in the synthesis of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. Chromium also has a direct influence on the efficacy of our metabolism, in addition to how well we use glucose. Even a slight deficiency in chromium can result in fatigue, anxiety and glucose intolerance. Effer-C™ contains 20 mcg of chromium - more than even the most popular effervescent C supplement.

Anti-oxidants

Part of what makes Effer-C™ so effective is its unique antioxidant profile. By adding more alpha lipoic acid (ALA) than similar competing products, in addition to 5 mg of CoQ10 and zinc, Effer-C™ provides powerful protection against harmful, cell damaging free radicals. If you haven’t experienced the nutritional rush that Effer-C™ delivers, you don’t know what you’re missing. NOW makes it easier than ever to stay energized and fully replenished throughout the day, during workouts and even on the road. Available in four delicious flavors (orange, lemonlime, raspberry and cranberry Effer-C™ is a simple and effective way to maintain high levels of vitamin C and unlock the energy that’s just waiting within.

EFFER-C RASPBERRY from NOW EFFER-C LEMON LIME from NOW EFFER-C CRANBERRY from NOW EFFER-C ORANGE from NOW



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Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells
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Date: December 20, 2005 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells

Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells

The differences between aging and growing old are poles apart. Sure, they may sound similar in nature. But when you think about it, the two are as different as night and day. Growing old is about retirement and travel and enjoying what you’ve worked an entire life for. Aging, on the other hand, summons images of wrinkled skin, brittle joints, cloudy minds and medicine cabinets full of prescriptions. It’s safe to assume that the majority of us want to look, live, and feel better as we grow old. Not the opposite. Many of us are on the right track - committed to a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and a well-balanced diet. And yes, these do serve as a solid foundation for good health during our golden years. It is our cells, however, that ultimately determine who grows old, and who just ages.

Still, slowing the proverbial hands of time is not all about health clubs and organic produce. If you want to grow old gracefully, you must nurture the ten trillion cells that defi ne you physically. Why? Because these cells are constantly under attack by free radicals - unstable molecules that either lack, or have an unpaired number of electrons. They scour the body in search of stable cells, and do whatever they can to rob them of their electrons, a process more formally known as oxidation. Considering that it’s environmentally impossible to completely avoid contact with the billions of airborne toxins that cause free radicals, the only other option is to safeguard your healthy cells. Making the commitment to a healthy lifestyle is the fi rst step in the process, and can be accomplished by eating healthier foods, exercising on a regular basis, and paying close attention to what you are exposed to environmentally.

The next step is to nourish and protect your cells. The best way to do this is to consume foods that are rich in antioxidants and other cell-friendly nutrients. Unfortunately, this task is often much easier said than done. Today’s average adult is busier than ever, making it far more diffi cult to consume fresh, unprocessed meals 100% of the time. This does not, however, imply that all hope is lost. Over the years, the nutritional Sciences have made stunning advances that afford you the opportunity to live your life while still safeguarding the integrity of your most basic building blocks. Here are a few of the best.

Antioxidants

Antioxidants work at the cellular level to paralyze the free radicals that cause oxidation throughout the body. Some of today’s most popular nutrients and dietary supplements fall into this category. They include vitamins A, E, and C, Selenium, Zinc, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Lycopene, Lutein, CoQ10, in addition to a host of others. And though similar in function, each of these free radical fi ghters has a unique role within the body.

Take CoQ10 for example. It’s present in every cell of the body, and is especially important for cardiovascular support. Lutein has been used extensively to prevent oxidation in the macular regions of the eyes. Zinc is a powerful immune system booster that has become extremely popular during cold and fl u season. Alpha Lipoic Acid is both fat and water soluble, and is commonly referred to as the “universal” antioxidant based on its ability to quench free radicals anywhere in the body.

Immune Boosting Herbs

Herbs such as Astragalus, Olive Leaf, Rhodiola, Echinacea, Panax Ginseng and Ashwaganda have been used for centuries to help support healthy cells and strong, responsive immune systems. They’ve also been shown to exhibit natural synergistic effects when used together. Today, they remain one of the most popular ways to naturally promote all-around wellbeing. When it comes to supporting healthy cells, NOW is pleased to offer one of the best selections of antioxidants, herbs and immune support formulas. Be sure to look for these and other great products at fi ne health food retailers, nationwide.*

OPCs

OPCs (proanthocyanidins) are high-powered polyphenol antioxidants that belong to the fl avonoid family. Grape seed extract, pine bark extracts such as pycnogenol and enzogenol, bilberry, gingko biloba, resveratrol and others all fall into this category. Research continues to suggest that OPCs work in the same manner that traditional antioxidants do, however their ability to eradicate free radicals is much greater and more versatile. Equally appealing, OPCs can easily cross the blood barrier of the brain to help protect brain and neural tissues from the damage caused by oxidative stress.

Mushroom Extracts

Throughout history, many civilizations have relied on organic mushroom extracts to encourage wellness. What we know now is that mushrooms such as Shiitake, Maitake, Reishi and others are rich in 1,3 Beta-glucans - soluble fi ber compounds that help support both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition, the active compounds in some mushrooms have been shown to stimulate the production of microphages, T cells, and other natural killer cells. These biological warriors serve at the front line when it comes to responding to bacterial attacks. They are of immeasurable value to the immune system, though drastically lacking in today’s average diet. In just the past few years, more and more healthconscious individuals have learned fi rst-hand how benefi cial they can be in the preservation of healthy cells.



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Nattokinase Fact Sheet
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Date: December 08, 2005 05:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nattokinase Fact Sheet

Nattokinase Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 8/8/05

LIKELY USERS: People seeking to support heart health and healthy circulation.1-6

KEY INGREDIENTS: Nattokinase, an enzyme

STRUCTURE/FUNCTION USE: Nattokinase is an enzyme isolated from Natto, a traditional Japanese fermented soy food. Natto has been consumed safely for thousands of years for its numerous health benefits. More recently, both clinical and non-clinical studies have demonstrated that Nattokinase supports heart health and promotes healthy circulation. Each serving of NOWR Nattokinase provides 2,000 FU (Fibrinolytic Units) to help keep already healthy levels of blood clotting factors within a normal range. 1-6

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: An assay of 2,000 FU (Fibrinolytic Units) is equivalent to 160 IU on the Urokinase assay. The FU assay measures Nattokinase activity by using the fibrin plate method and measuring the absorption of released low-molecular weight substances.7 NOW Nattokinase is made from non-GE (non-genetically engineered) bacteria (Bacillus subtilis var. Natto) grown on non-GE soybeans and standardized on a base of non-GE, corn-derived maltodextrin.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: Take one vegetarian Vcap once or twice a day between meals (without protein).

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Vein SupremeTM, Tru-E Bio ComplexTM, Pycnogenol®, garlic, and cayenne

CAUTIONS: None.

SPECIFIC: People with blood coagulation disorders or who take anticoagulant (“blood thinning”) medications (including aspirin) should consult a physician before use. Do not take if prone to bleeding. Unlike some other brands, NOWR Nattokinase contains no Vitamin K (K1 or K2), which would enhance clotting.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. Information given here may vary from what is shown on the product label because this represents my own professional experience and understanding of the science underlying the formula and ingredients. When taking any new formula, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

1. Fujita M, Hong K, Ito Y, Fujii R, Kariya K, Nishimuro S (1995) Thrombolytic effect of nattokinase on a chemically induced thrombosis model in rat. Biol Pharm Bull 18(10):1387-1391
2. Sumi H, Hamada H, Nakanishi K, Hiratani H (1990) Enhancement of the fibrinolytic activity in plasma by oral administration of nattokinase. Acta Haematol 84(3):139-143.
3. Suzuki Y, Kondo K, Ichise H, Tsukamoto Y, Urano T, Umemura K (2003) Dietary Supplementation With Fermented Soybeans Suppresses Intimal Thickening. Nutrition 19:261-264.
4. Suzuki Y, Kondo K, Matsumoto Y, Zhao B-Q, Otsuguro K, Maeda T, Tsukamoto Y, Urano T, Umemura K (2003) Dietary supplementation of fermented soybean, natto, suppresses intimal thickening and modulates the lysis of mural thrombi after endothelial injury in rat femoral artery. Life Sci 73:1289-1298.
5. Ito H, Suzuki T (2002) Effect of oral administration of nattokinase extract on blood mobility. Society of Analytical Bio-Sciences 25(4):1-5.
6. An Open Clinical Pilot Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Natural Super Kinase as an Add-On Oral Fibrinolytic Agent to Low Molecular Weight Heparin and Anti-Platelets in Acute Ischaemic Stroke. (no authors listed) (2004)
7. Method: J of Agri Food Chem, Vol 48 (2000) P3, 210-213, 216



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Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet
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Date: December 07, 2005 01:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet

Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 03/09/05

LIKELY USERS: People seeking support of the immune system and intestinal flora

KEY INGREDIENTS: Allicin (“AlliSure” patented, stabilized allicin from fresh garlic); Olive Leaf Extract (Olea Europaea with 18% minimum Oleuropein content); Elderberry extract, from fruit/berry, 60:1 concentrate (equivalent to 2,500 mg. of fresh berries of Sambucus nigra); Oil of Oregano (wild oregano from Origanum vulgare) ImmunEnhancer AG (trademarked Arabinogalactan from Larch Tree, Larix occidentalis)

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: AlliSure is the clinically tested, patented and stable form of allicin. Not allicin potential, but actual allicin. Allicin represents the immune supporting nutrients of raw garlic, and is chemically similar to penicillin, though with different physical properties. AlliSure shares garlic’s abilities to help maintain healthy cholesterol and blood pressure levels, and also has been shown to raise levels of a key T cell to enhance immune system function. Like raw garlic, AlliSure has antimicrobial properties linked to its ability to react with sulfur-containing metabolic enzymes. Allicin is also shown in studies to play a role in controlling blood sugar and abnormal cell growth.

Black Elderberries have strong antioxidant properties, containing flavonoids like anthocyanidins. They have been studied in relation to inhibition of viral replication and of minor inflammations.

Olive Leaf has been used as an antioxidant, cholesterol and blood viscosity regulator, and vasodilator. But its most important use has been as a way to help the body deal with undesirable organisms in the vital respiratory and intestinal areas.

Oil of Oregano (wild oregano, wild marjoram) contains carvacrol and thymol, which are responsible for much of its antimicrobial activities. It also has some anti-inflammatory effects.

Arabinogalactan from Larch tree bark (ImmunEnhancer AG) can help speed the immune system’s response to undesirable organisms and is often compared to Echinacea. It has also been shown to promote the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT INFORMATION: Patented and trademarked ingredients enhance quality controls and have clinical research. Rosemary Oil provides antioxidant protection for the capsule contents. Enteric coating protects the capsule from stomach acid to deliver its contents past the stomach. This helps to assure full potency and reduces the possibility of the oils repeating.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: One softgel twice daily, preferably with meals. Try one before using the full dose.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Probiotics, Antioxidants, D-Flame

CAUTIONS: Pregnant & lactating women, children and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. Discontinue use if any uncomfortable side effects occur. This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

ALLICIN:

Josling P. Preventing the common cold with a garlic supplement: a double-blind, placebo-controlled survey. Adv Ther. 2001 Jul-Aug;18(4):189-93. (AlliSure was used in this study.)

Abramovitz D, Gavri S, Harats D, Levkovitz H, Mirelman D, Miron T, Eilat-Adar S, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Eldar M, Vered Z. Allicin-induced decrease in formation of fatty streaks (atherosclerosis) in mice fed a cholesterol-rich diet. Coron Artery Dis. 1999 Oct;10(7):515-9. PMID: 10562920

Ankri S, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Mirelman D. Allicin from garlic strongly inhibits cysteine proteinases and cytopathic effects of Entamoeba histolytica. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1997 Oct;41(10):2286-8. PMID: 9333064

Cellini L, Di Campli E, Masulli M, Di Bartolomeo S, Allocati N. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori by garlic extract (Allium sativum). FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 1996 Apr;13(4):273-7. PMID: 8739190

Chowdhury AK, Ahsan M, Islam SN, Ahmed ZU. Efficacy of aqueous extract of garlic & allicin in experimental shigellosis in rabbits. Indian J Med Res. 1991 Jan;93:33-6.

Eilat S, Oestraicher Y, Rabinkov A, Ohad D, Mirelman D, Battler A, Eldar M, Vered Z. Alteration of lipid profile in hyperlipidemic rabbits by allicin, an active constituent of garlic. Coron Artery Dis. 1995 Dec;6(12):985-90. PMID: 8723021

Elkayam A, Mirelman D, Peleg E, Wilchek M, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Oron-Herman M, Rosenthal T. The effects of allicin on weight in fructose-induced hyperinsulinemic, hyperlipidemic, hypertensive rats. Am J Hypertens. 2003 Dec;16(12):1053-6. PMID: 14643581

Feldberg RS, Chang SC, Kotik AN, Nadler M, Neuwirth Z, Sundstrom DC, Thompson NH. In vitro mechanism of inhibition of bacterial cell growth by allicin. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1988 Dec;32(12):1763-8.

Focke M, Feld A, Lichtenthaler K. Allicin, a naturally occurring antibiotic from garlic, specifically inhibits acetyl-CoA synthetase. FEBS Lett. 1990 Feb 12;261(1):106-8.

Hirsch K, Danilenko M, Giat J, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Mirelman D, Levy J, Sharoni Y. Effect of purified allicin, the major ingredient of freshly crushed garlic, on cancer cell proliferation. Nutr Cancer. 2000;38(2):245-54. PMID: 11525603

Patya M, Zahalka MA, Vanichkin A, Rabinkov A, Miron T, Mirelman D, Wilchek M, Lander HM, Novogrodsky A. Allicin stimulates lymphocytes and elicits an antitumor effect: a possible role of p21ras. Int Immunol. 2004 Feb;16(2):275-81. PMID: 14734613

Rabinkov A, Miron T, Mirelman D, Wilchek M, Glozman S, Yavin E, Weiner L. S-Allylmercaptoglutathione: the reaction product of allicin with glutathione possesses SH-modifying and antioxidant properties. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2000 Dec 11;1499(1-2):144-153. PMID: 11118647

Rabinkov A, Miron T, Konstantinovski L, Wilchek M, Mirelman D, Weiner L. The mode of action of allicin: trapping of radicals and interaction with thiol containing proteins. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1998 Feb 2;1379(2):233-44. PMID: 9528659

Sela U, Ganor S, Hecht I, Brill A, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Mirelman D, Lider O, Hershkoviz R. Allicin inhibits SDF-1alpha-induced T cell interactions with fibronectin and endothelial cells by down-regulating cytoskeleton rearrangement, Pyk-2 phosphorylation and VLA-4 expression. Immunology. 2004 Apr;111(4):391-9. PMID: 15056375

Shadkchan Y, Shemesh E, Mirelman D, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Osherov N. Efficacy of allicin, the reactive molecule of garlic, in inhibiting Aspergillus spp. in vitro, and in a murine model of disseminated aspergillosis. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2004 May;53(5):832-6. Epub 2004 Mar 24. PMID: 15044429

Tsai Y, Cole LL, Davis LE, Lockwood SJ, Simmons V, Wild GC. Antiviral properties of garlic: in vitro effects on influenza B, herpes simplex and coxsackie viruses. Planta Med. 1985 Oct;(5):460-1. PMID: 3001801

Uchida Y, Takahashi T, Sato N. [The characteristics of the antibacterial activity of garlic (author's transl)] Jpn J Antibiot. 1975 Aug;28(4):638-42. PMID: 1099271

Yasuo Yamada and Keizô Azuma. Evaluation of the In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Allicin. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1977 April; 11(4): 743–749.

ELDERBERRY:

Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1985, 423.

Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, et al. (eds). PDR for Herbal Medicines. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics, 1998, 1116–7.

Mascolo N, Autore G, Capasso G, et al. Biological screening of Italian medicinal plants for anti-inflammatory activity. Phytother Res 1987;1:28–31.

