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  Messages 1-50 from 61 matching the search criteria.
Herbal treatments help balance hormone fluctuations and mood swings in women Darrell Miller 4/7/18
What Your Acne Says about Your Health!! Darrell Miller 9/4/17
The six health benefits of turmeric Darrell Miller 8/16/17
Diabetes management: How lifestyle, daily routine affect blood sugar Darrell Miller 5/17/17
5 Simple Ways to Naturally Relieve Bloating Darrell Miller 5/14/17
What are the health benefits of Blue Cohosh Darrell Miller 9/12/16
The Health Benefits of Boswellia Darrell Miller 9/9/16
BENEFITS OF RASPBERRY LEAVES TO WOMEN. Darrell Miller 7/9/14
Does The Red Raspberry Have Healing Properties? Darrell Miller 3/26/14
What Is Marjoram Oil? Darrell Miller 2/21/14
Health Benefits of Vitex Darrell Miller 12/20/13
Benefits of Maca root Darrell Miller 12/15/13
The Damiana Herb Darrell Miller 10/26/13
Can Guarana Boost Energy? Darrell Miller 1/24/13
Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root Darrell Miller 12/27/12
Can Melatonin Increase Prolactin? Darrell Miller 12/22/12
Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root Darrell Miller 12/21/12
Benefits of wild yam to women Darrell Miller 12/21/12
Acne Treatment of Different Skin Types Darrell Miller 9/20/11
Your Diet May Be What's Causing Your Acne Darrell Miller 9/19/11
What Are The Essential Minerals Our Body Needs? Darrell Miller 9/16/11
Can Avena Sativa Be Used For Menstrual Problems? Darrell Miller 9/7/11
Bromelain Supplements why? Darrell Miller 11/6/10
Passion Flower Herb Darrell Miller 12/23/09
Gentain Herb Can Sooth The Digestive Tract Darrell Miller 12/17/09
Fennel Seeds Darrell Miller 11/12/09
Pennyroyal Herb Darrell Miller 10/29/09
Feverfew Herb Darrell Miller 10/20/09
Cinnamon Bark Darrell Miller 10/15/09
Plantain Herb Darrell Miller 10/8/09
Goldenseal Root Darrell Miller 10/6/09
Figwort Darrell Miller 9/28/09
Horehound Herb Darrell Miller 9/21/09
Juniper Berries Darrell Miller 9/4/09
Cramp Bark Darrell Miller 8/26/09
Caraway Herb Darrell Miller 8/25/09
Freez Dried Nettle Leaf Darrell Miller 8/15/09
Myrrh Gum Darrell Miller 8/15/09
Mustard Extract Darrell Miller 8/14/09
Saffron Darrell Miller 7/28/09
Blue Cohosh Darrell Miller 6/7/09
Bayberry Darrell Miller 5/19/09
Nutritious Amaranth Darrell Miller 4/9/09
Phytoestrogen Darrell Miller 3/27/09
Migraines Darrell Miller 2/21/09
EFA's - Essential Fatty Acids Darrell Miller 9/15/08
Licorice Root Darrell Miller 5/23/08
Damiana Leaves Darrell Miller 5/22/08
Gently Narrow Your "Estrogen Window" With Lignan's Darrell Miller 1/25/08
You Should Say: Please Pass the Broccoli, Not I’ll Pass Darrell Miller 1/22/08




Herbal treatments help balance hormone fluctuations and mood swings in women
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Date: April 07, 2018 05:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Herbal treatments help balance hormone fluctuations and mood swings in women





Herbal treatments help balance hormone fluctuations and mood swings in women

Menopause is an unsettling time of life; the chemical seratonin becomes unbalanced and causes uncomfortable or even painful changes in the body. Fortunately, there are some natural herbs and treatments that can help with the hormonal imbalances experienced. Those herbs have a long history of use and are as follows: St. John's Wort, Kava Kava, Black Cohash and Valerian. These different herbal treatments are traditionally used to treat depression, menopausal problems as well as promote relaxation and healthy rest.

Key Takeaways:

  • Know the symptoms of menopause, as some are linked to other issues.
  • before starting any sort of treatment, even homeopathic, consult your doctor, as some supplements can adversely effect medications
  • St. John's Wart is one of the most popular supplements as it helps to stabilize moods

"Menopause is a natural occurrence wherein menstruation stops in women."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-04-06-herbal-treatments-help-balance-hormone-fluctuations-and-mood-swings-in-women.html

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What Your Acne Says about Your Health!!
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Date: September 04, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Your Acne Says about Your Health!!





Your acne says a lot about your overall health. There is a certain time in our life when we suffer from acne. There are many reasons behind why this happens. Age and genetics play a role in how acne impacts you. If you have outbreaks on your chin, then that says something about your health. If you break out on your cheeks, then you may have some irritation in your lungs. Each area means something different.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjRksf9iI4Y&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Some believe that acne eruptions appearing in the forehead area could be indicative of gastrointestinal problems.
  • Acne flare ups in the chin region could be indicative of hormonal shifts, such as with menstruation, or be linked to issues with the large intestine.
  • Cheek outbreaks could be a sign of lung related issues, such as a reaction to seasonal allergies.

"The presence of acne varies in the people, and the factors that come out can be many."

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The six health benefits of turmeric
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Date: August 16, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The six health benefits of turmeric





There are 6 benefits of turmeric. This spice has a lot of different health benefits that people can gain by eating it. It was once the prized ingredient in India and Pakistan. It has since gained worldwide attention as a super food. It is worthwhile to include this into your diet. It aids in digestion and also helps with your heart. It clears up your skin and also encourages good sleep. In addition, it is great for your mood.

Key Takeaways:

  • This historic addition to Pakistani and Indian cuisine is useful for its digestive properties.
  • The American Journal of Cardiology has noted that use of the spice regularly is beneficial for heart health.
  • Other benefits include antioxidant activity, better sleep, clearer skin and less pain upon menstruation.

"This peppery-tasting, golden-hued spice has multiple health benefits that make it a worthy addition to any diet."

Read more: http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-11-six-health-benefits-of-turmeric.html

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Diabetes management: How lifestyle, daily routine affect blood sugar
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Date: May 17, 2017 08:45 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Diabetes management: How lifestyle, daily routine affect blood sugar





If you have diabetes, you'll need to learn about and control several factors in your life if you want to control your blod sugar. Eat low carb, small portion meals timed around when you need your medicine. Stay hydrated and avoid sugary drinks. Develop an exercise plan with your doctor, then make an exercise schedule to incorporate it into your life. Frequently check your blood sugar, store your insulin propertly, and keep your doctor updated on any changes. Don't make changes to your diet or your insulin intake when you are ill. Talk to your doctor before drinking alcohol. Watch for cycles of erratic blood sugar during menstruation or if you have menopause. Lastly, log your stress level every time you take your insulin.

Key Takeaways:

  • Be aware of food portions and intake of good carbohydrates, such as fruits and vegetables, and make necessary modifications to your diet.
  • Develop an exercise plan with your doctor, making sure to discuss healthy blood sugar levels and being prepared if levels suddenly drop, and staying hydrated.
  • Discuss new medications with your doctor while taking insulin, and discuss issues with insulin if blood sugar levels drop too low or need adjusting.

"As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats."

Read more: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-management/art-20047963

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5 Simple Ways to Naturally Relieve Bloating
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Date: May 14, 2017 06:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Simple Ways to Naturally Relieve Bloating





Bloat is a very uncomfortable feeling which can be caused by eating certain foods, by menstruation and by other things. It causes a feeling of pressure in the abdomen. It can be painful or just unpleasant to deal with. There is also gas sometimes which is embarrassing if you're around others. This talks about how to deal with this bloating naturally rather than taking a medication. Many prefer natural remedies and these are good ones.

Read more: 5 Simple Ways to Naturally Relieve Bloating

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What are the health benefits of Blue Cohosh
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Date: September 12, 2016 01:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: What are the health benefits of Blue Cohosh


Blue Cohosh is scientifically known as Caulophylum thalictroides (L.). Different people call it different names, some of the popular names are yellow ginseng, blue ginseng, squaw root and papoose root.

Blue Cohosh plays an important role in women health. Several years back it was used to treat menstrual cramps and excessive menstruation. This plant was used to also induce labor.



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The Health Benefits of Boswellia
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Date: September 09, 2016 10:17 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: The Health Benefits of Boswellia

Boswellia, also known as the Indian frankincense, is a popular native tree in traditional medicine. The tree has numerous health benefits due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The following are some of them:

  1. It can be used to manage inflammatory disorders and sore throat infections.
  2. treat diarrhea.
  3. treat arthritis and pulmonary disease.
  4. treat rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis.
  5. treat syphilis, painful menstruation and ulcerative colitis.
  6. treat hay fever and asthma.
  7. It can be used to treat cancer and pimples.
  8. and treat topical wounds.

Chronic inflammation is at an epic high in America, largely due to poor diets. Taking boswellia daily can help reduce inflammation helping the body fight off diseases that may arise.


References:

  1. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-63-indian%20frankincense.aspx?activeingredientid=63&activeingredientname=indian%20frankincense
  2. //www.livestrong.com/article/114311-boswellia-benefits/

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BENEFITS OF RASPBERRY LEAVES TO WOMEN.
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Date: July 09, 2014 02:46 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: BENEFITS OF RASPBERRY LEAVES TO WOMEN.

Benefits of raspberry leaves to women

Raspberry is a plant that produces a sweet red berry that is widely consumed for its rich taste and nutritional value in vitamins. The raspberry leaf has also been observed to have nutritional benefits to the body as it contains magnesium, iron, Vitamin B and potassium. The leaves have also have been used for centuries to treat gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders; heart problems, diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, promotion of toxin removal through sweating and urination and for bile production. Tannins in the leaves have been observed to have a soothing effect on the skin.

This leaf has been observed to have multiple benefits to women’s health besides those mentioned above. Some of the benefits include;

  • Regulation of the flow of menstruation and reduction of cramps due to relaxation of the uterine muscles. It also helps in relieving post-menopausal and endometriosis symptoms by helping to clear excess hormones thus detoxifying the body.
  • Increasing fertility by strengthening of the uterine wall while relaxing the smooth muscles of the same and this increases the chances of the embryo to the wall while minimizing the chances of miscarriage. The minerals contained help detoxify extra hormones that may interfere with conception.
  • In pregnancy, the raspberry tea made from the leaves relieves morning sickness and leaves you nourished with more nutrients compared to water. Expectant women have also reported lesser cases of anemia, relieved leg cramps and swelling. The vitamins and minerals contained in the leaf are easily absorbed to help the baby grow while keeping the mother nourished.
  • In labor, the tea has been observed to concentrate the uterine contractions making the birth process as effective as it primarily affected by the contraction forces of the uterus thus shorter birth times. Other benefits include maintenance of the integrity membranes until birth and fewer cases of Caesarean, forceps or vacuum modes of delivery according to a research published in Australian College of Midwives Journal.
  • Mothers planning to have a vaginal birth after a Caesarean section (VBAC) have an advantage because the tea has products that help tone the uterine muscle after the procedure, since the abdomen and uterus are cut open thus somewhat weakening the muscles.
  • After birth, it brings in rich milk to the baby from its rich nutritional profile and helps control drastic change in hormones, a factor said to contribute to postpartum depression.

Source

  1. //wellnessmama.com/5107/raspberry-leaf-herb-profile/
  2. //www.stammnutrition.com/?p=275
  3. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-309-RED%20RASPBERRY.aspx?activeIngredientId=309&activeIngredientName=RED%20RASPBERRY

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Does The Red Raspberry Have Healing Properties?
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Date: March 26, 2014 11:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Does The Red Raspberry Have Healing Properties?

raspberry fruitRed raspberry fruit

Raspberry provides some of the very best results when it comes to the medicinal values especially in herbal medicine. The usefulness of the plant delivered from roots, bark, leaves and the fruit. Due to the wide range of minerals that found in red raspberry, which includes vitamins, potassium, calcium, sulphites and phosphate. The leaves contain important acids like citric, malic, tartaric and citrate, which are very good for the body. Red raspberry used in many cases to treat and prevent certain digestive system related diseases like diarrhea and dysentery.

Health benefits of raspberry

In many cases, raspberry in form of vinegar is used to cure sore throats and different cough related complications. The flowers of red raspberry used for the treatment of pimples in adolescents as well as poultice for eye inflammation. The juice made from red raspberry used as laxatives or as a remedy for children with fever, as well as the treatment of cystitis.

Raspberry products are used worldwide by women who are pregnant or have menstrual complications. The underlying factor in this case is that raspberry used to stop or reduce mucous discharge from genitals hence reducing the pain experienced during menstruation. For pregnant women red raspberry products used to prevent postpartum depression and hypertension while boosting breast milk production during lactation. In other cases, the leaves of red raspberry used to promote fertility in both men and women and prevent the causes of miscarriages.

Raspberries mixed with other products to produce medicines that can cure diseases like malaria, gonorrheal, leukemia and other dangerous diseases. This achieved through the ability of raspberry fruits having constituents that act like anti-septic, anti-gonorrhea, anti-malaria and anti-leucorrhea.

Sources

  1.  https://www.jcrows.com/remarkableraspberry.html
  2.  //www.herballegacy.com/Corless_History.html

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What Is Marjoram Oil?
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Date: February 21, 2014 04:52 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Marjoram Oil?

What is marjoram

marjoram plantMarjoram oil is extracted from the marjoram plant. The plants’ flowering leaves are distilled (using steam) to obtain the yellow marjoram essential oil. The plant is cultivated primarily for its leaves. Though the name marjoram is derived from French, the plant is indigenous to the Southern regions of present-day Turkey and Cyprus.

Historically, marjoram oil has been used by traditional healers thousands of years back. It is mentioned in old medical texts as an essential oil with healing properties for many illnesses. Up to date, the plant’s oil is renowned for its great medicinal value. The essential oil has a woody and spicy aroma when dilute and pungent-smelling when concentrated. Some of marjoram oil’s health benefits are discussed below.

Benefits of marjoram

Marjoram oil has therapeutic properties. Rich in antioxidants, it is used to calm nerves and relieve headaches when massaged on the temple. The essential oil is also used to soothe and relieve muscles of pain. A body massage with the oil helps ease stiff joints. Inhaling the marjoram oil’s aroma helps clear mucous from the breathing system as well as easing a congested nasal tract. It helps stem severe coughing.

Marjoram oil is best known for improving digestion and easing digestive tract disorders. It is a common essential oil used in aromatherapy as well. Adding a few drops of marjoram oil to bathing water or using it for massage helps relax the mind, bringing calmness. This can be used to pacify people who are stressed because it is a great sedative.

As an antiseptic, marjoram oil can be applied on wounds to help prevent these sores from becoming septic. For ladies who have to endure painful menstruation, this essential oil can be used to relieve menstrual cramps. Studies have also shown that this oil has the ability to lower blood pressure, slightly. Marjoram oil has quite a number of medicinal uses making it a versatile essential oil.

Sources

  1. //www.organicfacts.net
  2. //en.wikipedia.org
  3. //www.webmd.com

 

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Health Benefits of Vitex
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Date: December 20, 2013 09:04 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Benefits of Vitex

vitex flowerHealth Benefits of Vitex

Taken from a mediterrenian tree, vitex has numerous health benefits in human life especially to women. Taken as alternative medicine, the herb can affect human body in various ways leading to diverse health benefits.

These benefits include;

Menopause alleviation

Women who consume vitex have been found to have longer reproductive life due to delayed menopause. This results from prevention of the women from hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness and weight gain- identified as common signs of menopause. If properly administered, the herb has in addition been found to reduce the effects of hormonal imbalance such as excessive bleeding during menstruation.

Fertility enhancement

Vitex is used to enhance fertility. Studies have established that the herb helps women with irregular periods and consequent irregular ovulation. This has been attributed to the herb's ability to facilitate estrogen regulation in the body as required during the first half of ovulation cycle while enhancing improved levels of progesterone required in maintaining pregnancy.

Maintains pregnancy

Research has established that the use of vitex during the first trimester reduces the chances of miscarriage. This has been established to be effective because the herb contains chemical substances necessary for enhancing and regulating hormonal balance in the body during pregnancy.

Alleviates Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a set of unpleasant signs and symptoms experienced during menstruation. They include severe stomach and backaches, cramps, fatigue among others. Consumption of vitex has been found to alleviate these hormonal based complications. During menstruation, women often suffer hormonal imbalances which lead to differences in their responses to issues as well as strained body and even pains at times. The use of vitex has been found to enhance hormonal stability leading to reduced effects of the disorders associated with hormonal imbalances.

Relieves breast pain

On consumption of vitex, it influences the pituitary glad to produce progesterone hormone leading to reduction in breast pains especially during breast feeding.

References:

  1. //www.herbs-for-menopause.com/vitex/vitex-benefits.htm
  2. //www.livestrong.com/article/95347-vitex-benefits
  3. //hethir.hubpages.com/hub/vitex


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Benefits of Maca root
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Date: December 15, 2013 07:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of Maca root

maca rootsBenefit of Maca root.

Maca root has always been used as a source of food in Peru for many years because of its medicinal functions. This root is normally packed with other nutritionally rich components thus making it a good instrument for balanced diet contribution daily.

Maca Powder

Maca powder strongest health advantages are based on how the root will work in relation to the endocrine system. Endocrine system which is in charge of transition is a system of glands which releases human hormones in the blood system. This powder will energize the body so that it can make hormones. Due to this stimulation of the maca root, very good hormones will be released in your blood stream which will subsequently assist in regulating issues within those hormones.

Maca Root

Maca root is also used for vitality tonic in addition to being used as sport nutrition in libido improvement. This root has exclusive sense of balance of antioxidants, minerals, proteins, vitamins, plant sterols, and carbs which interacts to maintain the whole body at optimum level. Maca root offers energy thus balancing the endocrine system such as pancreatic, adrenals, thyroid and pituitary gland. It usually helps people to retrieve their endurance in addition to assisting in mental balance.

Health Benefits of Maca to Women

In women, the health benefits of this powder will include enhancing the levels of energy, improving sexual libido, increasing capacity of holding up against stress as well as decreasing sweating at night and menopausal flashes. Maca root is an adaptogen which revitalizes the body as whole.

Benefits of Maca to Men

Maca powder has also its benefits on men in that it enhances testosterone or androgenic hormone levels in addition to improving sperm fertility. Some men also experience erection cells reactions increase, a leading known as an organic and natural substitution of Viagra. Finally, this increase in human body hormones can also result in virility which helps in fighting from getting older.

References:

  1. //macapowderbenefits.net
  2. //www.all-smoothie-recipes.com/maca-root.html
  3. //www.menstruation.com.au/menstrualproducts/macasupportfertility.html


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The Damiana Herb
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Date: October 26, 2013 11:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Damiana Herb

damiana flower

Damiana is a shrub that primarily grows in Mexico and the West Indies. The plant was used the Aztecs to treat sexual problems like impotency and women used leaves along with tea to boost libido. To date, the Damiana plant remains so important such that it has been classified as a national treasure” in Mexico.

Health benefits of damiana herb

1. Prevention of sexual problems

Damiana is known to boost and maintain both mental and physical stamina. It works by stimulating the intestinal tract and bringing oxygen to the genital areas. In addition, the herb increases energy levels in the body, helping to restore desire and libido. In women, it increases the ability to achieve orgasms.

2. Helps with symptoms of Menopause

Many women who have used the leaves of the plant have noticed that the symptoms of menopause disappear after a period of regular use .In fact, symptoms of menopause like night sweats, hot flashes and headaches are normally treated with the damiana leaf by alternative medicine practitioners. It is also believed that the leaf regulates hormone production as well as levels.

3. Treatment for certain conditions

Damiana is commonly used to treat depression, bedwetting and nervous stomach. Though no scientific evidence exists, the herb is said to be effective for other conditions including:

· Anxiety and Depression.

· Asthma.

· Headache.

4. Other benefits

Damiana is thought to cause a mild laxative effect in larger doses and has traditionally been used improve digestion as well as treat constipation. The herb also helps restore and maintain normal nervous system functions.

Can The Herb Damiana Be Used For Both Men And Women?

Both men and women can use the herb. For men, it’s known to help raise levels of testosterone and also helps in treating impotence and premature ejaculation. For women, the herb helps to trigger delayed menstrual periods as well as ease symptoms of menstruation.

Sources:

  1. Wisegeek
  2. herbwisdom

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Can Guarana Boost Energy?
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Date: January 24, 2013 01:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Guarana Boost Energy?

14196Guarana, scientifically named as Paullinia cupana is an evergreen vine indigenous to the northern regions of Brazil and Venezuela. Guarana berries are widely considered to be a great source of organic caffeine and also have been used for hundreds of years by native Amazonian tribes, the Guaranis to help retain their stamina levels and improve physical endurance. The natives believed that the drink made from this powdered ground seeds of the berries could provide more energy. They also claimed that, by drinking Guarana juice one could go on hunt for many days without food and also without feeling fatigue.

Energy Booster

Guarana is used as an organic and effective energy booster. It has an identical chemical composition to that of caffeine, and also the plant seeds produce even greater caffeine effects than usual caffeine drinks. Guarana is released into the body much more slowly to provide longer stimulation. The plant immediately energizes the nervous system to provide sustained energy and may be taken in small dose to fight weakness and improve activity levels. Additionally, it decreases tiredness, and improves mental alertness. Also, Guarana extract is taken by sports athletes to keep up their peak performance.

Weight Loss

Guarana is traditionally used for weight Loss as well. It helps reduce fluid retention, inhibits appetite and boosts metabolic process. As a result, the extra fat stored becomes a source of fuel to the body.

Digestive properties

Guarana also consists of tannins, which is valuable in treating diarrhea and other types of digestive problems.

Aphrodisiac

Because of higher content of caffeine, Guarana has received a reputation of a powerful stimulant and also aphrodisiac. When compared to other libido supplements, Guarana doesn't have any side effects.

Pain relief

As an all-natural adaptogen, Guarana can be used to boost the body's effectiveness against anxiety, stress and fatigue. It's traditionally been useful for migraines, menstruation pains as well as heart related illnesses.

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Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root
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Date: December 27, 2012 10:38 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root

The Blue Cohosh Root is a perennial flowering plant belonging to the family 'Berberidaceae'. It is also known as 'Squaw Root' and produces fruits that resemble blue-berries. The foliage too has a bluish hue to it.

History Of The Blue Cohosh

Blue Cohosh is the native plant of North America. In the ancient times, it was commonly referred to as the 'Womens Herb' believed to bring relief during menstruation, relieve cramps, regulate erratic periods and facilitate or induce labour before delivery. Studies suggest that women consumed an infusion of the root a couple of weeks before they were due for giving birth.The plant, supposedly, acted on the uterus in some way. Also, the root was decocted into a strong drink which was then used as a contraceptive.

Health Benefits

Blue Cohosh root may be used for certain medicinal purposes though its safe use is still a contentious issue. It might have a role in stimulating the uterus or acting as a laxative and relieving painful colic conditions. Some people believe it to be a beneficial remedy for sore throat, hiccups, muscular spasms, epileptic cases, joint problems etc. The root has similarities to the hormone called 'estrogen' which is found in the female body. The root can be used in its fresh or dried form both. It can be used alone or as a blend of other herbs. Some people also use it as a coffee bean substitute. 

Those who should avoid blue cohosh are:

However, it is recommended that it should be taken under professional advice and supervision of a physician to prevent any untoward side-effects. People suffering from heart ailments, diabetes or diarrhoea and pregnant women should avoid the root. There are incidents that prove the negative effect of the Blue Cohosh on the kidneys if used excessively. It is best to use the Blue Cohosh in a controlled and supervised manner.

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Can Melatonin Increase Prolactin?
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Date: December 22, 2012 11:28 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Melatonin Increase Prolactin?

What Is Melatonin?

Melatonin chemically known as N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is a naturally occurring compound normally found in microbes, plants and animals. Many of the biological effects that are associated with this product are usually produced via activation of the melatonin receptors. However, there are others which are as a result of its powerful and pervasive antioxidant nature.

Melatonin and Sleep

Melatonin also plays a vital role in maintaining natural cycle of wakefulness and sleep. There are some controversies over whether melatonin can increase prolactin or not.

Can Melatonin Increase Prolactin?

Studies that have been conducted recently by medical experts have shown that melatonin can cause an increase in the level of prolactin. Prolactin refers to a hormone which usually plays a vital role in regulating menstrual cycle and in producing milk. It is thus advisable that women who normally experience mood changes or who are in depression related to menstruation should avoid it.

In conclusion, it is my sincere hope that the question on if melatonin can increase prolactin has been answered.

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Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root
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Date: December 21, 2012 05:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits Of Blue Cohosh Root

The Blue Cohosh Root is a perennial flowering plant belonging to the family 'Berberidaceae'. It is also known as 'Squaw Root' and produces fruits that resemble blue-berries. The foliage too has a bluish hue to it. History Of The Blue Cohosh Blue Cohosh is the native plant of North America. In the ancient times, it was commonly referred to as the 'Womens Herb' believed to bring relief during menstruation, relieve cramps, regulate erratic periods and facilitate or induce labour before delivery.

Studies suggest that women consumed an infusion of the root a couple of weeks before they were due for giving birth. The plant, supposedly, acted on the uterus in some way. Also, the root was decocted into a strong drink which was then used as a contraceptive.

Health Benefits

Blue Cohosh root may be used for certain medicinal purposes though its safe use is still a contentious issue. It might have a role in stimulating the uterus or acting as a laxative and relieving painful colic conditions. Some people believe it to be a beneficial remedy for sore throat, hiccups, muscle spasms, epileptic cases, joint problems etc. The root has similarities to the hormone called 'estrogen' which is found in the female body.

The root can be used in its fresh or dried form both. It can be used alone or as a blend of other herbs. Some people also use it as a coffee bean substitute. However, it is recommended that it should be taken under professional advice and supervision of a physician to prevent any untoward side-effects. People suffering from heart ailments, diabetes or diarrhea and pregnant women should avoid the root. There are incidents that prove the negative effect of the Blue Cohosh on the kidneys if used excessively.


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Benefits of wild yam to women
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Date: December 21, 2012 11:17 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of wild yam to women

Wild yam which is also known as Dioscorea villosa has been used for a very long time to help women deal with various health issues especially those associated with menstrual cycles. There are various forms in which this herb can be taken for example capsules and creams. Wild yam is so popular among women due to the progesterone properties that it carries. This herb contains an ingredient diosgenin which is converted in the body to produce progesterone.

Progesterone plays a very crucial role in a woman's body. Some of the roles include;

This hormone is known to produce mucus which protects the vaginal area from infections. When there are higher levels of progesterone in the blood, women will experience a spike in their libido. Supplementing with progesterone is mostly beneficial after menopause when most women experience reduced intimate desires. Progesterone plays a major role during menstruation. It prepares the endothelium for fertilization. If fertilization does not happen, the levels of progesterone will fall down resulting in menstrual periods.

Wild yam can help easy PMS

Women who experience painful cramps after menstruation could really benefit from progesterone supplements. With its antispasmotic properties, the progesterone may help to relax the muscles hence reducing the amount of pain experienced. Progesterone may also help to ease labor pains.

Wild Yam Is A Natural Progesterone

Women who are undergoing menopause may also want to use wild yam. This herb helps to restore hormonal balance thus ensuring that a woman does not face the usual hot flashes and sweating at night. Having hormonal imbalances could really deny you the comfort in life. Hormones such as progesterone which are very crucial for a woman's body processes should always be checked. Progesterone supplements are most appropriate when you are experiencing progesterone deficit. Wild yam supplement comes in the form of capsules or creams. If it comes combined with other ingredients, ensure that all the ingredients are safe for your body.

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Acne Treatment of Different Skin Types
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Date: September 20, 2011 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Acne Treatment of Different Skin Types

Not everyone has the same skin type, and if you have acne, then the treatment could be dependent on your skin type. Before discussing the different acne treatments available, therefore, it will be necessary to discuss the various skin types.

Skin types are graded in a number of ways, anything from 3 types to several. Here we shall discuss more than the normal three (oily, dry and normal) but instead look at seven.

1. Normal Skin

Normal skin looks evenly colored and textured, firm and smooth without larger pores. People with normal skin probably had mild acne when at high school, but cleared up fairly quickly during the teenage years without specialized treatment or scarring. Acne in this type of skin normally requires only mild topical treatment and a mild antibiotic face wash to keep the pores clean of dead skin cells.

Treatments designed to reduce sebum production could result in dry skin susceptible to environmental damage. What must be kept in mind is that the prime cause of acne is excessive production of skin oil, correctly known as sebum, becoming mixed with shed skin cells within the sebaceous pores and plugging them. When this plug gets infected with bacteria, the immune system leaps into action to produce puss through leucocytes attacking the bacteria, and inflammation designed to create temperature conditions alien to bacteria.

If you use treatments formulated to reduce sebum production in oily skin, then you might lose the natural skin oil needed to keep your skin waterproof and resistant to the pollution and chemical agents that can cause dermatitis.

2. Dry Skin

If you got through adolescence with few or no skin problems, and you have dry hair and your skin feels dry after washing, then you have dry skin. It is even more important with dry skin that you do not use sebum-reducing treatments, if you even get acne at all. Only the mildest acne treatments should be used if you have dry skin, thought is unlikely that you will get anything other the very mildest case if you really have dry skin.

Your skin can dry through age, so to be of a dry skin type, you should have suffered, or be suffering, these problems while you are 35 years old or under. After that age your skin tends to dry out naturally.

3. Oily Skin

This completes the trilogy of the classic skin types. Oily skin is associated with acne, and if your hair is oily, you tend to tan very easily rather than go red in the sun, and if oily make-ups, such as some foundations, tend to last only a short time, then you likely have oily skin.

You will also have suffered from acne as a teenager, and your skin will have a particular 'look'. It will often appear shiny, and will also seem to have a coarse texture with larger pores than most others seem to have. You will tend to get a lot of blackheads, not only as a teenager.

Oily skin is classically associated with acne, and it is for those with that skin type that classic treatments will be prescribed, such as antibiotics and Accutane.

Apart from these three skin types, there are others that have been defined involving a combination of these and also age.

Sensitive Skin

Sensitive skin is associated with broken blood vessels beneath the surface of the skin, and such skin types should be treated very carefully. If creams or lotions are applied to sensitive skin they should be rubbed in very gently as it could cause bruising.

Sensitive skin is no more susceptible to acne than most other skin types although significantly less so than oily skin. For that reason, treatments for sensitive skin should be similar to that for dry skin or in most cases normal skin.

Combination skin

Combination skin has an oily zone across the forehead, and down the nose and chin, the other areas of the face being normal or dry. Such skin can also be oily along the jaw line and normal to dry everywhere else. In such cases aggressive acne treatment might be necessary in the oily zones, and more mild treatments used in the areas which are normal.

There are three other classes or skin type based upon age or condition, one being mature skin and other ailing skin and the final type, surprise, surprise, being known as acne skin. Ailing skin is caused by skin conditions other than acne, and you should get the advice of a dermatologist if you believe you have this type of skin. Mature skin on the other hand is natural and occurs with age: the skin becomes slack and loose due to a slowing down of cell growth which causes the skin to lose elasticity. There is no cure for this type of skin other than cosmetic surgery, and it is rarely affected by acne.