Murkovic M, Abuja PM, Bergmann AR, et al. Effects of elderberry juice on fasting and postprandial serum lipids and low-density lipoprotein oxidation in healthy volunteers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Eur J Clin Nutr. Feb2004;58(2):244-9.

Newall CA, Anderson LA, Phillipson JD. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press, 1996, 104–5.

Yesilada E. Inhibitory Effects of Turkish Folk Remedies on Inflammatory Cytokines: Interleukin-1Alpha, Interleukin-1Beta and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha. J Ethnopharmacol. Sept1997;58(1):59-73. Youdim KA, Martin A, Joseph JA. Incorporation of the elderberry anthocyanins by endothelial cells increases protection against oxidative stress. Free Radical Biol Med 2000;29:51–60.

Zakay-Rones Z, Varsano N, Zlotnik M, et al. Inhibition of several strains of influenza virus in vitro and reduction of symptoms by an elderberry extract (Sambucus nigra L.) during an outbreak of influenza B Panama. J Alt Compl Med 1995;1:361–9.

OLIVE LEAF EXTRACT:

American Herbal Products Association. Use of Marker Compounds in Manufacturing and Labeling Botanically Derived Dietary Supplements. Silver Spring, MD: American Herbal Products Association; 2001.

Bennani-Kabchi N, et al. Effects of Olea europea var. oleaster leaves in hypercholesterolemic insulin-resistant sand rats. Therapie. Nov1999;54(6):717-23.

Bisignano G, et al. On the in-vitro antimicrobial activity of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol. J Pharm Pharmacol. Aug1999;51(8):971-4. Gonzalez M, et al. Hypoglycemic activity of olive leaf. Planta Medica. 1992;58:513-515. Visoli F, et al. Oleuropein protects low density lipoprotein from oxidation. Life Sciences. 1994;55:1965-71. PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd edition. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:557.

Petroni A, et al. Inhibition of platelet aggregation and eicosanoid production by phenolic components of olive oil.Thromb Res. Apr1995;78(2):151-60. Pieroni A, et al. In vitro anti-complementary activity of flavonoids from olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves. Pharmazie. Oct1996;51(10):765-8. Zarzuelo A, et al. Vasodilator effect of olive leaf. Planta Med. Oct1991;57(5):417-9. OREGANO OIL (OIL OF OREGANO, WILD OREGANO, WILD MARJORAM):

Dorman HJ, et al. Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils. J Appl Microbiol. Feb2000;88(2):308-16. Force M, et al. Inhibition of enteric parasites by emulsified oil of oregano in vivo. Phytother Res. May2000;14(3):213-4.

Hammer KA, Carson CF, Riley TV. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts. J Appl Microbiol 1999;86:985–90.

Kelm MA, Nair MG, Strasburg GM. Antioxidant and Cyclooxygenase Inhibitory Phenolic Compounds from Ocimum sanctum Linn. Phytomedicine. Mar2000;7(1):7-13. Lamaison JL, et al. Medicinal Lamiaceae with antioxidant properties, a potential source of rosmarinic acid. Pharm Acta Helv. 1991;66(7):185-8.

Ponce MM, Navarro AI, Martinez GMN, et al. In vitro effect against Giardia of 14 plant extracts. Rev Invest Clin 1994;46:343–7 [in Spanish].

Stiles JC, Sparks W, Ronzio RA. The inhibition of Candida albicans by oregano. J Applied Nutr 1995;47:96–102.

Tantaoui EA, Beraoud L. Inhibition of growth and aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus by essential oils of selected plant materials. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol 1994;13:67–72. ImmunEnhancer AG (Larch tree Arabinogalactan)

Corado J, et al. Impairment of Natural Killer (NK) Cytotoxic Activity in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection. Exp Immunol. 1997;109:451-457. Currier NL, Lejtenyi D, Miller SC. Effect over time of in-vivo administration of the polysaccharide arabinogalactan on immune and hemopoietic cell lineages in murine spleen and bone marrow. Phytomedicine. 2003 Mar;10(2-3):145-53. PMID: 12725568

Egert D, et al. Studies on Antigen Specificity of Immunoreactive Arabinogalactan Proteins Extracted from Baptisia tinctoria and Echinacea purpurea. Planta Med. 1992;58:163-165. Gonda R, et al. Arabinogalactan Core Structure and Immunological Activities of Ukonan C, An Acidic Polysaccharide from the Rhizome of Curcuma longa. Biol Pharm Bull. 1993;16:235-238. Hagmar B, et al. Arabinogalactan Blockade of Experimental Metastases to Liver by Murine Hepatoma. Invasion Metastasis. 1991;11:348-355. Kelly GS. Larch arabinogalactan: clinical relevance of a novel immune-enhancing polysaccharide. Altern Med Rev. 1999 Apr;4(2):96-103. Review. PMID: 10231609

Kim LS, Waters RF, Burkholder PM. Immunological activity of larch arabinogalactan and Echinacea: a preliminary, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Altern Med Rev. 2002 Apr;7(2):138-49. PMID: 11991793

Levine PH, et al. Dysfunction of Natural Killer Activity in a Family With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1998;88:96-104. Robinson RR, Feirtag J, Slavin JL. Effects of dietary arabinogalactan on gastrointestinal and blood parameters in healthy human subjects. J Am Coll Nutr. 2001 Aug;20(4):279-85. PMID: 11506055

Rolfe RD. The Role of Probiotic Cultures in the Control of Gastrointestinal Health. J Nutr. Feb2000;130(2S Suppl):396S-402S.

Salyers AA, Vercellotti JR, West SE, Wilkins TD. Fermentation of mucin and plant polysaccharides by strains of Bacteroides from the human colon. Appl Environ Microbiol. 1977 Feb;33(2):319-22. PMID: 848954

Uchida A. Therapy of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Nippon Rinsho. 1992;50:2679-2683.



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- US Center for Disease Control, 2005
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 07, 2005 01:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: - US Center for Disease Control, 2005

“Forty-three million Americans report that a doctor told them they have arthritis or other rheumatic conditions. Another 23 million people have chronic joint symptoms but have not been diagnosed with arthritis. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, limiting the activities of more than 16 million adults.” - US Center for Disease Control, 2005

This is of alarming concern, especially if you’re one of the nearly 60 million US adults who live with a joint disorder. Clearly, you don’t need to be reminded of what a struggle it can be. Mundane tasks become major, and major tasks become painful reminders of what life was like when your joints were strong and seemingly indestructible. Many sufferers lose hope, while others hopelessly lose out on so many of life’s activities.

Over the past ten years, notable advances in the nutritional Sciences have paved the path for landmark products such as Glucosamine, SAMe, Chondroitin, MSM, and others. As a result, millions have found relief in these products and continue to use them in their quest towards healthy mobility. Fortunately, the science behind these popular joint support supplements has done nothing but steadily improve. Celadrin® is perhaps the most convincing proof to date. Let’s examine.

In short, Celadrin® is novel blend of acetylated fatty acids, esters and other synergistic agents that enhance cell membranes throughout the body, resulting in greater mobility and more normalized joint function. The extremely high user success rate and virtually complete absence of side effects has helped Celadrin® rise to the rank of joint support extraordinaire. Yes, this is a bold statement. However, just one look at the supporting research is enough to convince even the most skeptical critics of what a true breakthrough it is. Celadrin®’s ability to provide fast, cumulative relief continues to be evidenced by extensive clinical research, as well as a steady flow of eye-opening human trials.

Unlike popular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) that simply mask joint discomfort, Celadrin® targets the source by enhancing cell membranes and restoring the vital fluids that cushion bones and joints. Ultimately, this is what makes it possible to enjoy a free range of motion without the bone-on-bone grinding that limits so many from their daily activities. Working in much the same manner that other fatty acids do, Celadrin®’s patented blend of esterified fatty acids spark positive changes at the cellular level. As this occurs, cell membranes become more responsive and less prone to articular cartilage deterioration.

“How long do I need to take it?”

Not only does it work well, studies continue to illustrate Celadrin®’s ability to work fast. This can be attributed to how easily absorbed the active ingredients are. In 2005, a University-led, placebo-controlled study examined 42 patients who struggled with knees that were…let’s just say less than fully functional. After just 30 minutes, 100% of the subjects treated with a topical form of Celadrin® reported significant improvement in joint mobility and support. Even more impressive, each participant demonstrated continuous and restorative benefits over the course of the entire 30 day study.

“How do I use Celadrin®?”

One of the most appealing elements of Celadrin® is the flexibility that users have when it comes to taking charge of their joint health. It is available in both oral and topical forms, and each is equally effective. Some users have reported greater results by supplementing the oral form while applying the topical lotion directly to the target areas in question. Still, no two people are alike. Accordingly, the severity and nature of each individual concern will vary from person to person. Therefore, it can be wise to determine which application works best for your particular situation.

“What if I don’t have joint problems?” For openers, you’re very fortunate. If your joints are strong and fluid, Celadrin® is one of the most effortless ways to keep them that way! Cartilage breakdown is gradual, and occurs over a long, delayed, unsuspecting period of time. In many cases, there is very little warning that your knee or shoulder is about to become part of a frightening and growing statistic. Your joints may feel fine today, but you’d be amazed at how fast that can change. Think of Celadrin® as Cartilage Insurance. You may not see an immediate need to support them right now, but if they do give out, you’ll sincerely wish you had.

“What should I look for in a Celadrin® product?”

As with every dietary supplement and joint-support product, you should always look for a quality formula from a trusted, well-established manufacturer with a history of producing quality products. NOW® Celadrin® products are scientifically formulated, tested for safety and potency and guaranteed to be of superior quality. Each full serving contains 1.5 g (1500 mg) of Celadrin® along with 300 mg of MSM for additional support. NOW® Celadrin® Liposome Lotion contains 7.5 % Celadrin® along with 1.25% USP Pharmaceutical grade natural Menthol. Both are now available at fine independent health food retailers nationwide.* credits: Jayson Kroner [mailto:jayson.kroner@nowfoods.com]

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MSM - Natures Primary Sources of Organic Dietary Sulfur
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Date: August 02, 2005 03:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: MSM - Natures Primary Sources of Organic Dietary Sulfur


Best MSM    

The MSM Story-One of Nature's Primary Sources
of Organic Dietary Sulfur! The human body requires a continuous
supply of usable sulfur, and MSM is one of the primary organic
sulfur-containing molecules for use by living organisms. From
life's earliest beginnings, primitive marine organisms
(blue-green algae and phytoplankton) have absorbed inorganic
sulfur from ocean waters and produced organic sulfur molecules,
primarily dimethyl sulfonium salts. These salts are released
back into the sea, where they are converted to dimethyl sulfide,
which readily evaporates, ending up in the upper atmosphere.
Dimethyl sulfide is then oxidized by UV light, forming DMSO and
MSM. The two compounds are delivered to land masses in rain
water, and absorbed by plants. MSM is a stable end-product of
this process, and thus serves as a primary source of sulfur in
the food chain.

Though present on earth since before life
appeared on dry land, and known to science since the 1950's, MSM
has only recently been recognized as having importance in human
nutrition.

Why the Human Body Needs MSM MSM occurs naturally
in the blood, body fluids and tissues. It is now believed that a
minimum MSM concentration of 0.2 parts per million is necessary
for the body to function normally. MSM may be the most easily
absorbed and non-toxic source of nutritional sulfur occurring in
nature.

Sulfur is a structural mineral that maintains the
strength of various tissues by forming sulfur "tie-bars"
(sulfhydryl bonds) between connective tissue proteins. MSM
serves as a readily available source of sulfur for this
function, and thus helps maintain the pliancy of tissues and
cell membranes. Repair of damaged tissue depends upon a supply
of sulfur for continuation of reactions involving sulfhydryl
groups (-SH). Sulfur is required for the maintenance of healthy
hair, skin and nails. In view of the presence of MSM in
biological systems since the beginning of evolution, it is
logical to assume that all higher life forms, including humans
and animals, are well adapted to use MSM as a sulfur
donor.

MSM Benefits Clinical research on the role of MSM in
the human body has culminated in the filing of several patents
covering numerous uses for MSM as a dietary ingredient for both
humans and animals. As a result of these investigations, it is
believed that physical and psychological stress increases in the
human body when the MSM concentration falls below minimum
levels, resulting in a loss of normal organ function.

Based
on observations, ingestion of MSM by humans has the following
beneficial effects:

• MSM supports maintenance of strong,
healthy body tissues by donating sulfur for formation of sulfur
tie-bars between connective tissue proteins.*

• MSM supports
normal gastrointestinal function.*

• MSM improves the body's
resistance to adverse physical stress.*

• MSM supports mental
alertness and maintenance of healthy mood.*

• MSM promotes the
body's processes that heal tissue.*

• MSM helps modify the
physiologic response to allergens.*

• MSM supports normal lung
function.*

• MSM supports normal relaxation of muscles.*

• MSM
supports normal joint function.*

• MSM helps maintain healthy
skin.*

Supplementation is Needed to Realize the Benefits of
MSM Widespread in nature, MSM is found in a variety of foods,
including fresh fruits and vegetables, raw milk, raw meat and
raw fish. However, MSM is a volatile substance easily lost
during cooking, pasteurization, food processing and storage. The
average American diet thus supplies at best a marginal MSM
intake, which may be inadequate to maintain the optimum MSM
concentration in the body. The body's MSM concentration is also
believed to decline with increasing age.

Dosage
Recommendations Effective dosages for the various reported uses
of MSM range from 500 mg to 6 grams per day. 1000 mg per day is
recommended to restore normal MSM concentrations, while higher
doses may be necessary for specific uses.

MSM is considered
to be as non-toxic to the body as water, and is therefore
completely safe at the higher dosage levels.

*These
statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug
Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat,
cure, or prevent any disease.

Scientific Abstracts and
References

1. Jacob, S., Herschler, R. Introductory remarks:
dimethyl sulfoxide after 20 years. Annals of the New York
Academy of Sciences 1983; 411:xiii-xvii.

2. Herschler, R.
Dietary and pharmaceutical uses of methylsulfonylmethane and
compositions comprising it. United States Patent 4,514,421;
April 30, 1985.

3. Herschler, R. Methylsulfonylmethane in
dietary products. United States Patent 4,616,039; October 7,
1986.

4. Sellnow, L. MSM: An Aid From Nature. The Blood Horse,
June 6, 1987:3459-3462.

5. Lawrence, R.M.
Methyl-sulfonylmethane (M.S.M.) A double-blind study of its use
in degenerative arthritis.

International Journal of Anti-Aging
Medicine 1998;1(1):50 6. Jacob, S.W., Lawrence, R.M., Zucker,
M. 1999. The Miracle of MSM. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons.



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An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam - NEEM
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Date: July 27, 2005 04:23 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam - NEEM

Keen on Neem

An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam.

The search for clean teeth, healthy gums and fresh breath is not just a modern obsession, but an age-old fixation. Dental historians believe that ancient cavity rates ranged from 1% among Eskimos, with their highly carnivorous diet, to 80% among members of Egypt’s royalty, who feasted on dainties that included many high-carb delights. So it’s no surprise that most ancient cultures had their favorite oral hygiene therapies.

In Indian, the tooth scrubber of popular choice was twigs taken from the neem tree. Small wonder: This tropical evergreen’s therapeutic versatility sports and impressive 4,000-year-old track record, earning it the nickname of “village pharmacy.” Indians who went abroad carried neem with them, and they put the entire tree-bark, fruit, leaf, root, seed-to health-enhancing use. One famous Indian emigrant, Mahatma Gandhi, was a keen neem enthusiast; after returning to his native land, Gandhi held prayer meetings under a neem tree.

Today, neem’s beautiful branches grace a vast swath of the Southern Hemisphere, including Australia (which may become the biggest neem-producing nation over the coming decades), Fiji, sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America and the Caribbean. This remarkable plant’s Sanskrit name, arista, says it all-“perfect, complete and imperishable.”

Keeping Teeth Intact

Your dentist is actually the second one to drill your pearly whites. The first drillers are the germs that reside in your mouth-or, to be more accurate, the acids these wee beasties produce. Their handiwork: dental caries, or just plain cavities. These bacteria are also responsible for gum disease, which can lead to tooth loss if unchecked. What’s even worse, low-level inflammation caused by disordered gums may create the kind of blood-vessel havoc associated with heart problems.

Neem extracts act against a variety of detrimental microbes, which may explain its time-tested success in helping to keep teeth whole. Scientists at India’s Zydus Research Centre found that individuals who used a neem dental gel twice a day for six weeks enjoyed significant reductions in both plaque-the gummy, bacteria-harboring stuff that accumulates on teeth-and gum disease (International Dental Journal 8/04).

Neem’s fame is spreading among Northern Hemisphere consumers. It is becoming an herbally aware toothpaste ingredient valued for the fresh feeling its cool astringency imparts to the mouth. Neem is also a prized component of other health and beauty products, such as bath powders, lotions, shampoos and soaps.

Ayurvedic Superstar

In India, neem is a vital weapon in the arsenal of Ayurveda, that country’s system of traditional medicine. Practitioners there mash the leaves into a paste to alleviate chickenpox and warts, and brew them into tea to break malaria’s feverish grip. The leaves also make a soothing soak for fungus-infected feet.

Indian scientists are also hard at work studying neem. They’ve distilled the substances that account for neem’s ability to fight bacteria, fungi and parasites (including the pests that infest pets). Researchers have explored neem’s other traditional usages; in one study, a bark extract was able to ease ulcers (Life Sciences 10/29/04). What’s more, neem is esteemed for its contributions to Indian agriculture; the seedcake makes a nutritious feed supplement and bees that feed on neem are free of wax moths.

If you value keeping your teeth in gleaming condition, consider neem.
-Linda James



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Vitanet ®

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ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS: CAUSE FOR WORRY
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Date: July 15, 2005 12:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS: CAUSE FOR WORRY

ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS: CAUSE FOR WORRY

Among some of the most troubling food additives that we routinely ingest are artificial sweeteners, also referred to as non-nutritive sweeteners. Having received the FDA stamp of approval, they are liberally ingested with little thought to what their actual health risks may be. Andrew Weil, M.D., in his book Natural Health Natural Medicine, writes: More worrisome than preservatives are artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a known carcinogen, should be avoided. Cyclamates, banned some years ago for suspected carcinogenicity, are not being reconsidered for use in food. They taste better than saccharin but cause diarrhea in some people. Avoid them too. Recently, aspartame (NutraSweet) has become enormously popular. The manufacturer portrays it as a gift from nature, but, although the two component amino acids occur in nature, aspartame itself does not. Like all artificial sweeteners, aspartame has a peculiar taste. Because I have seen a number of patients, mostly women, who report headaches from this substance, I don’t regard it as free from toxicity. Women also find that aspartame aggravates PMS (premenstrual syndrome). I think you are better off using moderate amounts of sugar than consuming any artificial sweeteners on a regular basis. A natural sweetener that may cause some people problems is sorbitol, originally derived from the berries of the mountain ash tree. Sorbitol tastes sweet but is not easily absorbed form the gastrointestinal tract and is not easily metabolized. It is a common ingredient of sugarless chewing gums and candies. If you eat a lot of it, you will probably get diarrhea. People with irritable bowel syndrome or ulcerative colitis should avoid sorbitol.

Ann Louise Gittleman, in her book, Super Nutrition for Women, writes: In 1977, a Canadian study indicated that when pregnant rats were fed large doses of saccharin, their male offspring developed bladder cancer. As a result, the Canadians banned saccharin and the U.S. Congress ordered warning labels on all saccharin products like Sweet ‘N Low. The national Academy of Sciences in 1978 evaluated the evidence and concluded that saccharin was primarily a promoter of other cancer-causing agents, a cocarcinogen. In the meantime, G.D. Searle developed aspartame, a combination of two amino acids and methanol (wood alcohol) . . . Few long-term studies of the effects of aspartame have been done. However, reports to the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control indicate that, as more people consume the substitute in large quantities, health may be affected. In some circumstances, individuals may be getting high levels of methanol; for example, it is estimated that on a hot day after exercise, an individual drinking three 12-ounce cans of diet cola could easily consume as much as eight times the Environmental Protection Agency’s recommended limit for methanol consumption. The most common complaints are dizziness, disorientation, tunnel vision, ear buzzing, loss of equilibrium, numbing of hands and feet, inflammation of the pancreas, high blood pressure, eye hemorrhages and seizures. Artificial sweeteners can stimulate hunger or cause additive allergies, just as sugar does. In other words, we get the disadvantages of sugar, along with the proven or suspected disadvantages of artificial sweeteners. While thousands of Americans continue to consume aspartame in unprecedented amounts, controversy surrounding its safety lingers. Dr. Richard Wurtman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has reported that abnormal concentrations of neurotransmitters developed when he fed laboratory animals large doses of aspartame. He believes that the phenylalanine content of the sweetener actually manipulates and alters certain brain chemicals which could initiate behavioral changes and even seizures. He also purports that while small quantities of aspartame may be safe, the cumulative effects of the compound—particularly if consumed with high carbohydrate, low protein snacks—could be serious (Wurtman I, 799-801, Wurtman II, 429-430, Wurtman III, 1060).

In spite of serious concerns, saccharine and aspartame packets sit in restaurant sugar bowls all over our country, while in Japan, natural stevia powder enjoys popularity as one of the best and safest non-caloric sweeteners available.

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Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness - The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a ...
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Date: July 14, 2005 09:28 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness - The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a ...

Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness

The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a syndrome

Question: How can you tell if a man has irritable male syndrome?
Answer: You ask him to pass the salt and he yells, "Take, take, take - that's all you ever do!"

Irritable male syndrome (IMS) may sound like a joke, but it's really no laughing matter. Just as women experience anxiety, depression and irritability with hormonal changes, men too can suffer from cyclic and menopausal symptoms-they're just more likely to be chastised for it instead of being consoled with a pint of Ben & Jerry's ice cream.

Since men's hormones actually fluctuate every hour rather than every 28 days, it should come as no surprise that male behavior should be affected. For some men over 40, however, the behavior swing can be quite dramatic, leaving a guy in a chronic bad mood. But try telling the grouch that he suffers from "male menopause" and he just might chuck the Ben & Jerry's at you.

The term "irritable male syndrome" was coined by Gerald A. Lincoln, a researcher at the Medical Research Council's Human Reproductive Sciences Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. Lincoln first observed IMS while studying Soay sheep, a large, curly-horned variety known for their boisterous rutting rituals that rival the masculine intensity of any Super Bowl party. After mating season, however, Lincoln noticed that as testosterone levels dropped off, the rams became agitated, fearful, withdrawn and likely to irrationally strike out at other males. The hypothesis behind this behavior is that the withdrawal of androgens affects melatonin and serotonin uptake and can make for one cranky ram. However, IMS in two-legged, human subjects can present itself with more complexity.

Psychotherapist Jed Diamond, author of The Irritable Male Syndrome: Managing the Four Key Causes of Depression and Aggression (Rodale Books), defines IMS as "a state of hypersensitivity, anxiety, frustration and anger that occurs in males and is associated with biochemical changes, hormonal fluctuations, and loss of male identity" that can occur at any time during a man's life. A lot of IMS involves depression; normally thought of as a female problem, this emotional downer often comes out differently in men, more outwardly than inwardly directed.

One point of similarity between the sexes is that IMS, like depression in women, is often linked to the multi-source stress that pervades modern living. The result? According to Diamon, "Up to 30% of men, especially those in adolescence and midlife, exhibit symptoms of IMS. In its mildest forms, it can cause men to be moody and irritable. At its worst, it can lead to violence and even suicide."

Is it a Bad Day or a Bad Decade?

So how can you really tell if a man has irritable male syndrome? Since a guy isn't likely to say flat out that he's having trouble with relationships or is having hot flashes (you read that right), there are other, more telltale signs to look for. While we all may temporarily experience bad moods, if you or someone you know exhibits one or more of these feelings with frequency over a period of time, IMS may be the cause: anger, sarcasm, defensiveness, blaming, withdrawal, anxiety, defiance, being argumentative, feeling unappreciated, frustration.

Physical IMS symptoms include fatigue, unexpected weight gain or loss, frequent urination, hair loss (besides the typical male pattern) and impotence. The thyroid gland, which serves as the body's master energy controller, is often out of whack on men suffering from IMS. If that sounds familiar, see your practitioner for a thyroid hormone check.

Less Flabby Means Less Crabby

Sometimes, IMS is not a matter of lowered testosterone levels but one of elevated estradoil, the usable form of the female hormone estrogen. This condition can develop with consumption of too many hormone-laced meats (eating organic meat is a good option). In addition, a diet high in high-glycemic carbs such as white breads and white pasta will undermine testosterone levels as well as pack on unwanted pounds.

To help trim down and keep IMS symptoms at bay, Larrian Gillespie, MD, author of The Gladiator Diet: How to Preserve Peak Health, Sexual Energy, and A Strong Body at Any Age (Healthy Life Publications), recommends a diet that's 40% protein, 35% low-glycemic carbs (read: green veggies) and 25% fat, of which only 10% should be saturated fat. To help keep testosterone levels up, avoid apricots, carrots, white potatoes, white rice (whole wheat past and rise are okay) and-sorry guys-dark beer.

Gillespie also recommends that men take a multivitamin daily along with calcium, magnesium and the herb saw palmetto to inhibit the breakdown of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone a precursor to prostate disease.

Now that you know IMS is real, you can take the bull (or Soay ram) by the horns and do something about it. IMS can be treated through diet, natural hormone replacement therapy and counseling, if necessary.

Question: What do you call a man who is always tired, miserable and irritable?
Answer: Normal.

Wrong answer! That was the old guy. Mr. Nice is back. -Karyn Maier



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Vitanet ®

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References
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 13, 2005 12:42 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: References

ENDNOTES


1 Time Magazine, (April 6, 1992).
2 Indena Fact Sheet, # 16.
3 The New York Times. (April 25, 1993).
4 Jon J. Mich n ovicz, M.D., Ph.D. H ow to Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer, (New York: Warner Books, 1994), 103.
5 Richard A. Passwater Ph.D., Cancer Prevention and Nutritional T h e ra p i e s, (New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, 1993).
6 G. Block, University of Southern California at Berkeley
7 “ L e u c o a n t h o c yanins Extract From Grapeseeds (Vins Vinifera),” Indena Publication
8 Liviero, International Symposium on Phytochemistry of Plants Used in Traditional Medicine.
9 R.I. Rayer, and C. L. Schmidt, Seminary Hospital, (Paris: 1981), 57, 2009 and Indena International Report (Data on File). 10 J . F. Thebaut, P. Thebaut and F. Vin, Gazet te Medicale, (1985), 92, 96.
11 L. Fusi, F. Czimeg, F. Pesce, R. Germagli, A. Boero, M. Vanzetti, G. Gandiglio, Ann Ott Clin, Ocul, (1988) 114, 575.
12 D. Zafirov, G. Bredy-Dobreva, V. Litchev, M. Papasovasvie, Ac ta Physiol Pharmacol, Inst i t u te of Phys i o l o g y, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, (Sofia, Bulgaria: 1990) 16 (3) 50-54.
13 B. Vennet, “Anti-ulcer Activity of Procyanidin Preparation of Wa ter Soluble Pro c yanidin Cimetidine Comp l exes,” Pharm Acta Helv, (Switzerland: 1989), 64 (11) 316-20
14 “Leucoanthocyanins Extract From Grapeseed (Vins Vinfera)” Indena Publication.



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PYCNOGENOL - ITS REMARKABLE BENEFITS
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Date: July 13, 2005 12:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PYCNOGENOL - ITS REMARKABLE BENEFITS

PYCNOGENOL - ITS REMARKABLE BENEFITS

New to North America but not to Europe, this natural product is considered safe and effective in the treatment of various diseases and for the maintenance of optimal health. This family of bioflavonoids is non-toxic, water soluble and highly bioavailable. Because proanthocyanidins scavenge free radicals so effectively, they have shown remarkable curative effects. Extensive research demonst rates that proanthocyanidins are such potent antioxidants, they find and neutralize free radicals with great rapidity, allowing cells to regenerate rather than deteriorate. Specific actions associated with Pycnogenol include:

  • • Binds with Collagen Fibers and helps restore skin elasticity
  • • Helps prevent excess wrinkling
  • • Protects capillaries from free radical damage which helps prevent phlebitis, varicose veins and bruising
  • • Treats Joint Pain and Injuries as a natural antiinflammatory
  • • Helps control and prevent edema
  • • Decreases the production of histamines in allergic reactions such as Hay Fever
  • • Reduces the risk of and treats diabetic retinopathy

    PYCNOGENOL SPECIFICALLY TARGETS: SKIN AND ELASTICITY

    Testing has suggested that Pycnogenol flavonoids exhibited an anti-enzyme effect which prevented the break down of collagen and elastin, the very compounds which keep skin firm and inhibit the formation of wrinkles.7

    TUMOR RELATED DISEASES

    Unquestionably, studies have shown that Pycnogenol has the ability to inhibit cellular mutations.8 The implications of this finding for anyone suffering from tumor related disease which originates from cellular malfunctions should not be underestimated.

    CARDIOVASCULAR CONDITIONS

    The potential of Pycnogenol to pr e vent cellular deterioration or uncontrolled growth is profound to say the least. Several investigations have shown that if it is taken on a daily basis, Pycnogenol benefits people suffering from cardiovascular diseases and breast tumors.9 In addition, double blind placebo controlled studies have indicated that patients suffering from circulatory insufficiencies and diseases of the lymph system showed significant improvement in pain control and vessel elasticity after taking these flavonoids.10

    VISION

    Subsequent experiments concluded that the family of bioflavonoids contained in Pycnogenol is capable of improving night vision and initialing “a rapid and marked improvement of visual performances after glare in comparison with control group.”11

    WATER RETENTION AND EDEMA

    Pycnogenol is particularly valuable for anyone who suffers from water retention and edema. Studies at the Institute of Physiology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences confirm that this biofl avonoid compound stabilized capillary walls, which decreased fluid leakage into tissues which causes swelling and pressure.12

    WHAT PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS RESPOND TO PYCNOGENOL?

    The bioflavonoids found in Pycnogenol have been clinically indicated in the following pathological conditions:

  • • circulatory diseases, including cardiovascular disease and stroke
  • • varicose veins
  • • edema
  • • bruising
  • • capillary fragility (commonly seen in diabetes can cause retina damage and decrease sight)
  • • visual disturbances
  • • aging of skin
  • • diabetes
  • • stroke
  • • prostate disease
  • • wrinkles
  • • stress

    PYCNOGENOL HAS THERAPEUTIC VALUE FOR THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS:

  • • BELL’S PALSY
  • • ULCERS
  • • EYESIGHT: INCREASES VISUAL ACUITY
  • • CANCERS: INHIBITS TUMOR GROWTH
  • • HEART DISEASE
  • • ATHEROSCLEROSIS
  • • MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
  • • COLDS AND FLU
  • • PROSTRATE PROBLEMS
  • • LUPUS
  • • ARTHRITIS
  • • MEMORY/ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE, SENILE DEMENTIA
  • • STROKE
  • • PARKINSON’S DISEASE
  • • PSORIASIS
  • • BURSITIS
  • • GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
  • • INSOMNIA
  • • IT CAN ALSO HELP TO INCREASE LONGEVITY AND OVERALL HEALTH

    PYCNOGENOL CAN CROSS THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER

    One of the most significant advantages of this flavonoid compound is its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Consequently, it acts as an invaluable therapeutic agent in treating depression, chronic fatigue, insomnia or loss of memory.

    ANTI-ULCER FORMING PROPERTIES

    Other scientific tests have indicated that proanthocyanidins also posses anti-ulcer properties and may work to prevent the formation of undesirable chemicals in the stomach.13

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    Quercetin and Bromelain - for better health.
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 04, 2005 10:28 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Quercetin and Bromelain - for better health.