Acne Skin

Acne skin is normally oily and associated with blackheads, pimples and spots. It is not normally applied to serious acne conditions, being mostly associated with skin which is generally 'spotty', as opposed to mostly clear. It is debatable whether acne skin is any different from oily skin which also tends to be covered with spots and pimples, and the treatments for acne skin are no different to those for oily skin: these are Accutane, antibiotics and topical treatments such as face washes and scrubs.

If you have acne skin you must be careful about the type of cosmetics and face cleansers you use, since either could aggravate your condition. This is not restricted only to those with oily skins of course, since everyone should be aware of the effect of cosmetics and face cleansers on their skin but it is more significant with those who suffer from acne. Cosmetics cannot cause acne, but they can help to aggravate infections which have already occurred.

Although most focus is placed on those with oily skins which are more susceptible to acne, people with any type of skin should consider carefully the types of cosmetic and cleansers which they use. Contrary to what you may have heard or read, acne has nothing to do with your diet - eating fatty foods or chocolates do not cause acne, which is caused only through production of excess sebum, or skin oil, by the sebaceous glands.

Irrespective of your skin type your physician will determine the best treatment that is appropriate for your particular case of acne. This may be different for individuals and may or may not change according to skin type. Antiseptic face washes or scrubs may be appropriate for some acne cases, Accutane might be the best treatment for others, while a course of internal antibiotics such as tetracyclines may be deemed appropriate for yet other cases.

Treating acne has three distinct phases:

1. Removal of the blackheads and lesions. The removal of lesions can also involve a degree of scar removal, although that is another topic. Black heads, whiteheads and other papules can be treated by the use of facial cleansers and scrubs. They should not be squeezed since the puss inside them could be forced deeper into the skin and so lead to a more generalized infection.

2. Treatment of the bacterial infection. The typical symptoms of acne, the papules, whiteheads and blackheads, are caused by bacterial infection of the plug of sebum and dead skin cells within the sebaceous follicles. The general treatment for such infections is antibiotics, both topically and internally. Tetracycline has already been mentioned as a common internal antibiotic, and several forms of antibiotics are used in facial scrubs of which peroxides and benzoates may perhaps be rather severe for dry and sensitive skins.

3. The third phase is treatment of the causes of excessive sebum production. This is generally not entirely treatable since it is predominantly due to excessive hormonal activity at certain times of your life such as puberty, menstruation, pregnancy and menopause. However, your physician may offer treatments such as the contraceptive pill which should be used with care.

Other treatments include agents that aid desquamation, so preventing the irregular shedding of skin cells that lead to the mixture of sebum and dead skin cells that form the plug that is so easily affected by bacterial infection.

Together these three stages of acne treatment can, if not prevent the condition, certainly reduce its extent and have less of an effect on your skin, particularly if you are the off the oily skin type. Doctors will take your skin type into consideration when determining the best acne treatment for you, although all generally this will only be with respect to topical treatments: treatments that are applied to the surface of your skin.

There are also a number of herbal treatments which are used in the treatment of various stages of acne, and many sufferers find these equally as effective as the more traditional forms of topical applications as prescribed by physicians. However given that the treatment you use is safe according to your physician, any that works for you is the acne treatment that you should likely use, irrespective of your skin type.

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Your Diet May Be What's Causing Your Acne
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Date: September 19, 2011 06:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Your Diet May Be What's Causing Your Acne

Although dieticians and physicians maintain that diet does not cause acne, this is not strictly true. Even dermatologists argue the point, but while it is generally agreed that eating fatty foods or excessive quantities of chocolate will not in itself lead to acne, there are certain valid arguments that diet has a role to play. Recent research has shed new light on dietary factors that can help to promote acne symptoms, if not being the sole cause of them.

Before discussing that, it is important to understand why acne gives rise to the symptoms that it does: lesions in the form of whiteheads and blackheads, pustules and cysts. While not necessary to discuss the biochemical details, the part that your diet has to play will not be understood without considering the effect of hormones on acne.

The reason that teenagers in particular appear to be more prone to acne is that an increased production of hormones has an effect on the condition that causes the symptoms of acne. Fundamentally, acne is characterized by the infection and inflammation of a mass of oil and dead skin cells within the pores of the skin, particularly on the face, neck, chest buttocks and back. If we discuss each of these elements first, and how they are created, then the relationship between diet and acne will become clear.

At a certain time in their lives, people experience a spurt of growth and develop sexually. This is initiated by the secretion of hormones, particularly of male sex hormones collectively known as androgens, and by various hormonal 'Growth Factors'. This stage of human development is known as puberty, although there is also an increase in androgen secretion by the adrenal glands just before menstruation and during pregnancy and menopause. Androgens such as testosterone are reserved not only for the male of the species!

An effect of androgens is to increase the rate of secretion of sebum from the sebaceous glands in the skin. The reason for this is unknown, though it has been hypothesized that its purpose is to waterproof the additional hair that is grown on the body at this time. Another suggested reason is as an olfactory warning to others to deter from sexual activity, in teenagers until their sexual development is complete, and in pre-menstrual, pregnant and menopausal women for obvious reasons. There is no substantial proof for any of these hypotheses, though the latter appears to make more sense than the former.

Irrespective of this, androgens also interfere with desquamation, and the dead skin cells within the pores tend to fall off irregularly and in clumps. This mix of dead skin cells and excess sebum clogs up the pores of the sebaceous follicles. Once this plug becomes infected with bacteria, the immune system is activated, inflammation occurs, and leukocyte action leads to pus formation. That is what is known as acne.

In order to determine how diet and acne are connected, it would be necessary to determine what components of our diet can either stimulate sebum production, or stimulate androgen secretion. If no such link could be found, then it would be fair to descry any connection between acne and the food you eat. However, there is a connection, and it is a positive one.

In addition to their main function, insulin and a hormone known as IGF-1 (Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 that helps promote growth in children) promote the secretion of testosterone, a male hormone or androgen. Knowing, as we now do, that androgens promote the secretion of sebum, then anything that increases the levels of insulin or IGF-1 within the body will also lead to sebum production and hence to acne. What that infers is that any foodstuffs that increase the insulin levels in the blood can also lead to acne.

This inference is supported in many ways. For example, it has been found that while drinking milk promotes a greater risk of acne, eating yoghurt does not. Why is this? It is known that milk can increase insulin levels because of its high sugar content. The effect of bacterial activity to produce yoghurt reduces the amount of sugars in the milk it is made from because the bacteria live on the lactose. The same argument applies to cheese, which promotes lower insulin levels than milk, if not as low as yoghurt.

This being the case, then a diet low in sugars and carbohydrates should reduce the incidence of acne generally. Recent research has indicated that a diet high in refined carbohydrates and sugar increases both IGF-1 and insulin levels in the blood. This then creates a surge in male hormones which in turn leads to excessive sebum secretion and intermittent shedding of skin cells and so on to the growth of bacteria and acne. It is a logical progression, supported both by theory and by observation.

So how should a person with a propensity for acne change their diet? Switch to fruits, vegetables and grains. Non-fatty meats are also acceptable, and .lots of fish and other seafood. Studies have concluded that diets rich in seafood lead to very low acne rates. The Japanese and coastal Chinese suffer very little acne in comparison with those taking a Western diet, particularly an American diet.

One of the reasons for this is that omega-3 fatty acids help to reduce both inflammation and sebum production. The same is true of green tea that contains antioxidants that reduce the blood levels of dihydotetosterone and hence of sebum secretion by the sebaceous glands. We could go on, and list supplement after supplement that contain antioxidants and other substances that can reduce the production of sebum and hence of the symptoms of acne.

Vegetable oils, on the other hand, with their high omega-6 fatty acid content, can drive up sebum production and the activity of the immune system and the inflammatory response. There are few doubts left that, while acne is not specifically caused by what you eat, diet can contribute to it and that acne and its severity can be eased by eating a diet low in carbohydrates and other sugar-promoting foods.

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What Are The Essential Minerals Our Body Needs?
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Date: September 16, 2011 11:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Essential Minerals Our Body Needs?

Overview

Diseases are something that Americans want to avoid. I think for the most part we know what we need to do, we are aware of the steps we need to take to avoid disease and health issues. For the most part though we are not doing it and I am not one to make excuses but a lot of that has to do with our fast paced life and for us not being able to cope up with our health needs. Our body is a very efficient machine and I feel is probably the best machine out there so to speak. However it will only be able to do this consistently if we make sure it gets a steady stream of essential nutrients.

We all know about vitamins and what benefits it brings and other substance that might help with improving our health but we seldom hear about essential minerals and I for one never really looked at it this way before so I guess it is high time for all of us to know what minerals we may need to focus on depending on the current state of our health.

Essential Minerals

A number of scientific researches have confirmed that in addition to vitamins our body is in need of several essential minerals as well to keep proper function.

Calcium is at the top of the list as it is able to help with so much in our body because first of all it is able to take good care of our bones’ density and maintaining its heath, without it our skeletal system will be weak and will not be able to function properly.

Magnesium is found primarily in muscle tissues and in soft tissues in the bone and also play a primary role in so many enzyme processes.

Iron is also one of the most essential to our body. It is a constituent of blood and muscle and it also acts as an oxygen transport and it is usually used to replenish blood levels lost during menstruation.

Manganese is a mineral which has been known to be responsible for growth and reproduction of bone formation. One of its primary functions as well is to help with energy in the body as it plays an integral role in the metabolism of carbohydrates.

Potassium is able to help with important nerve functions. It aids with better muscle contractions and also prevents the muscle tissues from cramping. It also has been shown to be able to aid in the regulation of blood pressure and keep it at a normal level.

Selenium is the kind of mineral that have been linked to antioxidant properties and with this there have been claims of cancer prevention and cardiovascular diseases. Some studies even have gone as far as suggesting that selenium can be taken to help prevent certain cancers. It also plays a hand in processing fats in the body.

Zinc is a mineral that has proven it essentiality through wound healing. It also has shown to have the ability to increase immune system responses.

Support a healthy body with a good multi-mineral supplement!

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Can Avena Sativa Be Used For Menstrual Problems?
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Date: September 07, 2011 02:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Avena Sativa Be Used For Menstrual Problems?

Overview

Avena Sativa in a way is just a common oat plant and is considered a cereal grain that is derived from seeds and its most common form in our diets is as rolled oats and oatmeal. A lot of us these days feel stressed and tired. Some may feel a little depressed or even fed up and this can lead to a lack of sexual desire. Many of us would think that supplementation might help with this since our fast-paced life often times is the culprit of this and we would like to have an easy fix for more energy. Most of the time we look at supplementation to help us with that and for the past decade Avena Sativa is one of those herbs that have shown a lot of promise in the area of health and other benefits which in this specific case is more on Menstrual Problems. Like in most cases for herbs, it starts out to be a simple research about how it could help us with energy and overall wellness then we would discover that it can do a lot more.

Avena Sativa and how it works

Also known as Oats Milky, Avena Sativa in the past decade has shown promise in benefiting a number of bloodstream functions and this was made evident as researchers have shown that it could help in various sexual functions mainly in men. It is able to help with erection and improve sexual appetites. The consensus of the users of this herb is that it is a great alternative to pharmaceutical erection enhancers and what's great about it is it doesn't have the side-effects. In the same way that it is beneficial for men it also has shown promise in women. The same sedative effects to the nervous system seems to be what allows the women to have a more relaxed body which is the reason that researchers have found as the stimulants to increase desire in women.

Menstrual Cycles and Avena Sativa

Menstruation disorders are most common in a woman's teenage years. It causes a lot of anxiety not only to the people suffering it because it also affects the family. Some factors that come into play are physical and psychological and in order to have a better understanding of how Avena Sativa can help let’s try to understand a regular menstrual cycle just in the general sense. Commonly a menstrual cycle happens during 21 to 35 days with about 3 to 10 days of bleeding and blood loss, this excessive blood loss during those days is what creates a lot of problems for a female’s well being. Studies have shown a distinct link between these disorders and a deficiency in magnesium in the body. This is where Avena Sativa come into play with its ability to influence the nervous system and regulate blood flow it can have positive effects both psychologically and physically. Furthermore, it also is magnesium rich which can aid in the relief of some symptoms, if not most of it, of menstrual disorders.

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Bromelain Supplements why?
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Date: November 06, 2010 10:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bromelain Supplements why?

pineapple bromelainBromelain enzyme may not be as familiar as other digestive supplements to most people but this helpful catalyst offers a wide range of benefits not only to the digestive system but also to other systems of the body.

Bromelain Enzyme Supplement

Bromelain enzyme is a proteolytic digestive catalyst that contains sulfur. From the word “proteolytic”, this substance aids in the digestion of proteins especially when taken with meals. On the other hand, when taken without meals, it is deemed to act as an anti-inflammatory supplement. Ananas comosus or the pineapple plant is the best source of this beneficial enzyme. However, fresh pineapple extract does not contain doses high enough to have a medicinal effect. Hence, a preparation to meet the body’s demand is produced. Bromelain supplements now come in the form of tablets and topical creams. They are now widely available and affordable to counterweigh the several uses it offers.

In the Digestive System, bromelain enzyme does not only help in digesting proteins but may also relieve gastric upset and heartburn especially when used together with other digestive enzymes like amylase, a catalyst responsbile for carbohydrate digestion, and lipase which is for the digestion of fats. Diarrhea conditions associated with deficiency in the proteolytic enzymes can also be alleviated with the use of this supplement.

In the Immune System, bromelain has been widely considered as an effective relief for pain and swelling caused by both injury and certain infections. Studies frequently show the bromelain’s ability in facilitating the body to restore health more quickly. The mechanism is said to be a reduction of fibrin and leukotriene accumulation, thus regulating the inflammation process. Researchers have demonstrated evidences that a daily intake of 1,200 to 1,800 mg of bromelain may help alleviate painful inflammation just like in rheumatoid arthritis.

In the Cardiovascular System, bromelain supplement is theorized to play a role in the prevention of heart disease caused by atherosclerosis or thickening of the arterial wall due to plaque deposits. It slows down the clumping of platelets thus preventing a possible heart attack. digestive process bromelain

Bromelain May Also Relieve Pain

Lastly, bromelain may also relieve pain associated premenstrual syndrome and menstraul cramps. Studies reveal that they act as prostaglandin inhibitors. However, bromelain can also increase the bleeding during menstruation.

Bromelain supplement has no Recommended Dietary Allowance but doses of up to 1 gram taken 3 times a day showed no toxic effects. Experts also advise to take bromelain on an empty stomach supplemented with magnesium to increase the bromelain’s effects.

Just like any other drug or food supplement, bromelain also has side effects, nonlife-threatening to be exact. It may have drug interactions such as increasing the absorption of some medications like antibiotics, chemotherapeutic drugs and specific antihypertensive agents. In addition, it may also bolster the effects of blood thinners such as warfarin (Coumadin), anti-inflammatory drugs and antiplatelet agents such as clopidogrel (Plavix). Since bromelain supplement can cause certain drug interactions, it is important to take this enzyme cautiously or under the supervision of a qualified health care provider.

To find quality bromelain supplements, look to your local or internet vitamin store.
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Passion Flower Herb
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Date: December 23, 2009 03:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Passion Flower Herb

passion flower herbThe passion flower comes from a genus of about five hundred species of flowering plants. These herbs are mostly vines, although some are shrubs. A few of these plants are herbaceous.

Passion flower has been found to be extremely soothing on the nervous system. It is used for conditions such as insomnia, hysteria, anxiety, and hyperactivity. Additionally, it is useful for eye conditions such as inflammation, dimness of vision, and eye irritations. Native Americans use this herb as a tonic and poultice for both bruises and injuries. Passion flower was used by the Aztecs as a sedative and for pain. The juice was also used for sore eyes, while the crushed plant tops and leaves were used for treating hemorrhoids and skin eruptions. Passion flower was listed in the National Formulary from 1916 to 1936. This herb was called the nonpoisonous and not dangerous opium of the natural physician by R. Swinburne Clymer, MD.

This herb is able to depress the central nervous system, helping with insomnia, anxiety, and nervousness. It may also be useful in lowering high blood pressure. Combinations that contain valerian and passion flower are considered to be very useful as a natural tranquilizer. This herb is also thought to be safe for both children and the elderly.

Passion flower contains a variety of complex substances that work on the nervous system and act as a sedative. The components that are responsible for the overall effect are not specifically known. However, maltol, ethyl-maltol, and flavonoids are all thought to contribute. Most research has centered around the sedative action and has found good results. Passion flower extract has also been found to reduce locomotor activity and prolong sleep. Passiflorine is thought to be one of the active ingredients of the plant. It has some similar activity to that of morphine. It contains anti-inflammatory properties that may be helpful in treating those who are suffering from arthritis. An additional benefit of passion flower is its ability to kill a wide variety of organisms. Among these are yeasts, molds, and bacteria. Passion flower works as an antispasmodic on the digestive system smooth muscles and the uterine muscles. This makes it an effective digestive aid for menstrual cramps. This herb contains both calcium and magnesium, which are essential for the nervous system.

In short, the passion flower herb is used to provide anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, diaphoretic, nervine, and sedative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium and magnesium. Primarily, passion flower is extremely beneficial in dealing with alcoholism, anxiety, spasmodic asthma, high blood pressure, eye infection, eye tension, fevers, headaches, insomnia, menopausal symptoms, nervousness, and neuralgia. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating bronchitis, convulsions, depression, diarrhea, dysentery, epilepsy, eyestrain, painful menstruation, muscle spasms, pain, Parkinson’s disease, restlessness, seizures, and poor vision.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by passion flower, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.


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Gentain Herb Can Sooth The Digestive Tract
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Date: December 17, 2009 04:23 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Gentain Herb Can Sooth The Digestive Tract

gentain purpleThe gentian plant is an herbaceous perennial with fleshy root and fat hollow stems. The leaves of the plant are ovate and pleated, while the flowers are yellow. The root of the plant often smells aromatic and tastes sweet at first and then bitter.

Gentian was used as a stomach tonic and aid in digestion in Ancient Rome. This herb is native to Europe and western Asia. Generally, gentian was consumed as a tea or alcoholic beverage. Gentian was an official drug in the Untied States Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1955 and was used as a gastric stimulant. At one point in time, this herb was used and acclaimed by medical science as being very beneficial for mankind.

Gentian was used to reduce fevers by cooling the system. It contains a bitter principle, which is known as amarogentin, which stimulates the glands, and includes the adrenals and thyroid. This herb helps in the production of bile, which can have a positive effect on the liver and gallbladder. Gentian is also used to clean the bowels, stimulate the pancreas, stimulate circulation, aid in the digestive process, and help with female problems. This herb has historically been used to treat wounds and been taken internally for inflammation from arthritis, jaundice, and a sore throat. Gentian is considered to be a great herb for strengthening the entire body and for use as tonic when it is combined with other herbs.

German scientists have performed studies which confirm that this herb is useful as a digestive aid. Herbal bitters, including gentian, are recommended for the treatment of indigestion. The bitter taste receptors located in the tongue are known for their ability to stimulate the digestive processes by increasing the flow of gastric juices and bile. The alkaloid found in gentian, gentianine, has been shown to contain anti-inflammatory activity in animal studies.

Internally, gentian is used as a liver tonic, to treat loss of appetite, digestive problems, flatulence, and insufficient production of gastric juices and saliva. This herb is responsible for stimulating the taste buds and promoting the flow of saliva, gastric juices, and bile. Because of this, gentian can be used in cases of anorexia, and in homeopathic medicine as well. There are no external uses or aromatherapy and essential oil uses for gentian. It should be noted that gentian should not be used by those with gastric or duodenal ulcers. gentain yellow

The root of the gentian plant is used to provide alterative, anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, blood purifier, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hepatic, sialagogue, stimulant, stomachic, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients provided by gentian include inositol, iron, manganese, niacin, silicon, sulfur, vitamins F and B-complex, and zinc. Primarily, gentian is extremely beneficial in treating loss of appetite, poor circulation, gastric disorders, indigestion, jaundice, and liver disorders. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with anemia, blood impurities, colds, constipation, stomach cramps, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, gas, gout, heart burn, absence of menstruation, nausea, spleen ailments, urinary problems, worms, wounds, and yeast infections. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by gentian, please contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Fennel Seeds
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Date: November 12, 2009 04:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fennel Seeds

fennel plantFennel is a plant species that is part of the genus Foeniculum. A member of the family Apiaceae, this plant is a hardy, perennial, umbelliferous herb. The plant has yellow flowers and feathery leaves. It is generally found growing on the shores of the Mediterranean, but it has become widely naturalized elsewhere. Now, the plant can be found growing wild in many parts of the world, especially on dry soils near the sea-coast and on river-banks. The plant is highly aromatic and flavorful. It is actually one of the primary ingredients of absinthe. Some species of fennel possess a swollen, bulb-like stem base, which is used as a vegetable. Fennel is used as food plant by some moth and bird species.

The fennel plant is native to the southern areas of Europe and Asia Minor. The herb is now cultivated in the United States and Great Britain. It was used anciently in many civilizations. Used in ancient Egypt, this herb aids in digestion and flatulence. In Italy, fennel was used to bring surgical patients out of anesthesia. Fennel was recommended by Hippocrates and Dioscorides to increase milk production in nursing mothers. The ancient Greeks used this herb for weight reduction, while the seventeenth-century herbalist Nicholas Culpeper also recommended this herb for losing weight.

Fennel is extremely helpful in weight reduction, as it suppresses the appetite. This herb aids in stabilizing the nervous system and can be used as a sedative for small children. Fennel can be used to expel phlegm from the throat, eliminate toxins from the body, and purify the blood. This herb is known for its ability to fortify the immune system and be good for the eyes. Additionally, fennel aids in digestion, improves night vision, relieves gas, expels worms, improves the quality of milk in nursing mothers, and cleans the bladder and liver. This herb has been used to stimulate menstruation and can help too soothe the smooth muscles of the digestive tract, as it aids in digestion and related problems.

Research on rats has found that the fennel seeds have estrogenic effects on the genital organs. The herb has been found to promote the production of milk in nursing mothers. Fennel is good for digestion, colic, and other stomach complaints. This herb contains essential oils that have a composition similar to catnip and peppermint. fennel plant The seeds of the fennel plant are used to provide anorectic, antacid, anti-inflaamtory, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic, estrogenic, expectorant, galactagogue, sedative, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, magnesium, niacin, potassium, sodium, sulfur, vitamins A, C, B1, and B2. Primarily, fennel is extremely beneficial in dealing with abdominal cramps, colic, gas, gastric disorders, indigestion, intestinal problems, and weight-related conditions.

Additionally, this herb can be very helpful in treating excessive appetite, asthma, constipation, convulsions, coughs, uterine cramps, gout, kidney ailments, absence of lactation, liver disorders, lung disorders, and nervous disorders. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by this herb, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Pennyroyal Herb
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Date: October 29, 2009 12:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pennyroyal Herb

penny royalThe pennyroyal herb is a member of the mint genus. It is an essential oil that is extracted and used in aromatherapy. Crushed pennyroyal leaves and foliage give off a very strong spearmint fragrance. Traditionally, pennyroyal is used as culinary herb, folk medicine, and abortifacient. This herb was commonly used by the Greeks and Romans as a cooking herb. The Greeks often flavored their wine with pennyroyal. Additionally, a large number of the recipes in the Roman cookbook of Apicius use pennyroyal along with herbs such as lovage, oregano, and coriander. Although it was still commonly used for cooking in the Middle Ages, it slowly fell out of use as a culinary herb. Today, it is seldom used. However, the essential oil of pennyroyal is extremely high in pulegone, which is toxic volatile organic compound, and is therefore poisonous to the liver and can stimulate uterine activity.

Pennyroyal was brought by European settlers to the New World. There, they found that Native Americans were using the American variety of pennyroyal for repelling insects, skin irritations, and many of the same illnesses that they were using their own variety for. Additionally, this herb was used to soothe the stomach and relieve cold symptoms. The pennyroyal that is found in America has similar properties to the herb that is found in Europe. However, the European variety is thought to be much more potent.

This herb possesses a volatile oil that works to remove gas from the stomach. It can be consumed as a tea of used as a footbath. If it is taken a few days before menstruation is due, it can help increase a suppressed flow. The pennyroyal tea is beneficial in relieving cold symptoms and also promoting perspiration. This herb has a strong, minty odor. It is used externally to repel insects like fleas, flies, and mosquitoes.

The oil of the pennyroyal plant is extremely concentrated and is often linked to toxic results. The oil is often associated with abortions and convulsions that result in death. It is believed that the oil irritates the uterus, which causes uterine contractions. The action is not predictable and is potentially dangerous. It is recommended that the oil be used only externally as a natural insect repellant. This herb is suggested for use as a decongestant for coughs and colds. Tea that is made from the pennyroyal herb is not associated with toxicity. penny royalIn fact, it helps to relax the digestive tract and soothe the stomach.

In short, the entire pennyroyal plant is used to provide alterative, antispasmodic, antivenomous, aromatic, carminative, decongestant, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, nervine, oxytocic, parasiticide, sedative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. Primarily, pennyroyal is extremely beneficial in treating bronchitis, childbirth pain, colds, colic, uterine cramps, fevers, gas, lung infections, and absent menstruation. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with convulsions, coughs, abdominal cramps, delirium, earache, flu, gout, headaches, leprosy, measles, migraines, mucus, nausea, phlegm, pleurisy, pneumonia, smallpox, sunstroke, toothaches, tuberculosis, ulcers, uterine problems, and vertigo.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by pennyroyal, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.



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Feverfew Herb
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Date: October 20, 2009 12:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Feverfew Herb

feverfewFor thousands of years feverfew has been used for the treatment of various ailments. History is full of references to feverfew. Dioscorides, an ancient Greek herbalist, recommended the use of feverfew almost two thousand years ago, as he valued the herb for childbirth, fevers, melancholy, and congestion of the lungs. It was also suggested for arthritis. In 1772, feverfew was suggested to be used to treat painful headaches. Many people believe that feverfew obtained its name from its use as a remedy for bringing down fevers, but this has been determined to be incorrect. Instead, the name came from the traditional Old English name for feverfew, featherfew. Featherfew came from the feather-shaped leaves of the feverfew plant.

Feverfew has been used for a long time as a natural remedy for pain relief, as it is considered an excellent remedy for migraines. This herb was used to treat any kind of pain and helped with chills and fever. Additionally, it helps in relieving colds, dizziness, tinnitus, and inflammation from arthritis. The herb works gradually and with a gentle action that allows the body to heal itself.

The most popular use of feverfew is in the prevention and relief of migraine headaches. In a study, those given the placebo had an increase in frequency and severity of headaches, nausea, and vomiting. On the other hand, those given the feverfew capsules had no increase in frequency or severity of migraines. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was done on seventy-two volunteers. One group received capsule dried feverfew leaves, while the other received a placebo. The group taking feverfew showed less severity of attacks and a reduction in symptoms that were associated with migraines, including vomiting. There was a definite improvement in the group using feverfew and no serious side effects resulted. Because some forms of migraines are believed to be associated with abnormal platelet behavior, feverfew may be beneficial as it has been found to help restrain the release of serotonin from platelets. This prevents a migraine from occurring.

It is thought that feverfew may also be a useful treatment in cases of rheumatoid arthritis. This is because of its ability to inhibit the formation of inflammation-promoting compounds like prostaglandins and leukotriene. feverfewThis herb seems to have similar properties to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), like aspirin. Feverfew may actually be even more effective with a lot fewer potential complications. Some of the studies involving feverfew and migraines have shown that feverfew may also lower blood pressure.

The leaves and flowers of the feverfew plant are used to provide alterative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, aromatic, bitter, carminative, emmenagogue, febrifuge, nervine, parasiticide, mild purgative, stimulant, and vasodilator properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are iron, niacin, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silicon, sodium, vitamins A and C, and zinc. Primarily, feverfew is extremely helpful in dealing with chills, colds, fever, headaches, sinus headaches, and inflammation.

Additionally, this herb is very beneficial in treating aches, ague, allergies, anxiety, arthritis, insect bites, poor circulation, dizziness, gastric disorders, nervous headaches, hot flashes, indigestion, and menopausal symptoms, absent menstruation, nervousness, tinnitus, and vertigo. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by feverfew, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Cinnamon Bark
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Date: October 15, 2009 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cinnamon Bark

cinnamon treeThe cinnamon plant is a small evergreen tree that grows between thirty two and forty nine feet tall. This plant belongs to the Lauraceae family and is native to Sri Lanka. The leaves of the plant are ovate oblong in shape and approximately two to seven inches in length, while the flowers, which have a distinct odor, are greenish in color. The fruit is a purple berry about one-centimeter and contain a single seed. The flavor of cinnamon is the result of an essential oil which makes up about 1/2% to 1% of its composition. This oil can be prepared by roughly pounding the bark, macerating it in seawater, and quickly distilling the whole. The oil is of a golden-yellow color, with the characteristic odor of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste.

Cinnamon has been known from ancient times, with the first mention of particular spice in the Old Testament being of cinnamon. In this, Moses commanded the use of sweet cinnamon and cassia in the holy anointing oil. Additionally, cinnamon is also mentioned elsewhere in the bible. This herb was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was often looked upon as a gift fit for even God. Cinnamon was imported to Egypt as early as 2000 B.C. The herb is also alluded to by Herodotus and other classical writers. Cinnamon was too expensive to be commonly used in funerals of ancient Rome. However, the Emperor Nero is said to have burned a year’s worth of the city’s supply at the funeral for his wife in 65 A.D.

Cinnamon can be harvested by growing the tree for two years and then coppicing it. About a dozen shoots will form from the roots in the next year. These shoots are then stripped of their bark and left to dry. Only the thin inner bark is used, while the outer woody portion is removed. Each dried strip of cinnamon are then cut into lengths of about five to ten centimeters for sale.

Cinnamon has been around for thousands of years. It is revered as a spice and also as a healing agent. Cinnamon was included in embalming oils by the Egyptians. This herb was used in China to treat fever, diarrhea, and menstrual problems dating as far back as 2000 BC. Cinnamon was a major trade commodity during the ancient times. Cinnamon grew in the southern regions of Asia originally. cinnamon tree This herb is used to help relieve upset stomachs, reduce milk flow, stop excessive menstrual flow, and alleviate back pain. Research has also determined that cinnamon contains components that possess antifungal and antibacterial capabilities. This herb is found in some toothpaste, which allows it to help some decay-causing bacteria. Cinnamon is also helpful for promoting healthy blood sugar levels.

The dried bark of the cinnamon plant is used to provide alterative, analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, sedative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. Primarily, cinnamon is beneficial in treating abdominal pain, candida, diarrhea, gas, gastric disorders, and indigestion.