  • Maintains Tissue Comfort by Regulating Enzymes*
  • Helps Maintain Normal Blood Viscosity*
  • Bromelain May Enhance Quercetin Absorption
  • Benefits

    Down-regulates the Body’s Response to Environmental Challenges Quercetin is a member of the flavonoid family, a diverse group of low molecular-weight compounds found throughout the plant kingdom. Flavonoids exhibit numerous biological activities, many of which are directly beneficial to human health. Quercetin, which belongs to the “flavonol” subgroup, is one of the most versatile and important flavonoids. Quercetin has a broad range of activity, much of which stems from its interaction with calmodulin, a calcium-regulatory protein.1 Calmodulin transports calcium ions across cellular membranes, initiating numerous cellular processes. Quercetin appears to act as a calmodulin antagonist.1 Through this mechanism, quercetin functions at the cell-membrane level with a membrane-stabilizing action.2 Quercetin inhibits calmodulin-dependent enzymes present at cell membranes such as ATPases and phospholipase, thereby influencing membrane permeability.3 Quercetin affects other calmodulin-dependent enzymes that control various cellular functions, including the secretion of histamine from mast cells.4 A number of investigations have corroborated quercetin’s ability to reduce histamine secretion from mast cells in various tissues, and also from basophils.5,6,7,8,9,10

    Quercetin modifies the body’s response to antigenic substances.* Suppression of histamine secretion from mast cells is one of quercetin’s most clinically important effects. Quercetin acts on ATPase at the membranes of histamine-containing granules in mast cells.3 Mast-cell degranulation and subsequent release of histamine into the bloodstream is an integral part of the body’s response to environmental challenges.

    Maintains Tissue Comfort by Regulating Enzymes*

    Quercetin’s enzyme-inhibiting action extends to enzymes such as phospholipase, which catalyzes the release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids stored in cell membranes.4,10 Arachidonic acid serves as the key substrate for substances such as thromboxanes, inflammatory prostaglandins and leukotrienes. In addition, quercetin inhibits the enzymes cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, which catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into its metabolites.4,10,11,12 Reducing levels of these metabolites, as well as histamine levels, is beneficial in maintaining the normal comfort level of body tissues and structures.

    Quercetin has also been shown to limit the function of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.13 Adhesion molecules are involved in physiologic processes that influence tissue comfort.13

    Bromelain is a complex substance derived from the pineapple stem largely composed of proteolytic (protein-digesting) enzymes. Bromelain acts by a variety of mechanisms to help maintain tissues in a normal state of comfort.14,15 Several investigators, including Taussig16 and Ako, et. al.,17 have presented evidence that bromelain is a fibrinolytic agent, i.e., it induces the breakdown of fibrin, a plasma protein that blocks tissue drainage. The generally accepted mechanisms involve direct proteolysis of fibrin by bromelain and activation of plasmin, a serum protease.16 Plasmin acts on fibrinogen (the precursor to fibrin), forming peptides which stimulate PGE1, a prostaglandin that helps maintain tissue comfort.16

    Helps Maintain Health of Blood Vessels by Modifying Oxidation of LDL Cholesterol* — Quercetin’s Antioxidant Action Quercetin is a versatile and effective antioxidant that scavenges a variety of free-radicals such as hydroxyl and lipid peroxy radicals.18 Quercetin also chelates ions of transition metals such as iron, which can initiate formation of oxygen free radicals.18 LDL cholesterol is vulnerable to oxidation by lipid peroxides. Oxidized LDL is absorbed by macrophages and arterial endothelial cells, leading to the formation of “foam cells,” and eventually plaque deposits, in arterial walls. Quercetin has been shown to protect LDL from oxidation, both by lipid peroxides and transition metal ions.19

    Helps Maintain Normal Blood Viscosity*

    Quercetin inhibits blood platelet aggregation (clumping), by potentiating PGI2, an anti-aggregatory prostaglandin, and by raising platelet cyclic AMP levels.20 Human studies have revealed that bromelain also reduces platelet aggregation.21 These properties qualify both quercetin and bromelain as valuable dietary ingredients for maintaining cardiovascular health.*

    Bromelain May Enhance Quercetin Absorption

    In addition to the actions described above that support the effects of quercetin, bromelain may also assist the absorption of quercetin in the G.I. tract. (Quercetin is generally believed to be poorly absorbed, although a recent study by Hollman et. al.,22 which concluded that humans do in fact absorb appreciable amounts of quercetin, contradicts this assumption.) Studies have shown that bromelain enhances absorption of antibiotics, presumably by increasing permeability of the gut wall.23, 24 Given that quercetin is a low molecular-weight compound, it is plausible that simultaneously ingested bromelain likewise enhances quercetin absorption.

  • *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
  • Scientific References

    1. Nishino, H., et. al., “Quercetin interacts with calmodulin, a calcium regulatory protein.” Experientia 1984;40:184-5.
    2. Busse, W.W., Kopp, D.E., Middleton, E., “Flavonoid modulation of human neutrophil function.” J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 1984;73:801-9.
    3. Havsteen, B,. “Flavonoids, a class of natural products of high pharmacological potency.” Biochemical Pharmacology 1983;32(7):1141-48.
    4. Middleton, E., “The Flavonoids.” Trends in Pharmaceutical Sciences 1984;5:335-8.
    5. Otsuka, H. et. al., “Histochemical and functional characteristics of metachromatic cells in the nasal epithelium in allergic rhinitis: Studies of nasal scrapings and their dispersed cells.” J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.1995;96:528-36.
    6. Fox, C.C., et. al., “Comparison of human lung and intestinal mast cells.” J. Allergy and Clin. Immunol. 1988;81:89-94.
    7. Pearce, F.L., Befus, A.D., Bienenstock, J., “Mucosal mast cells III. Effect of quercetin and other flavonoids on antigen-induced histamine secretion from rat intestinal mast cells.” J. Allergy and Clin. Immunol. 1984;73:819-23.
    8. Middleton, E. Drzewiecki, G., Krishnarao, D., “Quercetin: an inhibitor of antigen-induced human basophil histamine release.” J. of Immunology 1981;127(2):546-50.
    9. Bennett, J.P., Gomperts, B.D., Wollenweber, E.,“ Inhibitory effects of natural flavonoids on secretion from mast cell and neutrophils.” Arzneim. Forsch/Drug Res. 1981;31(3):433-7.
    10. Middleton, E. Drzewiecki G., “Naturally occurring flavonoids and human basophil histamine release.” Int. Archs Allergy appl. Immun. 1985;77:155-7.
    11. Yoshimoto, T. et. al., “Flavonoids: potent inhibitors of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase.” Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 1983;116(2):612-18.
    12. Della Loggia, R., et. al., “Anti-inflammatory activity of benzopyrones that are inhibitors of cyclo- and lipo-oxygenase.” Pharmacological Research Communications 1988; 20(Supp. V):91-94.
    13. Middleton, E., Suresh, A., “Quercetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of endothelial cell intracellular adhesion molecule-1.” Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol. 1995;107:435-6.
    14. Taussig, S.J., Batkin, S., “Bromelain, the enzyme complex of pineapple (Ananas comosus) and its clinical application.” An Update Journal of Ethnopharmacology 1988;22:191-203.
    15. Lotz-Winter, H., “On the pharmacology of bromelain: An update with special regard to animal studies on dose-dependent effects.” Planta Medica 1990;56:249-53.
    16. Taussig, S.J., “The mechanism of the physiological action of bromelain” Medical Hypothesis 1980;6:99-104.
    17. Ako, H. Cheung, A.H.S., Matsuura, P.K., “Isolation of a fibrinolysis activator from commercial bromelain.” Arch. Int. Pharmacodyn. 1981;284:157-67.
    18. Afanas’ev, I.B. et. al., “Chelating and free radical scavenging mechanisms of inhibitory action of rutin and quercetin in lipid peroxidation.” Biochemical Pharmacology 1989;38(11):1763-69.
    19. De Whalley, C.V., “Flavonoids inhibit the oxidative modification of low density lipoproteins by macrophages.” Biochemical Pharmacology 39(11):1743-50.
    20. Beretz, A. Stierle, A., Anton, R. Cazenave, J., “Role of cyclic AMP in the inhibition of human platelet aggregation by quercetin, a flavonoid that potentiates the effect of prostacyclin.” Biochemical Pharmacology 1981;31(22):3597-600.
    21. Heinicke, R. van der Wal, L. Yokoyama, M., “Effect of bromelain (Ananase®) on human platelet aggregation. ”Experientia 1972;28(7):844.
    22. Hollma, P. et. al., “Absorption of dietary quercetin glycosides and quercetin in healthy ileostomy volunteers.” Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1995;62:1276-82.
    23. Giller, F.B., “The effects of bromelain on levels of penicillin in the cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits.” A., J. Pharm. 1962;134:238-244.
    24. Bodi, T., “The effect of oral bromelain on tissue permeability to antibiotics and pain response to bradykinin; double-blind studies on human subjects.” Clin. Med. 1965;72:61-65



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    CHOLESTEROL RESCUE - Maintain Your Cholesterol Wellness
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    Date: June 29, 2005 01:48 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: CHOLESTEROL RESCUE - Maintain Your Cholesterol Wellness

    CHOLESTEROL RESCUE

    You live in a fat-drenched, fast food world, propped up by diets loaded with processed foods that stimulate your body to create excess bad cholesterol – or low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Your busy life is full of stress, and devoid of time for proper exercise. There are three ways to deal with cholesterol in the body, but a seemingly infinite number of lifestyle and hereditary elements that affect LDL levels. Is it any wonder you find yourself in danger of developing unwanted cholesterol levels? Source Naturals is devoted to helping you. So we developed CHOLESTEROL RESCUE as a comprehensive solution to help you keep cholesterol levels in the normal range. CHOLESTEROL RESCUE uses only natural ingredients, clinically researched to effectively maintain healthy cholesterol levels. It is scientifically formulated with the triple action of three ingredients that target the ways you can deal with your cholesterol concerns; combining the naturally occurring polymethoxylated flavone (PMF) and tocotrienol action of Sytrinol™ with the action of plant sterols. Research suggests that daily consumption of 800 mg of plant sterols, taken with food in two divided doses as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Source Naturals offers CHOLESTEROL RESCUE as part of our ongoing commitment to providing you with high quality natural supplements to support your healthy lifestyle.

    Cholesterol & Your Body

    On average, humans ingest approximately 300mg of cholesterol per day. Though an important part of a healthy body, a high level of cholesterol in the blood might be out of the normal range. Cholesterol is transported in your system by lipoproteins. There are two kinds of lipoproteins in your body, but the low-density lipoproteins, or LDL, are the major factors in developing unwanted cholesterol levels. If there are high levels of LDL circulating in your bloodstream, it can undergo oxidation by free radicals in the artery walls, which can then become trapped as imbalanced deposits. These deposits can build up, reducing critical blood-flow. CHOLESTEROL RESCUE has been specially developed to reduce LDL levels using two different methods: inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol in the liver, and reducing the absorption of dietary cholesterol.

    The Plant Sterol Effect

    Sterols are an essential component of the cell membrane, and are produced by both plants and humans. While the most common sterol produced in humans is cholesterol, plants produce phytosterols, or plant sterols. Using a complex compound of plant sterols similar to cholesterol with only slight molecular differences, CHOLESTEROL RESCUE has been formulated to balance the amount of dietary cholesterol your body absorbs.

    Plant sterols have long been known to inhibit the uptake of both dietary and bile-produced cholesterol in the intestines. The most plausible theory behind this is that, because of the similarity between plant sterols and cholesterol, the body cannot properly distinguish between the two during the absorption process, thereby displacing the uptake of cholesterol into your system. Research suggests that daily consumption of 800mg of plant sterols, taken with food in two divided doses as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

    Sytrinol™ For Heart Health

    CHOLESTEROL RESCUE also contains SYTRINOL™, a proven natural alternative for maintaining cholesterol wellness. The patented blend of citrus polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs) and tocotrienols has been clinically shown to promote cardiovascular health by supporting normal cholesterol production by your liver, helping balance triglyceride production, and providing powerful antioxidant protection. The PMFs promote normal cholesterol levels by inhibiting both the production of cholesterol precursors, such as cholesteryl esters, and the activity of HMG CoA Reductase, an enzyme that synthesizes cholesterol in the liver. These PMFs can also balance the body’s production of triglycerides by inhibiting your liver’s triglyceride producing enzyme, diacylglycerol acetyltransferase. Tocotrienols help break down cholesterol building blocks, interfere with cholesterol production, and provide critical antioxidant protection. Because cholesterol becomes problematic when oxidized, the powerful antioxidant action of tocotrienols can help prevent the conditions that may affect your cardiovascular circulation.

    Spearheading the Wellness Revolution in Cholesterol Defense

    With so many ways to develop undesirable cholesterol levels in your body, you need to be proactive in maintaining your good health. In our on-going dedication to your wellness, and a commitment to delivering the benefits of our high quality supplements to the natural products marketplace, Source Naturals has produced a scientifically formulated blend of three effective ingredients in fighting unwanted cholesterol. Combining a comprehensive formula of allnatural components, clinically researched for promoting cardiovascular health, CHOLESTEROL RESCUE is available now at your local health food store.

    References
    Guthrie N, Kurowska EM. Anticancer and Cholesterol-lowering activities of citrus flavonoids. Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods. (Wildman, R.E.C., ed), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. 2001. 113-126. Packer L, Weber SU, Rimbach G. Molecular aspects of alphatocotrienol antioxidant action on cell signaling. Symposium: Molecular Mechanisms of Protective Effects of Vitamin E in Atherosclerosis. American Society for Nutritional Sciences. 2001. 131:369S-373S. Hicks KB, Moreau RA. Phytosterols and phytostanols: functional food cholesterol busters. Food Technology. 2001. 55:63-67. Middleton Jr E, Kandaswami C, Theoharides TC. The effect of plant flavonoids on mammalian cells: implications for inflammation, heart disease, and cancer. Pharmacological Review. 2000. 52:673-751. Child P, Kuksis A. Critical role of ring structure in the differential uptake of cholesterol and plant sterols by membrane preparations in vitro. Journal of Lipid Research. 1983. 24: 1196-1209



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    Gamma E 400 Complex - Vitamin E with Powerful Tocotrienols
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    Date: June 29, 2005 10:50 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Gamma E 400 Complex - Vitamin E with Powerful Tocotrienols

    Gamma E Complex for better health

    Source Naturals brings you a better way of life with breakthrough research in vitamin E, the second most-recommended daily supplement today after multivitamins. No doubt you’ve heard how important vitamin E is to your health, but did you know that all vitamin E supplements are not alike? The bottle many people grab is usually a type of vitamin E chemically known as d-alpha tocopherol. Yet vitamin E is actually a general name for a whole family of compounds—and gamma E is gaining attention as a highly significant and potent form. Only Source Naturals GAMMA E 400 COMPLEX contains all four natural tocopherol forms, supplying 400 mg of gamma E tocopherol, 200 IU of alpha tocopherol, plus 5 mg of all four tocotrienols. And it takes the whole family together as they naturally occur, to derive the synergistic benefits of this remarkable vitamin.

    Vitamin E refers to eight related, lipidsoluble antioxidant compounds widely distributed in plants and especially in vegetable oils: the tocopherol sub-family (alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-) and tocotrienol sub-family (alpha-tocotrienol, beta-tocotrienol, gamma-tocotrienol and delta-tocotrienol). These vital antioxidants are effective against free radicals inside the cell because they are fat-soluble and can pass through the lipid layer of the cell membrane. The American diet is naturally high in gamma E tocopherol compared to alpha—and research now indicates there may be a good reason for this.

    The Missing Link?

    Since alpha tocopherol has historically been the major form sold, gamma tocopherol received little attention. But new research demonstrates that gamma-tocopherol may be the missing link to advanced cardiovascular protection. The combination of vitamin E tocopherols— particularly those with a high gamma-toalpha ratio—is a more potent antioxidant than alpha-tocopherol alone. Gamma-tocopherol protects against peroxynitrite free radicals and lipid peroxidative damage. Research has shown that gamma can inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX-2) activity, the production of irritating prostaglandin E2, and protect against nitrogen-based free radicals as well as afford improved cardiovascular support. Gamma has also been shown to support the activity of the alpha form as well as offer activity of its own—gamma supplementation results in an increase in alpha tocopherol concentrations in the body, whereas taking alpha only may suppress or decrease tissue gamma tocopherol. The eight forms of E are wisely delivered in a base of sesame oil, which is naturally high in gamma tocopherol and other components, including restorative lignans.