Additionally, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with arthritis, asthma, backaches, bloating, bronchitis, cholera, coronary problems, fevers, excessive menstruation, nausea, nephritis, parasites, psoriasis, rheumatism, upset stomach, vomiting, and warts. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by cinnamon, please contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Plantain Herb
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Date: October 08, 2009 01:20 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Plantain Herb

Plantain is one of the most commonly used plants found throughout the world. The herb is generally used for cooking and is lower in sugar content than general bananas. Plantain was known for its medicinal properties from England to the New World. Its popularity continues to grow to this day. The seeds of this herb are related to psyllium seeds. They are often used for the same purposes.

The outer layer of the seeds of plantain contain mucilage. This is a product that swells up when moist. These seeds are responsible for helping to lower cholesterol. However, plantain is most known for its gastric benefits. This herb is responsible for both neutralizing stomach acids and normalizing stomach secretions. Fresh plantain juice has been used to treat mild stomach ulcers. This herb helps to absorb toxins from the bowels and promotes normal bowel function. Plantain is a bulk laxative and increases in mass when it is mixed with water. Research has determined the value of plantain as a mild laxative. The intestinal transit time was decreased in those subjects who were tested.

Along with intestinal use, plantain can help with bladder infections and kidney problems. It can also help with bed-wetting in children. This herb is great as an expectorant. Plantain ingested in tea-form clears the head and ears of congestion. The tea is also helpful in treating chronic lung problems in children.

Plantain is known for its ability to neutralize poisons in the body. Those patients who had poison ivy were treated topically with crushed plantain leaves. Itching was eliminated and the condition was prevented from spreading in those who were treated. Additionally, the leaves were able to stop hemorrhaging when they were applied to the bleeding surface. The astringent properties that are found in this herb are helpful in stopping bleeding and promoting the healing of wounds.

Plantain works as an anti-inflammatory to help with problems like edema and hemorrhoids. Other conditions that plantain has been included for include nerve problems, fevers, burns, eye pain, and jaundice.

The leaves and seeds of the plantain plant are used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antivenomous, astringent, blood purifier, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, febrifuge, mucilant, parasiticide, gentle purgative, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, potassium, sulfur, trace minerals, and vitamins C, K, and T. Primarily, plantain is extremely beneficial in treating bed-wetting, snake bites, cystitis, diarrhea, intestinal problems, kidney problems, chronic lung disorders, neuralgia, blood poisoning, poison ivy, sores, ulcers, urinary incontinence, and wounds.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with insect bites, bronchitis, burns, high cholesterol, colitis, coughs, cuts, dysentery, edema, epilepsy, sore eyes, fevers, gas, external hemorrhages, hemorrhoids, infections, jaundice, leucorrhea, excessive menstruation, respiratory problems, primary tuberculosis, skin conditions, and stings. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medication. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by plantain, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Goldenseal Root
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Date: October 06, 2009 01:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Goldenseal Root

goldenseal root plant Goldenseal was used by the Native Americans as a tonic, for sore throats, eye infections, ulcers, and even arrow wounds. It was also used as an insect repellant and pesticide for crops. When boiled in water, it was used externally for skin conditions. The dried root of the goldenseal plant was official in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1831 to 1842 and was readmitted in 1863 to 1936.

Traditionally, goldenseal has been used for many different conditions. Among these are boosting the glandular system, hormone imbalance, congestion, inflammation, female problems, infection, bronchitis, menstrual problems, catarrh of the bladder, gastritis, ulcers, bowel stimulation, antiseptic, and as an immune system builder. Those with low blood sugar or pregnant women should not use this herb.

Recent studies have determined that goldenseal is beneficial in fighting viruses and infections. This herb contains the alkaloids hyrastine and hyrastinine, which possess strong astringent and antiseptic benefits on the mucous membranes. The berberine that is found in goldenseal, and can also be found in barberry, Oregon grape, and goldthread, is effective in fighting infections of the mucous membranes, which includes the mouth, throat, and sinuses. It has also been found to kill toxic bacteria in the intestinal tract like giardiasis, which is found in streams of North America. Goldenseal can help to relieve diarrhea in cases of giardiasis, amoebiasis, or other gastrointestinal infections.goldenseal root plant

The alkaloid content of goldenseal gives it its antibiotic properties. Goldenseal has a long history of use for fighting both colds and flu viruses. The berbine content is effective as a natural antibiotic and immune stimulant. The herb may also help to prevent candida infection which is the result of antibiotic use. Goldenseal is thought to help strengthen the immune system and may work by increasing the blood supply to the spleen. This enables the spleen to function and release compounds which are known to improve immune function. Some herbalists in England consider goldenseal to be the wonder remedy for digestive problems. This herb is recommended for use after the onset of a cold instead of as preventative action. For this reason, it is often found in cold remedy combinations.

The rhizome and root of the goldenseal plant are used to provide adaptogen, alterative, anthelmintic, antibiotic, antiperiodic, antiseptic, cholagogue, emmenagoggue, hepatic, nephritic, stomachic,, and mild purgative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, copper, iron, manganese, phosphorus, potassium sodium, vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and F, and zinc. Primarily, this herb is extremely helpful in treating bronchitis, poor circulation, colds, colitis, colon problems, coughs, diarrhea, eye infections, gonorrhea, gum disease, hemorrhages, hemorrhoids, infection, inflammation, intestinal problems, kidney problems, liver disorders, excessive menstruation, membrane infections, mouth sores, nosebleeds, and sore throat. goldenseal root plant

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with allergies, hay fever, asthma, Bright’s disease, burns, chicken pox, constipation, earaches, eczema, fever, flu, gallbladder problems, gastric disorders, gastritis, glandular problems, heart conditions, herpes, membrane irritation, nausea, nervous disorders, ringworm, skin disorders, spleen ailments, tonsitilits, and urinary problems. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by goldenseal, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Figwort
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Date: September 28, 2009 11:10 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Figwort

Figwort is the common name for some members of the Scrophulariaceae family, which is comprised mainly of herbs and small shrubs. These plants are distributed widely over all continents, with the family including few types of climbing plants and some parasitic and saprophytic forms.

There are approximately 2800 species and 200 genera of Figword distributed worldwide. Many of these grow in the American Northwest. The name was derived from European species of Scrophularia, which is the common figwort. The plants are used to treat hemorrhoids, which were known as figs. Additionally, figworts were used to treat scrofula, which is a form of tuberculosis that is carried in the milk of infected cows.

Figwort finds the majority of its use in the treatment of skin problems. In a broad manner, it acts to help the body function well. This herb brings about a state of inner cleanliness. Figwort may be used for eczema, psoriasis, and any skin condition where there is itching and irritation. Part of the cleansing that comes from figwort is due to the purgative and diuretic actions that it possesses. The herb may be used as a mild laxative to treat constipation. It can also be used as a heart stimulant. For safety purposes, figwort should be avoided where there is any abnormally rapid heartbeat.

The figwort family is characterized by irregular, bilaterally symmetrical flowers with four to five petal, joined to a calax and four to five petals, joined to a corolla. This forms a tube, with the petals flaring outward at the end. The lower ones form a down turned lip. The flowers are bisexual and are sometimes brightly colored. The leaves of the plant are alternate, opposite, and sometimes whorled. The fruit is typically a two-chambered capsule. Some common hemiparasites can be found in the figwort family. Among these are Indian paintbrush, owl’s clover, lousewort, and bird’s beak. These hemiparasites have green, photosynthetic leaves. A substantial portion of the parasite’s carbon comes from the host plant, which is parasitized from the roots.

Figwort is typically used as a skin medication for eczema, scabies, tumors, and rashes. The herb also provides hormone-like materials that are helpful in soothing the digestive organs. The herb has diuretic properties and can help to clean the kidneys. Figwort is sometimes used to treat circulatory disorders and may assist with the treatment of varicose veins. The herb is recommended for its ability to lower high blood pressure. Figwort can be used as poultice for ulcers, piles, scrofulous gland sin the neck, sores, wounds, and toothaches.

The leaves, stems, and roots of the figwort plant are used to provide alterative, anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic, bitter, demulcent, diuretic, purgative, parasiticide, and stimulant properties. Primarily, figwort is extremely beneficial in dealing with abrasions, athlete’s foot, cradle cap, fever, impetigo, indigestion, restlessness, and skin diseases. Additionally, the herb is very helpful in treating anxiety, burns, cuts, eczema, hemorrhoids, insomnia, kidney problems, and light flow in menstruation, nightmares, and worms. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by figwort, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Horehound Herb
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Date: September 21, 2009 11:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horehound Herb

Horehound has been around for thousands of years. The Romans used this herb in a combination as an antidote for poison. The horehound plant is a bushy plant that produces numerous annual branching stems. The plant is a foot or more in height and has whitish flowers. The leaves are much wrinkled, opposite, petiolate, and about an inch long. They are covered with white, felted hairs that give them a wooly appearance. The leaves have a strange, musky smell that can be diminished by drying the plant. Horehound is known to flower between June and September.

An ancient Greek physician by the name of Galen first recommended horehound for use in treating respiratory conditions. Early European physicians also used horehound to treat respiratory ailments. Early settlers in North America brought horehound with them to treat coughs, colds, and tuberculosis. The herb was also used to treat hepatitis, malaria, and intestinal worms. Horehound was also used to promote menstruation and sweating. Most commonly, the herb is used to treat colds and coughs, to soothe the throat and loosen mucus in the chest. Horehound is a well-known lung and throat remedy.

Warm infusions of horehound are able to relieve congestion and hyperemic conditions of the lungs. They do this by promoting an outward flow of blood. In large doses, horehound will work as a mild laxative. Applying the dried herb topically is a great way to treat herpes simplex, eruptions, eczema, and shingles.

The Romans praised horehound because of its medicinal purposes. Its Latin name Marrubium is derived from the word Maria urbs, which is an ancient town of Italy. The plant was called the ‘Seed of Horus” or the ‘Bull’s Blood,’ and the ‘Eye of the Star’ by the Egyptian Priests. Horehound was a main ingredient in Caesar’s antidote for vegetable poisons. It was recommended, in addition to its uses in coughs and colds, for those that had drunk poison or had been bitten by serpents. Horehound was once thought of as an anti-magical herb. Additionally, horehound is a serviceable remedy against cankerworm in trees. Some believed that if it is put into new milk and set in a place where there are a lot of flies, it will quickly kill all of them.

The marrubiin content of horehound is believed to be the responsible component, giving it its ability to stimulate bronchial mucosa secretions. This information was obtained by German research done in 1959. Horehound can be used as a safe and effective expectorant.

The entire horehound plant should be used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antitussive, aromatic, bitter, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, mild purgative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are iron, potassium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and F. Primarily, horehound is extremely helpful in dealing with asthma, colds, coughs, croup, lung ailments, excessive mucus, phlegm, and respiratory problems.

Additionally, this herb is beneficial in treating bronchitis, infectious diseases, earaches, external eczema, fevers, glandular problems, jaundice, absent menstruation, and external shingles. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horehound, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Juniper Berries
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Date: September 04, 2009 12:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Juniper Berries

The juniper plant is a coniferous plant which is part of the genus Juniperus of the cypress family. There are approximately 50-67 different species of juniper, which are distributed widely throughout the northern hemisphere. Among these locations include the Artic, south to tropical Africa in the Old World, and to the mountains of Central America.

Juniper berries were used in ancient Greece as a diuretic. In Europe, the scent of juniper berries was used to help ward off the plaque. Nicholas Culpeper, a seventeenth-century herbalist, recommended the use of juniper as an appetite stimulant. Native Americans used juniper berries as a survival food during the cold winter months. The berries were dried and ground and then made into cakes. Some tribes even roasted the berries, ground them, and then used them as a coffee substitute. The tea was recommended to be used by Jethro Kloss for kidney, prostate, and bladder disorders, and for dropsy and digestive diseases. The berries and oil of the juniper plant were listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1873. They were also listed in the National Formulary until 1960.

Juniper berries contain a volatile oil that has traditionally been used to treat conditions of the urinary tract. The berries of the juniper plant are often used to increase the flow of urine. They are also beneficial for ridding the body of uric acid, which may crystallize in the kidneys. They are also used to dissolve kidney stones and sediment in the prostate. Juniper berries are also recommended for treating digestive problems, indigestion, gas, and to cleanse the blood. The berries may even help to stimulate the appetite. This herb contains natural insulin which is responsible for helping to restore the pancreas when no permanent damage has occurred. Juniper may be applied directly to wounds as a poultice for healing and infection prevention.

One study that was done using animals found that juniper acts as an effective diuretic. The berries are believed to stimulate the flow of urine and the filtration process. The volatile oils, which are found in the juniper berries, are responsible for increasing the glomerular filtration rate of the kidneys. Juniper berries are often used for their diuretic properties. This herb is not recommended for use by pregnant women as it may increase uterine contractions.

The berries of the juniper plant are used to provide anodyne, antispasmodic, aromatic, astringent, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, nephritic, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in juniper are copper, sulfur, and vitamin C. Primarily, juniper is extremely beneficial in dealing with adrenal gland problems, bed-wetting, bleeding, colds, diabetes, edema, hypoglycemia, infection, kidney infections, kidney stones, pancreatic problems, uric acid irritations, urinary problems, uterine problems, and water retention.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating acne, ague, hay fever, allergies, arthritis, arteriosclerosis, insect and snake bites, blood impurities, bursitis, catarrhal inflammation, colic, coughs, convulsions, uterine and stomach cramps, cystic fibrosis, fungus, gas, gonorrhea, gout, bleeding gums, irregular menstruation, excessive mucus, prostate problems, rheumatism, scurvy, sores, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, urinary incontinence, and worms. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by juniper, please feel free to contact a representative at your local health food store.

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Cramp Bark
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Date: August 26, 2009 01:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cramp Bark

Used as a female regulator, cramp bark is considered to be a very valuable herb. It is also used to relieve cramps during menstruation. Early American practitioners used cramp bark to relieve cramps. This is where it got its name. This herb has been recommended by herbalists to help with pregnancy, after-pains cramps, and especially for the nervous discomforts of pregnancy.

Cramp bark is recognized as a uterine sedative. It is also an antispasmodic, used to relax the uterus and ovaries. This herb has been used to treat women when nervous afflictions could possibly cause a miscarriage. Cramp bark can also be used to treat cramps anywhere in the body.

Cramp bark also acts as a muscle relaxant, affecting other organs including the intestine and skeletal muscles. This herb is considered to be the most potent uterine antispasmodic of the Viburnum species. This is because is contains more of the antispasmodic constituent scopoletin. Cramp bark also contains more antispasmodic volatile oils than other species. This herb typically works very quickly for simple menstrual cramps. If it fails to relieve symptoms, the discomfort is probably not due to uterine muscle spasm but to inflammation or irritation of the uterus or ovaries, endometrial infection, or cysts. Black haw, a close relative of cramp bark, is also useful for uterine cramps, congestion, and irritation in the uterus and ovaries with radiating pains. It may be better indicated for those types of complains. This herb has been used to stop contractions during premature labor.

Additionally, it has been used in the last trimester of pregnancy to build up uterine muscles and ensure an easy labor. However, it is important to consult with an experienced herbalist before taking any botanicals during pregnancy. Additionally, the antispasmodic constituents in cramp bark may lower blood pressure by relaxing vessel walls. If it is taken in large dosages of thirty drops or more every two to three hours, this herb may reduce leg cramps, muscle spasms, or pain from a stiff neck.

Fresh or dried berries from the cramp bark tree are used in Russia as a pulse regulator to treat high blood pressure, heart problems, coughs, colds, lung problems, kidney problems, and bleeding ulcers. A decoction of flowers can be used externally for eczema and other skin conditions.

The bark and berries of the cramp bark plant are used to provide alterative, antiabortive, antispasmodic, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, nervine, and sedative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamins C and K. Primarily, cramp bark is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, convulsions, uterine cramps, leg cramps, heart palpitations, hypertension, nervousness, spasms, and urinary problems.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with after-pains of childbirth, colic, constipation, dysentery, epilepsy, fainting, gallstones, gas, jaundice, lockjaw, ovarian irritations, and rheumatism. It is important to consult a health care provider before considering taking this, or any supplement while on prescription drugs. For more information on the many benefits provided by cramp bark, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Caraway Herb
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Date: August 25, 2009 12:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Caraway Herb

The caraway plant, also known as Persian cumin, is a biennial plant that is found in the Apiaceae family. This plant is native to Europe and western Asia. The plant is very similar in appearance to a carrot plant, with finely divided, feathery leaves that have thread-like divisions that grow on twenty to thirty centimeter stems. The main flower stem is forty to sixty centimeters tall and has small white or pink flowers that are in the shape of umbels. The caraway fruits, which are erroneously called seeds, are crescent-shaped and about two millimeters in length and have five pale ridges. The caraway plant prefers warm, sunny locations and a well-drained soil as well.

The fruits of the caraway plant are usually used whole. They have a pungent, anise-like flavor and an aroma that is derived from the essential oils carvone and limonene. These oils are used as a spice in breads, especially rye bread, which is denser due to the yeast killing properties of the essential oil, limonene. Caraway is also used in liquors, casseroles, and other foods, especially in Central European and Northern European cuisine, like sauerkraut. This herb is also used to add flavor to cheeses. A substance made from the seeds is used as a remedy for colic, loss of appetite, digestive disorders, and to dispel worms.

Caraway herbs have been used as a flavoring in foods such as rye bread for thousands of years. It has also been used medicinally by the Romans, Germans, and the English. Generally, it was used to treat flatulence and indigestion. It was also used to relieve colic in babies.

Caraway is very similar to anise. Both of them are recommended for the same purposes. This herb is a powerful antiseptic. It is especially effective in relieving toothaches. When it is applied locally to the skin, it also acts as an anesthetic. This herb can be mixed with other herbs such as mandrake and culver’s root in order to help modify its purgative action. Caraway is also useful in treating stomach problems. Additionally, it helps prevent fermentation in the stomach. It can help to settle stomach after people have taken medication that causes nausea. Caraway also helps to relieve intestinal cramps and colic in babies.

This herb is known to encourage menstruation and the flow of milk in nursing mothers. Caraway also helps to ease uterine cramps.

The root and seed of the caraway plant are used to provide anesthetic, antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, galactagogue, mild purgative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, cobalt, copper, iodine, iron, lead, magnesium, potassium, silicon, vitamin B-complex, and zinc. It is important to consult your local health care professional before taking this, or any supplement in order to obtain the best results. Priamrily, caraway is extremely beneficial in treating loss of appetite, colic, uterine and intestinal cramps, gastric disorders, indigestion, and spasms.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with colds, absent lactation, absent menstruation, upset stomach, and toothaches. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by caraway, feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Freez Dried Nettle Leaf
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Date: August 15, 2009 02:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Freez Dried Nettle Leaf

The nettle plant is native to Europe and can be found throughout the United States and into Canada. This herb was cultivated in Scotland for use in making a durable cloth. The nettle plant is so rich in chlorophyll that it was used by the English to make a green dye for camouflage paint. This camouflage paint was used during World War II.

Nettle is one of the most useful of all plants. It contains alkaloids that neutralize uric acid. By decreasing uric acid, one can help to reduce symptoms of conditions like gout and rheumatism. Additionally, the astringent activity of nettle helps to decrease bleeding. The nettle plant is rich in iron, which is extremely vital to good circulation. It helps to reduce high blood pressure. Tannins that are found in the nettle root have been used as part of an astringent enema. This is used to shrink hemorrhoids and reduce excess menstrual flow. This herb became popular because of its use in irritating the skin of an inflamed area and increasing the flow of blood to reduce inflammation. The stinging action of nettle can be attributed to the histamine reaction that is caused by the formic acid in the hairs. Nettle has a reputation for use in cases of asthma and other respiratory conditions.

The use of nettle root extract was recommended by German physicians for treating urinary retention that is caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy. This recommendation was based upon evidence from clinical studies. Additional studies have determined that nettle root can increase the excretion of chlorides and urea from the urine. The diuretic activity produced by nettle root ahs been confirmed in animal studies. The diuretic properties can be attributed to the high potassium content. However, this has not been verified. A study that was conducted at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon found evidence of nettle for treating hay fever. In this study, freeze-dried capsules of 300 mg were used. The results showed significant relief from hay fever symptoms in the participants.

The leaves and roots of the nettle plant are used to provide alterative, antiseptic, astringent, blood purifier, diuretic, expectorant, galactagogue, hemostatic, and nutritive properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, chlorophyll, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, potassium, protein, silicon, sodium, sulfur, vitamins A, C, D, E, F, and P, and zinc. Primarily, nettle is extremely beneficial in dealing with external and internal bleeding, blood impurities, bronchitis, high blood pressure, rheumatism, and diarrhea. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating anemia, asthma, poor circulation, eczema, hay fever, hemorrhoids, hives, inflamed kidneys, excess menstruation, mouth sores, nosebleeds, skin disorders, and vaginitis.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by nettle, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Nettle is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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Myrrh Gum
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Date: August 15, 2009 01:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Myrrh Gum

Myrrh is the reddish-brown resinous material that comes from the dried sap of a number of trees. Primarily, it is obtained from the Commiphora myrrha, which is native to Yemen, Somalia, and the eastern parts of Ethiopia. Additionally, it comes from Commiphora gileadensis, which is native to Jordan. The sap of a number of other Commiphora and Balsamodendron species is also referred to as myrrh. Its name is most likely of Semitic origin. The quality of myrrh can be identified through the darkness and clarity of the resin. However, the best method of judging the resin’s quality is by feeling the stickiness of the freshly broken fragments. The scent of raw myrrh resin and its essential oil is sharp, pleasant, somewhat bitter, and be described as being stereotypically resinous. It produces a heavy, bitter smoke when it is burned.

In ancient times, myrrh was valued as a fragrance and healing agent. Ancient Egyptain women used the burned myrrh to get rid of fleas in their homes. The Chinese used myrrh to heal wounds. They also used this herb for menstrual problems, bleeding, hemorrhoids, and ulcerated sores. Myrrh is often mentioned throughout the Bible. In the Old Testament it is referred to in the preparation of the holy ointment. In Esther, myrrh is used as a purification herb for women and it is a perfume in Psalm 45:8.

This herb is a powerful antiseptic. Similar to Echinacea, it is a valuable cleansing and healing agent. Myrrh works on the stomach and colon to soothe and heal inflammation. This herb also provides vitality and strength to the digestive system. Myrrh stimulates the flow of blood to the capillaries. Additionally, it helps speed the healing of the mucus membranes. Among these include the gums, throat, stomach, and intestines. Myrrh can be applied to sore and it also works as an antiseptic. It can help promote menstruation, aid digestion, heal sinus problems, soothe inflammation, and speed the healing process.

Research has verified the use of myrrh as an antiseptic. Sometimes, it is added to mouthwash and toothpaste. Myrrh has also been found to have mild astringent and antimicrobial properties. This herb contains silyamrin, which is able to protect the liver from chemical toxins and help increase liver function.

The resin of the myrrh plant is used to provide alterative, antibiotic, antimicrobial, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, emmenagogue, expectorant, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are chlorine, potassium, silicon, sodium, and zinc. Primarily, myrrh is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, bronchitis, colds, colitis, colon problems, cuts, emphysema, gangrene, gastric disorders, sore gums, hemorrhoids, herpes, hypoglycemia, indigestion, infection, lung disease, excessive mucus, pyorrhea, sinus problems, mouth sores, skin sores, tonsillitis, and toothaches.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with abrasions, arthritis, boils, breath odor, canker sores, coughs, diarrhea, diphtheria, eczema, gas, menstrual problems, nervous conditions, phlegm, rheumatism, scarlet fever, thyroid problems, tuberculosis, ulcers, wounds, and yeast infections. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by myrrh, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Mustard Extract
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Date: August 14, 2009 11:49 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Mustard Extract

Mustard is also referred to as mustard greens, Indian mustard, and leaf mustard. This herb is a species of the mustard plant. One of its sub-varieties includes Southern Giant Curled Mustard, which is very similar in appearance to headless cabbage such as Kale. However, it has a distinct horseradish-mustard flavor. It is also known as green mustard cabbage.

The leaves, seeds, and stems of the mustard plant are edible. The plant can be found in some forms of African, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and Soul food cuisine. The leaves are used in African cooking, and the leaves, seeds, and stems are used in Indian cuisine. The plant has a particularly thick stem, it is used to make the Indian pickle and the Chinese pickle. The mustard made from the seeds of this plant is called brown mustard. The leaves are also used in many Indian dishes.

This species of mustard plant is more pungent than closely-related greens like kale, cabbage, and collard greens. It is often mixed with these milder greens in a dish of mixed greens, which may even include wild greens like dandelion. Mustard greens are high in both vitamin A and K. Mustard greens are often used in Chinese and Japanese cuisines. Asian mustard greens are typically stir-fried or pickled.

The ancient Greeks used mustard for its medicinal value. Additionally, it was used for its flavoring. The Romans also used this herb. They added crushed seeds to wine for a spicy flavor. John Parkinson and Nicholas Culpeper, English herbalists, both recommended mustard for ailments like epileptic seizures and toothaches. The herb was used by Native Americans and early colonists for rheumatism and muscle pain.

Mustard is a strong stimulating herb. It is responsible for promoting the appetite and stimulating the gastric mucous membranes to aid in digestion. An infusion of the mustard seed stimulates urine and helps to promote menstruation. Additionally, it is a valuable emetic for narcotic poisoning, as it empties the stomach without depression of the system. Mustard is often used externally as a plaster or poultice for sore, stiff muscles. A plaster of mustard can also be used to treat congestion, warm the skin, and clear the lungs.

The seeds of the mustard plant are used to provide alterative, analgesic, blood purifier, caminative, digestive, diuretic, emetic, expectorant, irritant, rubefacient, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in mustard are calcium, cobalt, iodine, iron, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B12, and C. Primarily, mustard is extremely beneficial in dealing with indigestion, liver disorders, and lung disorders.

Additionally, the herb is very helpful in treating appetite loss, arthritis, blood impurities, breath odor, bronchitis, emphysema, sore feet, fevers, gas, hiccups, kidney problems, pleurisy, pneumonia, snakebites, sprains, and sore throat. Before supplementing with this, or any other nutrient, it is important to consult your health care provider. In doing so, you will ensure yourself optimum health benefits. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by mustard, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Saffron
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Date: July 28, 2009 11:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Saffron

Saffron was used by the Greeks and Chinese as a royal dye because of its yellow color. Wealthy Romans used this herb to perfume their homes. In Europe, it was used medicinally between the fourth and eighteenth centuries. It was also being used in the kitchen to cook with.

In the book The Complete Herbal, Nicholas Culpeper recommended using saffron for the heart, brain, and lungs. The herb was also suggested for acute diseases like smallpox and measles. It was also recommended for hysteric depression. Dr. David Culbreth characterized the herb as a pain reliever and was said to promote perspiration and gas explosion and ease painful menstruation in the book Materia Medica and Pharmacology. Saffron was also said to relieve eye infections and encourage sore eruptions.

This herb is soothing to both the stomach and colon. It is responsible for acting as a blood purifier. Saffron helps stimulate circulation and regulate the spleen, heart, and liver. It is also helpful in reducing inflammation; treating arthritis, gout, bursitis, kidney stones, hypoglycemia, and chest congestion; improving circulation; and promoting energy. Small doses should be taken internally for coughs, gas, and colic and to stimulate appetite. The herb can also be applied externally in a salve for gout.

It has been shown that saffron may even help to reduce cholesterol levels. It neutralizes uric acid buildup in the system. Recent research determined that rabbits, which were fed crocetin, which is a component of saffron, had a significant reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Saffron is eaten daily in Valencia and Spain, resulting in little heart disease occurring among inhabitants. The evidence has shown that saffron increases oxygen diffusion from the red blood cells. Not only does it discourage uric acid buildup, it also inhibits the accumulation of lactic acid. Therefore, it may help prevent heart disease.

Other research done on saffron suggests that the crocetin ingredient may have the potential to act as an anticancer agent in studies done both in vitro and in animals. On study that was done using saffron extract in vitro found that tumor colony cell growth was limited by inhibiting the cellular nucleic acid synthesis. Additional research on cancer has found that saffron that was given orally helped in increasing the life span of mice with variety of laboratory-induced cancers.

The flowers of the saffron plant are used to provide alterative, anodyne, antineoplastic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, blood purifier, carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, sedative, and stimulant. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, lactic acid, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and vitamins A and B12. Primarily, saffron is extremely beneficial in treating fevers, gout, indigestion, liver disorders, measles, excessive perspiration, phlegm, psoriasis, rheumatism, scarlet fever, and stomach acid. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with appetite loss, arthritis, blood impurities, bronchitis, cancer, colds, conjunctivitis, coughs, fatigue, gas, headaches, heartburn, uterine hemorrhages, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, insomnia, jaundice, kidney stones, menstrual symptoms, skin disease, tuberculosis, ulcers, water retention, and whooping cough.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by saffron, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions. Saffron is available at your local or internet health food store. Note: Saffron should not be consumed internally.

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Blue Cohosh
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Date: June 07, 2009 04:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Blue Cohosh

Blue cohosh is one of the oldest indigenous plants that can be found in America. Blue cohosh is a woodland herb that is slowly becoming endangered because of over harvesting. A small plant that rarely grows more than two and a half feet in height, it can be found blooming in early April on wooded slopes. It was used by Native Americans to treat rheumatism, colic, cramps, epilepsy, and fevers. This herb also aided in childbirth and acted as a contraceptive. Blue cohosh was adopted by early settlers for both delivery and to help reduce fevers. The dried root was considered to be an official herb, found in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1882 to 1905, where it was recognized for its abilities to induce labor and menstruation.

Blue cohosh is also known as Caulophyllum thalictroides, blue ginseng, papoose root, yellow ginseng, blueberry root, and beech drops. This herb has been used to stimulate menstrual flow, induce labor, and for rheumatism, cramps, and epilepsy.

The chemical caulosaponin is found in blue cohosh. It is this chemical that induces uterine contractions and should be used only under medical supervision. Additionally, a study that was published in the Journal of Reproduction and Fertility found that blue cohosh is responsible for inhibiting ovulation in animals.

Blue cohosh is recommended by herbalists for irregular menstrual cycles, inflammation of the uterus, and to stop false labor pains. This herb has also been used as an antispasmodic and to relieve muscle cramps. Scientific studies have validated these uses, especially the herb’s estrogenic and antispasmodic properties. The hormone and menses-regulating powers have been shown to work best when the herb is combined with pennyroyal. Some studies have found that blue cohosh may also stimulate the immune system. This herb helps with cases of toxemia and has also been found useful in reducing emotional and nervous tension.