    Your Source of Advanced Nutrition

    Epidemiological research and clinical trials have suggested that vitamin E can help maintain healthy blood sugar levels, support healthy cholesterol levels, provide positive effects on the growth and regulation of cells and tissues and even nerve transmission. Source Naturals GAMMA E 400 COMPLEX is the most advanced form of this essential vitamin. We are dedicated to bringing you the finest nutrients modern research has to offer and a better way of life through optimal nutrition and a healthy lifestyle. Make GAMMA-E 400 COMPLEX part of your health plan for more complete nutrition.

    References
    Li, D et al. 2001. Different isoforms of tocopherols enhance nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and inhibit human platelet aggregation and lipid peroxidation: implications in therapy with vitamin E. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 6 (2): 155-161. Jiang, Qing et al. 2001. Gamma-tocopherol, the major form of vitamin E in the US diet, deserves more attention. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 74:714-22. Nesaretnam, et al. 2000. Tocotrienols inhibit growth of ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. 51, S95-S103.



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    Sources of Essential Fatty Acids
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    Date: June 25, 2005 08:38 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Sources of Essential Fatty Acids

    Sources of Essential Fatty Acids

    Essential fatty acids are found in both plant and animal sources, although primarily in plants. The EFA family is composed of two main forms, Omega-3 and Omega-6. The following explains exactly what these forms are.

    OMEGA-3: The most common forms of Omega-3 are eicosapentaenioic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and alpha-linolenic acid, which comes from plants and helps create EPA and DHA. Omega-3 is usually derived from fish oils. Dr. Roger Illingworth, associate professor of medicine and biochemistry at Oregon Health Sciences University, explains that Omega-3 fatty acids are “long-chained metabolic products from linolenic acid. . . When animals consume and metabolize plants rich in linolenic acid, they produce Omega-3.” EPA and DHA are liquid and remain that way, even at room temperature. It is said that they protect fish by providing a body fat that stays fluid even in cold temperatures. OMEGA-6: The most common form of Omega-6 is is gammalinolenic acid (GLA). GLA is known to provide the following benefits, among many others:


    1. Helps facilitate weight loss in overweight persons (but not in people who do not need to lose any weight).
    2. Reduces platelet aggregation (abnormal blood clotting).
    3. Helps reduce symptoms of depression and schizophrenia.
    4. Alleviates premenstrual syndrome symptoms.
    5. May help alcoholics overcome their addiction.

    Omega-6 is usually found in plant sources. The oils of coldwater fish such as salmon, bluefish, herring, tuna, mackerel and similar fish are known as Omega-3 fatty acids. The freshpressed oils of many raw seeds and nuts contain Omega-6 fatty acids. The most popular sources of Omega-3 and Omega-6 include:

    BLACK CURRANT SEED OIL: This oil is rich in linoleic acid (44%) and provides almost twice as much gamma-linolenic acid as evening primrose oil. Black currant seed oil also is an excellent source of an Omega-3 precursor known as stearidonic acid. BORAGE OIL: This oil comes from Borago officinalis, a plant with blue flowers. It is widely recommended in Europe to strengthen the adrenal glands, alleviate symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and relieve inflammation. Besides possibly helping with heart and joint function, it may also assist the growth of nails and hair. Borage oil is also an excellent source of GLA. In The Complete Medicinal Herbal, herbalist Penelope Ody asserts that it is “helpful in some cases of menstrual irregularity, for irritable bowel syndrome, or as emergency first aid for hangovers.” SALMON OIL: This oil is high in Omega-3 essential fatty acids. These types of EFAs are known to thin the blood, prevent clotting, regulate cholesterol production and strengthen cell walls, making them less susceptible to viral and bacterial invasion. Salmon oil has a natural ability to help the body relieve inflammation. In the ground-breaking book The Omega-3 Breakthrough: The Revolutionary, Medically Proven Fish Oil Diet, professor Roger Illingworth writes that Linolenic acid is a fatty acid with 18 carbons and 3 double bonds.

    It is manufactured exclusively by plants. When animals consume and metabolize plants rich in linolenic acid, they produce Omega- 3. Plankton, a minute form of marine life, is part plant and part animal. Its plant component manufactures linolenic acid. Fish eat the plankton, and the linolenic acid breaks down in their bodies in two types of Omega-3 fatty acids: EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) . . . The liquidity of EPA and DHA serves a vital function in fish, who require body fat that remains fluid even in very cold water. Fish oils, besides containing Omega-3 fatty acids, have shown to benefit those suffering from migraine headaches, arthritis, and high cholesterol levels.

    FLAX: Flax is a plant said to date back as far as 5000 B.C. It has been used since approximately 5000 B.C., making it one of the oldest cultivated crops. It is exported from several countries, including Argentina, Canada, India, Russia and the United States. The flowers are usually blue, although they are sometimes white or pink. The mucilaginous seed is, of course, called flaxseed. The oil primarily provides Omega-3/linolenic acid, and provides an average of 57 percent Omega-3, 16 percent Omega-6, and 18 percent of the non-essential Omega-9. Flaxseed oil is said to contain rich amounts of beta carotene (about 4,300 IU per tablespoon) and vitamin E (about 15 IU per tablespoon). In the October 1995 issue of Let’s Live, the history and uses of flax were highlighted by herbalist Carla Cassata. She writes, . . . It’s no wonder the Cherokee Indians highly valued the flax plant. They mixed flaxseed oil with either goat or moose milk, honey and cooked pumpkin to nourish pregnant and nursing mothers, providing them with the needed nutrients for creating strong and healthy children. It was also given to people who had skin diseases, arthritis, malnutrition as well as men wishing to increase virility. They believed flax captured energies from the sun that could then be released and used in the body’s metabolic process.

    This belief has merit. Flaxseed oil, rich in electrons, strongly attracts photons from sunlight. To be effective, EFAs must be combined with protein at the same meal. This flaxseed oil/protein/ sunlight combination releases energy and enhances the body’s electrical system. Also, this combination, along with vitamin E, can be beneficial for infertile couples and women suffering from premenstrual syndrome . . . Flaxseed oil, having an anti-inflammatory effect on the body, can benefit the 40 million Americans suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To achieve optimum results, however, substances that activate the sympathetic nervous system—like refined sugar, soda, coffee, fluoride— must be eliminated. Stress must also be reduced, because it too, activates the sympathetic nervous system, promoting inflammation.

    EVENING PRIMROSE: This flower is indigenous to North America, although the oil is particularly popular throughout Europe for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as night wil - low and evening star. It is an excellent source of both linolenic and linoleic acids. Both of these nutrients must be obtained from the diet, as the body cannot synthesize them. The seeds contain gamma linolenic acid. This polyunsaturated EFA helps with the production of energy and is a structural component of the brain, bone marrow, muscles and cell membranes. Evening primrose oil has also benefited those with multiple sclerosis, PMS, hyperactivity and obesity. It is estimated that it takes about 5,000 seeds to produce the oil for one 500 mg capsule.

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    REFERENCES
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 08:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: REFERENCES