In short, the rhizome of blue cohosh is used to provide alterative, anthelmintic, antispasmodid, diuretic, emmenagogue, estrogenic, expectorant, and oxytocic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, chlorine, iron, magnesium, manganese, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silicon, sodium, vitamins A, B1, B2, C, and E, and zinc. Primarily, blue cohosh is very beneficial in dealing with pain in childbirth, cramps, epilepsy, and estrogen deficiency, absence of menstruation, urinary problems, and uterine problems. Additionally, this herb has been shown to be extremely helpful in treating high blood pressure, bronchitis, colic, convulsions, cystitis, diabetes, edema, heart palpitations, excessive mucus, neuralgia, spasms, vaginitis, vaginal discharge, and whooping cough. For more information on the many beneficial effects of blue cohosh, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

Blue cohosh’s use in cultural and traditional settings is somewhat different from the concepts that are accepted by current Western medicine. It is advisable to consult with a primary health care professional when considering the use of herbal supplements. It may also be advantageous to consult with a practitioner that is trained in the uses of herbal supplements. It is important to note that one should always purchase herbal supplements from a reliable source in order to guarantee safety and efficiency.

Blue Cohosh is available in capsule or tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. Look for blue Cohosh in name brands like Natures Answer and Solaray to ensure that you receive a quality product that is pure.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Blue Cohosh is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.



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Bayberry
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Date: May 19, 2009 01:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bayberry

Even though bayberry is known best for the candle wax that is made from its fragrant berries, the dried root bark is used very often for its medicinal properties. Bayberry has been long used as a tonic to treat both diarrhea and external wounds. This herb has also been used as stimulant. Some Native American tribes even use bayberry to help reduce fevers. Bayberry is recommended as a tonic for its ability to stimulate the system and increase immune function. It is also recommended as a gargle to help treat tonsillitis and sore throat. It has also been considered that the astringent value of this plant may make it a great candidate for healing wounds.

The root, bark, and leaves of bayberry are used to provide alterative, antibacterial, antiseptic, astringent, emetic, febrifuge, insecticide, sialagogue, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb include calcium, magnesium, manganese, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, vitamins B1, B2, C, and zinc. Primarily, bayberry is used for its beneficial effects in treating cholera, colds, congestion, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, flu, glandular problems, goiters, uterine hemorrhage, indigestion, jaundice, excessive menstruation, and primary tuberculosis. Additionally, this has been shown to be extremely helpful in dealing with bleeding, colitis, bleeding gums, liver disorders, excessive mucus, scurvy, sore and ulcerated throat, thyroid problems, ulcers, prolapsed of the uterus, and varicose veins. For more information of the many beneficial effects of bayberry, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

Bayberry was initially only used in the south of the United States, where the Choctaw Indians boiled the leaves and drank the decoction as a treatment for fever. Later, Louisiana settlers drank bayberry wax in hot water as a treatment for the most violent cases of dysentery. Bayberry was popularized by Samuel A. Thomas, a New England herbalist, in the early 19th century, for its ability to produce “heat” within the body. He recommended this herb be used for colds, flu, and other infectious diseases, in addition to using it for the treatment of diarrhea and fever.

Since then, other herbalists recommend bayberry as it is an excellent emetic after narcotic poisoning of any king. This herb is also valuable when it is taken daily for all kinds of hemorrhages. Bayberry has an excellent general effect on the female organs as it is excellent in helping the uterus during pregnancy. Additionally, it makes a great douche for women. Excellent results have also been demonstrated after bayberry’s use in goiter. Bayberry tea should be used as an enema in treating diarrhea and dysentery.

To treat sores, boils, or carbuncles, the herb should be used as a wash or poultice, or can be applied to the infection as a powder. Bayberry tea is also an excellent wash for both spongy and bleeding gums. When the tea is taken internally, it is useful in jaundice, scrofula, and canker sores in both the throat and mouth. When the tea is taken warm, it promotes perspiration, improves the whole circulation, and tones up tissues. If bayberry is combined with yarrow, catnip, sage, or peppermint, it provides an incomparable remedy for colds.

As you can see bayberry is an herb that is good for many different ailments. Look for this wonderful herb in capsule or tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. Always purchase name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

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Nutritious Amaranth
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Date: April 09, 2009 03:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nutritious Amaranth

Amaranth is an herb full of vitamins. It was traditionally used by Native Americans in both Central and North America as a survival food. This herb has been cultivated for thousands of years in many different cultures due to the fact that it grows well in most climates and uses a very small amount of water. Amaranth contains a huge amount of protein and a lot more calcium than milk provides. It also contains the amino acid l-lysine, which is not often found in plants. Amaranth seeds were used by the Aztecs in their pagan ceremonies. Additionally, mature seeds of the amaranth plant were eaten raw, mixed with cornmeal, or added to soups. The leaves, which taste similar to spinach, can also be eaten.

Often, amaranth is used for gastroenteritis or the stomach flu. It helps to lessen the irritability of the tissues. A strong decoction of amaranth can be used to remove worms and other parasites from the digestive tract. Applying amaranth topically can help to reduce tissue swelling. The herb can be used with bandages for medical treatment. Additionally, it can help stop excess bleeding which is often caused by sore gums, nosebleeds, and heavy menses. Amaranth is highly digestible and is recommended for infant formulas.

Amaranth is a traditional food plant in Africa with the potential to improve nutrition greatly. There are several species of amaranth grown in Asia and the Americas for grain. Ancient grains still used to this day include three species: Amaranthus caudatus, Maranthus cruentus, and Amaranthus hypochondriacus. Even though amaranth was grown on a small scale in parts of Mexico, Guatemala, Peru, India, and Nepal, there is a huge potential for future cultivation in the U.S. and tropical countries. Because of this, this herb is often referred to as “the crop of the future.” Because of a weedy life history, amaranth grains grow very rapidly, with their seedheads weighing up to 1 kilogram and containing a half-million seeds. Amaranthus species have a 30% higher protein value than rice, wheat flour, oats, rye and other cereals.

Amaranth was revived in the 1970s because of it is very palatable, easy to cook, and a protein that is well suited to human nutritional needs. This herb was recovered in Mexico from wild varieties, now being commercially cultivated. A popular snack sold in Mexico City, this herb is often mixed with chocolate or puffed rice. Its use has recently spread to Europe and parts of North America. Amaranth is a pseudo grain because it has a very similar flavor and cooking ability to grains. Along with protein, amaranth provides a great source of dietary fiber and dietary minerals including iron, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and manganese.

The leaves, seeds, and flowers of the amaranth plant are responsible for all of the health benefitis provided. Amaranth’s properties include: alterative, astringent, demulcent, diuretic, and nutritive. Primarily, amaranth is used for diarrhea, dysentery, excessive menstruation, and nosebleeds. Amaranth can also be used for canker sores, bleeding gums, stomach and mouth ulcers, worms, and wounds. For more information on the benefits of this herb, please contact your local health food store.

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Phytoestrogen
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Date: March 27, 2009 01:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Phytoestrogen

Menopause is the time at which a woman stops ovulating and menstruation ceases, which indicates the end of fertility. Menopause is not a disease, but rather a natural progression in life, similar to puberty. Many years before a woman stops ovulating, her ovaries will begin to slow their production of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. Estrogen and progesterone are often thought of as the reproductive hormones.

Although estrogen is essential in reproduction, it is also extremely important in other non-reproductive organs and systems in the body. Cells in the uterus, bladder, breasts, skin, bones, arteries, heart, liver, and brain all contain estrogen receptors. These organs need this hormone in order to stimulate these receptors for normal cell function. Estrogen is needed to keep the skin smooth and moist and the body’s internal thermostat working properly. Estrogen is also essential for proper bone formation. Even though estrogen levels drop sharply after menopause, they do not disappear entirely. Other organs take over for the ovaries, continuing to produce a less potent form of estrogen. These organs, known as endocrine glands, secrete some hormones from fatty tissue in order to maintain bodily functions.

Progesterone works along with estrogen, stimulating changes in the lining of the uterus to complete the preparation for a fertilized egg during the second half of the menstrual cycle. If no egg is fertilized, the uterine lining is broken down and expelled, allowing the cycle to being again. Progesterone also has effects beyond the reproductive system, as it calms the brain and also affects other aspects of nervous system function. Testosterone is most important for both men and women, with women producing about 80 percent less than men do. However, it is the driving force for maintaining a healthy life and proper functioning organs.

The period when a woman’s body is preparing for menopause is known as perimenopause. For the majority of women, hormone production beings to slow down then they reach their thirties, continuing to diminish with age. Many women will experience few if any symptoms at this time, but others may suffer from anxiety, dry skin, fatigue, feelings of bloating, headaches, heart palpitations, hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, decreased interest in their significant other, loss of concentration, mood swings, night sweats, reduced stamina, urinary incontinence, uterine dryness and itching, weight gain, cold hands and feet, joint pain, hair loss, and/or skin changes.

Menopause occurs when a woman stops menstruating altogether. At this point, most of the acute problems a woman may have experienced are actually over and a new balance between all hormones should be established. However, women become increasingly vulnerable to other, potentially serious health problems at this time. Over the long term, the diminished supply of estrogen increased the likelihood of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and uterine atrophy. Osteoporosis especially is a major problem for women after menopause, with an estimated 80 percent of the hip fractures that occur in the United States every year being due to osteoporosis.

A proper diet, nutritional supplements, and exercise can help to minimize or eliminate most of the unpleasant side effects of menopause. The following nutrients are recommended for dealing with this stage of life: beta-1, cerasomal, coenzyme Q10, DHEA, essential fatty acids, lecithin granules, a multi-enzyme complex, soy protein, vitamin B complex, vitamin D3, vitamin E, boron, calcium, magnesium, quercetin, silica, zinc, l-arginine, multiglandular complex, a multivitamin and mineral complex, vitamin C, aloe vera gel, slippery elm, damiana, amaranth, chickweed, dandelion greens, nettle, seaweed, watercress, anise, black cohosh, fennel, licorice, raspberry, sage, unicorn root, wild yam root, hops, valerian root, gotu kola, red clover, dong quai, St. John’s wort, and Siberian ginseng.

All these above listed vitamins and herbs are available in capsule, tablet, or powder forms. When looking for natural alternatives to help replace estrogen naturally, look to your local or internet health food store for name brand products that can help restore an imbalance over time.

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Migraines
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Date: February 21, 2009 12:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Migraines

Migraines are severe, throbbing headaches that may or may not be accompanied by nausea, possibly with visual disturbances and other symptoms. Migraine incidences have increased by 50 percent within the last twenty years, with an estimated 25 to 30 million people suffering from them in the United States. Three out of four of these 25 to 30 million are women, with up to 24 percent of women experiencing at least one migraine in their lives and only 12 percent of men getting migraines. Migraine headaches are one of the most severe types of headache.

Research has described migraines as vascular headaches, as they involved excessive dilation or contraction of the brain’s blood vessels. Current research, however, gives other clues. The inflammation involved in migraines is most noticeable in the meninges, which surround the brain and the spinal cord. However, the inflammation of the meninges is not what leads to the pain of migraine, but instead abnormal nerve activity. Stimulation of the trigeminal nerve, which goes from the brain to the head and face, triggers the release of substances that are known as calcitonin gene-related peptides. These induce inflammation and send messages to pain receptors in the meninges. Some researches even liken migraines to meningitis in some ways, as the symptoms are very similar. However, meningitis is caused by viral or bacterial infection.

Migraines can occur anywhere from once a week to once or twice a year, often running in families. One factor that may contribute to the higher incidence of migraine in women may be fluctuations in the level of the hormone estrogen, as women typically get migraines around the time of menstruation, when estrogen levels are low. Most often, migraines occur in people between the ages of twenty and thirty-five, seeming to decline with age. Children can also suffer from migraines, with pain tending to be more diffuse, rather than localized. Migraines can first show up in childhood as colic, periodic abdominal pain, vomiting, dizziness, and severe motion sickness, rather than as headaches.

There are typically five phases in a migraine. The first phase beings a day or so before the onset of a headache, as changes in mood, problems with memory, an alteration in one or all of the five senses, and speech problems occur. Secondly, some people will see flashes or patterns of light and experience numbness of the hands and mouth just before the headache. This is called an aura, and is a common sign of a classic migraine.

Those migraines that occur without auras are called common migraines. The third phase occurs when the headache starts with a severe, throbbing pain occurring on one or both sides of the head and can also move from side to side. Nausea can also set in this phase, along with tenderness in the neck and scalp, sensitivity to light, and possibly immobilization due to pain. The fourth phase occurs when the headache dissipates, although nausea may linger. During the fifth phase, the person may feel tired and lethargic, simply wanting to sleep.

A variety of things can trigger a migraine in an individual who is susceptible, including allergies, constipation, stress, liver malfunction, too much or too little sleep, emotional changes, hormonal changes, sun glare, flashing lights, lack of exercise, and changes in barometric pressure. Dental problems and low blood sugar can also be factors, while other underlying causes such as genetic factors, chemical imbalances in the brain, poor nutrition, and the overuse of painkillers can cause an individual to be susceptible to migraines. Block Migraines with vitamins and herbs.

The following nutrients are recommended for preventing and dealing with migraines: calcium, magnesium, coenzyme Q10, DMG, DLPA, essential fatty acid complex, 5-HTP, a multivitamin and mineral complex, rutin, vitamin B complex, garlic, quercetin, taurine, vitamin C with bioflavonoids, cordyceps, feverfew, ginkgo biloba, cayeene, chamomile, fumitory, ginger, peppermint, rosemary, valerian, willow bark, and wormwood.

If you are experiencing migraines, consult your doctor before starting vitamin supplements. Vitamin supplements are natural and feed the body to make it stronger and capable of fighting the diseases it may come up against, but medications prescribed by your doctor can conflict with certain vitamins and herbs and a doctors consultation is needed when taken with medications. A source of natural vitamins are available at your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Natural vitamins and herbs are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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EFA's - Essential Fatty Acids
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Date: September 15, 2008 09:42 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: EFA's - Essential Fatty Acids

Many recent studies have found that EFAs may be extremely helpful for many chronic, stubborn conditions. Their continuously growing range of applications includes overcoming diseases such as alcoholism, breast cancer, and cardiovascular disease; strengthening the immune system; helping eliminate yeast infection; reducing symptoms of premenstrual syndrome; minimizing inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis; and assisting in the proper management of weight.

Alcohol dependence is an extremely serious condition that often results in decreased life expectancy, suicide, degeneration of the brain and liver, osteoporosis, and many other conditions. For each person, the rate at which alcohol is metabolized in the body is different, as a lot of it has to do with the person's nutritional status, the concentration and activity of liver enzymes, and the rate at which alcohol is consumed.

Alcoholics tend not to eat because the calories from alcohol, although nutrient-poor, diminish the appetite, causing many alcoholics to become extremely malnourished. An overall nutritional program should be employed to those people who are dependant on alcohol, which should include vitamins A, C, and B, complex, along with zinc, magnesium, selenium, amino acids, milk thistle, acidophilus, antioxidants, L-carnitine, and essential fatty acids. EFAs, especially those that are high in GLA, keep blood lipid levels from going out of control.

The body's immune system has a vital role in protecting us against cancer, as it recognizes and annihilates any abnormal cells before they have the chance to multiply and do damage. When the immune system is overwhelmed or not functioning properly, abnormal cells will reproduce without having anything to stop them. Because of the rapidly growing tumors which have a huge appetite for nutrition to keep them going, cancer patients often become malnourished and lose weight. A diet that is rich in cruciferous vegetables, fiber, antioxidants, vitamins A, C, and E, minerals, and essential fatty acids can help prevent breast cancer. Research shows that EFAs, especially GLA, have anti-tumor properties.

All of the cells in the body have a dependence on nutrients that are transported through the circulatory network. When blood vessels become clogged with fats and cholesterol, nutrition distribution is hindered and blood flow can be stopped in some areas, causing the heart to die. Exercise is a good for increasing circulation and keeping the blood from getting stuck. A diet that is high fruits, vegetables, natural fiber, and low in saturated fats, meats, and homogenized dairy products is also a good idea. Additionally, antioxidants, hawthorn berry, ginkgo biloba, vitamin E, Co Q-10, L-carnitine, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and EFAs will also be of benefit to the cardiovascular system.