    REFERENCES

    1 a. The Surgeon General’s “Nutrition and Health Report.” b. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES III)” c. The National Academy of Science’s. Diet and Health Report: Health Promotion and Disease Objectives (DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 91-50213, Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1990). e. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 2 Rolls BJ. Carbohydrates, fats, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr 1995; 61(4 Suppl):960S-967S. 3 McDowell MA, Briefel RR, Alaimo K, et al. Energy and macronutrient intakes of persons ages 2 months and over in the United States: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Phase 1:1988-91. Advance data from vital and health statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; No. 255. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics; 1994. 4 Center for Science in the Public Interest and McDonald’s Nutrition and You—A guide to Healthy Eating at McDonald’s: McDonald’s Corp,1991. 5 Bray GA. Appetite Control in Adults. In: Fernstrom JD, Miller GD eds. Appetite and Body Weight Regulation. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1994:1-92. 6 Michnovicz JJ. How to Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer. New York: Warner Book Inc. 1994:54. 7 Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet. National Research Council Report, National Academy of Sciences, 15 Feb. 1996. 8 Van Tallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979:32: 2723-33. 9 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:273. 10 Swaneck GE, Fishman J. Covalent binding of the endogenous estrogen 16A-hydroxyestrone to estradiol in human breast concer cells: characterization and intranuclear localization. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988:85;7831-5. 11 Colditz GA. Epidemiology of breast cancer. Findings from the nurses’ health study. Cancer1993;714:1480-9. 12 Hennen WJ. Breast Cancer Risk Reduction. The effects of supplementation with dietary indoles. Unpublished report 1992. 13 Deslypere BJ. Obesity and cancer. Metabolism 1995;44(93):24-7. 14 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:281. 15 Whittemore AS, Kolonel LN, John M. Prostate cancer in relation to diet, physical activity, and body size in blacks, whites, and Asians in the United States and Canada. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995;87(9):629-31. 16 Key T. Risk factors for prostate cancer. Cancer Survivor 1995;23:63- 77. 17 Kondo Y, Homma Y, Aso Y, Kakizoe T. Promotional effects of twogeneration exposure to a high-fat diet on prostate carcinogenisis in ACI/Seg mice. Cancer Res 1994;54(23):6129-32. 18 Wang Y, Corr JG, Taler HT, Tao Y, Fair WR, Heston WD. Decreased growth of established human prostate LNCaP tumors in nude mice fed a low-fat diet. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995;87(19):1456-62. 19 Nixon DW. Cancer prevention clinical trials. In-Vivo 1994;8(5):713-6. 20 Key T. Micronutrients and cancer aetiology: the epidmiological evidence. Proceed Nutr Soc 1994;53(3):605-14. 21 Gorbach SL, Goldin BR. The intestinal microflora and the colon cancer connection. Reviews of Infectious Diseases 1990;12(Suppl 2):S252-61. 22 Shrapnel WS, Calvert GD, Nestel PJ, Truswell AS. Diet and coronary heart disease. The National Heart Foundation of Australia. Med J Australia. 1995;156(Suppl):S9-S16. 23 Ellis JL, Campos-Outcalt D. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in native Americans: a literature review. Am. J. Preventive Med 1994;10(5):295-307. 24 DiBianco R. The changing syndrome of heart failure: an annotated review as we approach the 21st century. J. Hypertension 1994; 12(4 Suppl):S73- S87. 25 Van Itallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979;32(suppl):2723-33. 26 Kestin M, Moss R, Clifton PM, Nestel PJ. Comparative effects of three cereal brans on plasma lipids, blood pressure and glucose metabolism in mildly hyper-cholesterolemic men. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;52(4):661-6. 27 Story JA. Dietary fiber and lipid metabolism. In: Spiller GA, Kay RM. eds. Medical Aspects of Dietary Fiber. Penun Medical; New York, 1980, p.138. 28 Stein PP, Black HR. The role of diet in the genesis and treatment of hypertension. Med. Clin. North America. 1993;77(4):831-47. 29 Olin JW. Antihypertensive treatment in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Cleve. Clin. J. Medicine. 1994;61(5):337-44. 30 Tinker LF. Diabetes Mellitus—a priority health care issue for women. J. Am. Dietetic Association. 1994;94(9):976-85. 31 Gaspard UJ, Gottal JM, van den Brule FA. Postmenopausal changes of lipid and glucose metabolism: a review of their main aspects. Maturitas. 1995;21(3):71-8. 32 Coordt MC, Ruhe RC, McDonald RB. Aging and insulin secretion. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biology and Medicine. 1995;209(3):213-22. 33 Felber JP. From Obesity to Diabetes. Pathophysiological Considerations. Int. Journal of Obesity 1992;16:937-952. 34 Gillum RF. The association of body fat distribution with hypertension, hypertensive heart disease, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors in men and women age 18-79. J Chronic Diseases 1987;40:421-8. 35 Haffner SM, Stern MP, Hazuda HP, et al. Role of obesity and fat distribution in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellits in Mexican Americans and non- Hispanic whites. Diabetes Care 1986;9:153-61. 36 Bonadonna RC, deFronzo RA. Glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and Metabolism. 1991;17(1 Pt. 2):12-35. 37 Shoemaker JK, Bonen A. Vascular actions of insulin in health and disease. Canadian J. of Applied Physiology. 1995;20(2):127-54. 38 Resnick LM. Ionic Basis of Hypertension, Insulin Resistaince, Vascular Disease, and Related Disorders. The Mechanism of ‘Syndrome X’. Am. J. Hypertension. 1993;6(suppl):123S-134S. 39 Trautwein EA. Dietetic influences on the formation and prevention of cholesterol gallstones. Z. Ernahrugswiss. 1994;33(1):2-15. 40 Cicuttini FM, Spector TD. Osteoarthritis in the aged. Epidemiological issues and optimal management. Drugs and Aging. 1995;6(5):409-20. 41 Melnyk MG, Wienstein E. Preventing obesity in black women by targeting adolescents: a literature review. J Am. Diet. Association. 1994;94(4):536-40. 42 Robinson BE, Gjerdingen Dk, Houge DR. Obesity: a move from traditional to more patient-oriented management. J. Am. Board of Family Practice. 1995;8(2):99-108. 43 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. Reversal of Obesity in the Genetically Obese fa/fa Zucker Rat with an Ehpedrine/Methylxanthines Thermogenic Mixture. J. Nutrition. 1987;117:383-9. 44 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of ephedrin/methylxanthine mixtures: animal studies. Am J Clinical Nutr. 1986;43:388-394. 45 Richelsen B. Health risks of obesity. Significance of the regional distri-bution of adipose tissue. Ugeskr. Laeger. 1991;153(13):908-13. 46 Lissner L, Heitmann BL. Dietary fat and obesity: Evidence from epidemiology. European J. Clinical Nutrition. 1995;49(2):79-90. 47 Lissner L, Heitmann BL. The dietary fat: Carbohydrate ratio in relation to body weight, Current Opinion in Lipidology. 1995;6(1):8-13. 48 Ravussin E. Energy metabolism in obesity. Studies in the Pima Indians. Diabetes Care. 1993;16(1):232-8. 49 O’Dea K. Westernisation, insulin resistance and diabetes in Australian aborigines. Med J. Australia. 1991;155(4):258-64. 50 Bailey C. Fit or Fat . Houghton Mifflen, Boston, 1991. 51 McCarty MF. Optimizing Exercise for Fat Loss. Unpublished report. 52 Weinsier RL, Schutz Y, Bracco D. Reexamination of the relationship of resting metabolic rate and fat-free mass and the the metabolically active components of fat-free mass in humans. Am. J. Clinical Nutrition. 1992;55(4):790-4. 53 Evans WJ. Exercise, nutrition and aging. J. Nutrition. 1992;122(3 suppl):796-801. 54 Schlicker SA, Borra ST, Regan C. The weight and fitness status of United States children. Nutrition Reviews. 1994;52(1):11-7. 55 Raben A, Jensen ND, Marckmann P, Sandstrom B and Astrup A. Spontaeous weight loss during 11 weeks’ ad libitum intake of a low fat/high fiber diet in young, normal weight subjects. Stockholm Press. 1995;916-23. 56 Blundell JE, Cotton JR, Delargy H, Green S, Greenough A, King NA, Lawton, CL. The fat paradox: fat-induced satiety signals versus high fat overconsumption. Short Communication 1995:832-835. 57 Reinhold RB. Late results of gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13(4):307-8. 58 McCredie M, Coates M Grulich A. Cancer incidence in migrants to New South Wales (Australia) from the Middle East, 1972-1991. Cancer Causes Control 1994:5(5):414-21. 59 Schiff ER, Dietschy JM. Steatorrhea Associated with Disordered Bile Acid Metabolism. Am. J. Digestive Diseases. 1969;14(6) 60 Nauss JL , Thompson JL and Nagyvary J. The binding of micellar lipids to Chitosan. Lipids. 1983;18(10):714-19. 61 Braconnot H, Sue la natrue ces champignons. Ann Chim Phys 1811;79:265. 62 Odier A. Memoire sur la composition chemique des parties cornees des insectes. Mem Soc Hist Nat Paris 1823;1:29. 63 Johnson EL, Peniston QP. Utilization of shellfish waste for chitin and Chitosan production. Chp 19 In: Chemistry and Biochemistry of Marine Food Products. Martin RE, Flick GJ, Hebard CE and Ward DR (eds.) 1982. p.415-. AVI Publishing Co., Westport, CT. 64 Shahram H. Seafood waste: the potential for industrial use. Kem Kemi 1992;19(3),256-8. 65 Rouget C. Des substances amylacees dans le tissue des animux, specialement les Articules (Chitine). Compt Rend 1859;48:792. Commission on Natural Health Products. 1995 67 Peniston QP and Johnson EL. Method for Treating an Aqueous Medium with Chitosan and Derivatives of Chitin to Remove an Impurity. US Patent 3,533,940. Oct. 30:1970. 68 Poly-D-Glucosamine (Chitosan); Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance. Federal Register. 1995;60(75):19523-4. Rules and Regulations. Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Part 180. April, 19, 1995. 69 Arul J. “Use of Chitosan films to retard post-harvest spoilage of fruits and vegetables,” Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 70 Karlsen J, Skaugrud O. “Excipient properties of Chitosan,” Manufacturing Chemist. 1991;62:18-9. 71 Winterowd JG, Sandford PA. Chitin and Chitosan. In: Food Polysaccharides and their Applications. Ed: Stephen AM. Marcel Dekker 1995. 72 Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 73 Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 74 Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 75 Zikakis, JP. Chitin, Chitosan and Related Enzymes. Academic Press, Inc. 1984. 76 Abelin J and Lassus A. Fat binder as a weight reducer in patients with moderate obesity. ARS Medicina, Helsinki, Aug- October, 1994. 77 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Increasing effect of a Chitosan and ascorbic acid mixture on fecal dietary fat excretion. Biosci Biotech Biochem 1994;58(9):1617-20. 78 Maezaki Y, Tsuji K, Nakagawa Y, et al. Hypocholesterolemic effect of Chitosan in adult males. Biosci Biotchnol Biochem1993;57(9):1439-44. 79 Kobayashi T, Otsuka S, Yugari Y. Effect of Chitosan on serum and liver cholesterol levels in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutritional Rep. Int., 1979;19(3):327-34. 80 Sugano M, Fujikawa T, Hiratsuji Y, Hasegawa Y. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Chitosan in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutr Rep. Int. 1978;18(5):531-7. 81 Vahouny G, Satchanandam S, Cassidy M, Lightfoot F, Furda I. Comparative effects of Chitosan and cholestryramine on lymphatic absorption of lipids in the rat. Am J Clin Nutr, 1983;38(2):278-84 82 Suzuki S, Suzuki M, Katayama H. Chitin and Chitosan oligomers as hypolipemics and formulations containing them. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 63 41,422 [88,422] 22 Feb1988. 83 Ikeda I, Tomari Y, Sugano M. Interrelated effects of dietary fiber on lymphatic cholesterol and triglyceride absorption in rats. J Nutr 1989;119(10):1383- 7. 84 LeHoux JG and Grondin F. Some effects of Chitosan on liver function in the rat. Endocrinology. 1993;132(3):1078-84. 85 Fradet G, Brister S, Mulder D, Lough J, Averbach BL. “Evaluation of Chitosan as a New Hemostatic Agent: In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 86 Malette W, Quigley H, Gaines R, Johnson N, Rainer WG. Chitosan A New Hemostatic. Annals of Thorasic Surgery. 1983;36:55. 87 Malette W, Quigley H, Adickes ED. Chitosan effect in Vascular Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday, Eds: Chitin in Nature and Technology. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 88 Okamoto Y, Tomita T, Minami S, et al. Effects of Chitosan on experimental abscess with Staphylococcus aureus in dogs. J. Vet. Med., 1995;57(4):765-7. 89 Klokkevold PR, Lew DS, Ellis DG, Bertolami CN. Effect of Chitosan on lingual hemostasis in rabbits. Journal of Oral-Maxillofac-Surg, 1991;Aug. 49(8):858-63. 89 Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 90 Hiroshi S, Makoto K, Shoji A, Yoshikazu S. Antibacterial fiber blended with Chitosan. Sixth International Conference on Chitin and Chitosan. Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland. August 1994;16-19. 91 Shimai Y, Tsukuda K, Seino H. Antiacne preparations containing chitin, Chitosan or their partial degradation products. Jpn. Kikai Tokkyo Koho JP 04,288,017 [92,288,017] 13 Oct 1992. 92 Suzuki K, Okawa Y, Suzuki S, Suzuki M. Candidacidal effect of peritoneal exudate cells in mice administered with chitin or Chitosan: the role of serine protease in the mechanism of oxygen-independent candidacidal effect. Microbiol Immunol. 1987;31(4):375-9. 93 Sawada G, Akaha Y, Naito H, Fujita M. Synergistic food preservatives containing organic acids, Chitosan and citrus seed extracts. Jpn, Kokai Kokkyo Koho JP 04 27,373 [92 27,373] 30 Jan 1992. 94 Min H-K, Hatai K, Bai S. Some inhibitory effects of Chitosan on fishpathogenic oomycete, Saprolegnia parasitic. Gyobyo Kenkyu, 1994;29(2):73-4. 95 Nelson JL, Alexander JW, Gianotti L, Chalk CL, Pyles T. The influence of dietary fiber on microbial growth in vitro and bacterial translocation after burn injury in mice. Nutr 1994;10(1):32-6. 96 Ochiai Y, Kanazawa Y. Chitosan as virucide. Jpn Kokai Tokkyo Koho 79 41,326. 97 Hillyard IW, Doczi J, Kiernan. Antacid and antiulcer properties of the polysaccharide Chitosan in the rat. Proc Soc Expl Biol Med 1964; 115:1108-1112. 98 Shibasaki K, Sano H, MatsukuboT, Takaesu Y. pH response of human dental plaque to chewing gum supplemented with low molecular Chitosan. Bull- Tokyo-Dent-Coll, 1994:35(2): 61-6. 99 Kato H, Okuda H. Chitosan as antihypertensive. Jpn. Kikoi Tokyo Koho JP 06 56,674 [94 56,674] 100 Kato H, Taguchi T. Mechanism of the rise in blood pressure by sodium chloride and decrease effect of Chitosan on blood pressure. Baiosaiensu to Indasutori 1993;51(12):987-8. 101 Muzzarelli R, Biagini G, Pugnaoni A, Filippini O, Baldassarre V, Castaldini C, and Rizzoli C. Reconstruction of Periodontal Tissue with Chitosan. Biomaterials. 1989;10:598-603. 102 Sapelli P, Baldassarre V, Muzzarelli R, Emanuelli M. Chitosan in Dentistry. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 103 Borah G, Scott G, Wortham K. Bone induction by Chitosan in endochrondral bones of the extremities. In Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 104 Ito F. Role of Chitosan as a supplementary food for osteoporosis. Gekkan Fudo Kemikaru, 1995;11(2):39-44. 105 Nakamura S, Yoshioka T, hamada S, Kimura I. Chitosan for enhancement of bioavailability of calcium. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 07 194,316 [95 194,316] 01 Aug 1995. 106 Maekawa A, Wada M. Food Containing chitin or its derivatives for reduction of blood and urine uric acid. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 03 280,852 [91 280,852], 11 Dec 1991. 107 Weisberg M, Gubner R. Compositions for oral administration comprising Chitosan and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Antacid preparations for alleviating gastric hyperacidity. U.S. patent 3257275 108 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Mechanism for the inhibition of fat digestion by Chitosan and for the synergistic effect of ascorbate. Biosci Biotech Biochem1995;59(5):786-90. 109 McCausland CW. Fat Binding Properties of Chitosan as Compared to Other Dietary Fibers. Private communication. 24 Jan1995. 110 Deuchi K, Kanauchi O, Imasato Y, Kobayashi E. Biosci Biotech Biochem. 1994:58,1613-6. 111 Ebihara K, Schneeman BO. Interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, cholesterol and triglyceride with dietary fibers in the small intestine of rats. J Nutr 1989;119(8):1100-6. 112 Weil A, M.D. Natural Health Natural Medicine: Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1990:182. 113 Chen Y-H, Riby Y, Srivastava P, Bartholomew J, Denison M, Bjeldanes L. Regualtion of CYP1A1 by indolo[3,2-b]carbazole in murine hepatoma cells. J Biol Chem 1995;270(38):22548-55. 114 Intestinal Absorption of metal ions and chelates. Ashmead HD, Graff DJ, Ashmead HH. Charles C Thomas, Springfield, IL 1985. 115 Nutrient Interactions. Bodwell CE, Erdman JW Jr. Marcel Dekker New York 1988. 116 Heleniak EP, Aston B. Prostaglandins, Brown Fat and Weight Loss. Medical Hypotheses 1989;28:13-33. 117 Connor WE, DeFrancesco CA, Connor SL. N-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Effects on plasma lipoproteins and hypertriglyceridemic patients. Ann NY Acad Sci 1993;683:16-34. 118 Conte AA. A non-prescription alternative in weight reduction therapy. The Bariatrician Summer 1993:17-19. 119 McCarty MF. Inhibition of citrate lyase may aid aerobic endurance. Unpublished manuscript. 120 Bray GA. Weight homeostasis. Annual Rev Med 1991;42:205-216. 121 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of Ephedrin/Methylxanthine mixtures: Human studies. Intl J Obesity 986;10:467-481. 122 Arai K, Kinumaki T, Fujita, T. Bulletin Tokai Regional Fisheries Res Lab. 1968;No. 56. 123 Bough WA. Private communication. 124 Freidrich EJ, Gehan, EA, Rall DP, Schmidt LH, Skipper HE. Cancer Chemotherapy Reports 1966;50(4):219-244. 125 A Drovanti, AA Bignamini, AL Rovati. Therapeutic activity of oral glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis: A placebo-controlled double-blind investigation. Clinical Therapeutics 1980;3(4):260-272. 126 K Deuchi, O Kanauchi, M Shizukuishi, E Kobayashi. Continuous and massive intake of Chitosan affects mineral and fat-soluble vitamin status in rats fed on a high-fat diet. Biosci. Biotech. Biochemistry. 1995;59(7):1211-6. 127 . BesChitin W in Chitin Wound Healing (video), Unitika Corporation, April 1992.

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    FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview
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    Date: June 25, 2005 07:34 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview

    FEARING FATS: There's Plenty of Cause Overview

    A wealth of scientific evidence now exists which should have turned each and everyone of us into a fat “phobic.”1a-e In other words, virtually every health expert agrees that a high fat diet is directly linked to cardiovascular disease, various types of cancer and premature death. It’s no secret that excess dietary fat poses a tremendous health risk. The United States National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization and many other scientific institutes have confirmed the frightening hazards of fat. Health proponents generally concur that excess fat can significantly shorten one’s lifespan. More than 10,000 medical papers are published every year dealing with obesity and cardiovascular disease, two of the most insidious killers of Americans. Western eating habits, which promote fatty, salty, sugary foods, have created massive widespread disease and tremendous suffering. Studies have shown that fat is the macronutrient associated with overeating -

    ------------------------------------

  • • BACON CHEESEBURGER/HARDEE’S 39
  • • BURRITO SUPREME/TACO BELL 22
  • • HAMBURGER DELUXE/WENDY’S 21
  • • QUARTER POUNDER WITH CHEESE/MCDONALD’S 28
  • • SAUSAGE BISCUIT WITH EGG/MCDONALD’S 33
  • • POPCORN CHICKEN/KFC 45
  • • WHOPPER/BURGER KING 36

    TABLE 1. Total fat grams in single servings.4

    and obesity.2 In spite of this finding we are eating more fat and becoming fatter. The average absolute fat intake has increased from 81 to 83 grams per day over the last ten years.3 Our obsession with fatty foods has exacted an enormous toll in the form of rampant obesity, clogged arteries, hypertension, heart attack, stroke, breast cancer, etc. Many of us remain oblivious to the fat gram count of foods we routinely pop into our mouths, unaware that one fast food entree may contain more fat grams than one should consume in one given day. Take a good look at the following list of foods which have been assessed for fat content. Fast food has become a 20th-century sensation which continues to boom and expand throughout our society. Many of us literally exist on fast food, which is frequently also “fat” food. It’s no wonder so many of us “battle the bulge”, and have skyrocketing cholesterol counts. Our love affair with greasy, fried, rich, creamy foods has burdened our bodies with the dilemma of excess fat “baggage,” resulting in phenomenal amounts of money being spent on weight loss programs. Worse still, thousands of Americans are dying before their time or living extremely compromised lives only because they ingest too much fat. Why is this? The bottom line is that fats taste good!5 Many of us were raised on seemingly innocuous foods that are loaded with fat. Some of these include:

    macaroni and cheese battered fish sticks hot dogs cheese-filled casseroles pepperoni pizza burritos pancakes, waffles doughnuts pies and pastries ice cream candy bars ramen soup

    Fat is also a major ingredient in most of the snack food we constantly nibble on, including chips, crackers, cookies, and nuts. Check ingredient labels to find the fat gram content of most snack foods. You’ll be surprised to find out just how fatty these foods are. Even a healthy sounding food like a “bran muffin” can contain 36 grams of fat! No wonder they stay so “moist”. In addition to the above foods, fat can add wonderful flavor to breads, vegetables and the like, and is usually used liberally in the form of butter, sour cream, whipping cream, melted cheese, cream cheese spreads, dips, cream sauces, and gravies. Fruits can also be high in fats. Did you know that one avocado has 30 grams of fat? One half cup of peanuts contains 35 grams of fat and only one glazed doughnut has 13 grams of fat. The majority of research points to fat as a much more dangerous culprit than anyone might have imagined. Saturated fats such as lard, palm, coconut oil, and beef tallow are particularly menacing. Research scientists have found over and over again that fats can contribute to the growth of tumors in animal studies.6 The National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences reported that even a relatively small amount of extra body fat increases the risk of certain diseases for women and may compromise their longevity.7 Even being mildly overweight may be much more risky than anyone previously assumed.8

    The Relat ionship between Breast Cancer, Fat s, Fiber And Indoles

    Dr. Leonard Cohen, of the Dana Institute of the American Health Foundation at Naylor, believes that pre-cancerous lesions found in breast tissue will develop into cancer only if they are stimulated by certain agents such as fat.9 Women increase their risk of developing breast cancer when they consume a diet high in fat and animal protein and low in fiber, vegetables and fruits. When women put on weight, they have a tendency to create more estrogen since adipose tissue produces estrogen. Certain forms of estrogen, the so-called “bad estrogens” can act as carcinogens and are anything but desirable.10 High or unbalanced estrogen levels stimulate concerous tissue in the breast. Obesity is also associated with increased breast cancer mortality.11 The three most important ways to inhibit “bad” estrogen from inducing breast cancer are:
    1. Maintain an ideal body weight.
    2. Eat a diet high in fiber and low in fat (fiber helps to sweep excess estrogen from the bowel so it does not “recycle”).
    3. Consume enough cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, radishes, watercress etc.) so that adequate amounts of dietary indole-3-carbinol enter the system.12 Indoles are phytonutrients which help us balance our estrogen levels and reduce the levels of “bad estrogen” present. When combined with a low-fat, high-fiber diet, indoles can provide the body with significant metabolic protection against breast cancer.

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    How Does CLA Work?
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    Date: June 22, 2005 09:46 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: How Does CLA Work?

    How Does CLA Work?

    How could CLA hinder the growth and development of certain cancers in animals? Scientists have developed some intriguing possibilities, and many of them are related to the theory of antioxidants.

    WHAT IS AN ANTIOXIDANT?

    Well, one of the ironies of life is that oxygen, so essential to human life, also causes decay. Look at the parts of your car where paint may have pealed away, and you will notice rust, what scientists call oxidation. Molecules of oxygen combine with the iron or chromium on your car and change its chemical alignment to iron oxide or chromium oxide—rust. In a very real sense, the same thing happens to you as you age. Inside your cells, thousands of chemical reactions take place each moment. These reactions break apart the long chains of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen that make up body tissues and combines them in new ways. Some of those combinations cause decay. One example is when a free radical—a single atom of roaming oxygen—attaches itself to something useful, rendering it useless or even dangerous. If a free radical were to change DNA, for example, that could mutate a cell. This free radical process is one way this oxidation occurs, and antioxidants, often called free radical scavengers, attach themselves to the free radicals, blocking their damage. This can help improve life and help to cut the problems of oxidation. Indeed, many see antioxidants as a way of lessening the risks of cancer.

    Many people know about important antioxidants, such as ascorbigen (vitamin C), selenium or alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), but nature provides numerous antioxidants. Many exciting ones are emerging, such as proanthocyanidins (often known as pycnogenol), quercetin (common in many fruits) and selenium (a mineral). C LA may be another antioxidant emerging from the research. Dr. Pariza and others found in a 1991 experiment that in the test tube, CLA was effective in battling free radicals. 28 It helped prevent damage to the DNA inside the cells. Pariza says in another paper, “Our hypothesis is that the antioxidant activity of CLA may at least in part explain its anticarcinogenic effect.”29 That would mean that one way CLA prevents cancer is because it blocks these dangerous free radicals. (Other theories about how it fights cancer include breaking down the chemicals that cause cancer into others that don’t .30 All the theories may be true in specific situations, and none might.) But like many other emerging, exciting areas of scientific inquiry, this idea that CLA is an antioxidant has doubters. Researchers J.J. van den Berg, N.E. Cook and D.L. Tribble wanted to see if CLA protected fatty membranes comprised of a substance called palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) from the damage of biologic oxidation. In research published in 1995, they compared CLA’s effect to the wellknown antioxidant vitamin E. While vitamin E protected well, CLA did relatively little. They also found that CLA did not become a mineral chelator, an agent that helps natural minerals become available biologically. They bluntly said, “On the basis of our observations, a role for CLA as an antioxidant does not seem plausible.”31

    Another study in 1995, however, showed that CLA can break down into other substances, called feran derivatives, that do act as antioxidants.32 As in all emerging Sciences, debates ensue among honest, dedicated researchers. CLA may not, itself, be a antioxidant. Perhaps it acts as antioxidant in only certain situations. Perhaps things that come from CLA act like antioxidants. That is the state of the research today. (Indeed, Dr. Pariza says such debates are common in the field of antioxidants. 33)

    What is important to remember is that in numerous animal models, CLA protected against the dangers of many different kinds of cancer in animals, and that, according to scientists, it is one of the most potent cancer-preventing substances of its kind known to science. Whether the cause of this effect was because of CLA or because of some other reason really isn’t that important.

    Another thing to remember is that CLA is not a cancer drug. It is something that would be useful in addition to other cancer treatments. It is something to consider to lower your risks and, perhaps, lessen the effects of treatment. It should not be considered a treatment option on its own.

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    Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) and Mercury Cleansing Programs...
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    Date: June 21, 2005 05:02 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) and Mercury Cleansing Programs...

    Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) and Mercury Cleansing Programs

    by Isaac Eliaz, M.D., M.S., L.Ac.

    Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) is a dietary supplement derived from the peel and pulp of citrus fruit. MCP is mostly known for its positive effects on cellular health. Recently, however, clinical research on MCP has produced exciting results for its use as a gentle chelator (eliminator) of mercury and other heavy metals. Some of the expanding clinical applications for MCP include:

  • * Detoxification; reduction of heavy metal body burden
  • * Supports normal cholesterol levels
  • * Immunomodulation enhancement

    The Problem with Mercury

    Recent news on mercury is particularly concerning for the U.S. population. In March 2004 the EPA issued a press release reporting nearly all fish contained traces of mercury. Some samples contained levels high enough to harm an unborn baby or young child's developing nervous system. These findings prompted the EPA to issue a warning to women who may become pregnant, pregnant women and nursing mothers advising them to eat only two meals of fish per week that are thought to have lower levels of mercury.1 In their most recent update (August 2004), the EPA issued a warning that 1/3 of the nation's lakes and 1/4 of its river ways are contaminated with toxic levels of mercury and other contaminants, and warned pregnant women and children against consumption of fish from these sources. Additionally, a National Academy of Sciences panel definitively warned that some children who had been exposed to mercury while in the wombs of their mothers were at risk for becoming those children "who have to struggle to keep up in school and who might require remedial classes of special education." The risk of mercury toxicity from fish has reached epidemic levels. Two studies have further spurred on the concerns of mercury toxicity, as they both found women to have mercury levels that are 8-10% above what is considered safe.1,2 Furthermore, women who ate more fish were found to have higher levels of mercury. Another source of mercury toxicity may be amalgam dental fillings. Heavy metals, in conjunction with the abundant presence of environmental toxins and xenoestrogens, constitute a dangerous insult to the body through DNA damage, hormonal modulation, immune suppression, oxidative stress, and cellular irritation.

    A New Application for MCP Use: Heavy Metal Detoxification

    The standard western medical approach for removing mercury from the body to treat mercury toxicity is chelation. This procedure is performed with harsh chelators that can cause multiple side effects while potentially robbing the body of some of its essential nutrients. While this may be the routine and most beneficial procedure when facing a serious toxicity problem, are there other, gentler ways to reduce mercury levels? Two recent clinical studies have found that MCP may be a promising new dietary solution for reducing heavy metal load. In one recent clinical study, MCP was administered to a group of volunteers, and baseline levels of their total body mercury burden were measured and then compared against levels after treatment with MCP (15 grams of PectaSol® daily) for four months. The results showed a significant average decrease (over 60%; p=0.03) in the total body mercury burden after treatment with MCP3 In an earlier study, PectaSol® was given to patients and proven to increase urinary secretion of heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic.4 Both studies concluded that MCP may be a promising alternative to the harsher intravenous chelating therapies as MCP was found to be both effective and free of any side effects.

    How MCP Works as a Gentle Chelator

    Pectins are natural gelling agents, binders, thickeners, and stabilizers in foods. They mostly consist of galacturonic acid and galacturonic-acid methyl esters with average molecular weights from 50,000 to 150,000 daltons. High-methoxy (HM) pectin has at least 50% DE (degree of esterification) or greater, while a low-methoxy (LM) pectin?s DE is 50% or less. For systemic chelation of heavy metals, pectin is modified to a low molecular weight, and low-methoxy content. My observation from using MCP as a detoxification agent in my clinic is that it works as a gentle chelator in the bloodstream and it is very useful for ongoing use. Because fish are still recommended as part of a healthy diet and an essential source of certain nutrients (essential fatty acids like DHA), mercury levels are also becoming a widespread health concern. It is a Catch-22 for dietary health. As the widespread environmental cleanup of mercury is unlikely in the short-term, the medical community should develop methods to treat toxicity or reduce high body levels of mercury body burden. One approach is the use of traditional and alternative medicine cleansing programs along with the use of dietary supplements such as MCP that may act as gentle chelators. For chelation purposes, 5-15 grams of MCP should be taken per day depending on mercury levels for one year. Maintenance at 2-5 grams per day thereafter is usually sufficient. In my practice, I use 15 grams per day or 15 grams per day in the first 3-5 days of the month and 5 grams per day for the remainder of the month. MCP is generally regarded as safe and is well tolerated. Reported side effects have been rare, but may include mild and transient gastrointestinal discomfort.

    References:

    1-CDC Press Release: Blood and Hair Mercury Levels in Young Children and Women of Childbearing Age-United States, 1999 (see:/media/mmwrnews/n010302.htm#mmwr3) 2-Schober, SE, Sinks, TH, Jones, RL et al. (2003) Blood mercury levels in US children and women of childbearing age, 1999-2000. Journal of the American Medical Association. 289(13) :1667-74. 3-Eliaz, I. (2004) Modified citrus pectin (MCP) in the treatment of cancer. Paper presented at: The American Chemical Society Annual Meeting; Philadelphia, PA. 4-Eliaz, I. and D. Rode (2003). The effect of modified citrus pectin on the urinary excretion of toxic elements. Fifth Annual Conference of Environmental Health Scientists: Nutritional Toxicology and Metabolomics, University of California, Davis.

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    Isaac Eliaz, M.D., M.S., L.Ac., is a pioneer in the field of integrative medicine and founder of Better Health Publishing®, an education-based company that provides health care professionals, consumers and other interested parties with scientific research on integrative medicine. He is a respected author, clinical practitioner and frequent guest lecturer on integrative medical approaches to health, immune enhancement and cancer prevention and treatment. Since 1991, Dr. Eliaz has maintained a busy private practice in Sebastopol, California, and is the current medical director of the Amitabha Medical Clinic and Healing Center (email:information@amitabhaclinic.com) which focuses primarily on integrative and holistic protocols for cancer patients as well as those with chronic health challenges.



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    Anti-Aging Nutrients
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    Date: June 18, 2005 09:07 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Anti-Aging Nutrients

    Anti-Aging Nutrients by Edward C. Wallace, DC, ND Energy Times, February 3, 2000

    What's the big deal about trying to live longer? As you grow older (and the American population grows older alongside you) you may want to postpone the inevitable. Few wish to hasten "the journey from which no traveler returns." But as we approach that final bon voyage, chances are we desire clear sailing-aging without disability and with a peaceful, easy feeling.

    How Do We Age?

    Science has long puzzled about what causes the wrinkles, pains and deterioration of aging. In the search for causes, two basic theories have won over the most proponents: The first holds that cells are programmed with biological clocks that predetermine how many times they can reproduce before becoming non-functional. This theory has been largely formulated by the researcher Leonard Hayflick, MD.

    The second basic theory, introduced by Denham Harman, MD, PhD, in the mid 1950s, holds that cells eventually break down due to attack by caustic molecules called free radicals that cause oxidative stress.

    Programmed Cell Theory

    In the early '60s, Dr. Hayflick observed that human fibroblasts (cells from connective tissue) in the laboratory refused to divide more than about 50 times. Dr. Hayflick also found that even if he froze the fibroblasts after 20 divisions, they would remember that they only had 30 divisions left after thawing.

    Fifty cell divisions have been called the "Hayflick limit." Based on this research, scientists theorize that cells maintain a genetic clock that winds down as old age ensues. Many researchers believe the hypothalamus gland is the force behind our aging clocks, signaling the pituitary gland to release hormones that cause aging.

    Free Radical/Oxidative Stress Theory

    The other popular theory of aging pictures the human body as a cellular battlefield where attackers called free radicals damage our cells and tissues, making them age. In this scenario, a process called oxidation is the chief aging villain. On a microscopic level, oxidation generally entails molecules or atoms losing electrons. (Gaining electrons is called reduction.) The molecules or atoms that take these electrons are oxidizing agents.

    Free radicals are substances that can exist with missing electrons, making them readily able to donate or accept electrons and damage structures in cells. As such, they are highly reactive, binding with and destroying important cellular compounds. Most of the free radicals in your body are made during metabolic processes. More are added from the food you eat and environmental pollution. Most of these free radicals contain oxygen molecules. As each cell makes energy in little structures called mitochondria, free radicals result. These oxidant by-products can damage DNA, proteins and lipids (fats). Consequently, toxic by-products of lipid peroxidation may cause cancer, inhibit enzyme activity and produce mutations in genetic material that make you age faster.

    DNA Repair Theory

    Free radical damage to DNA can cause cells to mutate or die. Your body makes enzymes that can repair this damage and slow aging. But, over time, the amount of damage overwhelms the body's ability to fix things. As cells grow older, their ability to patch up DNA diminishes and the rate of damage proceeds faster than repair. The result: We age and eventually die.

    What Can We Do?

    The free radical theory of aging suggests that taking antioxidants (compounds known to prevent free radical damage) in our food or as supplements may slow aging.

    In the publication Age (18 [51] 1995: 62), it was reported that "aging appears to be caused by free radicals initiated by the mitochondria at an increasing rate with age. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide radicals formed by the mitochondria during normal metabolism are major risk factors for disease and death after about the age of 28 in developed countries. Antioxidants from the diet lower the production of free radicals without impairing essential reactions to maintain body function."

    Antioxidant Protection

    Common dietary antioxidants include: vitamins E and C, carotenes, sulphur containing amino acids, co-enzyme Q10 and flavonoids (a group of plant compounds or pigments responsible for the color in fruits and flowers). In addition, melatonin, DHEA and the amino acid compound glutathione may also prove of benefit.

    Glutathione along with the enzyme glutathione peroxidase are an essential part of free radical "quenching." (Quenching means changing free radicals into benign substances no longer capable of harm.) Deficiencies may suggest a decreased capacity to maintain detoxification and metabolic reactions in which glutathione plays a role, resulting in increased free radical stress and/or lipid peroxidation. Drinking too many alcoholic beverages can result in glutathione deficiency.

    In a study in which 39 healthy men and 130 healthy women between the ages of 20 and 94 were evaluated for glutathione levels, the older subjects had significantly decreased levels (especially in the 60 to 79-year-old group). The authors felt that physical health and longevity were closely related to glutathione levels (Jrnl Lab & Clin Sci 120(5), Nov. 1992: 720-725). Poor nutrition and/or deficiencies in essential micronutrients and many prescription medications may contribute significantly to detoxification capacity in an aged individual. All of these circumstances are common in the elderly.

    Eating a poor diet that contains too many processed foods without many fruits and vegetables can compromise your body's ability to detoxify pollutants, toxins and other harmful compounds. That can set off metabolic processes capable of fomenting large increases in free radical stress that can accelerate aging. Unfortunately, even in a country as prosperous as our own, nutrient deficiencies are frequent, especially in older citizens.

    Nutrition Deficiencies

    A study that looked at what elderly people consumed compared their reported intake with the 1989 Recommended Dietary Amount (RDA) and 1980 RDA: One of four people consumed only two-thirds of the RDA for calories and 60% consumed less than two-thirds of the RDA for vitamin D. As for other nutrients, 50% were found to have inadequate zinc levels (less than two-thirds of the RDA), 31% lacked calcium, 27% were short of vitamin B6, 25% didn't get enough magnesium, 7% missed out on folate and 6% ate less than two-thirds of the requirement for vitamin C (Nutrition Reviews (II), September 1995: S9-S15).

    When researchers examine what everyone in the U.S. eats, they find that only 9% of Americans consume the recommended five servings of fruits and/or vegetables per day (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sept 1993).

    A diet high in fruits and vegetables is naturally high in antioxidant compounds and is believed to help you live longer. Unfortunately, if you buy your produce in the supermarket, those fruits and vegetables may also be rich in pesticide and herbicide residues (Consumer Reports, March 1999). Obviously, organic produce lacks these residues. But, in any case, research continues to indicate that a diet low in meats and animal fat and high in vegetables protects against antioxidant damage.

    Longevity Diets

    A six-year study of 182 people over age 70 in rural Greek villages found that those following their traditional diet of olive oil, whole grain breads, fresh fruits and vegetables and wine were less likely to die during the study than those who consumed more red meat and saturated fat. The most important foods in lowering the risk of early death included fruits, vegetables, legumes (peas and beans), nuts, dairy products and cereals (BMJ 311, 1995: 1457-1460).

    Another article in Epidemiology highlights the evidence that eating a vegetarian diet increases your chances of living longer. Included in this survey is a recent country-wide study of diet and health in China, showing that the traditional near vegetarian diet of 10% to 15% of calories coming from dietary fat reduced the chances of heart disease, diabetes and many types of cancers (Epidemiology 3[5], 1992: 389-391).