Essential fatty acids have been shown to stop the growth of yeast organisms in the body. They do so by helping the oxygen to flow to cells. Since yeast is anaerobic, it cannot thrive in the presence of oxygen. Yeast overgrowth can cause a variety of symptoms that are often diagnosed as another condition, ranging from joint swelling to memory loss.

PMS is a collection of symptoms that occurs one to two weeks before menstruation, affects about one-third of women who are younger than forty. It is caused by hormone imbalances, which result in anxiety, irritability, and mental sluggishness. Research has found that women with PMS usually eat more refined carbohydrates, dairy products, and sodium, and less iron and other minerals than those women who do not experience this condition. Vitamin B complex, beta carotene, vitamin E, magnesium, milk thistle, acidophilus, and essential fatty acids are very helpful for PMS. Essential fatty acids, especially GLA, are helpful in balancing the body's hormone levels.

Reducing symptoms of disease like arthritis or PMS is important to all those who suffer from them. EFA's can help reduce the symptoms of these diseases. American diets are low in EFA's and one should consume them either in the foods they eat or supplement form to help the body strengthen its self and fight off disease.



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Licorice Root
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Date: May 23, 2008 11:53 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Licorice Root

Medical professionals, especially in Europe and Japan, have been using licorice more and more in medicine. The Chinese consider licorice to be a superior balancing and harmonizing agent, so it is added to many herbal formulas. It is reputed in many countries, including the United States, to be a treatment for stomach, intestinal and many other problems. What is it used for?

Antioxidant Properties

Licorice is being studied for its effects against oxidation of LDL cholesterol, which is a major component in atherosclerosis. Approximately 300 different phytonutrient compounds found in natural licorice are considered possible antioxidants.

Anti-Viral Properties

Licorice is being tested for its ability to help prevent certain viruses from replicating themselves in body cells. It appears to stimulate the immune system into producing interferon, which is known for its anti-viral effects. It is an effective aid in treating herpes and hepatitis. Promising results are also being reported in tests using licorice to combat SARS, influenza and HIV.

Stomach and Intestinal Problems

Licorice is a natural home remedy for heartburn, gastritis and acid reflux. It helps to promote new cell growth in the lining of the stomach. It also enhances the stomach's self-protecting abilities. Licorice has been used to treat peptic ulcers and aid in healing other types of ulcers.

Throat and Respiratory Problems

Licorice is widely known in the world of alternative medicine as an expectorant and cough suppressant. Colds and flu have been treated with licorice since the days of the Romans. Many over-the-counter cough medicines contain licorice extract because it soothes the mucous membranes.

Other Medicinal Properties

  • * Cleansing the colon
  • * Supporting lung health
  • * Promoting adrenal gland function
  • * Soothing sore throats
  • * Lowering stomach acid levels
  • * Coating the stomach wall
  • * As a laxative
  • * As a diuretic
  • * Stopping flatulence
  • * Relieving rheumatism
  • * Relieving arthritis
  • * Regulating low blood sugar
  • * Treating Addison's disease
  • * Treating symptoms of menopause
  • * Regulating menstruation
  • * Relieving menstrual cramps
  • * Possibly reducing the occurrence of night sweats
  • * Balancing hormones
  • * Healing cold sores and canker sores
The Romans made licorice extract. Chinese herbalists use licorice for treating a wide range of conditions. Its confectionery use originated in England in the 16th century. The roots are used to flavor fruit juices and syrups. They are also used to flavor alcoholic drinks such as Sambuca and Guiness beer.

Is Licorice Safe?

Licorice is not recommended for use by people who suffer from diabetes mellitus, heart disease, hypertension or kidney disease. It is also not recommended for use by women who are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Side Effects

Licorice, although not thought to suppress the immune system like pharmaceutical cortisones, may cause similar side effects in high doses. Some of these include weight gain, fluid retention and high blood pressure.

Description and Cultivation

The licorice plant stands up to five feet tall. It has spikes of lilac-colored flowers that have bean-like pods containing three or four seeds apiece. The root, which is used most frequently, reaches underground about three feet and branches into networks of rhizomes.

After three to five years, the roots and rhizomes are cleaned, pulped, boiled and then concentrated by evaporation. The root, if kept dry, will keep for an indefinite amount of time. If the licorice is powdered, it should be stored in an airtight container.

Licorice has been used for centuries in conjunction with established medicine, as an alternative herbal medicine, and as an herbal confection in many parts of the world. It is noted for its medicinal value in treating stomach, intestinal and other ailments, including helping to stimulate the immune system. Studies are ongoing to discover more potential uses for this naturally sweet herb.



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Damiana Leaves
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Date: May 22, 2008 11:45 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Damiana Leaves

Damiana can be used by both men and women. It is known to have restorative effects on reproductive organs in both sexes.

Uses:

For men, Damiana is known to raise levels of testosterone. It is also helpful in treating premature ejaculation and impotence. For women, it helps to induce delayed menstrual periods and ease the symptoms of painful menstruation. It also treats the headaches women sometimes get due to menstruation.

This herb has been widely advertised and used in Mexico as an aphrodisiac. The ancient Mayans used it as a sexual stimulant and people in Central America still use it in this way today. This use is controversial due to lack of scientific evidence to support the claim.

One study found some of the plant's compounds to be similar to those found in progesterone. More than 150 herbs have been tested for their ability to bind with the progesterone and estrogen receptors found in breast cancer cells. Damiana was one of the highest progesterone-binding herbs tested.

The herbal properties of Damiana have a life enhancing and stimulating effect on the body and mind. The herb works well on nervous exhaustion and to restore the body after periods of high stress.

Other Uses:

Damiana's stimulating action is considered very valuable to people who suffer from mild depression. Herbalists will typically recommend remedies that contain this herb. Damiana is very strong and aromatic, and has a slightly bitter taste. It can be found in different forms such as capsule, liquid extract and tea. Its leaves are used as a substitute for tea leaves in some countries. In other countries, it is used as flavoring in a variety of liqueurs.

Damiana acts as an antiseptic and tonic for the body. It is also a restorative agent for nervous system functions. Damiana is used for other conditions as well, although no scientific proof of its effectiveness exists. These conditions include:

* Asthma * Anxiety * Depression * Headache * Menstrual disorders

Damiana has been known to cause mild indigestion for some users. It also contains a compound called arbutin, which, in the urinary tract, converts into the chemical hydroquinone. Larger amounts can cause serious side effects such as:

* Convulsions * Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) * Nausea * Vomiting * Possible collapse and death

A maximum safe dosage of Damiana has not yet been determined. Also, the safety of using this herb has not been established in children or pregnant and nursing women. People with liver or kidney disease should use extra caution because their ability to safely use this herb is unknown as well.

In people using higher doses of Damiana, it is believed that they experience a mild euphoric sensation. In some cases, consumption of Damiana leaves has been known to act as a mild laxative. The more leaves consumed, the more prominent the laxative effect.

Damiana is native to parts of southern California and the Gulf of Mexico. It can also be found growing wild in some areas of the northern Caribbean Islands and Namibia. It is widely cultivated in these areas. Its preferred habitat has a hot and humid climate. It flowers in the summer and this is when the leaves are harvested. The leaves of the Damiana plant are the only part used for cultivation.

The herb can be taken in the form of a tea. Some people even smoke it like tobacco. The herb will bring about a relaxed state of mind for the user. It is said to induce a subtle high if smoked.

Damiana possesses many properties that are useful to both men and women. Research continues in an attempt to either prove or disprove claims of its benefits to humans.

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Gently Narrow Your "Estrogen Window" With Lignan's
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Date: January 25, 2008 12:23 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Gently Narrow Your "Estrogen Window" With Lignan's

Although many people think that breast cancer is a genetically transferred disease, the truth is that it is rarely genetically transferred, as only one in every ten cases are linked to genes for this cancer. Strong evidence points to environmental causes being the main reason for breast cancer. By avoiding synthetic chemicals that mimic estrogens, a substantial fraction of these cancers can be prevented. These synthetic chemicals are called xenoestrogens. These xenoestrogens are manmade chemicals that either imitate or enhance the effects of estrogens in the body's cells and tell these cells to grow.

During puberty, this growth message is important to a woman's body and during pregnancy and the preparation for that. At this time period, estrogens are in full force, but if estrogen stimulation is increased by chemicals, cell growth is increased even more. Uncontrolled cell growth provides the foundation for cancer. As cells rapidly multiply, which is what happens when exposed to estrogens, the chance of DNA mutation is enhanced, which causes the creation of cancerous cells. A lot of women today also deal with increased estrogen stimulation over their lifetimes due to an early onset of menstruation, late menopause, and less time spent breastfeeding. The use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives and post-menopausal hormone replacement also add to the estrogen burden, along with obesity and being overweight.

Estrogens affect cells by binding to receptor sites. However, there are tools that help to reduce the impact of areas that have a lot of receptor sites, such as the breasts. One of the main tools is lignans, which are a group or naturally occurring plant chemicals that are found in flaxseeds. Interest in lignans began with observational studies, which found a link between high intake and reduced risk of breast and colon cancers. Studies have reinforced those results, finding that lignans inhibit the growth of breast and colon cancer and also reduce the spread of skin cancer. The real benefit of lignans starts when they reach your intestines, where friendly bacteria convert them into phytoestrogens.

Phytoestrogens are a gentler estrogen, which bind to the same receptors that other estrogens bind, but don't have the growth-accelerating effects. While they are occupying these receptors, the less kind and gentle estrogens are unable to bind to them, resulting in both an estrogenic and estrogen-blocking effect. This explains why lignans are effective both for fighting against breast cancer and reducing the effect of hot flashes other symptoms during menopause. When estrogens are low, lignans act as weak estrogens, but when they are high, lignans act as estrogen blockers.

The risk for breast cancer is strongly affected by a woman's "estrogen window", or overall estrogen exposure that has been experienced over her reproductive years. The early onset of menstruation, no pregnancies, being pregnant after age 30, limited or no breastfeeding, short menstrual cycles, and late menopause all expand the estrogen window, increasing lifetime estrogen exposure along with the risk for breast cancer. By adding lignans to the diet, women can reduce the size of the estrogen window, and therefore, block the excess estrogen stimulation in estrogen-sensitive tissues like the breasts. Additionally, lignans are also believed to reduce the risk of colon and prostate cancers. When they are delivered along with omega-3-rich flaxseed oil, they promote better cholesterol balance, heart health, joint health, better bone density, greater endurance, better blood sugar balance, and healthy skin, hair, and nails.



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You Should Say: Please Pass the Broccoli, Not I’ll Pass
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Date: January 22, 2008 04:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: You Should Say: Please Pass the Broccoli, Not I’ll Pass

'Please pass the broccoli': not something that many mothers hear from their children. In fact, not many children appear to like any green vegetables let alone broccoli. This is not important at such a young age, but there comes a time when the health benefits that broccoli brings become almost essential to your good health and well being. Parents are right, but your children won’t believe you.

Some say that the nutritional punch of broccoli is stronger than that of any other vegetable. Is this claim justified? Let’s have a look at the evidence and the facts and you can judge for yourself. First the ‘ordinary’ nutrients of broccoli: vitamin C (more than oranges) and A, folic acid and calcium and also lots and lots of fiber. However, this wonderful vegetable contains not only high levels of calcium, but is also the one of the richest vegetable sources of magnesium. Calcium needs magnesium in order to be properly incorporated into your bone structure, and so broccoli is a very important calcium/magnesium source for vegans that do not drink milk or eat any other dairy products.

It is also rich in protein, containing 3% by weight and is also rich in iron. It is therefore an important part of the diet of women during menstruation when iron is important to enable the blood to maintain its proper erythrocyte levels. A deficiency of iron in the diet of women can lead to anemia and render them more susceptible to infection. However, it is more than just iron that renders this vegetable an important part of the female diet. Broccoli has been established to be of major importance in preventing cancer.

It is likely the most potent anti-cancer vegetable in your diet, and it has been established over 20 years of study that broccoli can help to prevent cancers of the breast and the cervix. The indoles that it contains prevent estrogens from promoting tumor growth, and it also contains beta-carotene, a strong antioxidant that destroys the free radicals that can also cause cancer. However, there is more to broccoli than just that.

Broccoli contains the highest concentration of sulforaphane of all the cruciferous vegetables that include Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, rocket and turnip, amongst many others. When you chew broccoli, the glucosinolate glucoraphan is converted to sulforaphane, not by the enzymes in your saliva, but by the actual physical damage done to the plant by the act of chewing. It could likely also be generated by hitting it with a hammer! It is glucosinolates that provide the slightly bitter taste many people experience when they eat vegetables such as brussels sprouts and broccoli, and that likely renders them somewhat unattractive to children!

Sulforaphane is an isothiocyanate containing the NCS functional group, and is actually bound loosely to the sugar as sulforaphane glucosinolate. It is the loose binding that allows it be released on chewing. Broccoli sprouts are its richest source, and it is a strong antioxidant which is why it is so effective in reducing the possibility of certain cancers.

When fighting cancers, your body produces phase-II enzymes, and since sulforaphane induces these enzymes, it stops the carcinogens before they can damage your DNA. This is achieved through the enhancement of the transcription of the proteins that suppress the tumors. In layman’s terms, it is the generation of tumor suppressant proteins from DNA that kills off the tumors before they can destroy the DNA.

There is even more however. Indoles have already been mentioned, and those in question are predominantly indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3-diindolylmethane (DIM). The latter is generated from the digestion of the former and possesses very potent anti-cancer properties. However, this indole can affect your health in ways other than just as an anti-cancer agent. It can modulate the immune system in a way that renders it suitable for the treatment of a number of viral infections, and is also believed to be a possible answer to the problem of bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics. It appears to operate synergistically with Interferon-Gamma, a cytokine that helps to prevent viruses from replicating within the cells of the body, to strengthen the MHC-I Complex, a part of the human genome that supports the immune response to viral attacks.

To put it plainly, broccoli can aid your resistance not only to certain cancers, but also to attack by viruses and some bacteria. It is not only cancers of the cervix and breast that broccoli can help to prevent, but also of the lung, prostate, larynx and bladder. I3C also helps to support the function of your liver in detoxifying your blood as well as supporting the cellular reproduction without which your body could not maintain itself after damage.

Broccoli is therefore an important vegetable to men as well as to women, not only for its anti-cancer properties, but also as a general antioxidant and consequent free radical scavenging properties. Its high fiber content is equally split between soluble and insoluble vegetable fiber, and so meets your dietary needs of both types.

Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli have been singled out by health organizations the world over as essential to your diet, and you should eat them regularly. Once daily would be good, but more is recommended if possible. As stated at the start, strong tasting vegetables containing glucosinolates might not be attractive to children and younger people, but their phytochemical content (the foresaid indoles and isothiocyanates) render them very potent antioxidants and anti-cancer foods.

Taken in relation to other foods, an ounce of broccoli contains as much calcium as a glass of milk, more vitamin C than a similar weight of orange, and a medium floret has more fiber than one slice of bran bread. It is rich in vitamin A and of course there are the other antioxidants and anti-cancer phytochemicals already detailed.

There are many ways of cooking broccoli to maintain its nutritional content, but if you do not like broccoli, then there are supplements available. You can purchase pure broccoli extract or an extract from a mixture of cruciferous vegetables. The choice is yours, but of one thing there can be no doubt. Broccoli is the king of green vegetables, and the nutrients it contains are not available in any other vegetable in such a concentrated and easy to assimilate form.

Your mom was right: it's not just 'eat your veg', but 'eat your broccoli'. No nutritional advice could be better than that. “Pass the broccoli please mom!”

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