    Staying Alive

    Staying skinny and limiting what you eat may also increase longevity. Scientific studies have previously shown that being overweight can theoretically curtail your life, increasing the risk of heart disease, diabetes and other life-shortening conditions. Animal studies have also shown that restricting food can slow diseases associated with aging. Researchers believe that cutting calories helps your immune system stay younger by reducing the formation of substances that are called proinflammatory cytokines.

    Specifically reducing your intake of fatty foods may decrease your chance of coming down with autoimmune diseases. Researchers think omega-6 fatty acid vegetable oils (like corn oil) may increase free radical formation and decrease levels of antioxidant enzyme messenger RNA in addition to other effects (Nutrition Reviews 53[4], 1995: S72-S79). Another study found that cutting calories lowers the levels of oxidative stress and damage, retards age-associated changes and extends maximum life span in mammals (Science 273, July 5, 1996: 59-63).

    In yet another study, it was shown that caloric restriction early in the life of lab animals increased their life span by a whopping 40% (Australian Family Physician 23[7], July 1994: 1297-1305). Today's modern higher-fat, low-fiber diet with substantial sugar consumption represents everything the longevity researchers say you shouldn't eat.

    Longevity and Exercise

    Exercise may slow aging. When researchers looked at the exercise habits of 17,000 men, average age of 46, they found that those who took part in vigorous activity lived longer.

    Exercise can improve both cardiac and metabolic functions within the body, while also decreasing heart disease risk. Even modest exercise has been shown to improve cholesterol and blood sugar levels (JAMA 273[15], April 19, 1995: 1179-1184). In a study of how exercise affects your chances of living longer, 9,773 men underwent preventive medicine examinations on two different occasions. When the researchers looked at who lived longest, they found the highest death rate was in men who were unfit during both physical exams.

    The Treadmill of Life

    The lowest death rate was in the men who worked out and were in good shape. The researchers concluded that for each minute increase in how long a man could keep treading on a treadmill (between the first and second exam) there was a corresponding 7.9% decrease in the risk of dying (JAMA 273 [14], April 12, 1995: 1093-1098).

    Since exercise can increase oxygen consumption up to 10 times, boosting the rate of production of free radicals, researchers believe that older individuals need more antioxidant nutrients to protect them. In a paper published in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (1997), researchers stated that if you regularly exercise in your golden years, you should take more antioxidant vitamins to compensate for this risk.

    Longevity Supplementation

    Melatonin is not often thought of as an antioxidant, but, instead, as a sleep aid. Melatonin, however, is an effective and efficient free radical scavenger and may help stave off the effects of aging. Melatonin protects against what are called hydroxyl free radicals. Research shows that older people's lack of melatonin may make them more susceptible to oxidative stress. In one study, researchers felt that new therapies aimed at stimulating melatonin synthesis may eventually lead to therapies for the prevention of diseases related to premature aging (Aging and Clinical Experimental Research 7[5], 1995: 338-339). Melatonin was shown to provide antioxidant protection in several ways.

    Toning Down Enzymes

    Melatonin can ease the effects of enzymes that generate free radicals, enhance the production of glutathione peroxidase (an antioxidant) and defuse the caustic action of free radicals that contain hydroxyls. In several studies, DHEA supplementation has been shown to potentially revive immune function in older adults (Exp. Opin. Invest. Drugs 4[2], 1995: 147-154).

    In a study of 138 persons older than 85 years compared to 64 persons 20 to 40 years of age, scientists found that the younger people had four times as much DHEA in their bodies.

    The researchers believe that our bodies make less and less DHEA as we get older. The authors of this study raise the possibility that declining DHEA may be partly to blame for our biological clocks running down (New York Academy of Sciences 1994: 543-552).

    Vitamins E & C

    A growing body of research also supports the benefits of taking vitamins E and C to hold off the effects of getting old. Researchers writing in Free Radicals and Aging (1992: 411-418) point out that as you get older your body is home to more and more free radical reactions that may lead to degenerative diseases like heart disease and arthritis. Research has found that in older people with exercise-induced oxidative stress, taking vitamin E every day may significantly fight off free radicals. (To investigate this effect, scientists measured waste products in urine that result from free radical reactions.) Their conclusion: Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin E may be beneficial.

    Chronological Age Vs.Biological Age

    Vitamin C also looks to scientists like a good anti-aging bet. Research in the Journal of Advancement in Medicine, (7[1], Spring 1994: 31-41) showed that folks consuming larger amounts of vitamin C were less likely to experience clinical problems at all ages. Those taking in less than 100 mg of vitamin C per day also suffered the most problems.

    In this research, individuals over 50 years of age who daily consumed the largest amount of vitamin C were as healthy or healthier than the 40 year olds who were taking the least amount of vitamin C.

    Similar Relationship

    A similar relationship appears to exist for vitamin E and serum cholesterol levels. In a study of 360 physicians and their spouses, researchers found that people in their 50s who consumed more vitamin E had lower cholesterol than those in their 30s who were taking less.

    And the longevity beat goes on: In a study evaluating environmental tobacco smoke and oxidative stress, researchers divided 103 people into three groups. Researchers blew smoke at 37 of these folks without protection while 30 of them got to breathe tobacco smoke but took antioxidant supplementation. Another 36 of them merely had to read magazines from doctors' offices. The results: After 60 days of supplementation the antioxidant folks had a 62% reduction in evidence of oxidative damage to their DNA. Cholesterol levels dropped and so did antioxidant enzyme activities. The researchers concluded that taking antioxidants provided a modicum of protection against environmental poisons.

    The range of antioxidant nutrients used in this study included: beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium as well as copper (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 7, November 1998: 981-988).

    Carotenoids

    When you mention carotene or carotenoids, most people think of the beta carotene that makes carrots orange. But more than 600 carotenoids are present in colorful vegetables and many of these misunderstood substances are more potent antioxidants than beta-carotene.

    Carotenoids have been shown to destroy oxygen free radicals in lipids (fats), help protect our cells from the sun's ultra violet radiation and enhance our natural immune response (J. Nutr 119[1], Jan. 1989: 112-115).

    Some evidence seems to show that how much carotenoids you (and other mammals) have in your cells may be the predominant factor in determining life span (Proc Natl Acad Sci 82 [4], 1985: 798-802). Therefore, a diet rich in carotenoids (leafy green vegetables, carrots, yams, sweet potatoes, squash, citrus fruits and tomatoes) along with supplementation seems to be just what the fountain of youth ordered.

    Flavonoids

    Flavonoids, a group of antioxidant plant pigments, seem to be able to protect specific organs. For instance, the flavonoids in milk thistle (Silybum marianum) have been used for ages for liver problems. Bilberry has been found protective for the eye and hawthorn for the heart and circulatory system.

    Numerous studies have shown the many beneficial effects of flavonoids with perhaps the best known being the ability of anthocyanidins in wine and grape seed extract to help protect your blood vessels and capillaries from oxidative damage (Phytotherapy 42, 1986: 11-14; Am J Clin Nutr 61, 1995: 549-54).

    Flavonoids are found in vegetables and such fruits as blackberries, blueberries, cherries and grapes. A diet rich in these foods helps ensure an adequate intake of these important nutrient compounds.

    Amino Acid Health

    Methionine and cysteine are sulphur containing amino acids (protein building blocks), both of which are essential in maintaining levels of glutathione, a substance that plays a major role in quelling free radicals. Studies have found that as we age, the level of these important amino acids in our bodies decreases. (NEJM 312 [1], 1985: 159-68). As it has been shown that adding cysteine to the diet of test animals can increase their life expectancy considerably, researchers believe these amino acids can help us live longer too.

    Attitude & Behavior

    Get more sleep! A recent study showed that men who habitually napped were less likely to have a heart attack. The men in this research who regularly napped for at least 30 minutes per day had about a 30% reduction in heart problems while those who napped for a full hour had a 50% reduction compared to non nappers. Naps of longer duration did not seem to increase the benefit. In the same research, investigators also found that spending time with a pet or merely contemplating nature could also improve cardiac health. Sensuality, optimism and altruism also appeared to have health benefits (Family Practice News, December 15, 1998: 14-15).

    In another study, this one in American Psychologist, researchers from the University of California found that people who are self-indulgent, pampered and achieve by running roughshod over the competition are less likely to outlive their healthy peers. Being egocentric, impulsive, undependable and tough-minded were predictors of poor physical health and a shorter life. So loosen up and be nice to your fellow humans! (U.C. Davis Magazine, Fall 1995: 14).

    Longevity at Last

    While no one has suggested that taking supplements, eating vegetables or exercising can, as of yet, extend the human life span past the generally recognized limit of about 120 years, researchers believe they can improve your odds of longer life. And by staying healthier, your old age will be more enjoyable, too.



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    Cancer fighter is found in broccoli
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    Date: June 14, 2005 06:09 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Cancer fighter is found in broccoli

    Cancer fighter is found in broccoli

    WASHINGTON (AP) - Remember when your mother told you to eat broccoli? Scientists say they've proved mother knows best.

    Dr. Paul Talalay of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine said in a paper published today that studies in his lab show broccoli is rich in sulforaphane, a chemical that works as a powerful anti-cancer compound in laboratory mice. Studies have shown that a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower, can lower the risk of cancer of the bowel, stomach and breast. How those vegetables caused the effect wasn't clear.

    Now, Dr. Talalay said, it appears that at least one anti-cancer ingredient in the vegetables is sulforaphane. It works by causing cells to expel cancer-causing toxins. He said this is the first time a high-potency compound has been isolated from vegetables and has been shown to accelerate the detoxification process in cells. Dr. Talalay said his team isolated sulforaphane from broccoli, then fed it to a group of mice. When cells in the mice were examined after five days, the scientists found that the chemical had triggered enzymes known to neutralize carcinogens within cells. Research, Dr. Talalay said, will shift to the long-term cancer-fighting effects of the chemical. "Our prediction is that sulforaphane will block tumor formation in animals and presumably in man," he said. Nutrition and medical scientists are trying to find ways to prevent cancer through a diet rich in foods that have anti-tumor properties.

    In earlier studies, Dr.Talalay said, he and others have shown that certain proteins in cells, called Phase I enzymes, can take innocent chemicals and turn them into carcinogens, or compounds that can give rise to cancer by disrupting the genetic pattern in cells. Other proteins, called Phase 2 enzymes, he said, tend to block formation of carcinogens. Sulforaphane, he said, is a potent activator of Phase 2 enzymes. "There is mounting evidence that if you are able to raise the Phase 2 enzymes, this will divert the carcinogenic compounds from damaging the [genes]," Dr. Talalay said. "By tilting this balance toward Phase 2 enzymes, we can achieve protection from cancer." The Hopkins researchers will conduct tests to determine how much broccoli must be consumed to establish an effective anti-cancer level of sulforaphane in cells. Over a decade of research has been done on cruciferous vegetables and there are large databases that confirm that cruciferous vegetables substantially reduce the risk of disease, specifically cancer. Studies show substances in these vegetables that have anti-cancer properties which cause the body to speed up production of enzymes, therefore being capable of neutralizing cancer agents. The studies also show these prevent damage to our DNA and slow the aging process. In women, metabolic processes are regulated which eliminate the bad (and maintain the good) estrogen, therefore substantially reduce the risk of breast cancer. Shortly after the NCI study was released, John Hopkins School of Medicine revealed similar studies.

    Due to these study results, the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, John Hopkins School of Medicine and the FDA have all reached out to inform the public of the anti-cancer compounds found in cruciferous vegetables, and are advocating the daily consumption of these vegetables. The average American has been eating only 4 and one half pounds of these vegetables per year!



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    The A Team
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    Date: June 14, 2005 06:04 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: The A Team

    The A Team

    by Gregory Meade Energy Times, October 11, 2004

    Want the A Team playing to improve your health? When you accumulate enough antioxidants to help you attack the molecular marauders out to mar your well-being, you improve your chances of avoiding illness.

    Nowadays you hear plenty of talk about the benefits of antioxidant nutrients. Antioxidants are the ammunition the body uses to fight off internal damage. They offer the body the means to fight against disease but, at the same time, your body must be in the position to use them optimally. That means getting enough sleep, consistently exercising and avoiding overly processed foods. Those lifestyle habits allow your body to garner its resources and effectively implement antioxidants in its quest for well-being.

    Your body has a love-hate relationship with oxidation: Can't live without it, often has trouble living with it. For instance, the production of energy in your cells requires oxidation. But the byproducts of that process, problematic molecules called free radicals, have to be chemically changed or eliminated to avoid the damage that results when they interact with other parts of the cell. Left unchecked, these molecular troublemakers can wreak havoc, oxidizing and punching holes in cell membranes and damaging other structures they contact. Antioxidant nutrients are used to defend against oxidation, quell these harmful destroyers and limit the potential harm they can cause.

    For a quick glimpse of one of your basic antioxidant defenses, look in the mirror. The color in your eyes represents antioxidant protection against oxidative injury from the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. Sunlight's energy sets loose free radicals every time it enters the lenses in your eyes. Pigments absorb this radiation and, in most cases, render it harmless.

    As part of your vision's defenses, two of the antioxidant pigments in your food, lutein and zeaxanthin, are deposited by your body in certain areas of your eyes-in a section called the macula as well as the lens (BJ Opthalmol 1998; 82:907-10).

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are classified as carotenoids, chemical relatives of beta carotene, the antioxidant pigment that makes carrots orange, and lycopene, the anticancer red coloring found in tomatoes. These fat-soluble nutrients are also present in algae. In both your eyes and plants, these nutrients absorb the destructive ultraviolet rays that give birth to free radicals.

    Blindness Protection

    Studies show that consuming large amounts of these pigments lowers your risk of a common form of blindness called age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and drops your chances of age-related cataracts. (More than 30 million people worldwide suffer from ARMD, and cataracts is the leading cause of blindness across the globe.)

    When the sun's rays enter the eye, lutein and zeaxanthin absorb and filter out dangerous radiation before it can injure the macula. The macula is the central part of the retina that allows us to see very fine detail. Otherwise, over time, as the macula deteriorates, our vision worsens. In addition, some researchers believe these nutrients help lower your chances of cancer.

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are found in spinach, Brussels sprouts, corn, collard greens, green beans, egg yolks, broccoli, cabbage, kale, lettuce, kiwi and honeydew melons. The petals of yellow flowers like marigolds and nettles are also rich in these antioxidant nutrients.

    Broccoli Protection

    You can also increase your chances of better sight as you age by consuming sulphoraphane, an antioxidant found in broccoli. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found that sulphoraphane takes part in the body's efforts to shield eye cells from free radicals generated by ultraviolet light (Proc Natl Acad Sci 2004; 101(28):10446-51).

    The researchers who performed this study believe that unlike the antioxidant nutrients vitamin C and natural vitamin E, sulphoraphane acts as an "indirect" antioxidant. That means that while those two vitamins are used by the body to directly defuse the harmful oxidative force of free radicals (and then must be replaced or regenerated in the cells), sulphoraphane acts indirectly, boosting the body's immunity defenses. Because of that indirect action, researchers point out, sulphoraphane lasts longer in the body and may produce a more profound, long-term antioxidant effect.

    In other laboratory tests, researchers have discovered that sulphoraphane can kill Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium recognized 20 years ago as the cause of debilitating stomach ulcers and often-fatal stomach cancers (Proc Natl Acad of Sci 5/28/02). This research shows that sulphoraphane is even effective against antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter. Adding to its benefits, sulphoraphane can help kill bacteria both inside and outside stomach cells; when this bacteria hides inside of cells it is particularly difficult to fight.

    " We've known for some time that sulforaphane had modest antibiotic activity," says Jed Fahey, a plant physiologist at Hopkins. "However, its potency against Helicobacter, even those strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, was a pleasant surprise."

    Looking for Mr. Good Diet

    For the biggest bang for your antioxidant buck, combine antioxidants with good lifestyle habits. A laboratory study of the heart-healthy effects of taking supplements of the antioxidant vitamins C and natural E along with L-arginine (an amino acid) found that exercise magnifies benefits (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 5/24/04, online). The scientists who performed this study recommend exercise along with antioxidants to boost your nutritional advantage.

    The box score shows that when playing with the A Team you've got the best chance of hitting an antioxidant home run.



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